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From spoken word poet Jasmine Mans comes an unforgettable poetry collection about race, feminism, and queer identity. With echoes of Gwendolyn Brooks and Sonia Sanchez, Mans writes to call herself—and us—home. Each poem explores what it means to be a daughter of Newark, and America--and the painful, joyous path to adulthood as a young, queer Black woman. Black Girl, Call Ho From spoken word poet Jasmine Mans comes an unforgettable poetry collection about race, feminism, and queer identity. With echoes of Gwendolyn Brooks and Sonia Sanchez, Mans writes to call herself—and us—home. Each poem explores what it means to be a daughter of Newark, and America--and the painful, joyous path to adulthood as a young, queer Black woman. Black Girl, Call Home is a love letter to the wandering Black girl and a vital companion to any woman on a journey to find truth, belonging, and healing.


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From spoken word poet Jasmine Mans comes an unforgettable poetry collection about race, feminism, and queer identity. With echoes of Gwendolyn Brooks and Sonia Sanchez, Mans writes to call herself—and us—home. Each poem explores what it means to be a daughter of Newark, and America--and the painful, joyous path to adulthood as a young, queer Black woman. Black Girl, Call Ho From spoken word poet Jasmine Mans comes an unforgettable poetry collection about race, feminism, and queer identity. With echoes of Gwendolyn Brooks and Sonia Sanchez, Mans writes to call herself—and us—home. Each poem explores what it means to be a daughter of Newark, and America--and the painful, joyous path to adulthood as a young, queer Black woman. Black Girl, Call Home is a love letter to the wandering Black girl and a vital companion to any woman on a journey to find truth, belonging, and healing.

30 review for Black Girl, Call Home

  1. 4 out of 5

    Berit☀️✨

    Beautiful. Powerful. Heartbreaking. Relevant. I am not a poetry person. In fact honestly the last poetry book I read was probably Shel Silverstein in the fifth grade. This book is a far cry from Where the Sidewalk Ends. Jasmine Mans words evoke so much emotion; as a woman, as a mother, as a daughter, as a friend, as a survivor of abuse. Jasmine beautifully expresses her feelings and thoughts on a wide array of topics: race, hairstyles, religion, expectations, rape culture, Family, politics, sex Beautiful. Powerful. Heartbreaking. Relevant. I am not a poetry person. In fact honestly the last poetry book I read was probably Shel Silverstein in the fifth grade. This book is a far cry from Where the Sidewalk Ends. Jasmine Mans words evoke so much emotion; as a woman, as a mother, as a daughter, as a friend, as a survivor of abuse. Jasmine beautifully expresses her feelings and thoughts on a wide array of topics: race, hairstyles, religion, expectations, rape culture, Family, politics, sexuality pop-culture. Each poem touched my soul in a different way. Jasmine is a spoken word poet and listening to her poetry elevates it to an entirely new level. I will pop the link two her YouTube video below, but I strongly encourage you to pick up the audiobook. I pre-ordered it and listen to it yesterday. The audiobook left me speechless (and if you know me that’s really hard to do). If you listen to or read one poetry book this year, this decade, this century, make it this one! https://youtu.be/AC1wGvPnTl8 *** Big thank you to Berkley for my gifted copy of this book. All opinions are my own. ***

  2. 5 out of 5

    Misha (Heartsfullofreads)

    This book full of poems was absolutely beautiful. Easily relatable with poems about black hair, what a Black Mother expects of her Black Daughter, and what seeing Black women in the media means, etc. I'm so happy that I read this. This book full of poems was absolutely beautiful. Easily relatable with poems about black hair, what a Black Mother expects of her Black Daughter, and what seeing Black women in the media means, etc. I'm so happy that I read this.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Never Without a Book

    Yes Black Girl Yessss! What a collection!

  4. 5 out of 5

    -`ˏ Galaxi Faerie ˎ´˗

    -`ˏ 5 stars ˎ´˗ Storyline -`ˏ 10/10 ˎ´˗ A collection of compelling modern poetry that explores topics involving race, pop culture, sexuality, feminism, and mental health. Characters -`ˏ 8/10 ˎ´˗ There are no definitive answers. Anyone can identify with one or more poetry especially those in the black community. Atmosphere -`ˏ 8/10 ˎ´˗ I was hit with a warm wave of nostalgia reading “Momma Has a Hair Salon in the Kitchen” until the phrases “hold ya head still” and “Don’t make me pop you” appeared. *fla -`ˏ 5 stars ˎ´˗ Storyline -`ˏ 10/10 ˎ´˗ A collection of compelling modern poetry that explores topics involving race, pop culture, sexuality, feminism, and mental health. Characters -`ˏ 8/10 ˎ´˗ There are no definitive answers. Anyone can identify with one or more poetry especially those in the black community. Atmosphere -`ˏ 8/10 ˎ´˗ I was hit with a warm wave of nostalgia reading “Momma Has a Hair Salon in the Kitchen” until the phrases “hold ya head still” and “Don’t make me pop you” appeared. *flashback* It was the early 2000s, hours passing by still trapped between my mother’s legs. Fear constantly flows through my spine with each instant of the hot comb. With only my hands protecting me, I pray quietly until I am released...Each of her poems made me feel a kind of emotion rather than it could be narrated. Language -`ˏ 10/10 ˎ´˗ Nothing more than praise for the poet Jasmine Mans. Her writing is extremely powerful and lyrical. Enjoyment -`ˏ 10/10 ˎ´˗ Some of my favorites: Speak to Me of My Mother, Who Was She Laughing Sanctuaries Whitney: Fairy Godmother Fascinations 1,000 questions on gender roles for a lesbian Dear Ex-Lover The Girl Who Didn't Die & Sandra Bland: A Different Story e-Arc provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. -`ˏ Thank You ˎ´˗

  5. 5 out of 5

    Margaret (Maggie)

    OH MY GOD y’all...these poems are 🔥! These poems are NOW AND NECESSARY! My heart literally ached when I read some of them. We stand with you! ✊🏿✊🏾✊🏽✊🏼✊🏻 5/5 For a full review, follow @maggiethereader on Instagram.

  6. 4 out of 5

    madison

    ahhhh, I loved these poems! they explore identity, race, sexuality, home, family, feminism, queerness, what it is to be a woman.... belonging and not belonging. and with such tenderness and awareness. if you love poetry about any of these topics, you don't want to miss it and I highly recommend buying and/or reading this book! I loved Mans's storytelling and the whole book left me wanting more. I love when that happens -- the book ends and you feel like you could read twice as much as what is the ahhhh, I loved these poems! they explore identity, race, sexuality, home, family, feminism, queerness, what it is to be a woman.... belonging and not belonging. and with such tenderness and awareness. if you love poetry about any of these topics, you don't want to miss it and I highly recommend buying and/or reading this book! I loved Mans's storytelling and the whole book left me wanting more. I love when that happens -- the book ends and you feel like you could read twice as much as what is there because it's just that good. honestly though, it was just right - i'm just greedy. really excited to explore Mans's work further. thanks to #NetGalley and Berkley Publishing Group for sharing a copy of this collection with me in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    You should definitely be aware of some content warnings when going into this: homophobic slurs, racism, mention of Birmingham bombing, gun violence, rape/assault, familial death, parental resentment, cancer, human trafficking, violence against transwomen, trauma, separation of families at the border, forced sterilization without consent, lesbophobia, mentions of sex I knew as soon as I saw this cover that I was going to love this poetry collection. The cover itself is so gorgeous and unapologetic You should definitely be aware of some content warnings when going into this: homophobic slurs, racism, mention of Birmingham bombing, gun violence, rape/assault, familial death, parental resentment, cancer, human trafficking, violence against transwomen, trauma, separation of families at the border, forced sterilization without consent, lesbophobia, mentions of sex I knew as soon as I saw this cover that I was going to love this poetry collection. The cover itself is so gorgeous and unapologetically Black that it was inevitable. The poems themselves spoke to so many important instances in Black culture, while also tackling items that the Black community often avoids discussing. From sexuality, to God, to getting your hair pressed in the kitchen, to rape to Whitney Houston's impact, I don't think there was anything in this collection that didn't speak to me. While I can't personally relate to every experience, I can absolutely attest that each collection touched me in some way because you'd be hard pressed not to find someone who at least knows a Black woman who has experienced these moments or thoughts. Every poem felt extremely personal, reflective, and just beautifully written.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Jasmine Mans "Black Girl, Call Home" is a stunning, powerful collection of poetry. There was a slow burning build up to each new piece. This collection was like a good pot of gumbo - there was a little bit of everything mixed up in this work and each bite was delicious with a new flavor. My favorite pieces included but are not limited to "The Light", "Footnotes to Kanye", "The Little Mermaid", "Kill That Nigga Dead", "Sandra's Haiku", "Missing Girls", and "You Took Sundays". This collection has Jasmine Mans "Black Girl, Call Home" is a stunning, powerful collection of poetry. There was a slow burning build up to each new piece. This collection was like a good pot of gumbo - there was a little bit of everything mixed up in this work and each bite was delicious with a new flavor. My favorite pieces included but are not limited to "The Light", "Footnotes to Kanye", "The Little Mermaid", "Kill That Nigga Dead", "Sandra's Haiku", "Missing Girls", and "You Took Sundays". This collection has something for every one. So many themes ran through this work and they all resonated on a different level. Mans touches on police brutality, being black in America, being a Black girl in America, being a Black lesbian girl in America, Black family life, pop culture, hip hop, Louisiana roots, rape culture, and so much more. This is a collection to read and reread because each time you will pick up on a different meaning or interpretation of each piece. I would recommend this collection to fans of Hanif Abdurraqib's "A Fortune for Your Disaster" or Morgan Parker's "Magical Negro".

  9. 4 out of 5

    Misse Jones

    JASMINE MANS COME THROUGH!!!! There’s so much I want to say about the beautiful brilliance that comprises Black Girl, Come Home but I would be totally remiss to first not speak on the nostalgia that came with the unveiling of this cover. The barrettes, in varying colors was an ode to my childhood growing up in the 80s. You were nobody if you didn’t get your mama or big mama or big sister...SOMEBODY to do your hair and put the whole pack of barrettes in. Why? Because then they would match whateve JASMINE MANS COME THROUGH!!!! There’s so much I want to say about the beautiful brilliance that comprises Black Girl, Come Home but I would be totally remiss to first not speak on the nostalgia that came with the unveiling of this cover. The barrettes, in varying colors was an ode to my childhood growing up in the 80s. You were nobody if you didn’t get your mama or big mama or big sister...SOMEBODY to do your hair and put the whole pack of barrettes in. Why? Because then they would match whatever outfit you chose to wear!! It made me think of press and curls, biker shorts and cross colours, hard boy Guess jean outfits: oh the memories. And that is exactly what Mans does with this collection: it took me back to a feeling of home and back to my own path of discovery. Each poem was thoughtfully constructed, loud, proud and a testament to what it means to be a Black girl and Black woman in America and in your own skin. It is a ride filled with bumps in the road that each of us will take (in so many ways) to a path of truth, discovery, self-love and ultimately: HEALING. Mans’ work does not merely scratch the surface as some do but digs deep into the heart of matters. In “Trans-Panic” she warns: Don’t come inside me looking for nothing. She goes OFF IN “Footnotes for Kanye” with ripe truths and urgently reminds us in “Serena” that Women are not allowed real emotion in tennis, in the street, in the office, in their skin. TWO SNAPS AND A HAND CLAP!! There is a poem here for the Black girl in each of us. This is a collection that will sit with me for a long while and I encourage you to grab a copy as well. Easily one of the best collections of the year! Special thank you to NetGalley and Berkeley Publishing Group for gifting me a copy of this collection in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melly Mel - Shelf_ishly_lit

    Black Girl, Call Home by Jasmine Mans Pub date March 9, 2009 I can’t presume to be able to find the words - right or even adequate- to convey the beauty of this collection. To say that’s this is merely a collection of poetry - I can’t. It’s so much more. It’s poetry, prose, discourse - yet compartmentalizing the words bound between the covers feels like forsaking the breadth of its whole. At times, the pieces offered invoke a lyrical rythme prompting me to read aloud, pick up speed, sing. Move. Th Black Girl, Call Home by Jasmine Mans Pub date March 9, 2009 I can’t presume to be able to find the words - right or even adequate- to convey the beauty of this collection. To say that’s this is merely a collection of poetry - I can’t. It’s so much more. It’s poetry, prose, discourse - yet compartmentalizing the words bound between the covers feels like forsaking the breadth of its whole. At times, the pieces offered invoke a lyrical rythme prompting me to read aloud, pick up speed, sing. Move. Then there are pieces where Mans creates tension that pulls your lens in sharpe focus to injustice and heart wrenching longing. Calling you in to look, listen, and sit in the uncomfortable knowing. And then just as swiftly, Mans brings forth quiet and stillness - subtle and tender - holding me close in an accountable embrace. It’s vivid. Crisp. Visceral. Cathartic. Healing. And the genogram/ connectogram at the end - brilliant. The images encapsulate relational dynamics punctuated by systemic and structural inequities framed around the psychosocial- emotional conceptualisation of oneself as part of and impacted by the whole. It’s bloody brilliant. These are my musings. Rudimentary. Insufficient. My last remark - pls partake in this journey. My thanks to Berkley Publishing and NetGalley for my advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Oyinda

    Book 95 of 2021 Black Girl, Call Home by Jasmine Mans is a powerful and hard hitting collection of poems. This book covers some deep and dark subject matters, that really need to be talked about. It was so relatable and refreshing, but also very heartbreaking and a gut punch. The author starts with poems relating to childhood memories that evoke nostalgia, just like the cover does. From there, she delves into more serious themes. She discusses homophobia, from her mother as well as random strangers Book 95 of 2021 Black Girl, Call Home by Jasmine Mans is a powerful and hard hitting collection of poems. This book covers some deep and dark subject matters, that really need to be talked about. It was so relatable and refreshing, but also very heartbreaking and a gut punch. The author starts with poems relating to childhood memories that evoke nostalgia, just like the cover does. From there, she delves into more serious themes. She discusses homophobia, from her mother as well as random strangers. She also discusses rape, rape culture, and being a survivor. Despite the title being a call to black girls, she also examines issues relating to being a black boy, and being trans. Police brutality is also explored in this collection. A part of this collection also examines physical abuse in relationships. Some of the poems also talk about the loss of a loved one. The language used in this collection is so beautiful and lyrical, it lures you in and talks about these serious issues in a way that is both jarring and soothing. I loved the audiobook, which was narrated by the author. There was so much emotion in her performance and it really tugged at my heartstrings. My only problem with this collection, and it was a big one, was the Kanye West part and her words about Kim. It really rubbed me the wrong way. Overall, this was such a beautiful book and I highly recommend it!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    I love poetry and don't read it enough, but when I do I am glad that I can immerse myself in beautiful poetry like Jasmine Mans Black Girl, Call Home. It's hard to review this book because it is both beautiful and heartbreaking, hopeful and devastating. I flew through this but had to pause after a few when the emotions became too much. "Black Son" was one of those pieces it hits you right in the heart and makes it so difficult to move past. I particularly enjoyed: "The Little Mermaid", "Crazy", I love poetry and don't read it enough, but when I do I am glad that I can immerse myself in beautiful poetry like Jasmine Mans Black Girl, Call Home. It's hard to review this book because it is both beautiful and heartbreaking, hopeful and devastating. I flew through this but had to pause after a few when the emotions became too much. "Black Son" was one of those pieces it hits you right in the heart and makes it so difficult to move past. I particularly enjoyed: "The Little Mermaid", "Crazy", "Sandra Bland", and "Missing Girls". "Serena" and "Dear First Lady" are both beautiful as well. Are women labeled crazy when you feel like their rage outweighs the evidence of their pain? Mans addresses racism, trauma, sexual assault and rape, oppression faced by LGBTQIA+ people, murders of Black people by police, Jay Z and Kanye, government sanctioned eugenics and sterilization of women, and motherhood. She doesn't leave any stone unturned, dives deep into feelings and emotions in a way that is difficult to read but you also can't stop. I hope everyone reads this book. Thank you to Berkley for my copy to review

  13. 5 out of 5

    delaney

    There's a phone number at the end and, when you dial it, Jasmine Mans reads one of her poems in such a way that the beep at the end jolts you out of it. Art. The poems within Black Girl, Call Home had that same quality. It feels like you are reading a story, a journey, through poems. But each poem could also stand by itself like a single painting. Together it made sense as a collection. Some subjects that hit me hardest: unnamed and countless black women and girls used for human experimentation There's a phone number at the end and, when you dial it, Jasmine Mans reads one of her poems in such a way that the beep at the end jolts you out of it. Art. The poems within Black Girl, Call Home had that same quality. It feels like you are reading a story, a journey, through poems. But each poem could also stand by itself like a single painting. Together it made sense as a collection. Some subjects that hit me hardest: unnamed and countless black women and girls used for human experimentation in the name of health, criticizing Kanye West by name dropping his songs/lyrics, Sandra Bland, Birmingham Church Bombing, sterilization of women, Serena Williams, and Michelle Obama. There were poems in dedication to these subject, some exploring topics centered on the Black female experience, some personal to Mans herself, and others inspired by Black female authors and poets. It all called home.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    I received a gifted galley of BLACK GIRL, CALL HOME by Jasmine Mans for an honest review. Thank you to Berkley Publishing Group and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review!⁠ ⁠ BLACK GIRL, CALL HOME is a poetry collection. It tackles a variety of subjects including racism, sexism, mental health, sexuality, rape, music, and cultural icons. It speaks to the author's own story as a young, queer Black woman in America. Mans uses a variety of formats and lengths to convey powerful messages, oft I received a gifted galley of BLACK GIRL, CALL HOME by Jasmine Mans for an honest review. Thank you to Berkley Publishing Group and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review!⁠ ⁠ BLACK GIRL, CALL HOME is a poetry collection. It tackles a variety of subjects including racism, sexism, mental health, sexuality, rape, music, and cultural icons. It speaks to the author's own story as a young, queer Black woman in America. Mans uses a variety of formats and lengths to convey powerful messages, often grouping poems around a subject to build on her ideas and convey her messages.⁠ ⁠ I found this to be a gripping and powerful collection. I have already put a request in to my library to get the audio version of the book in because I would love to hear the readings by the author! I did an exploration of YouTube to find some of the poems which jumped out at me. The author is an amazing performer in addition to being a fantastic writer.⁠ ⁠ The poem “Birmingham” is written from the perspective of a little girl caught in the Birmingham church bombing of 1963, caught up in Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream. This is one where the imagery really stuck with me from reading the author's words. I was able to find a recording of the author's rendition online and it brought the power home even more!⁠ ⁠ Even if you don’t regularly pick up poetry collections, this is one that I would highly recommend! BLACK GIRL, CALL HOME is out 3/9/2021!⁠ ⁠ ⁠

  15. 5 out of 5

    Daina (Dai2DaiReader)

    I could not wait to get my hands on this book of poetry! The cover just spoke to me before the words inside this book did. I loved absolutely everything about it! There is just so much goodness packed into this short book! The author’s words were so tuned in and relatable on all levels. Every poem caused a reaction. The conversations about hair, women’s bodies, experimentation and motherhood made me think wow, yell yes, laugh out loud, nod my head and clap my hands! There were poems about Whitne I could not wait to get my hands on this book of poetry! The cover just spoke to me before the words inside this book did. I loved absolutely everything about it! There is just so much goodness packed into this short book! The author’s words were so tuned in and relatable on all levels. Every poem caused a reaction. The conversations about hair, women’s bodies, experimentation and motherhood made me think wow, yell yes, laugh out loud, nod my head and clap my hands! There were poems about Whitney Houston, Serena Williams and Michelle Obama which showed little black girls they have someone to emulate because seeing a physical representation of themselves gives them space to know that their dreams know no bounds. I feel warm, comforted and SEEN by the words on these pages! Thank you Berkley Publishing Group and NetGalley for providing me with an e-ARC.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    This poetry collection is breathtaking. Absolutely breathtaking in the way she puts words together and expresses deep emotions and feelings as if they were jotted down on a cocktail napkin. Short or long, in various formats sharing about love and family, or music and Black deaths, she goes everywhere but in focused, tenacious, powerful words. It's jarring and amazing together and poems separately. I'm in particular love with some related to Michelle Obama and Serena Williams. "You can't break a This poetry collection is breathtaking. Absolutely breathtaking in the way she puts words together and expresses deep emotions and feelings as if they were jotted down on a cocktail napkin. Short or long, in various formats sharing about love and family, or music and Black deaths, she goes everywhere but in focused, tenacious, powerful words. It's jarring and amazing together and poems separately. I'm in particular love with some related to Michelle Obama and Serena Williams. "You can't break a heart that already came in pieces." "You're sport / Not spectacle / Woman before / Competitor / When they walk / You fly..."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Soula Kosti

    "They are whispers. You never met these girls, but you know all of them." Black Girl, Call Home by Jasmine Mans should be considered essential reading. So many of these poems broke my heart, angered and frustrated me, but it is crucial to have the conversations that arise from poems such as these even if some of these topics aren't in our comfort zone. In this poetry collection, Mans explores various themes, such as womanhood, queer identity, race, feminism, mental health, police brutality, sexual "They are whispers. You never met these girls, but you know all of them." Black Girl, Call Home by Jasmine Mans should be considered essential reading. So many of these poems broke my heart, angered and frustrated me, but it is crucial to have the conversations that arise from poems such as these even if some of these topics aren't in our comfort zone. In this poetry collection, Mans explores various themes, such as womanhood, queer identity, race, feminism, mental health, police brutality, sexual assault, and media representation. Mans showcases the struggle of interacting with family and society in a world that was built for certain people. Some of my favorites were: - Speak to Me of My Mother, Who Was She - Treat Her Right, While She's Still Here - The Little Mermaid - The Black Stork - Crazy - Kill that Nigga Dead - Conversations - Dear Ex Lover Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing an ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cassie

    Thank you to Berkley Publishing for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest review. Black Girl, Call Home is raw and powerful poetry by spoken-word poet Jasmine Mans. Her words are unflinching, rhythmic, and so descriptive. It takes a gift to convey such heart, and this book hit me hard. Mans explores her truths of a being a daughter, being a woman in America, and being Black and queer. I especially like her thought trees in the back of the book. It really pulled the ideas together for me - h Thank you to Berkley Publishing for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest review. Black Girl, Call Home is raw and powerful poetry by spoken-word poet Jasmine Mans. Her words are unflinching, rhythmic, and so descriptive. It takes a gift to convey such heart, and this book hit me hard. Mans explores her truths of a being a daughter, being a woman in America, and being Black and queer. I especially like her thought trees in the back of the book. It really pulled the ideas together for me - how one thought and poem can lead to exploring some other feeling or event. Her feelings hit close to her heart, whether she's musing about her mother's life, slave women being experimented on, or Kanye - it's all tied together in such an interesting way. Poetry isn't my go-to genre, but this is powerful and I'll be recommending it to everyone!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Raven

    There is nothing as emblematic of Black American girlhood than bold and kitschy plastic barrettes, and there is no subject I adore more than Black American girlhood, so I was absolutely elated when I saw the cover of this poetry collection. But with Black Girl, Call Home, Jasmine Mans is doing much more than celebrating to Black girlhood (though she is certainly doing that too). She is also considering what it means to be a Black mother raising a Black child; the poems in this collection at time There is nothing as emblematic of Black American girlhood than bold and kitschy plastic barrettes, and there is no subject I adore more than Black American girlhood, so I was absolutely elated when I saw the cover of this poetry collection. But with Black Girl, Call Home, Jasmine Mans is doing much more than celebrating to Black girlhood (though she is certainly doing that too). She is also considering what it means to be a Black mother raising a Black child; the poems in this collection at times frame this as an ethical issue. What is the moral designation assigned to bringing a child into a world that is fraught with systemic oppression. She is also considering our collective ancestors. “A Pouring Thing” is about an enslaved woman being used both chattel and the component of an experiment on reproductive health. At the end of the reading, I felt raw and empty as though something had been ripped from me. In “Refrain: Ledger of Women Patients Sterilized Without Consent,” the poem is simply a list of women, Black, white, and indigenous, who were admitted to the hospital for one thing and were forcibly sterilized just because. Mans’ use of form is phenomenal, “Missing Girls” is presented as a word search but within the jumble of letters are the names of girls who’ve gone missing. I think the form itself is perhaps saying quite a bit about effort, entertainment, invisibility, and the sheer and overwhelming number of murdered and missing girls. Also her ability to marry the sort of poetry that is heavy on abstractions and the sort of poetry that is vivid in its imagery and skilled in use of poetic devices beguiles me. This collection is ripe with topics for discussion. One of my favorite poems in the collection, “Whitney: Hologram” goes beyond the creepiness of hologram concerts and encourages us to consider how we live in a society that views people as commodities rather than beings deserving of compassion, even more so for any person of any or multiple marginalized communities. There are also many poems on Kanye West that explore Black women’s tendency towards forgiveness (sometimes instead of accountability) when it comes to people who may not yet deserve it, trans-panic and “crazy” women, being both Black and queer, and so much more. I want to liken my experience reading this collection to eating a bag of potato chips. One moment the bag is full and the next moment your hands are dusted with salt and the bag is empty. And though you kind of wish there were a few more chips left in the bag, you are both satiated and left with a dull ache in your belly to remind you of salt, vinegar, and that mesmerizing crunch. Thanks to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing Group for providing me with an ARC and an opportunity to read this collection in exchange for an honest review!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anna Aguirre

    Black Girl, Call Home a book of poems by Jasmine Mans is a personal journey through race, feminism, and sexuality. Jasmine Mans is a Black American poet whose debut book of poetry Chalk Outlines of Snow Angels was first published in 2012. In her latest collection of poems, Mans explores the relationship between her sexuality and race and how they were shaped by her relationship with her mother and the importance of home. You see that from the first poem in the collection “I Ain’t Gon’ Be Bald-He Black Girl, Call Home a book of poems by Jasmine Mans is a personal journey through race, feminism, and sexuality. Jasmine Mans is a Black American poet whose debut book of poetry Chalk Outlines of Snow Angels was first published in 2012. In her latest collection of poems, Mans explores the relationship between her sexuality and race and how they were shaped by her relationship with her mother and the importance of home. You see that from the first poem in the collection “I Ain’t Gon’ Be Bald-Headed No More” where it touches about the importance of hair especially when it relates to Black females and how her mother was going to make her pretty by styling her hair, to the last poem “Brown Marks” which equates female stretch marks to a map home. Poetry is my first love, but I usually disdain most modern poetry. I grew up reading Langston Hughes and Walt Whitman. And have always wondered what happens to a dream deferred. Modern poetry does nothing for me, but I can recognize when something is profound and well written. I have very little in common with Jasmine Mans other than both of us being born female and neither of us identifying as straight, but there were poems in this volume that spoke to me in ways that very few modern poems do. Her mother could have been my mother braiding my hair for the first day of school so that, in my mind, I could look pretty. Her poems also touch on famous Black celebrities: Jay-Z, Kanye, Serena Williams, and Whitney Houston. There is also a tribute to Michelle Obama and how very important Barack Obama’s presidency was and not only because he was the first African-American president, but because his presidency shone a light on his family and it gave little black girls everywhere someone to look up to. Someone who looked like them was in the White House and maybe someday it could be them. My favorite poems, probably because I can relate to them more, are “Dear Ex-Lover” and “Invite Me.” The first is a letter written to an ex detailing how she’ll get over her ex by marrying a man and having a daughter. And the line “If she ever falls in love with a woman; I’ll love bravery down her spine,” is still taking up space in my mind. It’s a beautiful poem about raising our daughters to be braver than we ever hoped to be when it comes down to holding on to love. “Invite Me” is about holding on to the person we love until we become one. So, no this isn’t my favorite book of poetry that I own, but I will revisit some of these poems. **A digital copy was provided free of charge from NetGalley in return of a review

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kiera

    5/5 stars This is a truly magnificent poetry collection that grapples with race, identity, love, sexuality, and so much more. I first learned about Jasmine and her work in 2016, when I found her spoken word poem “Footnotes for Kanye” on YouTube. I was captivated by her delivery and the power in her devastating words. In this collection, Mans gorgeously describes the love between mother and daughter - the deep ache to know one another’s pain, the sorrow in knowing how the world will treat your child 5/5 stars This is a truly magnificent poetry collection that grapples with race, identity, love, sexuality, and so much more. I first learned about Jasmine and her work in 2016, when I found her spoken word poem “Footnotes for Kanye” on YouTube. I was captivated by her delivery and the power in her devastating words. In this collection, Mans gorgeously describes the love between mother and daughter - the deep ache to know one another’s pain, the sorrow in knowing how the world will treat your child, the ways that love can sometimes sound like reprimand, look like stretch marks, and taste like home-cooked food. She meticulously chronicles America’s long history of violence against women, covering everything from sexual assault to systemic forced sterilization. In “Birmingham”, she writes poignantly from the perspective of a little girl killed in the Baptist Street Church bombing. In “Trans-panic”, she calls out the brutality and silencing that trans people face. Her poems about Sandra Bland, Whitney Houston, and Serena Williams are at once both a love letter to Black women and a lamentation for the way our society uses, dehumanizes, and discards Black women. Mans explores her sexuality and writes beautifully about queer identity. Her poems describe a love that is so tender, sensual, urgent, and nurturing - the kind of love that makes you want to make a home wherever you are, to hold someone and to be held. Ultimately, this work beckons to its readers to call home. “Home” is a complex place, and can look like a lot of different things, but these poems bring us one step closer on our journey to find it. I can’t recommend this work highly enough. Thanks to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing for this ARC!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tami

    Black Girl, Call Home is an essential text for every library and high school classroom. In Jasmine Mans poetry collection, readers will be treated to a variety of formats: short verse, long verse, aphorisms, haiku’s, and found word poetry. From this poetic variety many themes emerge within these pages: the geography of family and familial relationships, sexuality, race, strength and resilience, and pop culture references. From the moment I started reading this collection I could not stop. I haven Black Girl, Call Home is an essential text for every library and high school classroom. In Jasmine Mans poetry collection, readers will be treated to a variety of formats: short verse, long verse, aphorisms, haiku’s, and found word poetry. From this poetic variety many themes emerge within these pages: the geography of family and familial relationships, sexuality, race, strength and resilience, and pop culture references. From the moment I started reading this collection I could not stop. I haven't read as much poetry in my life as I would like, mainly because most poetry seems too metaphorical and unapproachable. In 2021 I’m making a point to find poetry that tells personal stories of struggle, resilience and individual strength that are precise in their wording and intent. Black Girl, Call Home is the first example of what I was looking for. I first heard about this collection from Oprah magazine and immediately was drawn to it. I received the book in the afternoon and finished the book by 7pm! I barely pulled myself away even to eat dinner. This collection is so moving and powerful, tender, and raw. There is an urgency and tone to Mans' poetry that is memorable, I kept finding myself still thinking of an earlier poem as I started one later in the collection. I frequently stopped to take notes because my teacher brain began to think of how her work could be used in the high school classroom. This is a 5 star read for me! Thank you to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing for the ARC of this book in return for an honest review. For a long form review please check Biggest Little Library's Goodreads Page or our website blog post. Black Girl, Call Home will also be featured on Episode 81 dropping April 20th.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Biggest Little Library Podcast

    This review is a partial excerpt of the full length review available at www.biggestlittlelibrary.net/blog/bla... Black Girl, Call Home is an essential text for every library and high school classroom. In Jasmine Mans poetry collection, readers will be treated to a variety of formats: short verse, long verse, aphorisms, haikus, and found word poetry. From this poetic variety many themes emerge within these pages: the geography of family and familial relationships, sexuality, race, strength and res This review is a partial excerpt of the full length review available at www.biggestlittlelibrary.net/blog/bla... Black Girl, Call Home is an essential text for every library and high school classroom. In Jasmine Mans poetry collection, readers will be treated to a variety of formats: short verse, long verse, aphorisms, haikus, and found word poetry. From this poetic variety many themes emerge within these pages: the geography of family and familial relationships, sexuality, race, strength and resilience, and pop culture references. From the moment I started reading this collection I could not stop. I haven't read as much poetry in my life as I would like, mainly because most poetry seems too metaphorical and unapproachable. In 2021 I’m making a point to find poetry that tells personal stories. Black Girl, Call Home is the first example of what I was looking for. I first heard about this collection from Oprah magazine and immediately was drawn to it. I received the book in the afternoon and finished the book by 7pm! I kept finding myself still thinking of an earlier poem as I started one later in the collection. I frequently stopped to take notes because my teacher brain began to think of how her work could be used in the high school classroom. I'd like to see her poems used in high school literature classes because they are approachable and timely and students would understand and identify with her experiences and intensity. This is a five-star read for me! Thank you NetGalley and Berkley for the ARC of Black Girl, Call Home in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kimberley

    I didn’t go into this book with expectations. So many times lately I see hype for a poetry collection and am disappointed to find it lacking; either because the author concentrates too much on being “fake deep” than on truly finding a way to lay bare their emotions on the page or because they go so far to the left, creatively, they lose me altogether. I tend to favor a balance of depth and simplicity. In other words, keep it hella real but hella simple. Jasmine Mans does that and then some. This I didn’t go into this book with expectations. So many times lately I see hype for a poetry collection and am disappointed to find it lacking; either because the author concentrates too much on being “fake deep” than on truly finding a way to lay bare their emotions on the page or because they go so far to the left, creatively, they lose me altogether. I tend to favor a balance of depth and simplicity. In other words, keep it hella real but hella simple. Jasmine Mans does that and then some. This collection is everything. From the first page, to the last, I was riveted: nodding in sisterhood to the parts which mimicked my own experiences—as a (once young) Black woman—to feeling infinite empathy for how difficult it was/is, at times, for her to walk in her own truth, despite the relationships she lost in the process. There is nothing cutesy here. It’s all raw and unfiltered. Beautifully presented in sections which touch on pop culture (Kanye’s demise into whatever the hell Kanye has devolved into), love, mother-daughter relationships, and being a Black woman in a world where our minority status is something other than “other”. This particular passage stuck with me: There are thousands of mentally ill Black women in unmarked graves right beneath us. There are girls documented as “women,” never considered “girls.” Please understand that parts of my body hold rage in their honor. There is no peace in these stories. Time does not breed peace for these stories. I mean ...damn. And then this hit me, as the mother of a son: “I am just afraid to raise a Black son.” Who will spend the rest of his life praying for a melody, or a melanin safe enough to scream in, a son who has to be a martyr for a war he never asked for. Sis. Jesus. I could pull verse after verse and it would be be enough to convey the brilliance that is this collection. It’ll be on my shelf once it releases, right alongside another fave, “The Secret Lives of Church Ladies”, and I encourage you to place it on your list too. Jasmine Mans is my new favorite poetess. I can’t wait to see what she does next! Thanks to Edelweiss+ for the advanced eGalley. Opinion is my own

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melly Mel - Shelf_ishly_lit

    Black Girl, Call Home by Jasmine Mans Pub date March 9, 2009 I can’t presume to be able to find the words - right or even adequate- to convey the beauty of this collection. To say that’s this is merely a collection of poetry - I can’t. It’s so much more. It’s poetry, prose, discourse - yet compartmentalizing the words bound between the covers feels like forsaking the breadth of its whole. At times, the pieces offered invoke a lyrical rythme prompting me to read aloud, pick up speed, sing. Move. Th Black Girl, Call Home by Jasmine Mans Pub date March 9, 2009 I can’t presume to be able to find the words - right or even adequate- to convey the beauty of this collection. To say that’s this is merely a collection of poetry - I can’t. It’s so much more. It’s poetry, prose, discourse - yet compartmentalizing the words bound between the covers feels like forsaking the breadth of its whole. At times, the pieces offered invoke a lyrical rythme prompting me to read aloud, pick up speed, sing. Move. Then there are pieces where Mans creates tension that pulls your lens in sharpe focus to injustice and heart wrenching longing. Calling you in to look, listen, and sit in the uncomfortable knowing. And then just as swiftly, Mans brings forth quiet and stillness - subtle and tender - holding me close in an accountable embrace. It’s vivid. Crisp. Visceral. Cathartic. Healing. And the genogram/ connectogram at the end - brilliant. The images encapsulate relational dynamics punctuated by systemic and structural inequities framed around the psychosocial- emotional conceptualisation of oneself as part of and impacted by the whole. It’s bloody brilliant. These are my musings. Rudimentary. Insufficient. My last remark - pls partake in this journey. My thanks to Berkley Publishing and NetGalley for my advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mairy

    This is book was everything I hoped for in a contemporary poetry book and then some. I have been wanting to read poetry for a very long time, but nothing ever appealed to me. Black Girl, Call Home was THE book to introduce me to modern poetry. I wouldn't even label this work of art as poetry; it was much more introspective and personal than that. It felt like I was reading Jasmine Mans' personal diary which was never meant to be published. She opened the door to her heart and soul and it was som This is book was everything I hoped for in a contemporary poetry book and then some. I have been wanting to read poetry for a very long time, but nothing ever appealed to me. Black Girl, Call Home was THE book to introduce me to modern poetry. I wouldn't even label this work of art as poetry; it was much more introspective and personal than that. It felt like I was reading Jasmine Mans' personal diary which was never meant to be published. She opened the door to her heart and soul and it was something! Not only was this book not repetitive in its layout or style, it was the most creative thing I read in a long time. I kept being amazing at the content and, the more I was reading, the more exciting I was at turning the next page, anticipating what I was going to discover next. This book was fresh, deep, creative, raw, diverse, and touched a multitude of subject such as racism, sexism, gender inequality, motherhood. family, love, the rich African American culture, love and its complexities, and much more. Special praise to Mans' poem titled NOLA. As a Neworleanean, I couldn't NOT mention it ;-) Much praise and a very deserving 5 stars for this book that made me feels all kinds of crazy emotions. Thank you Net Galley and Berkley and this e-ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Libriamo3116

    Poetess Jasmine Mans writes of herself, of being young, of growing up, of being a queer Black woman, and of what it has meant and now means to be Black in America. Hailing from Newark, New Jersey, Jasmine crafts beautiful and heartbreaking confessions, observations, and statements that cut to the truth and meaning of the feelings and pain experienced by mothers and sisters and daughters. From the sweetest highs to the bitterest lows, Black Girl, Call Home illustrates the lived experience of a wo Poetess Jasmine Mans writes of herself, of being young, of growing up, of being a queer Black woman, and of what it has meant and now means to be Black in America. Hailing from Newark, New Jersey, Jasmine crafts beautiful and heartbreaking confessions, observations, and statements that cut to the truth and meaning of the feelings and pain experienced by mothers and sisters and daughters. From the sweetest highs to the bitterest lows, Black Girl, Call Home illustrates the lived experience of a woman who seeks meaning, and comfort, and more, in life.⁣ ⁣ I loved this brutal, raw, honest collection of poetry from Jasmine Mans. I appreciated the portions that focused on historical experimentation on Black women. Topical discussion of police brutality, feminism, and queerness were great. Her poetry is approachable, and is simultaneously beautiful and capable of rending your soul with its jagged edges. Each piece is crafted with purpose, intensity, and is framed for personal reflection. Jasmine shares many personal thoughts, feelings, and experiences, and does so in a way that arrests your attention and empathy. I recommend you pick up the phone and call home, then pick this up and read it.⁣ Thank you Berkley Publishing Group for providing me with a free digital copy of this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Munjiru

    This is poetry centered around race and racial violence, sexuality, queerness and feminism as experienced in present day America based on the author’s life experiences. There’s a lot going on in this collection especially dealing with the Black female experience in the US and the way the intersection of different minority identities in one body can make life so heavy. The collection kind of flows through these different themes building on itself as you go towards the end. The sections on sexual This is poetry centered around race and racial violence, sexuality, queerness and feminism as experienced in present day America based on the author’s life experiences. There’s a lot going on in this collection especially dealing with the Black female experience in the US and the way the intersection of different minority identities in one body can make life so heavy. The collection kind of flows through these different themes building on itself as you go towards the end. The sections on sexual assault and the historical abuse of Black women’s bodies hit me the hardest. >>> They Don’t Know Anything Men around me compliment me for not being raped. Men around me compliment me for not telling them I’ve been raped. Men around me think that for a woman to be raped, she had to have been caught, somewhere, being less of herself. >>> A Pouring Thing She was awake and on her knees for some of the surgeries. Screamed like a cow in labor, or like a woman in dying, naked and open, nipples hardened towards the ground, stomach bloated, almost stuck, a crying, pouring thing. Some of my other favorites include: Black Son, Kanye (the driveby on Mr. West...whoo), Didn’t Feel Like Winning, She Doesn’t Look Like Rape, 1000 Questions on Gender Roles for a Lesbian, Serena. A strong collection.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christine Chatelain Latimer

    Can you say BLACK GIRL MAGIC!!! Black Girl, Call Home there are no words that I can come up with to describe this collection of poems. This collections are the words that took my breath away. It so many poems within this collection that are so powerful, inspiring and nostalgic. Jasmine Mans did exactly what I feel like every great collection or book should do. Leave you speechless, in deep thought, and pull different emotions out of you as you turn the page. A poem that is always going to stick Can you say BLACK GIRL MAGIC!!! Black Girl, Call Home there are no words that I can come up with to describe this collection of poems. This collections are the words that took my breath away. It so many poems within this collection that are so powerful, inspiring and nostalgic. Jasmine Mans did exactly what I feel like every great collection or book should do. Leave you speechless, in deep thought, and pull different emotions out of you as you turn the page. A poem that is always going to stick with me always is Black Son. As I was reading Black Son I couldn’t help but think about my worries for my boys navigating through this world with their beautiful black skin and running into someone who don’t think the same. The opening Bald-headed cabbage patch took me back to my grade school days. It’s was so many short poems with a big impact like And Jay-Z says “Aren’t We Past That?”. I could go on and on about the greatness of this book but you hopefully you get the picture. I definitely can’t end this review without touching base on this cover! 😍😍 Whoever came up with this cover deserves an applause 👏🏾 I was in love at first sight. The cover definitely made me want to read this book. . Thank you to Berkley Publishing and to NetGalley for the ARC. . Is it worth reading: Absolutely

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jaleesa McKnight

    Black Girl, Call Home explores the talents and creative story of Jasmine Mans as an spoken word artist from Newark, NJ. This book is more than a bunch of poems, but is a safe house for every black girl. It tells of an memorable and historic experience of Black womanhood . These poems is destined to leave a warmth, a chill and terror imprint on the heart. Jasmine creates poems that tugs on love, injustices, sexual violence, queerness, slavery and property, mourning, power and powerlessness, body Black Girl, Call Home explores the talents and creative story of Jasmine Mans as an spoken word artist from Newark, NJ. This book is more than a bunch of poems, but is a safe house for every black girl. It tells of an memorable and historic experience of Black womanhood . These poems is destined to leave a warmth, a chill and terror imprint on the heart. Jasmine creates poems that tugs on love, injustices, sexual violence, queerness, slavery and property, mourning, power and powerlessness, body awareness and unawareness, girl trafficking, wonder and glory. This being my first read by this author I am taken away by the demand this book possess. If you don’t know the life of a black girl read this book, if you are unaware of the injustices that we have faced read this book, if you didn’t know we were property once before read this book, and if you ever left home, called momma and returned home read this book. Each line of poetry is a moment in time from generation to generation. Black Girl, Call Home is a refreshing new read and a must to add to your bookshelves. Look to pre-order or purchase on the release date of March 9th, 2021. Source: ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for a honest review . Thank you #netgalley #berkelypublishing

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