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Daughter. Sister. Priestess. Protector. Son. Brother. Demi-God. Hero. Monsters. Gifted and burdened with beauty far beyond that of mere mortals, Medusa seeks sanctuary with the Goddess Athena. But when the lustful gaze of mighty Poseidon falls upon her, even the Temple of Athena cannot protect her. Young Perseus embarks on a seemingly impossible quest. Equipped with only bra Daughter. Sister. Priestess. Protector. Son. Brother. Demi-God. Hero. Monsters. Gifted and burdened with beauty far beyond that of mere mortals, Medusa seeks sanctuary with the Goddess Athena. But when the lustful gaze of mighty Poseidon falls upon her, even the Temple of Athena cannot protect her. Young Perseus embarks on a seemingly impossible quest. Equipped with only bravado and determination, his only chance of success lays in the hands of his immortal siblings. Medusa and Perseus soon become pawns of spiteful and selfish gods. Faced with the repercussions of Athena's wrath Medusa has no choice but to flee and hide. But can she do so without becoming the monster they say she is. History tells of conquering heroes. Tales distorted by time. Medusa’s truth has long been lost. Until now. Now it is time to hear her truth. Revel in this powerful retelling of one of mythologies greatest tales today.


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Daughter. Sister. Priestess. Protector. Son. Brother. Demi-God. Hero. Monsters. Gifted and burdened with beauty far beyond that of mere mortals, Medusa seeks sanctuary with the Goddess Athena. But when the lustful gaze of mighty Poseidon falls upon her, even the Temple of Athena cannot protect her. Young Perseus embarks on a seemingly impossible quest. Equipped with only bra Daughter. Sister. Priestess. Protector. Son. Brother. Demi-God. Hero. Monsters. Gifted and burdened with beauty far beyond that of mere mortals, Medusa seeks sanctuary with the Goddess Athena. But when the lustful gaze of mighty Poseidon falls upon her, even the Temple of Athena cannot protect her. Young Perseus embarks on a seemingly impossible quest. Equipped with only bravado and determination, his only chance of success lays in the hands of his immortal siblings. Medusa and Perseus soon become pawns of spiteful and selfish gods. Faced with the repercussions of Athena's wrath Medusa has no choice but to flee and hide. But can she do so without becoming the monster they say she is. History tells of conquering heroes. Tales distorted by time. Medusa’s truth has long been lost. Until now. Now it is time to hear her truth. Revel in this powerful retelling of one of mythologies greatest tales today.

30 review for Athena's Child

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cara Kane

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I felt so angry and upset whilst reading this book. What happened to Medusa is unforgivable and I hate, HATE Athena for it! Such a great retelling of a well known myth. The book reeks of injustice and that’s what made it one of the best books I’ve read this year. Looking forward to reading the second book in the series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    ☼ Sarah ☼

    "Women hold knives more often in the day than men ever do, yet it is not women who stab their husbands to death when they fear adultery." Many of us learned of the Greek myth of Medusa for the first time as children, and it went a little like this: "Medusa was a dreadful monster who sat around for a long time doing dreadful monster things, like having snakes for hair and turning people to stone. One day, a brave hero named Perseus put a stop to her monstering, and everyone lived happily ever afte "Women hold knives more often in the day than men ever do, yet it is not women who stab their husbands to death when they fear adultery." Many of us learned of the Greek myth of Medusa for the first time as children, and it went a little like this: "Medusa was a dreadful monster who sat around for a long time doing dreadful monster things, like having snakes for hair and turning people to stone. One day, a brave hero named Perseus put a stop to her monstering, and everyone lived happily ever after." However, there's a little more nuance to it than that. Ovid's Metamorphoses claims that Medusa was originally a beautiful maiden, punished by Athena for having sex with Poseidon in her temple, and many feminist critics have begun to interpret Medusa's story as either a symbol of feminine rage or a victim-blaming narrative. In Athena's Child, Lynn follows suit, showing us how a young Medusa stood up for the voices of women until Poseidon, liking her fire, forced himself upon her, and how Athena in her wrath cursed her. This Medusa is anything but monstrous; forsaken by her goddess, she wants to be left in peace on her island, though of course, a sporadic stream of glory-hungry would-be heroes insist on landing and attempting to kill her. No one is willing to listen to Medusa's story, but she longs to be heard. I challenge anyone to read this one and come away feeling unsympathetic! Lynn also writes from the point of view of Perseus, who sets out to decapitate Medusa in order to bring her head to the cruel King Polydectes, hoping to kill Polydectes with her gaze and save his mother from having to marry him. I found his perspective far less engaging, and while his intentions were noble, I couldn't bring myself to care for him. (view spoiler)[The ending adds to this, but it's very realistic, too. Perseus tells Medusa that he will make sure her story is heard, but gives up at the first hurdle after returning to his ship and realising that his men want to hear about valour and bloodshed and not a wronged priestess, reflecting how even with the #MeToo movement, many women's stories still aren't being listened to. (hide spoiler)] While the prose here was perhaps a little too sparse and quick to jump around in perspective for my tastes, Athena's Child is a simply told reimagining in the style of Madeline Miller's Circe or Pat Barker's The Silence of the Girls. It asks us to reconsider how we view villainised women, to listen to their stories, and to stand up for ourselves and for others. Fans of Greek mythology may appreciate this one, but I think it's also a read worth considering for a younger audience (especially if they grew up hearing the "Medusa was bad and then Perseus relieved her of her head, the end" version of the myth)!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sumit

    ‘𝙂𝙤𝙙𝙨 𝙙𝙤 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙥𝙖𝙮 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙥𝙧𝙞𝙘𝙚 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙬𝙧𝙤𝙣𝙜𝙙𝙤𝙞𝙣𝙜𝙨. 𝙈𝙤𝙧𝙩𝙖𝙡𝙨 𝙙𝙤. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙜𝙤𝙙𝙨, 𝙡𝙞𝙠𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙧𝙞𝙘𝙝 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙬𝙤𝙧𝙡𝙙, 𝙥𝙪𝙨𝙝 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙖𝙜𝙚𝙣𝙙𝙖𝙨 𝙤𝙣𝙩𝙤 𝙩𝙝𝙤𝙨𝙚 𝙬𝙝𝙤𝙨𝙚 𝙫𝙤𝙞𝙘𝙚𝙨 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙡𝙤𝙪𝙙 𝙚𝙣𝙤𝙪𝙜𝙝 𝙩𝙤 𝙨𝙥𝙚𝙖𝙠 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢𝙨𝙚𝙡𝙫𝙚𝙨. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙬𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙬𝙚𝙖𝙠. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙪𝙣𝙬𝙖𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙙. 𝘼𝙣𝙙 𝙣𝙤 𝙤𝙣𝙚 𝙨𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙩𝙨 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙤𝙨𝙚 𝙬𝙝𝙤 𝙣𝙚𝙚𝙙 𝙞𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙢𝙤𝙨𝙩. 𝙒𝙝𝙮 𝙬𝙤𝙪𝙡𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮? 𝙏𝙤 𝙨𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙖𝙣𝙤𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙧 𝙞𝙨 𝙩𝙤 𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙠 𝙡𝙤𝙨𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙨𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙩𝙝𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧𝙨𝙚𝙡𝙛. 𝘼𝙣𝙙 𝙢𝙖𝙣 𝙘𝙖𝙣𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙨𝙚𝙚 𝙗𝙚𝙮𝙤𝙣𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙙𝙚𝙥𝙩𝙝 𝙤𝙛 𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙤𝙬𝙣 𝙧𝙚𝙛𝙡𝙚𝙘𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣.’ 🐍Gifted and burdened with a beauty far beyond that of mere mortals, Medusa seeks sanctuary wi ‘𝙂𝙤𝙙𝙨 𝙙𝙤 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙥𝙖𝙮 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙥𝙧𝙞𝙘𝙚 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙬𝙧𝙤𝙣𝙜𝙙𝙤𝙞𝙣𝙜𝙨. 𝙈𝙤𝙧𝙩𝙖𝙡𝙨 𝙙𝙤. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙜𝙤𝙙𝙨, 𝙡𝙞𝙠𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙧𝙞𝙘𝙝 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙬𝙤𝙧𝙡𝙙, 𝙥𝙪𝙨𝙝 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙖𝙜𝙚𝙣𝙙𝙖𝙨 𝙤𝙣𝙩𝙤 𝙩𝙝𝙤𝙨𝙚 𝙬𝙝𝙤𝙨𝙚 𝙫𝙤𝙞𝙘𝙚𝙨 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙡𝙤𝙪𝙙 𝙚𝙣𝙤𝙪𝙜𝙝 𝙩𝙤 𝙨𝙥𝙚𝙖𝙠 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢𝙨𝙚𝙡𝙫𝙚𝙨. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙬𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙬𝙚𝙖𝙠. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙪𝙣𝙬𝙖𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙙. 𝘼𝙣𝙙 𝙣𝙤 𝙤𝙣𝙚 𝙨𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙩𝙨 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙤𝙨𝙚 𝙬𝙝𝙤 𝙣𝙚𝙚𝙙 𝙞𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙢𝙤𝙨𝙩. 𝙒𝙝𝙮 𝙬𝙤𝙪𝙡𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮? 𝙏𝙤 𝙨𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙖𝙣𝙤𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙧 𝙞𝙨 𝙩𝙤 𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙠 𝙡𝙤𝙨𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙨𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙩𝙝𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧𝙨𝙚𝙡𝙛. 𝘼𝙣𝙙 𝙢𝙖𝙣 𝙘𝙖𝙣𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙨𝙚𝙚 𝙗𝙚𝙮𝙤𝙣𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙙𝙚𝙥𝙩𝙝 𝙤𝙛 𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙤𝙬𝙣 𝙧𝙚𝙛𝙡𝙚𝙘𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣.’ 🐍Gifted and burdened with a beauty far beyond that of mere mortals, Medusa seeks sanctuary within the temple of Goddess Athena and became her priestess. But when the lustful gaze of mighty Poseidon falls upon her, even the Temple of Athena cannot protect her. The goddess who was supposed to protect her accused her of defiling her temple and cursed her with eternal misery which destroyed her family and turned her into a murderer, a monster - the Gorgon. To save his mother from a forced-marriage with a tyrant king, Perseus - a Demi-god, born out of wedlock, haunted by his own kin, and adopted by another family embarks on a seemingly impossible quest of bringing the Gorgon's head. But when he came to know that the said Gorgon is Medusa, a priestess of Goddess Athena wrong by the same goddess, will he proceed with his mission? Will, he chose the death of one wronged woman to save the other from wrong? ‘𝙒𝙝𝙮 𝙞𝙨 𝙞𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙬𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙫𝙞𝙚𝙬𝙚𝙙 𝙖𝙨 𝙪𝙣𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙗𝙡𝙚? 𝙒𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙝𝙤𝙡𝙙 𝙠𝙣𝙞𝙫𝙚𝙨 𝙢𝙤𝙧𝙚 𝙤𝙛𝙩𝙚𝙣 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙣 𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙚𝙫𝙚𝙧 𝙙𝙤, 𝙮𝙚𝙩 𝙞𝙩 𝙞𝙨 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙬𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙬𝙝𝙤 𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙗 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙝𝙪𝙨𝙗𝙖𝙣𝙙𝙨 𝙩𝙤 𝙙𝙚𝙖𝙩𝙝 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮 𝙛𝙚𝙖𝙧 𝙖𝙙𝙪𝙡𝙩𝙚𝙧𝙮. 𝙒𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙜𝙖𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙧 𝙞𝙣 𝙘𝙡𝙪𝙨𝙩𝙚𝙧𝙨 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙛𝙧𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙙𝙨𝙝𝙞𝙥𝙨 𝙨𝙩𝙧𝙤𝙣𝙜𝙚𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙣 𝙨𝙩𝙚𝙚𝙡, 𝙮𝙚𝙩 𝙞𝙩 𝙞𝙨 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙬𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙬𝙝𝙤 𝙗𝙚𝙖𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙝𝙪𝙨𝙗𝙖𝙣𝙙𝙨 𝙩𝙤 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙜𝙧𝙤𝙪𝙣𝙙 𝙞𝙣 𝙜𝙖𝙣𝙜𝙨 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙣 𝙖 𝙝𝙞𝙣𝙩 𝙤𝙛 𝙬𝙧𝙤𝙣𝙜-𝙙𝙤𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙚𝙘𝙝𝙤𝙚𝙨 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙖𝙞𝙧. 𝙄𝙩 𝙞𝙨 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙬𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙬𝙝𝙤 𝙧𝙚𝙦𝙪𝙞𝙧𝙚 𝙡𝙤𝙫𝙚𝙧 𝙖𝙛𝙩𝙚𝙧 𝙡𝙤𝙫𝙚𝙧, 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙣 𝙢𝙖𝙠𝙚 𝙥𝙧𝙤𝙢𝙞𝙨𝙚𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙡𝙤𝙫𝙚 𝙬𝙝𝙞𝙘𝙝 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮 𝙧𝙚𝙘𝙖𝙣𝙩 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙣 𝙙𝙖𝙧𝙠𝙚𝙧 𝙝𝙖𝙞𝙧 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙙𝙚𝙚𝙥𝙚𝙧 𝙚𝙮𝙚𝙨 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙘𝙖𝙨𝙩 𝙞𝙣 𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙙𝙞𝙧𝙚𝙘𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣. 𝙏𝙞𝙢𝙚 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙩𝙞𝙢𝙚 𝙖𝙜𝙖𝙞𝙣, 𝙬𝙚 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙘𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙙 𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙖𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙚𝙢𝙤𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙖𝙡 𝙤𝙣𝙚𝙨, 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙞𝙧𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙖𝙡 𝙤𝙣𝙚𝙨. 𝙒𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙙𝙤𝙣’𝙩 𝙜𝙚𝙩 𝙙𝙧𝙪𝙣𝙠 𝙡𝙞𝙠𝙚 𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙝𝙪𝙧𝙡 𝙞𝙣𝙨𝙪𝙡𝙩𝙨 𝙖𝙩 𝙨𝙩𝙧𝙖𝙣𝙜𝙚𝙧𝙨 𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙧𝙤𝙬 𝙧𝙤𝙘𝙠𝙨 𝙞𝙣 𝙥𝙧𝙤𝙩𝙚𝙨𝙩𝙨. 𝙒𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙪𝙨𝙚 𝙬𝙤𝙧𝙙𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙨𝙤𝙣 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙢𝙚𝙣 𝙪𝙨𝙚 𝙛𝙞𝙨𝙩𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙛𝙤𝙧𝙘𝙚. 𝙎𝙤 𝙬𝙝𝙮 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙬𝙚 𝙖𝙡𝙬𝙖𝙮𝙨 𝙨𝙚𝙘𝙤𝙣𝙙? 𝙒𝙝𝙮 𝙞𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙢𝙮 𝙜𝙤𝙙𝙙𝙚𝙨𝙨? 𝙒𝙝𝙮 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙬𝙚 𝙖𝙡𝙬𝙖𝙮𝙨 𝙨𝙚𝙘𝙤𝙣𝙙?’ 🐍The book - 1st in The Grecian Women trilogy - is a Greek mythological retelling of Medusa and her nemesis Perseus. Narrated from the POVs of Medusa, Dane, and Perseus, the book is divided into 2 parts. Part 1 explores Medusa's backstory and how she turned from a priestess into a Gorgon and Part 2 shows us Perseus's origin story and his own quest of becoming a hero. 🐍Hannah's writing is lyrical and elegant. Within just a few pages she has cleverly done for Medusa what Miller has done for Circe which makes you think about the way the stories are told, but her writing certainly lacked Miller's richness and depth. Further, the fast-paced narratives and sudden jump in the timeline, and change in POVs, make it difficult to cope up with the story. 🐍The characters are beautifully envisioned and articulately flesh out. By the end of the book, you are definitely gonna feel for Medusa's plights and sufferings and your perspective towards the Olympian Gods will change -as if nothing change over the centuries, it was always women who are blamed for men's cruelties, not the other way around. Other supporting characters are barely touched. 🐍The ending felt abrupt and unfulfilling, as many points were left open for readers' own imagination. Nevertheless, it liked it - it gives you a different outlook on Medusa's fate and forced you to accept that it was not she who loses her humanity, but people do. Overall, Athena's Child was an enjoyable lite read for me. If you are into Greek myth, then you should definitely check out this refreshing retelling of Medusa. Highly recommendable. 𝙈𝙮 𝙍𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙣𝙜: ⭐⭐⭐⭐(4/5)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Marie

    This book was stunning. The writing style, the plot, the characters! The way this author describes things and explains engrained social norms like patriarchy is unbelievable. I like the thought of Medusa being the victim and telling the story from her POV. Definitely suggest reading this book and I cannot wish for her next book to come out in March of this year ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Athena's Child by Hannah Lynn Athena's Child by Hannah Lynn is a spellbinding retelling of one of Greek mythology's most important tales. This wonderfully written novel tells Medusa’s story which has been either lost or distorted over the years. This story follows the beautiful and gifted but burdened Medusa as she seeks sanctuary with the Goddess Athena in her temple. However when the mighty Poseidon falls for her beauty even Athena can not protect her. Meanwhile young Perseus is embarking on h Athena's Child by Hannah Lynn Athena's Child by Hannah Lynn is a spellbinding retelling of one of Greek mythology's most important tales. This wonderfully written novel tells Medusa’s story which has been either lost or distorted over the years. This story follows the beautiful and gifted but burdened Medusa as she seeks sanctuary with the Goddess Athena in her temple. However when the mighty Poseidon falls for her beauty even Athena can not protect her. Meanwhile young Perseus is embarking on his seemingly impossible quest. When both Medusa and Perseus become pawns of the spiteful and selfish gods, Medusa must flee and hide or face Athena’s powerful wrath. Whilst hiding Medusa worries that she will become the monster others say she is. Lynn’s story is a powerful retelling of one of mythologies greatest tales. This was a fascinating novel and an alternative story about Medusa which definitely gets the reader rethinking what they think they know about the so called monster that Medusa is known to have been. The story flows well and the characters although known through Greek mythology stories are described very differently in this story and they even become relatable characters. A great story and I recommend the book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    Actual rating: 3.5 stars. Athena's Child is a retelling of the Greek myth of Medusa, a priestess of Athena who was turned into a monster after being raped by Poseidon. I really liked the beginning and the ending of the story, but the middle dragged a little for me. The book isn't long at all, but I was still a little bored in parts, maybe because I didn't much care for Perseus's adventures which were narrated in the second half. Medusa was by far the character who stood out the most to me. I loved Actual rating: 3.5 stars. Athena's Child is a retelling of the Greek myth of Medusa, a priestess of Athena who was turned into a monster after being raped by Poseidon. I really liked the beginning and the ending of the story, but the middle dragged a little for me. The book isn't long at all, but I was still a little bored in parts, maybe because I didn't much care for Perseus's adventures which were narrated in the second half. Medusa was by far the character who stood out the most to me. I loved how outspoken, strong and gentle she was, and I felt a lot for her. She went through truly horrific experiences. Knowing some things before she did, for example how her gaze killed people, was also very tragic. The final confrontation with Perseus was also extremely well done. It was a powerful ending and I really appreciated it. As for things I liked less, I would have loved if the author had given a more original explanation for Athena's turning Medusa into a monster. It is well known that Greek gods are unjust and cruel and their actions often don't make much sense, but the story would have been much more intriguing if the author had explored Athena's action more. I also didn't like how Medusa's sisters turned against her: I could understand them, but I also would have preferred a more loving relationship between them, also because, if I'm not mistaken, in the original myth they went after Perseus to avenge her death. That being said, Athena's Child was a good read overall and I'm curious to read the next book in the trilogy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    M.L.

    This was an interesting read. Because the prose was so descriptive and (often) indirect, I often found it hard to know exactly what it was referring to and had to reread certain paragraphs more than once. The story was well told, however, if tragic. A good read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Fiona Atay

    This is a simply stunning read from Hannah Lynn. It retells the tale of Medusa, the Gorgon, from two fresh perspectives, that of Medusa herself and that of Perseus’ own heroic quest. In so doing, Lynn distills from this classic myth a new pathos and some deeply provoking ideas. Beginning the story from the time of Medusa’s own human childhood, Lynn’s prose is elegantly simple but simply engrossing, detracting nothing from the power of the tale itself but infusing it instead with force and clarit This is a simply stunning read from Hannah Lynn. It retells the tale of Medusa, the Gorgon, from two fresh perspectives, that of Medusa herself and that of Perseus’ own heroic quest. In so doing, Lynn distills from this classic myth a new pathos and some deeply provoking ideas. Beginning the story from the time of Medusa’s own human childhood, Lynn’s prose is elegantly simple but simply engrossing, detracting nothing from the power of the tale itself but infusing it instead with force and clarity. There is something both classically universal and yet uniquely horrifying in this particular Medusa’s tale as Lynn imagines it, but it is in the redemptive quality with which Lynn infuses the ending which made this story stunning for me. I was left with the feeling that somehow, having read her tale, I was able to salvage Medusa’s story from the obscuring mists of myth - and I found the experience profoundly moving. Anyone who has read and enjoyed such retellings as Attwood’s ‘Penelopiad’ or Barker’s ‘The Silence of the Girls’ will appreciate this voyage into classical Greek myth – but I would recommend it to anyone who thinks to presume they can ever know the truth about anything.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I received this book to review for a book group I am part of. I am a big fan of Greek mythology and couldn’t resist reading the story of Medusa and her curse. I’ve read a lot of Greek stories where gods are using humans as pawns and hurt them with barely a thought. Medusa born beautiful in its own way a curse is taken to Athena’s temple in a bid to protect her from the men who wanted her. She is accepted in and over 5 years becomes a priestess for her Goddess but her beauty also draws in another g I received this book to review for a book group I am part of. I am a big fan of Greek mythology and couldn’t resist reading the story of Medusa and her curse. I’ve read a lot of Greek stories where gods are using humans as pawns and hurt them with barely a thought. Medusa born beautiful in its own way a curse is taken to Athena’s temple in a bid to protect her from the men who wanted her. She is accepted in and over 5 years becomes a priestess for her Goddess but her beauty also draws in another god Poseidon who wants her whether she consents or not. After her attack by Poseidon she is cast out and cursed and she flees. She has now become a monster. Skip ahead two thousand years and Perseus is born a Demi god child of Zeus who takes a quest to take Medusa’s head to help his mother betrothed to a king he despises. A great story you get both sides and how much control the gods have over these humans.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Em Yarnell

    I'm not sure I can fully put into words how much I enjoyed this book. I've always been a bit fascinated and confused by Greek mythology. I wasn't sure what to expect from this but wow! I love the perspective and the style of writing. I felt like I was living it with Medusa and the rollercoaster of emotions that you encounter from her sturggles trials and tribulations. I loved it moving to Perseus and reading his account, again as if I were travelling along with him and I cant post spoilers but t I'm not sure I can fully put into words how much I enjoyed this book. I've always been a bit fascinated and confused by Greek mythology. I wasn't sure what to expect from this but wow! I love the perspective and the style of writing. I felt like I was living it with Medusa and the rollercoaster of emotions that you encounter from her sturggles trials and tribulations. I loved it moving to Perseus and reading his account, again as if I were travelling along with him and I cant post spoilers but the ending I really didn't see coming. I know that sounds a bit strange, but I really didn't. It's brilliantly written with a fantastic pace and just the right amount of humour. It draws you in until you find you're reading it in any spare moments you have.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    I loved this! This was such an original take on a classic story, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Starting with Medusa, the monstrous Gorgon, we see her life before she was turned and see her fate at the hand of the Gods. Beginning with her life as a Priestess of Athena and then watching as despite everything that happens to her, she is still an inherently good person. And Perseus, the hero, on his daring quest, and seeing the reasons behind it. The book was fast-paced and very easy to read - I didn I loved this! This was such an original take on a classic story, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Starting with Medusa, the monstrous Gorgon, we see her life before she was turned and see her fate at the hand of the Gods. Beginning with her life as a Priestess of Athena and then watching as despite everything that happens to her, she is still an inherently good person. And Perseus, the hero, on his daring quest, and seeing the reasons behind it. The book was fast-paced and very easy to read - I didn't want to put it down. I wasn't expecting to have such empathy for Medusa, rooting for a Gorgon to have a happy ending. Great read, would recommend.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nancy S Robison

    A brilliant and heartbreaking reexamination of the story of Medusa. This book deserves 10 stars. A girlchild's betrayal by almost everyone around her and her mistreatment and abandonment by the Gods themselves makes for a tragic and compelling story. The Greek Gods of Olympus could be benevolent or cruel and jealous. They did what they pleased and used humans for their own entertainment. This often included the flagrant seduction or rape of human women. I never considered what the making of a mon A brilliant and heartbreaking reexamination of the story of Medusa. This book deserves 10 stars. A girlchild's betrayal by almost everyone around her and her mistreatment and abandonment by the Gods themselves makes for a tragic and compelling story. The Greek Gods of Olympus could be benevolent or cruel and jealous. They did what they pleased and used humans for their own entertainment. This often included the flagrant seduction or rape of human women. I never considered what the making of a monster might entail. Now I see. You should read this astonishing book!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joni Janice Mielke

    I loved everything about this book, from the writing style to the way in which characters are evoked and reimagined - be they gods, goddesses, mortals, monsters or demi-gods. Hannah Lynn's storytelling brings characters to life with sensitivity and skill that I couldn't put my Kindle down. The quiet conviction persists throughout, answering the question that humans have been asking for time immemorial. Are monsters born of monsters, or do they become them - and if so, why? Athena's Child holds th I loved everything about this book, from the writing style to the way in which characters are evoked and reimagined - be they gods, goddesses, mortals, monsters or demi-gods. Hannah Lynn's storytelling brings characters to life with sensitivity and skill that I couldn't put my Kindle down. The quiet conviction persists throughout, answering the question that humans have been asking for time immemorial. Are monsters born of monsters, or do they become them - and if so, why? Athena's Child holds the answers, and while this reading alone has inspired me to dig into mythology with relish, readers will find satisfaction here too, and perhaps a fresh perspective. Highly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kath Middleton

    This is a retelling of the tale of Medusa, the gorgon, and Perseus, her nemesis. I had a thing for Greek and Roman mythology in my teens and enjoy this genre. It took me a while to get into the story and really latch on to it but when I did, I found the idea behind this refreshing. The feelings of Medusa, the personality of Perseus – they are recreated here. I enjoyed this very different take on an old tale. It’s imaginative and exciting. It’s mythology, Jim, but not as we know it!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    Recap: Medusa's story Review: I enjoyed this Greek myth retelling. It was a quick read, well-paced and I came away with feelings of compassion for the snake-headed gorgon. I know aspects of the Greek myth but you could read this without any knowledge at all, it's explained well without being overloaded. Recap: Medusa's story Review: I enjoyed this Greek myth retelling. It was a quick read, well-paced and I came away with feelings of compassion for the snake-headed gorgon. I know aspects of the Greek myth but you could read this without any knowledge at all, it's explained well without being overloaded.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Wild

    A captivating retelling of the story of Medusa. I knew a small amount about Medusa’s life but not the full details surrounding her downfall. 🐍 I enjoy Greek mythology so I was looking forward to reading this one. It didn’t disappoint. It’s very readable, easy to follow and easy to understand. Medusa’s sad story is wonderfully and imaginatively told, making it a gripping read. It gives a great insight into the life of such an interesting and fascinating mythical character. I loved it! Hurry up and A captivating retelling of the story of Medusa. I knew a small amount about Medusa’s life but not the full details surrounding her downfall. 🐍 I enjoy Greek mythology so I was looking forward to reading this one. It didn’t disappoint. It’s very readable, easy to follow and easy to understand. Medusa’s sad story is wonderfully and imaginatively told, making it a gripping read. It gives a great insight into the life of such an interesting and fascinating mythical character. I loved it! Hurry up and write the next one, Hannah Lynn!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Philippa Dakin

    This is not my usual read but as I have read all of Hannah Lynn’s previous books, I was happy to give it a try. I was not disappointed; such a beautifully written book, based on the story of Medusa. The story telling is strong, and I was surprised at how easily I could invest in the characters. Would highly recommend.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Margaret McCulloch-Keeble

    Flippin' gods! and they called Medusa a monster! Ooh, the injustice of it all! I didn't really know much about Medusa but this little book has taught me much. I found this to be a quick, easy read, well written and engaging. Flippin' gods! and they called Medusa a monster! Ooh, the injustice of it all! I didn't really know much about Medusa but this little book has taught me much. I found this to be a quick, easy read, well written and engaging.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Symonds

    I couldn't wait to start reading this book, I am a big fan of Hannah's writing, and this one was really good. At school I was always interested in Medusa and Classical Greek Myths. This is the story of Medusa but Hannah has put a slightly different twist on the story which I found fascinating. If you think you know the truth about things wait till you read this one. Hannah's written is descriptive but engaging and I look forward to her next book. As brilliant as ever. I couldn't wait to start reading this book, I am a big fan of Hannah's writing, and this one was really good. At school I was always interested in Medusa and Classical Greek Myths. This is the story of Medusa but Hannah has put a slightly different twist on the story which I found fascinating. If you think you know the truth about things wait till you read this one. Hannah's written is descriptive but engaging and I look forward to her next book. As brilliant as ever.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carly Benedict

    FINALLY Medusa gets her own story. This tragic retelling of the myth of Medusa and Perseus was beautifully written and finally humanized Medusa like she's never been before. This book definitely deserves more recognition. It was a relatively short read, so I blew through it in a day and a half. FINALLY Medusa gets her own story. This tragic retelling of the myth of Medusa and Perseus was beautifully written and finally humanized Medusa like she's never been before. This book definitely deserves more recognition. It was a relatively short read, so I blew through it in a day and a half.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mel Greenwood

    I really enjoyed this book. I’ve always loved reading Greek mythology but the twist here is incredible and the story is written so well. I couldn’t put it down!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dorien

    Pretty well written, good for people that already forgot the details of greek mythology like me. A feminist view of the world of heroes and immortals. It's easy bed-time reading, and free on Amazon. Pretty well written, good for people that already forgot the details of greek mythology like me. A feminist view of the world of heroes and immortals. It's easy bed-time reading, and free on Amazon.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sal Kat Wright

    An incredible new retelling of the classic myth of Perseus and Medusa, with a truly beautiful twist. I flew through it within 4 hours!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jacki Prettyman

    Another fabulous book from Hannah Lynn. This total remake and re-imagining of Medusa is so unexpected. It will tug at your heart while experiencing anger at the circumstances that led to the making of Media's life. Definitely a page turner that resounds loudly with today's modern culture. Another fabulous book from Hannah Lynn. This total remake and re-imagining of Medusa is so unexpected. It will tug at your heart while experiencing anger at the circumstances that led to the making of Media's life. Definitely a page turner that resounds loudly with today's modern culture.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Maureen D. Hunter

    Excellent Thoroughly enjoyed this book. I am looking forward to her next book. This was well written and suspenseful. I also felt the author created a depth to her characters that are pretty one dimensional in mythology.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Serenity

    Really loved this book, one to return to.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Okay The story was all right, definitely for a younger audience but a good way to introduce the story of Medusa and make people think about the way stories are told.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Suzanna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Listen, this isn’t a bad book. We all know the story, the characters were interesting but a little flat, but my real issue was with the organization. We start off with the story being told by Medusa, then a quick jump to Poseidon’s POV for about a page and a half. Then when the sisters got to their island, I found myself thinking, “what is the rest of the story going to be about?” Then suddenly, without ANY warning we switch to Eurydice’s story. Maybe I was just tired, but I was so confused be Listen, this isn’t a bad book. We all know the story, the characters were interesting but a little flat, but my real issue was with the organization. We start off with the story being told by Medusa, then a quick jump to Poseidon’s POV for about a page and a half. Then when the sisters got to their island, I found myself thinking, “what is the rest of the story going to be about?” Then suddenly, without ANY warning we switch to Eurydice’s story. Maybe I was just tired, but I was so confused because I mixed up Eurydice and Euryale’s names. This switch was a good move because I was definitely getting bored of Medusa and her sisters, but I wish there was at least some acknowledgement of either the subject change or the time jump. My other issue was with the ending. I’m still upset about it. We get this whole heart to heart and I stupidly thought that Perseus would follow through on his promise, and then the author basically wraps up the whole story and says he goes back on his word in literally a single paragraph. I’m no author but that is the most abrupt ending I’ve ever read and it feels so rushed and unfinished. Besides that, it’s a fine book. It’s quick and you sympathize with Medusa, and if you can get past the organization issues, go ahead.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mxb

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I felt this was a bold premise, rewriting the Medusa story for a 21century audience and I think, whilst periodically engaging, it failed. The problems I had with it were the abrupt switching of POV and thousands of years, the ending which was abrupt and felt like the author had become fed up with writing and just ended with a so-there. But also, to my mind, if you’re going to unpick the story for a modern audience, you need to unpick the whole thing. So we learn about Medusa’s back story and it’ I felt this was a bold premise, rewriting the Medusa story for a 21century audience and I think, whilst periodically engaging, it failed. The problems I had with it were the abrupt switching of POV and thousands of years, the ending which was abrupt and felt like the author had become fed up with writing and just ended with a so-there. But also, to my mind, if you’re going to unpick the story for a modern audience, you need to unpick the whole thing. So we learn about Medusa’s back story and it’s all feminist viewpoint etc but then Athena, as a female god, who is all seeing we are told in one passage, suddenly is not when Medusa is raped and believes instead gossip about Medusa and reacts like a Victorian aunt whose niece has been despoiled. It didn’t make sense. And then, after visiting this terrible punishment on Medusa and her sisters and not allowing them to kill themselves as we are told over and over, a couple thousand years go by and suddenly Athena decides that enough is enough and Medusa can die. None of it made any sense. And I’ve seen some reviews referring to Madeline Millers work but Madeline Miller is a scrupulous researcher and you do not end up with half a dozen plot holes and erratic pacing with her work. It was just ok.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Fran

    A retelling of the story of Medusa the Gorgon I wanted to love this story. The story of Medusa has always been one of my favourites and I wanted to love this retelling however I did not. Perhaps I have been spoilt having read Madeline Millers stories who has such a lyrical way with words. Hannah Lynn's interpretation of the story just seemed to have a more modern feel. The way the characters talked to one another it felt like they could have been speaking at any time, I wasn't transported back to A retelling of the story of Medusa the Gorgon I wanted to love this story. The story of Medusa has always been one of my favourites and I wanted to love this retelling however I did not. Perhaps I have been spoilt having read Madeline Millers stories who has such a lyrical way with words. Hannah Lynn's interpretation of the story just seemed to have a more modern feel. The way the characters talked to one another it felt like they could have been speaking at any time, I wasn't transported back to the times of ancient greece. Not only that but I found myself bored. I thought it was going to tel Medusa story from entirely her perspective and although I know Perseus is a important part of that story the second half of the book told from his perspective felt like a cop out. I agree Hannan Lynn wrote some highly quotable passages about the powers of women and the role of the gods. However, again it just felt a little disjointed. It isn't to say I didn't enjoy thi story because I did. I just feel like it had the potential to be so much more and it missed the mark for me.

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