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Loving Country

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Loving Country is a book that inspires ultimate respect for Mother Earth and the role of her custodians. While readers are encouraged to discover the sacred country of Australia in an open-minded and sensitive manner, the intention of this book is to foster communication and understanding between all peoples and country, to bring about a range of environmental and social c Loving Country is a book that inspires ultimate respect for Mother Earth and the role of her custodians. While readers are encouraged to discover the sacred country of Australia in an open-minded and sensitive manner, the intention of this book is to foster communication and understanding between all peoples and country, to bring about a range of environmental and social changes.  Co-authors Bruce Pascoe and Vicky Shukuroglou hope to empower communities to tell their own stories, and for people to honour them and the country from which they have grown. Beautifully designed, all of the writing and photography in Loving Country has been created in consultation with communities. From the ingenious fish traps at Brewarrina and the rivers that feed the Great Barrier Reef, to the love stories of Wiluna and the whale story of Margaret River, there is so much to celebrate and admire about the oldest continuing culture in the world.  For those who want to do more than a whistle-stop tour of Australia, this book offers some keys to unlock and reveal the heart of this loving country.


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Loving Country is a book that inspires ultimate respect for Mother Earth and the role of her custodians. While readers are encouraged to discover the sacred country of Australia in an open-minded and sensitive manner, the intention of this book is to foster communication and understanding between all peoples and country, to bring about a range of environmental and social c Loving Country is a book that inspires ultimate respect for Mother Earth and the role of her custodians. While readers are encouraged to discover the sacred country of Australia in an open-minded and sensitive manner, the intention of this book is to foster communication and understanding between all peoples and country, to bring about a range of environmental and social changes.  Co-authors Bruce Pascoe and Vicky Shukuroglou hope to empower communities to tell their own stories, and for people to honour them and the country from which they have grown. Beautifully designed, all of the writing and photography in Loving Country has been created in consultation with communities. From the ingenious fish traps at Brewarrina and the rivers that feed the Great Barrier Reef, to the love stories of Wiluna and the whale story of Margaret River, there is so much to celebrate and admire about the oldest continuing culture in the world.  For those who want to do more than a whistle-stop tour of Australia, this book offers some keys to unlock and reveal the heart of this loving country.

57 review for Loving Country

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Westle

    Co-authors Bruce Pascoe and Vicky Shukuroglou capture a diverse range of landscapes and introduce readers to the profoundly sacred country from different places across Australia. Opening up a really important conversation, about respect, understanding and celebration for the world’s oldest continuing culture. The book has some stinging critiques, particularly about the reverence placed on Colonial culture, while ignoring the significance of First Nations culture. I was particularly moved by the Co-authors Bruce Pascoe and Vicky Shukuroglou capture a diverse range of landscapes and introduce readers to the profoundly sacred country from different places across Australia. Opening up a really important conversation, about respect, understanding and celebration for the world’s oldest continuing culture. The book has some stinging critiques, particularly about the reverence placed on Colonial culture, while ignoring the significance of First Nations culture. I was particularly moved by the discussion of the Whale and its importance in cultures right around Australia including in the red centre. The stories and research tie together for a really riveting read. The generosity of the story tellers, knowledge keepers and Lore men and women can’t go unnoticed. Reading Loving Country at this time has made me feel profoundly homesick, but in a good way. It is fair to say this book only has the capacity to explore a small fraction of what makes Australia unique, with hundreds of nations making up what is now called Australia, but the message is clear encouraging the reader to seek out stories, experiences and understandings of country that might be hidden or not automatically apparent, it asks you to listen and learn with respect and openness. As Australia, wakes up to a public holiday marking Invasion Day, this is one of those books I hope more and more Australian’s pick up and really open their hearts and minds to the underlining messages, these are lands for which people have long ancestral connections.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    This read has been as an e-audio book, which I recommend as a way to absorb and embrace the text. But get hold of a copy of the truly beautiful paper publication. If you can, obtain a copy of your own to return to as you absorb the depth of each story and sort. (I am currently awaiting the arrival of my own copy in the mail, reborrowing from the library was no longer meeting my needs) .......... First read as an e-audio book, now consumed as a paper book. So much beauty and so much truth. Bruny I This read has been as an e-audio book, which I recommend as a way to absorb and embrace the text. But get hold of a copy of the truly beautiful paper publication. If you can, obtain a copy of your own to return to as you absorb the depth of each story and sort. (I am currently awaiting the arrival of my own copy in the mail, reborrowing from the library was no longer meeting my needs) .......... First read as an e-audio book, now consumed as a paper book. So much beauty and so much truth. Bruny Island nearly destroys me with each read, but they are truth-stories that must be shared and heard Don’t forget to sit with the forward from each author. These give you a context and starting point as well as gentle reminders to frame each part. Bruce Pascoe is a clear speaking truth teller and every one of his books helps the reader open their minds to the lived reality of the First Peoples of Australia and the change forced upon every aspect of life with the invasion/arrival of Anglo settlers. This is our history, the history we as a nation have yet to have the courage to embrace and sit down and be ready for the dialogue of Truth-Telling and the listening we must do.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Viola

    https://australian.museum/learn/scien... Changing one word in Australia's national anthem is mere tokenism and does little for actual inclusion - Joe Williams Scott Morrison has missed the mark yet again when it comes to forming a genuine relationship with First Nations Fri 1 Jan 2021 I was made aware on Thursday by a friend to the incoming changes to the national anthem. My reply was an “eye roll” emoji with the words: “But we aren’t all one, we certainly aren’t treated as one; and many, sure as https://australian.museum/learn/scien... Changing one word in Australia's national anthem is mere tokenism and does little for actual inclusion - Joe Williams Scott Morrison has missed the mark yet again when it comes to forming a genuine relationship with First Nations Fri 1 Jan 2021 I was made aware on Thursday by a friend to the incoming changes to the national anthem. My reply was an “eye roll” emoji with the words: “But we aren’t all one, we certainly aren’t treated as one; and many, sure as hell, aren’t free”. I put out a tweet on Friday with my thoughts: “ For we are one and free, is like a present from yr nerd uncle, who tries to be cool, but fails hard. I mean, is that line trying to convince us, or you? Cos’ we definitely aren’t treated as one, & many sure as hell aren’t free” Prime minister Scott Morrison was quoted as saying the change “takes away nothing … but adds much”. 'We are one and free': Australia's national anthem to change in attempt to recognise Indigenous history What on earth does this change of one word add? Is it supposed to hit the “warm and fuzzies”, taking away the notion of “us and them” by pretending that all people who live on this continent are one big happy family? Let’s be brutally honest, we aren’t. You all know the rates of incarceration when it comes to First Nations v non-Indigenous Australians, deaths in custody, the drastic health disparity and the difference in life expectancy between First Nations and non-Indigenous Australians, you know of the negative profiling when it comes to mainstream media between the two (if you don’t, it’s not hard to Google). Why on earth would anyone think that the changing of just one word would encourage First Nations people to feel as “ONE” with any Australian? To me, changing just one word with the view of inclusion does very little for actual inclusion, and does next to nothing for the hope of uniting a nation. It’s time for a fresh start and to get a new song ( For example Published on Nov 13, 2017 The lyrics for this revised anthem were written by Judith Durham, Kutcha Edwards, Lou Bennett, Camilla Chance and Bill Hauritz. In the video clip above it is performed by Kutcha Edwards during the KAGE Team of Life theatre production. To read more about the video, visit the link below: https://dulwichcentre.com.au/anthem/ Hear & see : https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Gn4NeUE... ) The increasing conversation around changing the date and changing the anthem to be more inclusive of the original custodians, is a positive thing, but I believe the prime minister has missed the mark yet again when it comes to forming a genuine relationship with First Nations. I could be wrong, but I haven’t read anything that states the PM sat with First Nations people or a representative of some sort, to discuss what would be the best way to make the anthem inclusive. If the views were to be inclusive, why not talk to the very people you are hoping to include? Changing just one word is mere tokenism; and I can’t help but hear the “that should shut’m up” jeers from the nationalist peanut gallery – the very people who assure everyone who cares to listen that the “real” Indigenous people don’t want tokenistic change. I no doubt will see in the comments, “OK Joe, he’s trying, and something is better than nothing, from little things big things grow”. I’m sorry but tokenistic and minimal change is pretty much nothing, when it comes to uniting or being more inclusive for all, especially the people who have lived here for 120,000 years. ‘Small, important step’: change to Australia’s national anthem wins cautious support Read more I have long been an advocate of changing three things – the date, the song, the flag – not for any other reason than that the current three don’t represent First Nations. I ask again, what is so threatening about including the original people who lived, loved and looked after this country for thousands of years before any European boats turned up? I am someone who refuses to use the word “reconciliation”. To reconcile is to heal a broken relationship. Let’s be honest, we have never had a relationship. From the white Australia policy to the flora and fauna act, we have been forced to assimilate into a certain way of life. Changing just one word in the song (which has been done before) shows that it can be done. Let’s not forget the current anthem has only been official since 1984, it’s not like it’s steeped in centuries or decades of tradition; we sang God Save The Queen in my lifetime. The song I believe is a beautiful representation of a united, multicultural Australia is the one written by Judith Durham, Uncle Kutcha Edwards, Lou Bennett, Camilla Chance and Bill Hauritz. It’s time for a fresh start and to get a new song. And if we are genuine about this word “reconciliation”, we need to start a relationship before we try to heal one that never existed. • Joe Williams is a proud Wiradjuri man, former professional sportsman, founder of The Enemy Within and adjunct associate professor at the School of Psychology, University of Queensland See also https://www.theguardian.com/australia... Source https://www.publish.csiro.au/RS/pdf/R...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Loving Country is a must-read for all Australian adults. Why did I give it only 4 stars then? If it had been a travel guide, I would have given it 5. I listen to this as an audiobook, which I recommend doing. It helped me understand how to pronounce certain words. Bruce Pascoe also has a lovely speaking voice, and conveys his feelings very plainly. His anger, disappointment and sense of betrayal is made clear, and is devastating and captivating in equal measure. Vicky Shukuroglou sounds more tem Loving Country is a must-read for all Australian adults. Why did I give it only 4 stars then? If it had been a travel guide, I would have given it 5. I listen to this as an audiobook, which I recommend doing. It helped me understand how to pronounce certain words. Bruce Pascoe also has a lovely speaking voice, and conveys his feelings very plainly. His anger, disappointment and sense of betrayal is made clear, and is devastating and captivating in equal measure. Vicky Shukuroglou sounds more tempered, and I did find her sections just a little less interesting and memorable than Pascoe's. I thoroughly enjoy this text, and read it in only a few days. I kept thinking I would re-read it before visiting the places mentioned, and thinking about which of my friends I could rope into a road trip to the places mentioned. I found myself dreaming of tours with the custodians of this land, seeing hidden history and culture that is often discarded by White Australians.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Austen

    Brilliant book, absolutely loved it. Thought it would have just been a good flick-through to have with us whilst travelling but I read the whole thing like a novel before we even left. Very sad to see that I'd been to one of the places discussed and I didn't even know the cultural significance of it! (Gulaga) One thing which would have been a good addition to the book was a map of Oz with which state each location is in (or even better, which language group it is in!). Thanks authors, love it. Brilliant book, absolutely loved it. Thought it would have just been a good flick-through to have with us whilst travelling but I read the whole thing like a novel before we even left. Very sad to see that I'd been to one of the places discussed and I didn't even know the cultural significance of it! (Gulaga) One thing which would have been a good addition to the book was a map of Oz with which state each location is in (or even better, which language group it is in!). Thanks authors, love it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    A truly beautiful book inside and out. Since reading it I am relating differently to the country around me, seeing it with fresh eyes. Can’t wait to visit some of the places written about so thoughtfully by Pascoe and Shukurglou. It’s such a beautiful book I’ve given about 9 copies as Christmas presents!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Keerthi

    Everyone loves their country very much. Glad to see this post and i liked the content and information provided here. To know Best bike showrooms visit Sai Swarna Motors

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary Catt

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shirley

  10. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Graham

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wang Chuanqing

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nadia

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Jane

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kirstin

  16. 5 out of 5

    Beth Montgomery

  17. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maya Kukudzhanova

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christina Graham

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rowan Quinn

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vikki Petraitis

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Spence

  26. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hardie Grant Books

  28. 4 out of 5

    WheeldonHS

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Wilcox

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  31. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  32. 5 out of 5

    Lucie

  33. 5 out of 5

    Joel

  34. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Crnkovic

  35. 4 out of 5

    Caitlyn Hampel

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  37. 5 out of 5

    Lipstick Librarian

  38. 5 out of 5

    Bridget Weller

  39. 4 out of 5

    Yariet Peers

  40. 4 out of 5

    Holly Regan

  41. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Melvold

  42. 4 out of 5

    Angela Bestard

  43. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Lawry

  44. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

  45. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  46. 4 out of 5

    Margie

  47. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  48. 4 out of 5

    Gene

  49. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  50. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  51. 4 out of 5

    Tim Riley

  52. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Rose

  53. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  54. 5 out of 5

    Oshanna Alexander

  55. 4 out of 5

    Andrej

  56. 5 out of 5

    Lola

  57. 4 out of 5

    Anne Wade

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