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The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line: Untold Stories of the Women Who Changed the Course of World War II

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For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who S For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line are the heroes of the Greatest Generation that you hardly ever hear about. These women who did extraordinary things didn't expect thanks and shied away from medals and recognition. Despite their amazing accomplishments, they've gone mostly unheralded and unrewarded. No longer. These are the women of World War II who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen--in and out of uniform. Liane B. Russell fled Austria with nothing and later became a renowned U.S. scientist whose research on the effects of radiation on embryos made a difference to thousands of lives. Gena Turgel was a prisoner who worked in the hospital at Bergen-Belsen and cared for the young Anne Frank, who was dying of typhus. Gena survived and went on to write a memoir and spent her life educating children about the Holocaust. Ida and Louise Cook were British sisters who repeatedly smuggled out jewelry and furs and served as sponsors for refugees, and they also established temporary housing for immigrant families in London. Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told--and the sooner the better. For theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come.


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For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who S For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line are the heroes of the Greatest Generation that you hardly ever hear about. These women who did extraordinary things didn't expect thanks and shied away from medals and recognition. Despite their amazing accomplishments, they've gone mostly unheralded and unrewarded. No longer. These are the women of World War II who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen--in and out of uniform. Liane B. Russell fled Austria with nothing and later became a renowned U.S. scientist whose research on the effects of radiation on embryos made a difference to thousands of lives. Gena Turgel was a prisoner who worked in the hospital at Bergen-Belsen and cared for the young Anne Frank, who was dying of typhus. Gena survived and went on to write a memoir and spent her life educating children about the Holocaust. Ida and Louise Cook were British sisters who repeatedly smuggled out jewelry and furs and served as sponsors for refugees, and they also established temporary housing for immigrant families in London. Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told--and the sooner the better. For theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come.

38 review for The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line: Untold Stories of the Women Who Changed the Course of World War II

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line by Mari K Eder is a wonderful nonfiction book that is a fascinating collection of real-life women that went above and beyond in a multitude of avenues during the events of WWII. I truly loved reading about all of these brave, selfless, courageous, and impressive women that in some way contributed to the success of the county and the allies during the war. I find it invaluable for current-day young girls, adolescents, and women to be able to read such accounts of The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line by Mari K Eder is a wonderful nonfiction book that is a fascinating collection of real-life women that went above and beyond in a multitude of avenues during the events of WWII. I truly loved reading about all of these brave, selfless, courageous, and impressive women that in some way contributed to the success of the county and the allies during the war. I find it invaluable for current-day young girls, adolescents, and women to be able to read such accounts of heroic women in the past to know how resilient we are, what we are capable of, and how we as the human race, and society, can overcome if put to the test. The wonderful array of accounts, some involved with military operations, some outside of these events, all important, and all somewhat under the radar thus far (and unjustly so!). I am so honored to be able to experience and learn about all 15 of these brave and impressive women and will forever be changed and grateful for all that they risked and added for the betterment of all. An excellent collection and book. 5/5 stars Thank you NG and Sourcebooks(nonfiction) for this arc and in return I am submitting my unbiased review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon, Instagram, and B&N accounts upon publication.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anna Guastello

    This was a very eye-opening and interesting read! I had no idea who any of these women were before reading this work, and I'm so glad that I do now. The book is well-structured, each impressive woman has a dedicated chapter, making it an easy book to digest and to come back to. I was also impressed how the author was able to connect some of the women to each other, strengthening the stories of each of the women. I would highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a little inspiration! This was a very eye-opening and interesting read! I had no idea who any of these women were before reading this work, and I'm so glad that I do now. The book is well-structured, each impressive woman has a dedicated chapter, making it an easy book to digest and to come back to. I was also impressed how the author was able to connect some of the women to each other, strengthening the stories of each of the women. I would highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a little inspiration!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Date reviewed/posted: January 23, 2021 Publication date: August 3, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of Date reviewed/posted: January 23, 2021 Publication date: August 3, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII—in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line are the heroes of the Greatest Generation that you hardly ever hear about. These women who did extraordinary things didn't expect thanks and shied away from medals and recognition. Despite their amazing accomplishments, they've gone mostly unheralded and unrewarded. No longer. These are the women of World War II who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen—in and out of uniform. Liane B. Russell fled Austria with nothing and later became a renowned U.S. scientist whose research on the effects of radiation on embryos made a difference to thousands of lives. Gena Turgel was a prisoner who worked in the hospital at Bergen-Belsen and cared for the young Anne Frank, who was dying of typhus. Gena survived and went on to write a memoir and spent her life educating children about the Holocaust. Ida and Louise Cook were British sisters who repeatedly smuggled out jewelry and furs and served as sponsors for refugees, and they also established temporary housing for immigrant families in London. Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told—and the sooner the better. For theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The women in this book are rockstars and I had not heard of any of them before but will now never forget them. I questioned at first why the Cook sisters were so important for smuggling jewels and furs, but it all made sense in the end. The book was wonderfully researched and well written and will appeal to men and women with an interest in history. I will recommend it to friends, family and book clubs alike. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I simply adore emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/snowflakes / literally-like-overusers etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🎖️🎖️🎖️🎖️🎖️

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ruth B.

    I was lucky to get an preview copy of Mari K. Eder’s outstanding book. As a retired military officer myself, I thought I knew a lot about women who served in WWII but I didn’t. This book is loaded with tributes to women who responded to threats wherever they existed. As I read chapter after chapter, I would think I had a favorite, only to decide they were all special. Eder writes with a clear and interesting style and she pays a lasting tribute to the featured women for all they risked and contr I was lucky to get an preview copy of Mari K. Eder’s outstanding book. As a retired military officer myself, I thought I knew a lot about women who served in WWII but I didn’t. This book is loaded with tributes to women who responded to threats wherever they existed. As I read chapter after chapter, I would think I had a favorite, only to decide they were all special. Eder writes with a clear and interesting style and she pays a lasting tribute to the featured women for all they risked and contributed. She shows what a difference women made, and how little they asked for or expected in return. The chapters at the end are especially reflective and inspirational, linking the past to the present and to the future. Women’s history, and world history, is advanced with this book, and that’s no small compliment. I strongly recommend The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told even as the last of them are nearing or past their centenary. How these women lived to be forty is amazing given what they endured, let alone into their 90s and over. Some were tortured, many were starved, PTSD is a given, some were humiliated by their own branch of services, some were spies and/or resistance fighters, all were driven. And not all were white either! And shame on the US g Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told even as the last of them are nearing or past their centenary. How these women lived to be forty is amazing given what they endured, let alone into their 90s and over. Some were tortured, many were starved, PTSD is a given, some were humiliated by their own branch of services, some were spies and/or resistance fighters, all were driven. And not all were white either! And shame on the US govt for denying them the recognition due them until so late. Even the US Army refused to acknowledge that they were veterans or deserved benefits--and the Army was the last branch to include women! There are many photos from archives and families. I requested and received a free temporary ebook copy from Sourcebooks via NetGalley. Thank you! I have preordered a copy for my local library.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Akindle

    The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line by Mari K. Eder I liked this book! A collection of stories of woman who went above and beyond to serve our country in WW2, this was an amazing book. As woman had to step up in to the working world, it was a big shift that has impacts even today. This book get 5 Stars from me!! Thank you to NetGalley for the chance to read in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Julie Pint

    A beautiful look at many women in history whose actions under difficult conditions have been forgotten or unknown to most people. The stories are nothing short of heroic. A fantastic resource for classrooms to inspire current generations while remembering our past. 4 stars only because the last third of the book turned to more current people than a look at the past, and in doing so it feels like an agenda rather than a look at history. Thanks to NetGalley for the read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Penny A.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jerri Carlin

  10. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nissa

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amanda W

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dana

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Meeker

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kit

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Nicole

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alley W.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Bull Chafin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karren Sandercock

  22. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Eichelberger

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rose

  25. 4 out of 5

    Victoria (RedsCat)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marissa Redenbaugh

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shabana

  29. 5 out of 5

    Irene

  30. 5 out of 5

    LS Johnson

  31. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Aucoin

  32. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Burnett

  33. 4 out of 5

    Milou

  34. 5 out of 5

    Kristin (Kritters Ramblings)

  35. 5 out of 5

    Thelma

  36. 4 out of 5

    Jillian McKee Loera

  37. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Short

  38. 5 out of 5

    Kenzie Mills

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