hits counter Made to Explode: Poems - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Made to Explode: Poems

Availability: Ready to download

In her fourth collection, acclaimed poet Sandra Beasley interrogates the landscapes of her life. She probes memories of growing up in Virginia, in Thomas Jefferson’s shadow, where liberal affluence obscured and perpetuated racist aggressions, but where the poet was simultaneously steeped in the cultural traditions of the American south. Her home in Washington, DC, inspires In her fourth collection, acclaimed poet Sandra Beasley interrogates the landscapes of her life. She probes memories of growing up in Virginia, in Thomas Jefferson’s shadow, where liberal affluence obscured and perpetuated racist aggressions, but where the poet was simultaneously steeped in the cultural traditions of the American south. Her home in Washington, DC, inspires prose poems documenting and critiquing our capital’s institutions and monuments, and a stirring suite explores Beasley’s affiliation with the disabled community. Bold and intimate, Made to Explode untangles the poet’s roots and seeks out resonance in society writ large.


Compare

In her fourth collection, acclaimed poet Sandra Beasley interrogates the landscapes of her life. She probes memories of growing up in Virginia, in Thomas Jefferson’s shadow, where liberal affluence obscured and perpetuated racist aggressions, but where the poet was simultaneously steeped in the cultural traditions of the American south. Her home in Washington, DC, inspires In her fourth collection, acclaimed poet Sandra Beasley interrogates the landscapes of her life. She probes memories of growing up in Virginia, in Thomas Jefferson’s shadow, where liberal affluence obscured and perpetuated racist aggressions, but where the poet was simultaneously steeped in the cultural traditions of the American south. Her home in Washington, DC, inspires prose poems documenting and critiquing our capital’s institutions and monuments, and a stirring suite explores Beasley’s affiliation with the disabled community. Bold and intimate, Made to Explode untangles the poet’s roots and seeks out resonance in society writ large.

40 review for Made to Explode: Poems

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    I don't usually read books of poetry, but this one knocked me off my socks. As only an accomplished poet can, Sandra Beasley recounts episodes of a coming of age of a woman growing up in Virginia and becoming aware of a wider world, then later as a resident of DC. There are poems that I returned to even after reading an hour or so before, that broke my heart. Very few smiles here. And who can't relate to visits at fast food restaurants. I don't usually read books of poetry, but this one knocked me off my socks. As only an accomplished poet can, Sandra Beasley recounts episodes of a coming of age of a woman growing up in Virginia and becoming aware of a wider world, then later as a resident of DC. There are poems that I returned to even after reading an hour or so before, that broke my heart. Very few smiles here. And who can't relate to visits at fast food restaurants.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Monticello Peaches Jefferson planted over a thousand trees in the South Orchard—eighteen varieties of apple, six apricot, four nectarine, and thirty-eight types of peach. Lemon Cling. Heath Cling. Indian Blood Cling. Vaga Loggia. Breast of Venus, which Jefferson accounted for as the “teat peach”— interlopers mistaken as indigenous. Each cleft globe was a luxury, yet so abundant they were sliced, chipped, boiled, brandied, fried, sun-dried, and extras fed to the hogs. My first wish is that the labourers may be Monticello Peaches Jefferson planted over a thousand trees in the South Orchard—eighteen varieties of apple, six apricot, four nectarine, and thirty-eight types of peach. Lemon Cling. Heath Cling. Indian Blood Cling. Vaga Loggia. Breast of Venus, which Jefferson accounted for as the “teat peach”— interlopers mistaken as indigenous. Each cleft globe was a luxury, yet so abundant they were sliced, chipped, boiled, brandied, fried, sun-dried, and extras fed to the hogs. My first wish is that the labourers may be well treated, the Master wrote. He created a system for tipping. Once, James Hemings was whipped three times over before the sun had set behind Brown’s Mountain. When Jefferson traveled to Paris in 1784, he took Sally and her brother— James, who learned the language, who trained at pasta and pastry, paid four dollars per month to serve as chef de cuisine to the Minister to France. James, who had to be coaxed to leave a country where, in 1789, slavery had been abolished. I hereby do promise & declare until he shall have taught such person as I shall place under him for that purpose to be a good cook, this previous condition being performed, he shall thereupon be made free . . . “For that purpose”: their brother, Robert. In 1796, James was freed. In 1801, James killed himself. In 1802, Robert debuted macaroni pie on the menu for Jefferson’s state dinner. In 1824, a recipe layering pasta, cheese, and butter appears in The Virginia Housewife: Or, Methodical Cook, alongside Mrs. Mary Randolph’s marmalade that specifies a pound of West Indies sugar to two pounds of peaches—“yellow ones make the prettiest”—and a hard chop until flesh gives away to transparent pulp, chilled to a jelly. If one was accused of stealing or eating beyond one’s share the grill was secured over the mouth. This was considered the kind muzzle. The unkind one settled an iron bit over the tongue. The groundskeepers knew we’d come with our wreath to lay at Jefferson’s grave, walking Monticello’s grass at misted dawn, half-drunk and laughing. We came every year. There are two types of peaches: one to which the stone clings, shredding to wet threads, and another allowed to lift clean. “Freestone,” they call those peaches— that most popular variety, the White Lady.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Randolph Pitts

    The poetry shelves in my library are fairly diverse and eclectic. On them are poets whom I cherish and want to return to again and again: Fernando Pessoa, Robert Desnos, Sylvia Plath, Dante, Robinson Jeffers, Karoline von Günderrode… Theirs are what I call “forever books,” books I want to be with me always. These books have a new neighbor on my poetry shelves: Sandra Beasley’s “Made To Explode.” First it is a book of sheer beauty: beauty of words and sounds and images and feelings – feelings abo The poetry shelves in my library are fairly diverse and eclectic. On them are poets whom I cherish and want to return to again and again: Fernando Pessoa, Robert Desnos, Sylvia Plath, Dante, Robinson Jeffers, Karoline von Günderrode… Theirs are what I call “forever books,” books I want to be with me always. These books have a new neighbor on my poetry shelves: Sandra Beasley’s “Made To Explode.” First it is a book of sheer beauty: beauty of words and sounds and images and feelings – feelings about love, longing, nostalgia, and perhaps most important, about being a woman. (The concluding stanza of “Death By Chocolate” is devastating: “I get you, women who did not grow up aspiring to be a plot device… We’re over it. Our mouths have more to say.”) “Made To Explode” dreams its own unique reality and invites the reader to do the same. Some of Beasley’s images may seem surrealistic at first – spiders dropping at midnight to the cold stone floor of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington DC, for example – only they are not. They are like breathtaking photographs taken by a brilliant photographer who knows exactly how to frame the image, where to set the focus, and most important, when to push the shutter. The ability to weave and juxtapose such images and events isolated and abstracted from experience is one of Sandra Beasley’s greatest gifts, and one of the most exhilarating things about this book. Is this a somber book, an elegiac reflection on places from the poet’s childhood and youth redolent with personal memories? Not at all. Sandra Beasely’s topsy-turvy wit continues to creep up on the reader unexpectedly, inviting smiles and even the occasional chuckle. “Made To Explode” is so rich that as soon as I received it I read it through three times, and with each reading discovered a new favorite. First was “Intersectionality,” a geometry of morals, passions and logic. Next there was “Pigs In Space,” in which tacos, tortillas and kimchi make conceptual guest appearances on the moon. Then “The Vow,” with its crackling diction and a concluding line that brought tears to my eyes. (Read the poem and let me know if you agree with me.) And then. . . “Lazarus,” for the moment my favorite poem in the volume, and another with a devastating final line that leaves one thinking long after the book is back on its shelf. “Someone always lets the earthquake out,” Sandra Beasley writes in the prose-poem “Weak Ocean,” and in the case of “Made to Explode” that someone is she. This is a truly momentous collection, superbly crafted and tremendously enjoyable to read. “Made to Explode” is not only a five star book. It is a must.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Courtney LeBlanc

    A collection of poems that is very DC-centric (which I liked!) from Black Death Spectacle: "Ask the poet what gets colored in. / Ask the poet what gets colored in a / red / room. / Ask the poet who sits in a red room, drinking." from American Rome: "Marrionberry: jams of Washington / state. I thought they were mocking this city. / Take a mayor and boil his sugar down -- / spoon-spreadable, sweet. We take presidents / and run them in a game's fourth-inning stretch. / We take Bullets and turn them i A collection of poems that is very DC-centric (which I liked!) from Black Death Spectacle: "Ask the poet what gets colored in. / Ask the poet what gets colored in a / red / room. / Ask the poet who sits in a red room, drinking." from American Rome: "Marrionberry: jams of Washington / state. I thought they were mocking this city. / Take a mayor and boil his sugar down -- / spoon-spreadable, sweet. We take presidents / and run them in a game's fourth-inning stretch. / We take Bullets and turn them into Sea Dogs." from Death by Chocolate: "These wives! I get you, women who / did not grow up aspiring to be a plot device. / We almost die a lot. Or: we die a lot, / almost. We're over it. Our mouths have more to say."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jacquelyn

    A gorgeous volume. I had read many of these pieces as they were published, but seeing them side by side was electric. I was particularly drawn to her portrait of Washington, DC. It is, as always, a great privilege to watch Beasley’s poetic mind at work in these pages.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason Gallagher

    There are only so many things that you can say about Beasley, but I think what is most interesting is that given her severe food allegeries, she might be the best nonfood writer writing about food in American right now. Poems about something I try to do three times a day?! Amazing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Amazing! If you’re not reading this book, are you even reading? This book is exceptional, important, and necessary. Review to come in The Indianapolis Review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

    There are some take-your-breath-away beautiful poems in here, but I'm not in the right headspace to appreciate them. I'll try coming back to them when the school year ends! There are some take-your-breath-away beautiful poems in here, but I'm not in the right headspace to appreciate them. I'll try coming back to them when the school year ends!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Serena

  10. 4 out of 5

    Simeon Berry

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hannah VanderHart

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  13. 4 out of 5

    Liz Baldwin

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  16. 4 out of 5

    Casey Reiland

  17. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  19. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Smith

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Waters

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  25. 5 out of 5

    Claire

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Wilder

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Frank

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leighann

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Page

  31. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Owens

  32. 5 out of 5

    Robin

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jenelle

  34. 5 out of 5

    Dee

  35. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Park

  36. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  37. 4 out of 5

    Jan Grass

  38. 4 out of 5

    Claire Handscombe

  39. 5 out of 5

    Cai

  40. 5 out of 5

    Anne

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.