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From Nate Powell, the National Book Award–winning artist of March, a collection of graphic nonfiction essays about living in a new era of necessary protest In seven interwoven comics essays, author and graphic novelist Nate Powell addresses living in an era of what he calls “necessary protest.” Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest is Powell’s From Nate Powell, the National Book Award–winning artist of March, a collection of graphic nonfiction essays about living in a new era of necessary protest In seven interwoven comics essays, author and graphic novelist Nate Powell addresses living in an era of what he calls “necessary protest.” Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest is Powell’s reflection on witnessing the collapse of discourse in real time while drawing the award-winning trilogy March, written by Congressman John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, this generation’s preeminent historical account of nonviolent revolution in the civil rights movement. Powell highlights both the danger of normalized paramilitary presence symbols in consumer pop culture, and the roles we play individually as we interact with our communities, families, and society at large. Each essay tracks Powell’s journey from the night of the election—promising his four-year-old daughter that Trump will never win, to the reality of the authoritarian presidency, protesting the administration’s policies, and navigating the complications of teaching his children how to raise their own voices in a world that is becoming increasingly dangerous and more and more polarized. While six of the seven essays are new, unpublished work, Powell has also included “About Face,” a comics essay first published by Popula Online that swiftly went viral and inspired him to expand his work on Save It for Later. The seventh and final essay will contextualize the myriad events of 2020 with the previous four years—from the COVID-19 pandemic to global protests in the wake of George Floyd’s murder to the 2020 presidential election itself—highlighting both the consistencies and inversions of widely shared experiences and observations amidst a massive social upheaval. As Powell moves between subjective and objective experiences raising his children—depicted in their childhood innocence as imaginary anthropomorphic animals—he reveals the electrifying sense of trust and connection with neighbors and strangers in protest. He also explores how to equip young people with tools to best make their own noise as they grow up and help shape the direction and future of this country.  


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From Nate Powell, the National Book Award–winning artist of March, a collection of graphic nonfiction essays about living in a new era of necessary protest In seven interwoven comics essays, author and graphic novelist Nate Powell addresses living in an era of what he calls “necessary protest.” Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest is Powell’s From Nate Powell, the National Book Award–winning artist of March, a collection of graphic nonfiction essays about living in a new era of necessary protest In seven interwoven comics essays, author and graphic novelist Nate Powell addresses living in an era of what he calls “necessary protest.” Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest is Powell’s reflection on witnessing the collapse of discourse in real time while drawing the award-winning trilogy March, written by Congressman John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, this generation’s preeminent historical account of nonviolent revolution in the civil rights movement. Powell highlights both the danger of normalized paramilitary presence symbols in consumer pop culture, and the roles we play individually as we interact with our communities, families, and society at large. Each essay tracks Powell’s journey from the night of the election—promising his four-year-old daughter that Trump will never win, to the reality of the authoritarian presidency, protesting the administration’s policies, and navigating the complications of teaching his children how to raise their own voices in a world that is becoming increasingly dangerous and more and more polarized. While six of the seven essays are new, unpublished work, Powell has also included “About Face,” a comics essay first published by Popula Online that swiftly went viral and inspired him to expand his work on Save It for Later. The seventh and final essay will contextualize the myriad events of 2020 with the previous four years—from the COVID-19 pandemic to global protests in the wake of George Floyd’s murder to the 2020 presidential election itself—highlighting both the consistencies and inversions of widely shared experiences and observations amidst a massive social upheaval. As Powell moves between subjective and objective experiences raising his children—depicted in their childhood innocence as imaginary anthropomorphic animals—he reveals the electrifying sense of trust and connection with neighbors and strangers in protest. He also explores how to equip young people with tools to best make their own noise as they grow up and help shape the direction and future of this country.  

30 review for Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    I don't need to tell you 2020 is a dumpster fire. You're reading this, I think it's safe to assume you're alive, you've been living through it (touch wood, 2020 is still going when I write this). This comic memoir, about the last 4 or 5 years, has been quite confrontational - not because I didn't already pretty much agree politically with Powell, but because it has shown me how cynical 2020 has made me. At first read, I had a hard time reading the book, simply because it is very open and honest. I don't need to tell you 2020 is a dumpster fire. You're reading this, I think it's safe to assume you're alive, you've been living through it (touch wood, 2020 is still going when I write this). This comic memoir, about the last 4 or 5 years, has been quite confrontational - not because I didn't already pretty much agree politically with Powell, but because it has shown me how cynical 2020 has made me. At first read, I had a hard time reading the book, simply because it is very open and honest. There is little irony or sarcasm, which made me very uncomfortable. It quickly became clear this is written out of a need to not only put down on paper what has been happening, but moreso what we can and should do to change it. When Trump gets elected in 2016, it came as a shock to Powell and his family, which consists (beside himself) of his wife and his young daughter. Powell draws his daughter as a little unicorn-girl, which is a sweet touch. The book shows Powell wrestling with this political change, trying to define what has changed and how we got there. He spends as much time on preparing for protests, teaching his daughter that she has a right to protest. He implores the reader to not just be an online activist, but to actually take to the streets, even if you're on your own (that last one seems a tall ask, but that might just be me). Then Covid-19 hits, and he keeps a diary on that change, how it mentally affects his family. It's especially hard for his daughter, who of course hasn't yet got the capacity to deal with this. It's a beautifully drawn book, full of anger, but also just as full of hope. Use the anger as your driving energy, lose the cynicism: do something. (Kindly received an ARC from Abrams through Edelweiss)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Raymond

    This is a powerful collection of seven essays in graphic novel format written and illustrated by Nate Powell who illustrated the March trilogy by the late Congressman John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. In Save It For Later Powell covers the importance of protests, beginning with the aftermath of the 2016 elections to the pandemic and the 2020 protests for racial justice and Black lives. Throughout the book he focuses on how he and his wife teach their daughters about racism, fascism, bullies, and the This is a powerful collection of seven essays in graphic novel format written and illustrated by Nate Powell who illustrated the March trilogy by the late Congressman John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. In Save It For Later Powell covers the importance of protests, beginning with the aftermath of the 2016 elections to the pandemic and the 2020 protests for racial justice and Black lives. Throughout the book he focuses on how he and his wife teach their daughters about racism, fascism, bullies, and the symbols that are used to promote the various -isms (i.e. Confederate and Nazi flags, the Punisher logo, etc.). John Lewis is a strong moral force in this collection. While the collection is pretty strong as whole, I found Chapter 3 (Good Trouble, Bad Flags) and Chapter 5 (About Face) to be the most powerful. Although, the topics in this collection are serious, the author knows how to put in moments of levity. There were a few laugh out loud moments on my part. It's not a long book but don't rush through it. Take it all in, internalize it, and determine what your response is to this work. Thanks to Abrams ComicArts, Jessica Focht, and Nate Powell for a free ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    I received this as an ARC from Abrams Comicarts. Thank you. This is a book I can’t give a rating to because of a personal bias. I used to live in the town that is the backdrop to this book. And there is the possibility that I may have crossed paths with the author during my time there. I enjoyed Powell’s drawing style and how he chose to render young children in an anthropomorphic way.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    I was so excited to have the opportunity to get a first look at the newest work by the creator of March. The illustrations are as captivating and nuanced as one would expect. At times, truth and poignancy seem to be burned into the pages, and the autobiographical nature of this work, the fact that Powell is wrestling with issues in real time with his own family, creates an intimate tone. For me, the flaw is in the absolute didacticism that seems to overtake more emotional components. There is to I was so excited to have the opportunity to get a first look at the newest work by the creator of March. The illustrations are as captivating and nuanced as one would expect. At times, truth and poignancy seem to be burned into the pages, and the autobiographical nature of this work, the fact that Powell is wrestling with issues in real time with his own family, creates an intimate tone. For me, the flaw is in the absolute didacticism that seems to overtake more emotional components. There is too much “telling” which doesn’t leave room for enough “showing.” It is unfortunate. I wanted to be swept away, and in the end I agreed with much of it, but have only a few episodes rather than the complete work about which to feel impassioned. Thank you to Nate Powell, Abrams ComicArts, and NetGalley for an Advance Reader Copy in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    I’m mainly reading all these serious graphic novels, because of our library’s stubborn refusal to get the ones I’m more into. Which is to say my comic book tastes are more conventional, something to do with adventures, nontraditional superheroes and antiheroes, etc. Politics, especially modern American politics…not so much. But the art was great, so it attracted my attention. I’ve heard of the author’s books about the late John Lewis, but never actually knew his name or read them. Seems like po I’m mainly reading all these serious graphic novels, because of our library’s stubborn refusal to get the ones I’m more into. Which is to say my comic book tastes are more conventional, something to do with adventures, nontraditional superheroes and antiheroes, etc. Politics, especially modern American politics…not so much. But the art was great, so it attracted my attention. I’ve heard of the author’s books about the late John Lewis, but never actually knew his name or read them. Seems like politics are his thing, with a heavy emphasis on activism, protesting, etc. This book is a collection of seven personal/biographical reflections of his from the recent past, starting from 2016 and chronicling the proceeding mess. It’s all done from a very woke liberal perspective and seemingly meant for the same type of audience. I can’t imagine someone from the opposite end of the increasingly divided political spectrum checking out this book and changing their mind about some things. So this is very much along the lines of preaching to the choir and doing so from an increasingly desperate and terrified place. I wouldn’t say it’s hyperbolic, because it’s perfectly rational and any rational, reasonable, informed person can easily agree with a lot of it, but it is somewhat…hysterical? No, maybe apocalyptic? It reminds me of John Oliver show, which I barely even watch anymore, because his rage and frustration (however righteous and justifiable) have become too distractingly present, turning his program into the angry liberal shouting show. I suppose it’ll all just a reflection of the ugliness of American politics. Like their pundits, they are exhausting. For a solution this book advises protests. Of any size. In fact, the author has done a march of one, just walking around with handcrafted signs, presumably raising awareness. The other solution seems to be indoctrinating children into politics at a really early age. I’m not a parent, can’t even imagine bringing a kid into this world, so I can’t really speak to that except to say I don’t think I would want this for my kid, not at that age. But the author and his wife have two young girls and they’ve been politically educating them quite thoroughly, considering, all along. Which is…ok, I understand, it creates more aware citizens making more informed decisions from an early age, but also…shouldn’t the kids be spared some of that real world crap for a while? Who knows…breeding is a form of hubristic immortality and everyone wants to see themselves reflected in their kids, so why wouldn’t a political activist teach their kids to be politically active? Why not teach some democracy while you’re at it, who know how long that’s gonna be around for anyway? So yeah, don’t think I’ve the right amount of optimism to appreciate this book. I’m not a marcher. I don’t think marches have been effective in decades. Outside of self reassurances gained from hanging out with likeminded individuals, it seems useless and dangerous. So no, I don't buy what he's selling, but...but…hedging bets…should there be in fact some value in it, this author will get you all hyped up to do it. Some interesting food for thought here, parenting, politics, protesting, all of that. Some really great art. Definitely not for everyone, though, and that just cuts the legs right from under it in a way. Very well intentioned. Whether it is inspirational or not…that’s up to you entirely.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Lewis

    Save It For Later is a graphic memoir of essays that address how we teach our children about injustice, inequity, and all the other things messed up about the world we are raising them in. It is written by Nate Powell, the artist who worked on March, and about his experiences as a white man learning about institutional racism. It starts with the 2016 election of Donald Trump and moves both forward to the COVID pandemic and backward to the author's childhood, covering topics like how the alt-righ Save It For Later is a graphic memoir of essays that address how we teach our children about injustice, inequity, and all the other things messed up about the world we are raising them in. It is written by Nate Powell, the artist who worked on March, and about his experiences as a white man learning about institutional racism. It starts with the 2016 election of Donald Trump and moves both forward to the COVID pandemic and backward to the author's childhood, covering topics like how the alt-right have adopted paramilitary aesthetics as a dogwhistle to their cause, to the death of John Lewis, to the anxiety of witnessing a world that might be changing for the worst instead of better. I feel like the April release date is an interesting choice, we will be living in an entirely different world by then (one can hope), and I bet Nate Powell had some poignant things to say about the Capitol insurrection that didn't get to make it into the book. Some of the dialogue with his daughter felt forced and awkward (and perhaps not the most age-appropriate), and I didn't really understand the artistic decision to make his daughter into a unicorn, but the book is still an important call to action that white Americans acknowledge our privilege and not be afraid to confront our own biases (in fact, Nate argues, we should welcome those confrontations as opportunities to learn and grow). I would typically prefer to read texts like this from voices of color, but I do think Nate is able to offer the perspective of being a white ally with the rare self-aware understanding that one day, he hopes to be able to raise his children well enough that the next generation will be even more progressive and be able to call him out on things (and the goal to listen and change rather than wallow in defensiveness or fragility when that time comes). Note: I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley. I was not compensated in any other fashion for the review and the opinions reflected below are entirely my own. Special thanks to the publisher and author for providing the copy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Essential reading for our times. Will gift this to all friends who are parents, and some who aren’t. Big appreciation to Nate Powell for his extraordinary dedication and humility. With allies like this, we’re going to be okay.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Jones

    *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Nate Powell’s ‘March’ has been on my radar for a few years now but this is the first of his works that I’ve picked up. I’m happy to say that this was a powerful work, showing how evil slips into society and the power that each of us have to protest. Powell tackles themes of racism, white supremacy and the rise of far right groups in the United States, whilst opening up about how he speaks to his young daugh *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Nate Powell’s ‘March’ has been on my radar for a few years now but this is the first of his works that I’ve picked up. I’m happy to say that this was a powerful work, showing how evil slips into society and the power that each of us have to protest. Powell tackles themes of racism, white supremacy and the rise of far right groups in the United States, whilst opening up about how he speaks to his young daughters about Donald Trump’s rise to the presidency and the importance of introducing children to tough topics. I felt throughout that Nate Powell illustrated the hopelessness, anger and glimmers of positivity perfectly. Some of these essays were created in 2020 and so the pandemic and the Black Lives Matter protests of last summer are discussed. Overall I think that this book perfectly captures the emotions of seeing injustice around you and inspires the reader to stand up to those who feel emboldened to perpetuate that injustice. 4 out of 5 stars!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Adam Shields

    Summary: A memoir of parenting and activism over the past five years. Nate Powell is best known as the March Trilogy artist, a collaboration with John Lewis to tell the story of his early years as a Civil Rights Activist through the end of his days at SNCC. A new series telling John Lewis' story after his days at SNCC will start coming out in August. This interview at Paste in 2015 says that after his kids were born, he has a hard time doing more than 250 pages of art a year. Graphically, he tends Summary: A memoir of parenting and activism over the past five years. Nate Powell is best known as the March Trilogy artist, a collaboration with John Lewis to tell the story of his early years as a Civil Rights Activist through the end of his days at SNCC. A new series telling John Lewis' story after his days at SNCC will start coming out in August. This interview at Paste in 2015 says that after his kids were born, he has a hard time doing more than 250 pages of art a year. Graphically, he tends toward black and white with occasional splashes of color for effect. In many ways, he has become one of the best-known artists in the country—the first to win a National Book Award and the winner of many other awards. There are a ton of good articles on Powell. He has also talked many times about the near impossibility of making a living as an artist. Even one that is as well known as he. Save it for Later is a memoir. I preordered as soon as I heard about it, and like many books that I buy because of the author, I intentionally did not read much about it before I read it. I was unprepared for how much of the book was about navigating parenting as an activist. And it was that part that really spoke to me as a reader. You cannot read my book reviews regularly and not know that I am somewhat of an activist myself. As I discussed yesterday, part of what motivates me is that I cannot parent as I want to if I do not deal with my own issues first. I am an activist in part because I want my kids to be activists. I want my kids to work for change in the world and see their responsibility to work for change for the sake of others. I took my kids, 3 and 4 at the time, to the 50th Anniversary march remembering MLK's funeral. They came with us to several marches and prayer services in response to Floyd, Aubry, and Taylor's deaths last year. I discussed with my daughter the death of Daunte Wright and the protests going on this morning. Powell is five years younger than I am, but his kids are slightly older. He is a stay-at-home father as well. In this memoir, he draws his kids with animal heads in a brilliant move of protective reality. He communicates the difficulty of informing his kids of the world's problems because he thinks it is important, and struggling with how much to tell them at what age. There is a point where he recounts a conversation between himself and his daughter about the police. He wants her to know that policing is corrupted and racially discriminatory, but he does not want her to fear the police. When my daughter heard the NPR reports of arrests at protests in Minnesota yesterday, she asked why people are arrested. 'Did they do something bad?' I reminded her that protests were a response to injustice. And sometimes, we have to be willing to be arrested to opposed injustice. And she knows enough civil rights history and enough about the problem of police brutality to connect protests to justice movements immediately. But that does not make these discussions easier. The opening of the book was about the election of Trump. It was apocalyptic in tone and as I glanced through reviews on Goodreads, many of the negative or mixed reviews were complaining about politics or about 'preaching to the choir.' This morning I listened to an NPR report about YouTube and its role in the rise of disinformation and misinformation and how that has helped fuel conspiracy theory-based family and other relational breakdowns. I know some will view Powell's opposition to Trump and his commitment to civil rights as a type of conspiracy theory. The rise of Trump has mattered to the increasing problems in communicating across political lines. It is not that Trump has caused the problem, but that he has exposed and widened the problems of race and the inability to work across political lines. The world's tribalism is becoming worse, but the way to deal with tribalism isn't to reject commitments to justice but to build relational networks. I had a long conversation yesterday about the difficulty of having an in-house conversation about forgiveness within a church setting because of the ways that forgiveness has been abused to shut down conversations around race. The tribalism problem is not just 'out there.' Powell does not have a lot of hope in Save It for Later. He is grappling with frustration and depression and the world going in a way he does not want. But in some ways, grappling with parenting is always an expression of hope. Caring for children and parenting them to be adults that will work for justice requires a level of hope, even if it is not at the top of mind. He also is self-reflective enough to know that while he can respect his parents and their growth, he knows that his own children will be frustrated with him for his own lack of growth in the future. It is the nature of things. One of the reviews on Goodreads said that in some ways, Powell is 'preaching to the choir,' but the choir isn't only there to sing; they are also there to be in solidarity with one another and to hear the sermon. And while Powell can be a bit didactic at times, his passion carries through, and I find it honest and inspiring. I was surprised at how much I connected with Save it for Later. I instantly thought of several people I want to pass my copy onto. I don't think you need to be an activist Gen X parent to appreciate Save it for Later, but I think that is who will most identify with it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Thank you to the publisher for an ARC to review. This one is a tough one to review. How do you review someone’s personal reflections of the Trump presidency and a global pandemic? Ultimately, this book shines when Powell tells us his own history and how he is trying to parent in a tumultuous world. Where this book drags is when Powell gives us a history lesson. I would have been fine with an entirely memoir approach, but this step into the history of white-supremicist symbols felt bogged down. And Thank you to the publisher for an ARC to review. This one is a tough one to review. How do you review someone’s personal reflections of the Trump presidency and a global pandemic? Ultimately, this book shines when Powell tells us his own history and how he is trying to parent in a tumultuous world. Where this book drags is when Powell gives us a history lesson. I would have been fine with an entirely memoir approach, but this step into the history of white-supremicist symbols felt bogged down. And to be honest, the history student in me kept wanting citations for some of those facts. The choice to depict his children as animals is BRILLIANT and the illustrations are wonderful. Possible that this one feels too “echo chamber-y” to me, but still has an important message.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    Very powerful collection of essays from Nate Powell about the power of protest, particularly in our politically polarized climate.

  12. 4 out of 5

    S.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I thank Abrams Books for sending me this free ARC. TW: fascists; Nazi, fascist, and Confederate symbols and people; depression, anxiety, panic attacks  This graphic novel choked me up. At John Lewis's death, I was fully weeping. The writer and artist are both Nate Powell, who illustrated The March trilogy, which I read last year (probably why I added this book to my "want to read" list). The art is beautifully detailed and evocative. The back cover states "Finished book will be in full color"-- the I thank Abrams Books for sending me this free ARC. TW: fascists; Nazi, fascist, and Confederate symbols and people; depression, anxiety, panic attacks  This graphic novel choked me up. At John Lewis's death, I was fully weeping. The writer and artist are both Nate Powell, who illustrated The March trilogy, which I read last year (probably why I added this book to my "want to read" list). The art is beautifully detailed and evocative. The back cover states "Finished book will be in full color"-- the ARC is in black and white... but the finished book would still be impressive even if it were in black and white. Not all graphic novels can pull that off, but I'm sure many published in b&w had economic constraints. (Also... I like how he drew Steve Bannon to look demonic.) One of my first thoughts was: Save what for later? I guessed the answer is this planet. After I started reading, I conjectured that it's about saving democracy... sanity... justice... compassion... wisdom... etc. for their kids. After a while, I saved and reused some protest signs (I participated in weekly anti-Dump rallies until my knees became too genetically disabled to stand for long--but fortunately I take advantage of acupuncture). Maybe it means save this graphic novel for after we defeat fascism or save this information for later. When I noticed "Parenting" in the subtitle I briefly worried I'd bought a parenting book--I'm not a parent and never felt like becoming one. But no, while the author is a parent and his kids are in the book (or unicorn versions of them), it's really an autobiographical collection of seven graphic essays about his experience during the rise of fascism in this country. It resonates and brings up memories and reflection whether or not you have kids. The author is a white male--and I'd like to see something like this by authors of color--but wow, he and his partner are great parents. More parents should be like them. The author--at least during the events of this book, 2015 to 2020--didn't have the privilege of living in a "blue" state. Indiana was nightmarish enough growing up there in the 1970s and 80s--imagine dwelling in such a state while the toilet demon squatted in the White House and fascists came out of the closet by the millions. Imagine still being there--because fascists are still out of the closet. Okay... if neo-Nazis attend cons dressed like Nazis, I'm glad I no longer attend cons on a regular basis. (Of course, if I did, I'd still wear Doctor Who costumes and Victorian costumes... and I'd probably show up dressed as a suffragist.) "For racist white Americans still in the living memory of World War II, simply having an enemy was of utmost importance--even when they agree with that enemy's position. Nationalist belief is the core of that belief system." This book has good analysis of white supremacy and the U. S. in recent years. It's insightful. I'm part Jewish and it's hard to wrap my head around how the U. S. used to be an Ally that fought against Nazism... and now neo-Nazis/white supremacists/white nationalists are mainstream in this backasswards country and have partially taken over it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest is an anthology of seven interwoven comic essays written and illustrated by Nate Powell. In a series of deeply felt comic essays, Powell chronicles his efforts to maintain and pass on progressive political beliefs in a regressive political climate. Nathan Lee Powell is an American graphic novelist and musician. His 2008 graphic novel Swallow Me Whole won an Ignatz Award and Eisner Award for Best Original Graphic Novel. He illustr Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest is an anthology of seven interwoven comic essays written and illustrated by Nate Powell. In a series of deeply felt comic essays, Powell chronicles his efforts to maintain and pass on progressive political beliefs in a regressive political climate. Nathan Lee Powell is an American graphic novelist and musician. His 2008 graphic novel Swallow Me Whole won an Ignatz Award and Eisner Award for Best Original Graphic Novel. He illustrated the March trilogy, an autobiographical series written by U.S. Congressman John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, which received the 2016 National Book Award, making Powell the first cartoonist to receive the award. For the most part, this collection of comics was written and constructed rather well. As the parent of two young daughters, Powell strives to teach them the value and importance of activism in the face of systemic racism, the threat of white supremacy, and the devastation wrought by Covid-19. Powell perfectly sums up his mission with this graphic novel: "It is we, together, who will determine what kind of society our kids grow into, by what we each choose to do, or not do" As Powell moves between subjective and objective experiences raising his children he reveals the electrifying sense of trust and connection with neighbors and strangers in protest. He also explores how to equip young people with tools to best make their own noise as they grow up and help shape the direction and future of the United States. Like most anthologies there are weaker contributions and Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest is not an exception. Comparatively speaking, there were a couple of comic essays that wasn't as strong as the rest – comparatively speaking as each individual essay was written rather powerfully. Some of my favorite comic essays were: "Promises" where Powell recalls the pain of explaining to his daughter the election of Trump over Hillary Clinton, while in the powerful "About Face" he unpacks how various symbols have been co-opted by right-wing militias as icons of intimidation. "Tornado Children," captures the slow-motion grief of the Covid pandemic. All in all, Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest is a wonderful memoir of parenting and activism throughout the Trump presidency.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Read more graphic novel reviews at The Graphic Library. This collection of graphic essays presents Nate Powell as he tackles with the election of 2016, difficult conversations he has with his young daughter on the power of protest and symbols (especially those used by white supremacists), and the effect of the Global Pandemic on his family and his mental state. In early chapters, Powell recounts telling his children about then-candidate Trump (although not specifically named until the end of the Read more graphic novel reviews at The Graphic Library. This collection of graphic essays presents Nate Powell as he tackles with the election of 2016, difficult conversations he has with his young daughter on the power of protest and symbols (especially those used by white supremacists), and the effect of the Global Pandemic on his family and his mental state. In early chapters, Powell recounts telling his children about then-candidate Trump (although not specifically named until the end of the book). As white supremacy becomes a more visible component of American society, Powell reflects on writing March with John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, and trying to reconcile those protest movements with the marches by Neo Nazis through his city and state. In the last chapter, Powell has a call-to-arms where he challenges others not to passively agree with others who are protesting, but to do some of it for yourself as well. The comic essay may be an area that hasn't been explored much by students and school libraries, and you may not have many in the collection. We are used to our comics being for entertainment, not to serve as a vehicle for opinion. Powell has won several awards for his illustrations, so it seems natural for him to grapple with these difficult topics through comic format. He warns up front that this is not a manual for parenting, although there is quite a bit of reflection and explanation on how he talked with his daughter. In one of the chapters, Powell follows the progression of white supremacy - from Nazis in WWII, to beards being symbols of paramilitary, to monochromatic black cars, to the use of the Punisher logo, to the black-and-white version of the American Flag, to Mohawks being adopted by American fascists - and a lot of it relies on probably a deeper understanding of recent American history than I possess. This chapter broke with the more personal reflections Powell had in every other chapter, and thus stood out of place a bit amidst the others, but provides interesting insight into the foundations of the conversations Powell has with his family, and even with strangers while protesting. Powell's award-winning skills as an illustrated are on full display here. The review copy wasn't fully colored on every page as the final published work will be, but what was colored was done so expertly. On every page, the fear and uncertainty plaguing the country comes through in dark illustrations with heavy use of bold shading and thick lines. Colors are muted and fade often as the conversation turns to bleaker topics. The glimmers of hope that Powell's daughter bring also brings in more color, but the loss of color around her shows her loss of faith and her fear growing as the pandemic sets in. Rather than sticking to one design choice, Powell uses color like another character in the book, constantly conveying emotion. Once again, the suitability level is based not on the inappropriateness of the content (although there are a few F-bombs), but rather in the reader having a passing understanding of American History and national politics. This would pair well with an American History, Government, or Civics curriculum. Sara's Rating: 8/10 Suitability Level: Grades 11-12 This review was made possible with an advanced reader copy from the publisher through Net Galley. This graphic novel will be on sale April 6, 2021.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Powell's art is just as impactful here as it is in the March trilogy, and no one would accuse this graphic essay collection of lacking earnestness. Some readers might accuse it of preaching to the choir, but folks in the choir don't just come to church to sing; they want (need?) to hear the sermon, too. If you want a sense of what this book is like, one chapter (about the fetishization and commodification of what is essentially G.I. Joe cosplay among macho militia types) was previously published Powell's art is just as impactful here as it is in the March trilogy, and no one would accuse this graphic essay collection of lacking earnestness. Some readers might accuse it of preaching to the choir, but folks in the choir don't just come to church to sing; they want (need?) to hear the sermon, too. If you want a sense of what this book is like, one chapter (about the fetishization and commodification of what is essentially G.I. Joe cosplay among macho militia types) was previously published online: https://popula.com/2019/02/24/about-f... I think this book will be an excellent time capsule for future readers who might not grasp the severity of our civic panic (not to mention the fragility of our democratic experiment) during this regressive and troubling time. Contemporary readers, depending on their ideological bent, will experience this as either (a) a cathartic reflection of their own feelings or (b) an honest window into the feelings and fears of their neighbors across the aisle. Readers who will experience it as (b) are exactly the kinds of readers I wish would read this, and exactly the kinds of readers who probably won't want to. (That said, I probably wouldn't want to read a graphic-novel memoir about someone taking their kids to Tr*mp rallies and teaching them to "own the libs" with memes or whatever. I'll throw a "physician, heal thyself!" my way next time I'm in front of a mirror.) Some readers seem baffled by the decision to draw children as anthropomorphic animals, but c'mon, people: It's not supposed to make literal sense; it makes emotional sense.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jaimie

    * Received as an ARC from the publisher This graphic novel was an interesting read, but I didn't really feel like I connected with it on anything more than a superficial level. Being Canadian (even being as close as we are to the United States) I felt like I was just an observer to the events happening south of the border before/during/after the 2016 election, and even though I am fully aware that racism, bigotry, and (let's be honest) plain horrible individuals live everywhere the book didn't re * Received as an ARC from the publisher This graphic novel was an interesting read, but I didn't really feel like I connected with it on anything more than a superficial level. Being Canadian (even being as close as we are to the United States) I felt like I was just an observer to the events happening south of the border before/during/after the 2016 election, and even though I am fully aware that racism, bigotry, and (let's be honest) plain horrible individuals live everywhere the book didn't really hit any major notes for me. That being said, I appreciated Powell's lens of viewing the act of protest through the eyes of his children, and his themes around the challenges of growing up in this strange and interesting time. Is childhood as innocent now as it was for us growing up a generation ago? Maybe we had it easier, maybe things are "better" in many Canadian cities, or maybe we were just blissfully unaware until a slightly older age. I think for readers in different circumstances than mine (living in the U.S., having children, being more active in the protest sphere maybe) this book could potentially hit some poignant notes, but for me it wasn't much more than an observation of how a different segment of the population views the events of the last few years.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heather Jennings

    Let me begin by saying that this is not a graphic novel for kids or even YA. It is for you, fellow Gen Xers, and even more so if you are a parent. The text is fittingly dark for something so raw and confessional. It reads like a diary and connects the growing fascism in our current climate to prior historical elements. Powell connects cosplay at Comic Cons to the cosplay in paramilitary gear in supremacist circles and even the Punisher comic series logos co-opted by hate groups. This book hits h Let me begin by saying that this is not a graphic novel for kids or even YA. It is for you, fellow Gen Xers, and even more so if you are a parent. The text is fittingly dark for something so raw and confessional. It reads like a diary and connects the growing fascism in our current climate to prior historical elements. Powell connects cosplay at Comic Cons to the cosplay in paramilitary gear in supremacist circles and even the Punisher comic series logos co-opted by hate groups. This book hits hard when discussing White fragility and the irony of hate groups adopting the style and behaviors of those they once claimed to hate. Later, the layer of Covid and its effect on young kids shows how catastrophe may not fit the narratives we always envisioned. Powell also shares his grief at the loss of John Lewis, and it is closely followed by his attempt to be a “wingnut” and continue the journey of action. My one point of confusion was the decision to depict the children as animals rather than humans. After finishing this text, I felt like I understood and commiserated with Powell even more. Thank you NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for my unbiased review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    Save it for Later is a collection of a handful of non-fiction comics by Nate Powell. Powell was the illustrator for John Lewis' graphic memoir series March: Book One. Like Lewis, Powell believes in the right of American's to march in order to fight oppression. In this collection, Powell shines a light on his family's personal experiences with Trump-era America. These experiences include anxiety over Trump winning the election, the surge in racist events, and the COVID lockdown. This was a powerf Save it for Later is a collection of a handful of non-fiction comics by Nate Powell. Powell was the illustrator for John Lewis' graphic memoir series March: Book One. Like Lewis, Powell believes in the right of American's to march in order to fight oppression. In this collection, Powell shines a light on his family's personal experiences with Trump-era America. These experiences include anxiety over Trump winning the election, the surge in racist events, and the COVID lockdown. This was a powerful collection and I can see how Powell's passion of social justice has impacted his children who also want to march to make a difference. Thank you to the publisher for the review copy.

  19. 5 out of 5

    R.J. Sorrento

    This is a creative visual collection of comic essays on life after Trump’s election and during the pandemic. It’s a liberal white man’s perspective and he shares his history of protesting and his collaborative creative work with the late, great John Lewis. I really liked the visual style but I found the choice to make his children look like unicorns a bit distracting. Aside from that this is a creative take on volatile times. I truly appreciated the inspiration to not just be a “retweeter” or an This is a creative visual collection of comic essays on life after Trump’s election and during the pandemic. It’s a liberal white man’s perspective and he shares his history of protesting and his collaborative creative work with the late, great John Lewis. I really liked the visual style but I found the choice to make his children look like unicorns a bit distracting. Aside from that this is a creative take on volatile times. I truly appreciated the inspiration to not just be a “retweeter” or an “armchair resister.” This book makes me want to continue to take action for justice and equality. Thank you to Abrams and Hachette Book Group for the ARC.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Orth

    Got an ARC from Ingram Five interconnected essays from just before the 2016 election to now in which Powell (illustrator of John Lewis’ 3 volume series March) explores his, his daughter’s and society’s role in protesting injustices. He specifically looks at our responsibility to speak out against the chipping away of our democracy and shines a light on the comparison of Trump’s actions to an authoritarian regime. Questioning white middle America’s complacency, Powell illustrates his need to march Got an ARC from Ingram Five interconnected essays from just before the 2016 election to now in which Powell (illustrator of John Lewis’ 3 volume series March) explores his, his daughter’s and society’s role in protesting injustices. He specifically looks at our responsibility to speak out against the chipping away of our democracy and shines a light on the comparison of Trump’s actions to an authoritarian regime. Questioning white middle America’s complacency, Powell illustrates his need to march with his young daughter and teach her the importance of choosing to do something. Because doing nothing is an action in and of itself.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David Lester

    Save It for Later is a remarkably brave and moving memoir of a dark time in American history. But it is also defiant and hopeful, offering America a chance to redeem itself from the nightmare: "But then, at what age should a parent explain some of how and why police and white supremacists have collaborated to uphold unjust laws, and the extra courage of those protesting against that injustice? How does a parent best explain that enslavement was legal, and the heroism required to change it?" Save Save It for Later is a remarkably brave and moving memoir of a dark time in American history. But it is also defiant and hopeful, offering America a chance to redeem itself from the nightmare: "But then, at what age should a parent explain some of how and why police and white supremacists have collaborated to uphold unjust laws, and the extra courage of those protesting against that injustice? How does a parent best explain that enslavement was legal, and the heroism required to change it?" Save it For Later is full of eloquent humanism, poignant humour and Nate Powell's dramatically fluid art. Buy this book for yourself, your family, your friends and... your enemies.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    This was more interesting than I was anticipating. At first I feared it would be a typical white liberal take on Trump's presidency but it quickly delves into much more fruitful territory such as white complicity, intergenerational differences, the uses of protest and the co-opting of pop cultural tropes by the far right. As expected from the author of March, there's several allusions and parallels to John Lewis' civil rights protests, along with deep personal soul searching. Powell seems like a This was more interesting than I was anticipating. At first I feared it would be a typical white liberal take on Trump's presidency but it quickly delves into much more fruitful territory such as white complicity, intergenerational differences, the uses of protest and the co-opting of pop cultural tropes by the far right. As expected from the author of March, there's several allusions and parallels to John Lewis' civil rights protests, along with deep personal soul searching. Powell seems like a great dad too.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Verónica Muñiz-Soto

    Nate Powell’s “Save it for later” is a powerful visual anthology of visual essays that will give you some perspective on the aftermath of the 2016 elections. Nate Powell is the artist behind John Lewis’ outstanding collection March, which presents us with the importance of the March on D.C. for Civil Rights. The story’s progression feeds on the despair millions of Americans felt at that moment and gives us a better look at how the election results came to be. The book is insightful and well thou Nate Powell’s “Save it for later” is a powerful visual anthology of visual essays that will give you some perspective on the aftermath of the 2016 elections. Nate Powell is the artist behind John Lewis’ outstanding collection March, which presents us with the importance of the March on D.C. for Civil Rights. The story’s progression feeds on the despair millions of Americans felt at that moment and gives us a better look at how the election results came to be. The book is insightful and well thought, the art is amazing and it is a great resource for ELA, History and Social Sciences.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rocco Versaci

    A collection of seven essays about the author’s life in a Midwestern college town amid all of the political turmoil following the 2016 election, the importance of protest, and the challenges of both fatherhood and Covid. Powell also illustrated the amazing “March” trilogy, and the section in this book about John Lewis’ passing is very moving. I won the ARC, which I’m reviewing here. It’s in black and white, while the actual book will be in color—a feature that will enhance much of this book, esp A collection of seven essays about the author’s life in a Midwestern college town amid all of the political turmoil following the 2016 election, the importance of protest, and the challenges of both fatherhood and Covid. Powell also illustrated the amazing “March” trilogy, and the section in this book about John Lewis’ passing is very moving. I won the ARC, which I’m reviewing here. It’s in black and white, while the actual book will be in color—a feature that will enhance much of this book, especially the part about the flag and how it’s been altered by our consumer culture.

  25. 4 out of 5

    April O

    Having enjoyed Nate Powell's previous graphic novel March I was excited to get a copy of Save It for Later. I found the seven essays interesting, his art style as detailed and unique as ever and his writing thought provoking. Though politics isn't usually my favorite subject, I especially enjoyed how he combined his generation's experiences growing up with his parent's and his children's. An enjoyable if challenging read at times. Thank you to Abrams Comic Arts for an ARC in exchange for an hone Having enjoyed Nate Powell's previous graphic novel March I was excited to get a copy of Save It for Later. I found the seven essays interesting, his art style as detailed and unique as ever and his writing thought provoking. Though politics isn't usually my favorite subject, I especially enjoyed how he combined his generation's experiences growing up with his parent's and his children's. An enjoyable if challenging read at times. Thank you to Abrams Comic Arts for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kara Nevle

    This is one of the more difficult books I’ve read this year. It’s definitely written by a liberal man for a liberal audience. It’s both a call to activism and ruminations on parenthood during an increasingly polarized period. He questions how his generation will be remembered and how his generation may be remembered in its successes and failures. Throughout the essays he acknowledges his privilege in having the choice to explain these things to his children and in his own childhood with how his p This is one of the more difficult books I’ve read this year. It’s definitely written by a liberal man for a liberal audience. It’s both a call to activism and ruminations on parenthood during an increasingly polarized period. He questions how his generation will be remembered and how his generation may be remembered in its successes and failures. Throughout the essays he acknowledges his privilege in having the choice to explain these things to his children and in his own childhood with how his parents explained these things.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sinistmer

    I really enjoyed this work. Powell is very honest about his efforts to be a voice of protest and change in American society and trying to parent a child who is growing up with these things. I like his breakdowns of topics like toxic masculinity and the violent rebel fantasies and the challenges of confronting these problems. Powell's artwork reminds solid through this, and I found the fact he drew his children as animals to be charming and a bit reminiscent of Maus. I think his artwork is especia I really enjoyed this work. Powell is very honest about his efforts to be a voice of protest and change in American society and trying to parent a child who is growing up with these things. I like his breakdowns of topics like toxic masculinity and the violent rebel fantasies and the challenges of confronting these problems. Powell's artwork reminds solid through this, and I found the fact he drew his children as animals to be charming and a bit reminiscent of Maus. I think his artwork is especially effective talking about the appearance of these symbols in violent white nationalism.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dame Samara

    As someone with small ones in my life seeing how others have approached explaining the state of the world to them. These essays were incredibly moving and had some amazing points. This book at it's core about being an activist at your level of ability and it's honestly beautiful. I must say that I think this could have been way more impactful before the election. But I'm intrigued to come back in April to see if this book has a different impact. As someone with small ones in my life seeing how others have approached explaining the state of the world to them. These essays were incredibly moving and had some amazing points. This book at it's core about being an activist at your level of ability and it's honestly beautiful. I must say that I think this could have been way more impactful before the election. But I'm intrigued to come back in April to see if this book has a different impact.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt Welch

    This is a great little book capturing the last few years of confusion, anger, mistrust and general hatred pitting neighbor against neighbor. The author speaks to teaching our children of injustice. I would recommend it if nothing else to remind yourself how you felt during some of the events of the past few years, whether for or against them and if your perspective has changed or your resolve gotten stronger.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Justin Hardy

    The first essay or two seem to confirm the fear that this will be a too-straightforward tale of liberal virtue and pluck in the early Trump period. I’d urge anyone worried about escalating cringe to stick with it, though. It goes to much more interesting places when it gets to the pandemic and the 2020 protests, and there’s an essay on the Punisher symbol, Blue Lives flag, and other protofacist regalia that is really great.

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