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An engaging children's book whose aim is opening a dialogue about systemic racism, inspired by Emmanuel Acho’s viral video series "Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man." Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is an accessible book for children to learn about systemic racism and racist behavior. For the awkward questions white and non-black parents don’t know h An engaging children's book whose aim is opening a dialogue about systemic racism, inspired by Emmanuel Acho’s viral video series "Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man." Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is an accessible book for children to learn about systemic racism and racist behavior. For the awkward questions white and non-black parents don’t know how to answer, this book is an essential guide to help support communication on how to dismantle racism in our youngest generation. Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy creates a safe, judgment-free space for curious children to ask questions they’ve long been afraid to verbalize. How can I have white privilege if I’m not wealthy? Why do Black people protest against the police? If Black people can say the N-word, why can’t I? And many, many more. Young people have the power to effect sweeping change, and the key to mending the racial divide in America lies in giving them the tools to ask honest questions and take in the difficult answers. Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is just one way young readers can begin to short circuit racism within their own lives and communities.


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An engaging children's book whose aim is opening a dialogue about systemic racism, inspired by Emmanuel Acho’s viral video series "Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man." Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is an accessible book for children to learn about systemic racism and racist behavior. For the awkward questions white and non-black parents don’t know h An engaging children's book whose aim is opening a dialogue about systemic racism, inspired by Emmanuel Acho’s viral video series "Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man." Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is an accessible book for children to learn about systemic racism and racist behavior. For the awkward questions white and non-black parents don’t know how to answer, this book is an essential guide to help support communication on how to dismantle racism in our youngest generation. Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy creates a safe, judgment-free space for curious children to ask questions they’ve long been afraid to verbalize. How can I have white privilege if I’m not wealthy? Why do Black people protest against the police? If Black people can say the N-word, why can’t I? And many, many more. Young people have the power to effect sweeping change, and the key to mending the racial divide in America lies in giving them the tools to ask honest questions and take in the difficult answers. Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is just one way young readers can begin to short circuit racism within their own lives and communities.

30 review for Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan David Pope

    Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy, the middle grade adaption of Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man, inspired by the viral Youtube series "Uncomfortable Conversation with a Black Man" made my head hurt. I picked up this book after passing on the hype received by the original version, but honestly being intrigued by the fact that it made its way into a children's book. I have many feelings about the burst of new anti-racist children's literature on the market, and whether folk Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy, the middle grade adaption of Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man, inspired by the viral Youtube series "Uncomfortable Conversation with a Black Man" made my head hurt. I picked up this book after passing on the hype received by the original version, but honestly being intrigued by the fact that it made its way into a children's book. I have many feelings about the burst of new anti-racist children's literature on the market, and whether folks are actually vetting the content or just buying it to say they did. However, I gave this a chance. 1. What struck me was Acho's introduction. He speaks about not being able to identify much with the Black community growing up, Acho is Nigerian-American and attended a predominately Black church, but felt misunderstood and outcast within Black spaces— up until he played football in college with a majority Black team. So this already had me on the fence. Why does Acho feel that he can have these conversations about issues concerning the Black community (and serve as some sort of authority to inform white folks) when he himself, up until college, was unconnected to the community? He himself seems to still be finding his place. 2. It's the liberalism for me. Throughout the book Acho offers these reflective moments called "Let's Get Uncomfortable", followed by a call to action in a way. And while he calls for “diversity and inclusion” and “peaceful protest”, he offers little to no calls for anything that will lead to real substantial systemic change. He mentions the idea of defunding the police, but doesn't go as far as supporting what he calls the "radical" idea of abolition (and then proceeds to offer instructions on how Black children should act when they encounter police). 3. About 150 pages in, Acho brings up Ibram X. Kendi's claim that Black people can be racist. And while I was thankful that he seemed to understand the flaws in Kendi's claim— power is required, and Black folks simply do not hold the power to be this racial oppressor (and when Black folks in higher positions inforce racist policies that harm Black folks this is internalized anti-Blackness)— Acho backpedals towards the end of the book saying "A black person can be racist individually... but Black people as a whole don't have enough power in America to effect systemic racism." This statement is a ball of contradictions, and has to be confusing to young audiences and those who are attempting to learn. 4. Finally, what is the goal of creating these guidebooks for white audiences? What is the evidence that any of this is actually doing real tangible work to challenge the systems that oppress Black and brown folks? This books is like a pat on the wrist for a racist. Acho speaks to his "young white brothers and sisters", comforts them about how racism is "not their fault individually", tells them to have conversations, and advocate for more Black teachers at their schools etc., and while he uses words like systemic racism and white supremacy (which may feel "radical") his challenges don't feel direct or strong. In addition to this Acho sites YouTube videos, a few online articles, and YA texts for further learning, and I'm wondering what he has read beyond this? He really, as I stated earlier, feels like he's at the beginning stages of interrogating his politics himself. It feels as if he read Kendi's "Stamped: From the Beginning" as an introduction to anti-racism and felt compelled to write a book. And while he has the freedom to right what he wants, I challenge whether he is equipped to have full-flushed out conversations on race. And once again, what is his goal? I believe that reading this has confirmed my irritation with us continuing to say "let's have a conversation about that", "let's continue this conversation", "this is a necessary conversation"— but where do the conversations end and the action really begins? When do we move beyond these same liberal talking points and begin to challenge entire systems. Children are ready for these talks. In Punching the Air by Ibi Zoboi and Yusef Salaam they challenge the carceral system and include characters who discuss ideas like prison abolition— and that is what we need to see more of. This is not to say that Acho is wrong about everything, but this text does a disservice to those who read this and are searching for a guide on next steps to fighting racism. Fiction Suggestions: - Punching the Air by Ibi Zoboi - Anger Is A Gift by Non-Fiction Suggestions: - Our Prisons Obsolete by - We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom by Bettina L. Love - Race Matters by Cornel West - From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation by Keeanga Taylor

  2. 4 out of 5

    TheNextGenLibrarian

    “And white privilege is about the word white, not rich. It’s having advantage built into your life. It’s not saying your life hasn’t been hard; it’s saying your skin color hasn’t contributed to the difficulty in your life.” 👦🏾 This book takes his viral video series entitled Uncomfortable Conversations With A Black Man and makes it accessible for young readers in a book similar to what Jason Reynolds did with Stamped by Ibram X. Kendi. It’s a way for kids to learn about systemic racism and racist b “And white privilege is about the word white, not rich. It’s having advantage built into your life. It’s not saying your life hasn’t been hard; it’s saying your skin color hasn’t contributed to the difficulty in your life.” 👦🏾 This book takes his viral video series entitled Uncomfortable Conversations With A Black Man and makes it accessible for young readers in a book similar to what Jason Reynolds did with Stamped by Ibram X. Kendi. It’s a way for kids to learn about systemic racism and racist behavior to help dismantle it for the next generation. 👦🏾 I loved how timely this middle-grade novel is mentioning George Floyd during the pandemic, Colin Kaepernick and the NFL, and the #blacklivesmatter movement so that it’s clear why these causes are so important. With the murder of Daunte Wright two days ago, this book is more necessary than ever. We have to open the lines of communication so there’s understanding in our society enough to make changes to fight racism for our future generations. Thank you Netgalley for the ARC. Every classroom and #library needs to purchase this title on May 4.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Grace W

    (c/p from my review on TheStoryGraph) A super helpful, super relatable story that doesn't talk down to kids. I like it so much because it approaches the subject matter in a frank and honest way that delves deep into the whys and hows. Super glad this book exists. TW for this book include: Racial slurs, Racism, Police brutality, Gun violence, Slavery, and Death (including death of a parent and child) (c/p from my review on TheStoryGraph) A super helpful, super relatable story that doesn't talk down to kids. I like it so much because it approaches the subject matter in a frank and honest way that delves deep into the whys and hows. Super glad this book exists. TW for this book include: Racial slurs, Racism, Police brutality, Gun violence, Slavery, and Death (including death of a parent and child)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    This was written really well in my opinion. A lot of "Uncomfortable conversations" for sure, but conversations that need to be happening. I know this version of the book is written for a younger audience and I think Emmanuel does a great job covering hard and possibly confusing topics like voter suppression, and systemic racism in general. I learned a lot and I think this book is great for all ages. I still have plans to read his original "Uncomfortable Conversations With a Black Man" and now I This was written really well in my opinion. A lot of "Uncomfortable conversations" for sure, but conversations that need to be happening. I know this version of the book is written for a younger audience and I think Emmanuel does a great job covering hard and possibly confusing topics like voter suppression, and systemic racism in general. I learned a lot and I think this book is great for all ages. I still have plans to read his original "Uncomfortable Conversations With a Black Man" and now I want to watch his youtube videos as well!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Lee

    Another great book to add to your bookshelf if you want to raise an antiracist child.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carmel

    I loved the first version of this book but not much has changed in this update targeted toward younger readers. In some ways, this version will be easier to give to students, but it’s a rare student who actively searches for a nonfiction book exploring racism/the Black experience. Recommended to read one version or the other.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sharmali Chinniah-commodore

    Every child in America needs to read this book. Parents need to read this book. Our children need to be anti racists. Have zero tolerance for racism they see. Educate them so they can speak honestly and intelligently against racism they see. Don’t walk away. Don’t be quiet. Speak out. Fight for your friends and loved ones of color. They need your help.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andee

    Thank you, oh so much, NetGalley for this ARC and now reference book for me. I don't follow football, so when Emmanuel Acho started Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man on YouTube I came for the content rather than the name. See, Donald Trump was our president and all of a sudden, friends and family members came out as bat sh%$ crazy. What could be worse than the horror of an idiot white supremacist at the helm of our nation? A world pandemic in which said idiot claimed was no big deal. Thank you, oh so much, NetGalley for this ARC and now reference book for me. I don't follow football, so when Emmanuel Acho started Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man on YouTube I came for the content rather than the name. See, Donald Trump was our president and all of a sudden, friends and family members came out as bat sh%$ crazy. What could be worse than the horror of an idiot white supremacist at the helm of our nation? A world pandemic in which said idiot claimed was no big deal. I NEEDED Acho's episodes. And now - I have Acho's book. While I will be getting this book for the middle school library post haste, I will also be buying the "grown up" version for myself. As members of the Trump cult are trying to get elected to our school board, the issue for them is to get rid of any critical thinking when it comes to race and American history. Through this book, Acho is my cheerleader, therapist, and teacher. "It's not always obvious, but don't ever let anyone convince you that we are in a racism-free, or, as some folks like to say, a "post-racial America." "An evil, oppressive past is right here with us. And it's not hiding in plain sight. It's raising its arms and saying, LOOK!" Recommended for everyone. Seriously. Everyone.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Pardue

    This honest review is in exchange for an ARC from NetGalley. Acho gets right to the point with young adults. I'd encourage white parents of teenagers to read it with their kids and begin taking action. The "Talk It, Walk It" sections in each chapter gives readers actionable steps. The book is written honestly and appropriately for young adults. This honest review is in exchange for an ARC from NetGalley. Acho gets right to the point with young adults. I'd encourage white parents of teenagers to read it with their kids and begin taking action. The "Talk It, Walk It" sections in each chapter gives readers actionable steps. The book is written honestly and appropriately for young adults.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Highly recommend! I am not the target audience for this book… Young white children who are ready or curious about becoming allies should read this book. Black children that want to know some more about out history, should read this book. It was very well done and definitely made me put it on my wish list to bring to school!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Adapted for a younger audience, I found the structure of this book to be very successful. He discussed terms, history, culture -- basically everything you need to know when talking about race. Highly recommend! I will have to check out the video series, too.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This was just phenomenal. Thanks Libro.fm for the May ALC to support Anderson’s Bookshop 📚

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisette

    Can't wait to pass this book along to my son. Can't wait to pass this book along to my son.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Broas

    I wish I could make this required reading in my school. A relevant, challenging and interesting read. I love how Acho weaves stories and questions with facts and details. The action steps for kids are doable and timely. Loved this book!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

    This is a book that should be in every Elementary (for older kids), Middle, and High school library. Moreover, I think the book should be assigned reading, probably in middle school, and would be good for class discussions, particularly in areas of the country where white people have been sheltered from interaction with black folks. The author addresses white folks directly, or at least white children, but as an Asian American, I felt like he could have been addressing me, or at least people in This is a book that should be in every Elementary (for older kids), Middle, and High school library. Moreover, I think the book should be assigned reading, probably in middle school, and would be good for class discussions, particularly in areas of the country where white people have been sheltered from interaction with black folks. The author addresses white folks directly, or at least white children, but as an Asian American, I felt like he could have been addressing me, or at least people in my parent's generation. Because growing up, there were many Asians in my parents' generation, often immigrants, who tended to fear black folks and think less of them. And that was conveyed to us through phrases or actions. But I, as an Asian American, have also experienced racism towards me because of the color of my skin, so I could feel some of what the author was talking about. What I really appreciated about this book is that Emmanuel Acho spoke directly to kids and explained the issues, gave solid examples, and then challenged us to take certain actions to try to combat racism. He really breaks it down into three major categories of racism--individual, systemic, and internalized racism. But with each part, he tells his audience that it's time to get uncomfortable, and then he gives specific suggestions for what they can do to be an ally. He brings in a lot of history and he also explains where the anger comes from, although he is quick to point out that his anger may not be his friend's anger or the other guy down the street. Ultimately, though, he does not let up and urges us to really examine what we have learned and that perhaps it's time to open our mind (past time!). Although this is geared towards children, I honestly think this book could be good for older folks who have been reluctant to dive into the whole idea of racism. Overall, I think this is a book that should be widely read, and I am hoping that some hearts and minds might be changed by it. I received an advance review copy for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this young readers' edition of Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man, Mr. Acho uses his perspective as a second generation Nigerian American who grew up in predominately white schools to explore issues of race, racism, implicit bias and other topics in an instructional way. I especially liked how introduced a topic and had consistent chapter elements like "Let's Get Uncomfortable", "Let's Rewind" (talking about the history of a topic), and "Talk It, Walk E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this young readers' edition of Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man, Mr. Acho uses his perspective as a second generation Nigerian American who grew up in predominately white schools to explore issues of race, racism, implicit bias and other topics in an instructional way. I especially liked how introduced a topic and had consistent chapter elements like "Let's Get Uncomfortable", "Let's Rewind" (talking about the history of a topic), and "Talk It, Walk It". I think that's a helpful format for younger readers trying to unpack these weighty concepts. One particularly important topic was the debate about whether the term African American or Black (which is not capitalized in this book, but which current convention usually capitalizes) should be used. While Black seems to be the most commonly accepted term, Mr. Acho opines that the final determination of use should be up to the individual. The We Need Diverse Books Movement is mentioned (this started in 2014, but has been taken more seriously after the summer of 2020. Finally.), and Mr. Acho has a good blend of current news stories, personal anecdotes, and history to illustrate his points. There is an excellent bibliography at the back. In general, this book is a good overview of topics from these other books presented in a way that is a bit more linear than Kendi and Reynold's Stamped. Certainly, both books are essential in middle school library collections. I haven't read the adult version, so I don't know if that would be more appropriate for high schools. This could certainly be used in elementary classrooms, but I don't deal with younger students enough to know how younger readers would process this on their own.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jaymie

    [I received a free review copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.] 5 stars+++ = Best of the best Exceptional! I highly recommend this one for classroom and school libraries as well as public libraries and home libraries. This is for readers 10 and up. Some readers may struggle to push through the material - discussion groups at school or family discussion can help, because the material is worth pushing through. The material is written for white r [I received a free review copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.] 5 stars+++ = Best of the best Exceptional! I highly recommend this one for classroom and school libraries as well as public libraries and home libraries. This is for readers 10 and up. Some readers may struggle to push through the material - discussion groups at school or family discussion can help, because the material is worth pushing through. The material is written for white readers to better understand racial issues, but the history and author's stories and context could be fantastic for readers of color as well. Chapters respond to a specific question and common topics in anti-racist discussions - white privilege, microaggressions, bias, color blindness, systemic racism, the Confederate flag, etc. Each chapter follows a set pattern which I think will help struggling readers know what to expect from each section. The tone is conversational while never talking down to readers. It's an intense conversation, so readers will likely want to take it a chapter at a time. There are no footnotes or citations given in the chapters, but sources are listed in the backmatter. The author also makes recommendations for further reading, documentaries to watch, etc. Just because this is targeted at kids and teens doesn't mean adults can't benefit from reading this too. If you find yourself confused by the recent conversations about anti-racism, or if you aren't sure how to respond to common arguments, this will be a fantastic starting point for your anti-racist journey.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Selena

    This may be one of the most important books I have ever read. I tell myself I am colorblind because I believe all people are people, no matter the color of their skin. I know that by being born white I will never be treated or know how people of other skin colors are treated simply because of the color of their skin. I didn't realize that color blindness is just as bad as labeling people because of their color: "If you don't see someone's skin color, then you'll never recognize when you're treat This may be one of the most important books I have ever read. I tell myself I am colorblind because I believe all people are people, no matter the color of their skin. I know that by being born white I will never be treated or know how people of other skin colors are treated simply because of the color of their skin. I didn't realize that color blindness is just as bad as labeling people because of their color: "If you don't see someone's skin color, then you'll never recognize when you're treating them poorly because of their race. Instead of being color blind, be introspective." That does make a lot of sense to me- I tell my children, hate is not the opposite of love, apathy is. In order to see our biases, we have to admit that we have them and be aware of them and consciously make changes. This important realization happened before Chapter 3! This book is so well written with stories and analogies even younger children can understand. While he does bring in his experiences and history, he also added references to bolster his narrative and give credence to those who may be reading and trying to argue his points. I will be introducing this to my students this year, although we are down to 13 days, but will be sure to begin the book the beginning of school next year to give us time to read and discuss. I was given the opportunity to read this by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karen Cohn

    This was a fascinating look into racism from the perspective of a black man raised in both white and black cultures. I will be the first to admit that I don’t watch football, and I had no idea who Emmanuel Acho is in terms of his football career; however, I will be looking for more writing from him in the future. This volume, based on a series of videos he created, goes into the history of racism in this country and how it has evolved into the systematic issues that exist today. It also gives wa This was a fascinating look into racism from the perspective of a black man raised in both white and black cultures. I will be the first to admit that I don’t watch football, and I had no idea who Emmanuel Acho is in terms of his football career; however, I will be looking for more writing from him in the future. This volume, based on a series of videos he created, goes into the history of racism in this country and how it has evolved into the systematic issues that exist today. It also gives ways potential solutions. The volume is written in a readable, approachable way while still dealing with difficult issues without pulling any punches. Acho states that “Ending racism is not a finish line that we will cross. It is a road that we will travel,” and he spends this volume traveling that road along with his readers. Anyone interested in the history of racism will get a great deal out of this book. It would also be valuable for parents who wish to discuss this topic with their teens, which is, after, one of the reasons he wrote it in this format. I can’t say I enjoyed this in the classical sense, because much of what Acho discusses points to the worst in American history and society, but I did find it to be valuable information presented in an accessible style.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Riley

    In this highly engaging middle grade/YA book, Emmanuel Acho breaks down the history of racism in America in accessible language peppered with personal anecdotes. I recommend “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy” for upper elementary students through adults looking for a comprehensive overview of systemic racism, white privilege, and ways to combat racial injustice and be an ally. Acho’s inclusion of the Black Lives Matter movement, Colin Kaepernick’s peaceful protests in the NFL, the mu In this highly engaging middle grade/YA book, Emmanuel Acho breaks down the history of racism in America in accessible language peppered with personal anecdotes. I recommend “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy” for upper elementary students through adults looking for a comprehensive overview of systemic racism, white privilege, and ways to combat racial injustice and be an ally. Acho’s inclusion of the Black Lives Matter movement, Colin Kaepernick’s peaceful protests in the NFL, the murder of George Floyd, and the Capitol Hill insurrection help readers put these current and more distant historical events in the larger context of racism in America. Each chapter starts with a quote and introduction, followed by “Let’s Rewind” (a history of the chapter’s topic), “Let’s Get Uncomfortable” (an ask for the reader to examine their own biases and feelings about racism), and finally “Talk It, Walk It” (a call to action). This simple structure and narrative writing make Acho’s “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy” an essential addition to every school and classroom library. Thank you to NetGalley for the eARC to review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Welch

    I absolutely love this project that Acho has embarked on, and I love that he is presenting these conversations in so many modalities (YouTube videos, podcasts, books for adults and children). His videos and books have started conversations for me with coworkers and friends on many of the subjects he presents. Acho has really made me evaluate the ways in which I am standing up as an ally, and how I can continue to improve. This particular book is geared towards middle grade readers, and I think t I absolutely love this project that Acho has embarked on, and I love that he is presenting these conversations in so many modalities (YouTube videos, podcasts, books for adults and children). His videos and books have started conversations for me with coworkers and friends on many of the subjects he presents. Acho has really made me evaluate the ways in which I am standing up as an ally, and how I can continue to improve. This particular book is geared towards middle grade readers, and I think that at times the text may be a bit complex for the intended age group. However, I would still highly recommend this one (knowing that kids may need a bit of support at times both with the content and with the complexity of text). Acho supplies a great list of resources (books, movies, videos, etc.) that kids can turn to if they want to expand their knowledge on racism and allyship. One of the other huge strengths of the book is that Acho provides kids with immediate actions they can take to be an ally.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    White privilege is always having the benefit of the doubt. Some people don’t start from zero they start in the negatives. Why is a white person always the go to person? Why are Native Americans portrayed as cartoonish? Civil War began over slavery and the confederate flag promotes slavery. Colonialism is the result of powerful European countries invading foreign countries and claiming those lands for themselves. Taxes fund schools and more taxes are available based on housing prices in affluent white White privilege is always having the benefit of the doubt. Some people don’t start from zero they start in the negatives. Why is a white person always the go to person? Why are Native Americans portrayed as cartoonish? Civil War began over slavery and the confederate flag promotes slavery. Colonialism is the result of powerful European countries invading foreign countries and claiming those lands for themselves. Taxes fund schools and more taxes are available based on housing prices in affluent white neighborhoods. Over 50% of children’s books depict white characters. Twenty seven percent of the main characters of children’s books are animals or inanimate objects. Only 10% had main characters that are black. White frailty is when white people feel uncomfortable. Poverty, not race is a more accurate predictor of crime. Many white saviors in movies such as In the Help, Hidden Figures and To Kill a Mockingbird. Ending racism is not a finish line we will cross; it is a road we must travel.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sacha

    Thanks to NetGalley and Roaring Brook Press for this essential arc, which I loved and received in exchange for an honest review. I’ll post that glowing review upon publication. Updated 5/4/21 5 stars This much-needed book is an excellent addition to the racial and cultural educations of young adults and adults alike. Acho employs current examples and a wealth of supported statements to articulate his points about various aspects of racism in America. This book really lives up to the promised conve Thanks to NetGalley and Roaring Brook Press for this essential arc, which I loved and received in exchange for an honest review. I’ll post that glowing review upon publication. Updated 5/4/21 5 stars This much-needed book is an excellent addition to the racial and cultural educations of young adults and adults alike. Acho employs current examples and a wealth of supported statements to articulate his points about various aspects of racism in America. This book really lives up to the promised conversational aspect. For me, Acho's tone, familiarity, and ease make what could be really challenging and/or dense subjects consumable for the masses. This book is going to come in handy not only for those looking to improve themselves but also for those hoping to make better inroads with friends, family, and fools on social media (maybe stay away from that last part, but at least you'll get some tools here if you must do that). I will absolutely be recommending this to students, but I also recommend it to anyone who is wanting to learn more about how to do better and/or encourage others in that direction. This is an essential read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is a nonfiction book, written in a conversational tone, about systemic racism and what it means to be an ally. It tackles many topics that are often difficult for white people to understand like black vs. African American, cultural appropriation, black people using the n-word, and white privilege. Because it's written for teenagers (and middle grades too), the tone and the discussion of historical context is relevant and easy to understand. The tone o Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is a nonfiction book, written in a conversational tone, about systemic racism and what it means to be an ally. It tackles many topics that are often difficult for white people to understand like black vs. African American, cultural appropriation, black people using the n-word, and white privilege. Because it's written for teenagers (and middle grades too), the tone and the discussion of historical context is relevant and easy to understand. The tone of this book is definitely one of it's best qualities. The content is solid too, but the tone is what keeps this nonfiction book from reading like a textbook. I think this book is an important one for teenagers, but also for teachers who may be struggling to understand how students of color may be feeling. I read an ARC from NetGalley.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy by Emmanuel Acho Published May 4, 2021 <3 THIS MAN IS FINER THAN FROG HAIRS! I LOVE THIS MAN'S VOICE AND HIS BOOKS! HEY BOOO... Young people have the power to affect sweeping change, and the key to mending the racial divide in America lies in giving them the tools to ask honest questions and take in the difficult answers. Approaching every awkward, taboo, and uncomfortable question with openness and patience, Emmanuel Acho connects his own experience with Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy by Emmanuel Acho Published May 4, 2021 <3 THIS MAN IS FINER THAN FROG HAIRS! I LOVE THIS MAN'S VOICE AND HIS BOOKS! HEY BOOO... Young people have the power to affect sweeping change, and the key to mending the racial divide in America lies in giving them the tools to ask honest questions and take in the difficult answers. Approaching every awkward, taboo, and uncomfortable question with openness and patience, Emmanuel Acho connects his own experience with race and racism—from attending majority-white prep schools to his time in the NFL playing on majority-black football teams—to insightful lessons in black history and black culture. Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is just one way young listeners can begin to short circuit racism within their own lives and communities.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. If you've watched his YouTube videos, Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man, you're familiar with Acho and the topics he chooses to talk about (if you haven't watched those videos, you'll want to). Maybe you just know Acho because of his NFL career. This book is the young adult version of his best selling book, "Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man". In it, you'll learn about things like cultural appropriation, stereotyping, and the history of blackface. From Emmitt Till to Black If you've watched his YouTube videos, Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man, you're familiar with Acho and the topics he chooses to talk about (if you haven't watched those videos, you'll want to). Maybe you just know Acho because of his NFL career. This book is the young adult version of his best selling book, "Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man". In it, you'll learn about things like cultural appropriation, stereotyping, and the history of blackface. From Emmitt Till to Black Wall Street, Acho tells us what we need to hear. Some parts may be uncomfortable like he says, but he tells us of things that we all need to hear, for a greater understanding. A must-read for young people of all backgrounds.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lizanne Johnson

    This title is a must have for our middle school and high school libraries’ anti racist collections. Acho’s book is highly accessible and well organized. His writing is straightforward and honest. He includes enough history with references for further reading. He has obviously done his homework. This would make an excellent book club book with plenty to discuss and action steps to take to make change happen. I highly recommend this book. With Acho’s NFL background this title may appeal to some un This title is a must have for our middle school and high school libraries’ anti racist collections. Acho’s book is highly accessible and well organized. His writing is straightforward and honest. He includes enough history with references for further reading. He has obviously done his homework. This would make an excellent book club book with plenty to discuss and action steps to take to make change happen. I highly recommend this book. With Acho’s NFL background this title may appeal to some unlikely readers which is definitely a plus. Be sure to check out the back matter. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the chance to read this arc in exchange for an honest review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is an incredibly important addition to the literary canon of Antiracist texts. I truly appreciate that Emmanuel Acho has adapted his adult novel for young adult readers. The tone of the novel is very conversational and meets young readers where they are. Acho's voice shines through as a calm voice of reason and guidance. Acho focuses on how racism falls into three categories: individual, systemic, and internalized. Through his personal experiences and Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Boy is an incredibly important addition to the literary canon of Antiracist texts. I truly appreciate that Emmanuel Acho has adapted his adult novel for young adult readers. The tone of the novel is very conversational and meets young readers where they are. Acho's voice shines through as a calm voice of reason and guidance. Acho focuses on how racism falls into three categories: individual, systemic, and internalized. Through his personal experiences and the incorporation of historical information, readers of all ages need to pick this book up as soon as possible.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Arielfranchakyahoo.com

    From white privilege to cultural appropriation, this book explains it all and in a way that is accessible and enjoyable for young readers. Acho tackles some tough topics here, but explains them well, with humor and in a way that is so relatable for kids. Along the way, he also provides some excellent recommendations for similar books and provides thoughtful explanations and further considerations at the end. I listened to the audiobook, courtesy of Libro.fm (thank you for the ALC!) and the narra From white privilege to cultural appropriation, this book explains it all and in a way that is accessible and enjoyable for young readers. Acho tackles some tough topics here, but explains them well, with humor and in a way that is so relatable for kids. Along the way, he also provides some excellent recommendations for similar books and provides thoughtful explanations and further considerations at the end. I listened to the audiobook, courtesy of Libro.fm (thank you for the ALC!) and the narration was awesome! I highly recommend this book to tweens and teens, but as an adult, I thoroughly enjoyed it and learned from it as well. Five out of five stars for sure!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Teri Tischer

    This is a fabulously thought provoking book! It put me through myriad emotions, from anger to sadness. The prolonged trauma of the Black race is disturbing. I became so much more informed of our racist institutions and how so many Whites became billionaires from Blacks' enslaved labor. It is profoundly unsettling, but wriiten in a manner of hopefulness for reformation. This book is a must read for all White people. Also, The correct title is "Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man." This is a fabulously thought provoking book! It put me through myriad emotions, from anger to sadness. The prolonged trauma of the Black race is disturbing. I became so much more informed of our racist institutions and how so many Whites became billionaires from Blacks' enslaved labor. It is profoundly unsettling, but wriiten in a manner of hopefulness for reformation. This book is a must read for all White people. Also, The correct title is "Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man."

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