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Captain Malik and the crew of his spaceship are in search of the only resources that matter – and can only be found by harvesting the giant corpses of alien gods that are found on the edge of human space..and now they see an opportunity to finally break free from this system: by being the first to find a living god. THE GODS ARE ALWAYS BEAUTIFUL... ...AND THE GODS ARE ALWAY Captain Malik and the crew of his spaceship are in search of the only resources that matter – and can only be found by harvesting the giant corpses of alien gods that are found on the edge of human space..and now they see an opportunity to finally break free from this system: by being the first to find a living god. THE GODS ARE ALWAYS BEAUTIFUL... ...AND THE GODS ARE ALWAYS DEAD. Captain Malik and the crew of the spaceship the Vihaan II are in search of the only resources that matter – and can only be found by harvesting the giant corpses of alien gods that are found on the edge of human space. While other autopsy ships and explorers race to salvage the meat, minerals, and metals that sustain the human race, Malik sees an opportunity to finally break free from this system: by being the first to find a living god. But Malik’s obsession with the gods will push his crew into the darkest reaches of space, bringing them face to face with a threat unlike anything they ever imagined, unless the rogue agent on their trail can stop them first... Superstars Al Ewing (Immortal Hulk) and Simone Di Meo (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers) present a new sci-fi epic about the search for meaning and the hard choices we make to find it, no matter the cost to the world – or universe – around us. Collects We Only Find Them When They’re Dead #1-5.


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Captain Malik and the crew of his spaceship are in search of the only resources that matter – and can only be found by harvesting the giant corpses of alien gods that are found on the edge of human space..and now they see an opportunity to finally break free from this system: by being the first to find a living god. THE GODS ARE ALWAYS BEAUTIFUL... ...AND THE GODS ARE ALWAY Captain Malik and the crew of his spaceship are in search of the only resources that matter – and can only be found by harvesting the giant corpses of alien gods that are found on the edge of human space..and now they see an opportunity to finally break free from this system: by being the first to find a living god. THE GODS ARE ALWAYS BEAUTIFUL... ...AND THE GODS ARE ALWAYS DEAD. Captain Malik and the crew of the spaceship the Vihaan II are in search of the only resources that matter – and can only be found by harvesting the giant corpses of alien gods that are found on the edge of human space. While other autopsy ships and explorers race to salvage the meat, minerals, and metals that sustain the human race, Malik sees an opportunity to finally break free from this system: by being the first to find a living god. But Malik’s obsession with the gods will push his crew into the darkest reaches of space, bringing them face to face with a threat unlike anything they ever imagined, unless the rogue agent on their trail can stop them first... Superstars Al Ewing (Immortal Hulk) and Simone Di Meo (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers) present a new sci-fi epic about the search for meaning and the hard choices we make to find it, no matter the cost to the world – or universe – around us. Collects We Only Find Them When They’re Dead #1-5.

30 review for We Only Find Them When They're Dead, Vol. 1: The Seeker

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    These scavenger ships mine the flesh of dead Gods floating in space. They are monitored by overzealous space cops, one of which has a grudge with our captain. It's an intriguing setup, but not nearly enough world building yet. The series is severely decompressed, it felt padded out for four issues finally delivering the history between the Georges and Richtor in the fifth issue. There's also some confusing time hopping going on. Still, I'm intrigued. Simone Di Meo's art is gorgeous. My only compl These scavenger ships mine the flesh of dead Gods floating in space. They are monitored by overzealous space cops, one of which has a grudge with our captain. It's an intriguing setup, but not nearly enough world building yet. The series is severely decompressed, it felt padded out for four issues finally delivering the history between the Georges and Richtor in the fifth issue. There's also some confusing time hopping going on. Still, I'm intrigued. Simone Di Meo's art is gorgeous. My only complaints are that the coloring is sometimes too dark, obscuring the art, and the panels don't always flow well. There were a couple of times I had to backtrack to find something I thought I'd missed but nope, it just wasn't there.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Small butcher-spacecraft carve up the corpses of dead gods floating in space. But then one of these small butcher-spacecrafts decides to “go rogue” and see a live god. Which is against the rules for some reason so a space cop chases after them. This was awful. I mean… what?! People carving up god corpses for meat - could there be anything more banal as a premise!? For food. Do the people of the future not have cows or chickens anymore? They’ve mastered warp speed but haven’t figured out how to m Small butcher-spacecraft carve up the corpses of dead gods floating in space. But then one of these small butcher-spacecrafts decides to “go rogue” and see a live god. Which is against the rules for some reason so a space cop chases after them. This was awful. I mean… what?! People carving up god corpses for meat - could there be anything more banal as a premise!? For food. Do the people of the future not have cows or chickens anymore? They’ve mastered warp speed but haven’t figured out how to make any meat substitutes and/or farm cattle? Or is there something to the god meat - a magical property it imbues to the consumer? Don’t know because, oh yeah, Al Ewing is a shitty writer. Nothing is explained so everything fails to make sense. I always thought gods were (mostly) ethereal beings rather than corporeal. How are these corpses “gods” - is it because they’re big? Does size mean you’re a god? Why are they all hot anime girls in armour - does that make them gods? Why is it against the law to see a live god - what happens if you do besides attract the attention of a space cop? And that’s the book: nothing characters arbitrarily chasing each other through space for unclear reasons, saying weirdly antiquated ship sayings (why do they still say stuff like “eight bells” in the 24th century - are they hipster douchebag space-butchers?!), and occasionally stumbling across a giant hot anime girl in armour. This comic is garbage! Al Ewing Only Writes Forgettable Bad Sci-Fi Comics, Book One: Don’t Bother is underwritten, poorly conceived, uninteresting crap.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    I’m a huge fan of Al Ewing and, true to form, the story here is really good. There are some great ideas here and some really emotionally powerful scenes as well as a nice plot twist towards the end. If I had one complaint it would be that it suffers slightly from bloat; this story could have been told equally well in three issues, rather than five. As for the artwork, well, the line work is really good but I’m not a fan of the colouring. There’s a disturbing trend in comicbooks at the moment to u I’m a huge fan of Al Ewing and, true to form, the story here is really good. There are some great ideas here and some really emotionally powerful scenes as well as a nice plot twist towards the end. If I had one complaint it would be that it suffers slightly from bloat; this story could have been told equally well in three issues, rather than five. As for the artwork, well, the line work is really good but I’m not a fan of the colouring. There’s a disturbing trend in comicbooks at the moment to use really bright, non-complimentary, almost neon colours and I really don’t like it. I find it migraine inducing, to be honest. I’d give this 3.5 stars if I could but I’m feeling generous so I’ll round up rather than down. My next book: Colonel Weird: Cosmagog

  4. 5 out of 5

    RG

    The art us glorious. The story a big mess. The world building is so confusing. The time jumps and parallel stories are too jumbled to resemble a full story. I'd read the first 2 issues and decided to jump on board for a tpb..was dissapointed The art us glorious. The story a big mess. The world building is so confusing. The time jumps and parallel stories are too jumbled to resemble a full story. I'd read the first 2 issues and decided to jump on board for a tpb..was dissapointed

  5. 5 out of 5

    Oneirosophos

    The first issue is astonishing and breathtaking. The whole premise is inconceivable and the consequencies immeasurable! Then, an unneeded family drama bushwacks and hits heavily the whole plot. Until the last issue, it's an unfortunate trainwreck... The first issue is astonishing and breathtaking. The whole premise is inconceivable and the consequencies immeasurable! Then, an unneeded family drama bushwacks and hits heavily the whole plot. Until the last issue, it's an unfortunate trainwreck...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Al Ewing's first creator owned effort at Boom! follows the crew of a salvage ship that liberates pieces of dead gods in order to sell them and keep the universe running. The rules around salvaging these body parts are tight, and there's an unspoken history between the captain of the ship that we follow, and the captain of the guard that unfolds across this first arc as both parties do the unspeakable. WOFTWTD is the most ungainly acronym I've had to type in a while, but it's a damn good book so I Al Ewing's first creator owned effort at Boom! follows the crew of a salvage ship that liberates pieces of dead gods in order to sell them and keep the universe running. The rules around salvaging these body parts are tight, and there's an unspoken history between the captain of the ship that we follow, and the captain of the guard that unfolds across this first arc as both parties do the unspeakable. WOFTWTD is the most ungainly acronym I've had to type in a while, but it's a damn good book so I'll let it off. The set-up here is intriguing to say the least, and there's a lot to be inferred from what isn't explained just as much as what is. I like that Ewing manages to create such a strange and interesting universe, and then chooses instead to focus on the inter-personal relationships between the crew and the law enforcement that hound them. It's all very Star Trek. And in typical Star Trek fashion, where we end up is absolutely not where you thought we'd be going - I'd never have guessed as to the way this first arc ends, and it really excites me as to what's in store next. The art in WOFTWTD is literally out of this world. Simone Di Meo throws in all sorts of strange angles and perspectives that enhance the outer space setting, and the colours are all various shades of neon so the futuristic aspect is really played up. It's a very good looking book; if you enjoyed Di Meo's art on his Power Rangers run recently, then this will be right up your alley. WOFTWTD flies at you full force, unapologetically crafting a galaxy worth of story opportunities and then taking all the ones you don't expect it to - and it looks gorgeous while it does it. Recommended, and definitely one to watch.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jason Ashmore

    I read this as individual issues as it was released. The premise was intriguing and I liked what I had seen of the art from previews so I subscribed. Overall I've enjoyed this first arc and I think there's alot of promise here. I felt like the pacing was uneven at points and a coupe issues in I nearly gave up on the book but glad I didn't. I really picked up again near the end. In alot of ways I'd label this one as a space soap opera but not entirely in a bad way. This art is gorgeous and even i I read this as individual issues as it was released. The premise was intriguing and I liked what I had seen of the art from previews so I subscribed. Overall I've enjoyed this first arc and I think there's alot of promise here. I felt like the pacing was uneven at points and a coupe issues in I nearly gave up on the book but glad I didn't. I really picked up again near the end. In alot of ways I'd label this one as a space soap opera but not entirely in a bad way. This art is gorgeous and even in the slower issues for me the art was great and helped keep me engaged. Looking forward to seeing where this goes into arc #2.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Al Ewing finally drops his first creator-owned comic, and it plays into the big cosmic stuff with which he demonstrated such flair at Marvel, giving us a society centuries hence built around mining the bodies of gigantic space-gods; as per the title, nobody has ever seen a live one. I'm not sure how long it's been in the works, but the notion of a world where the only way to scrape a living is to find things of awe and beauty, and then render them down for parts, is profoundly 2020s, especially Al Ewing finally drops his first creator-owned comic, and it plays into the big cosmic stuff with which he demonstrated such flair at Marvel, giving us a society centuries hence built around mining the bodies of gigantic space-gods; as per the title, nobody has ever seen a live one. I'm not sure how long it's been in the works, but the notion of a world where the only way to scrape a living is to find things of awe and beauty, and then render them down for parts, is profoundly 2020s, especially when you factor in the way that big corporations and rules tilted in their favour are rapidly making even this melancholy trade impossible for anyone with the least hope of liberty. At its best, Simone di Meo's art has a limpid, simple quality which, for reasons I couldn't quite explain, reminded me in places of Avatar: The Last Airbender, or at least the promo art for it, because I've never actually watched the cartoon. There are times, though, mostly when shit kicks off, and especially once the palette darkens in later issues, where it can become unclear what's going on, and in places I found myself missing Ewing's collaborator on previous cosmic stuff, Christian Ward. Still, since I got the beard, protagonist Captain Malik may be the first character I've looked at and thought, yep, that might be an achievable fancy dress goal. Not that there's anywhere to wear fancy dress anymore, of course. Which brings us nicely back around to the engine of the story: "But I need more than to survive. I need more than to cut up bodies forever. I need something that's more than just living. Does that make me ungrateful? Is that wrong?" And so we follow the crew on an illegal, insane leap into the void between galaxies in search of something more, and the hope of just maybe seeing one of the gods alive... "On, on, the glorious quest!" Of course, if there's anything the 2020s should have taught us by now, it's that leaping into the dark because you think it has to be better than what you've got is generally a really stupid plan, and there's worse than rotting fish and impounded cheese waiting out there for these poor bastards.

  9. 5 out of 5

    david Wood

    Started off full of promise but sadly wound up a confusing mess

  10. 4 out of 5

    Trike

    I was incredibly disappointed in this one, especially with my high expectations given Ewing’s terrific run on Immortal Hulk. I was hoping to get some weird Space Opera stuff along the lines of Outer Darkness, Vol. 1: Each Other's Throats, but this doesn’t compare. It’s basically that scene from Guardians of the Galaxy when they go to Knowhere, which is the decapitated moon-sized head of a dead Celestial that various aliens are mining for who-knows-what-purpose. Or how they use all the stuff from I was incredibly disappointed in this one, especially with my high expectations given Ewing’s terrific run on Immortal Hulk. I was hoping to get some weird Space Opera stuff along the lines of Outer Darkness, Vol. 1: Each Other's Throats, but this doesn’t compare. It’s basically that scene from Guardians of the Galaxy when they go to Knowhere, which is the decapitated moon-sized head of a dead Celestial that various aliens are mining for who-knows-what-purpose. Or how they use all the stuff from dead kaiju in Pacific Rim. Except that’s not what the story is about. It’s about a smuggler squaring off against his former sister-in-law who is a space cop. And that story is pretty thin and ridiculously decompressed. Normally all of that would be contained in one or perhaps two issues, but here it’s stretched interminably over five issues. The art is the worst part. De Meo can clearly draw but can’t convey a story. 95% of the book is done in closeups and most of the rest is impressionistic, so you pretty much can’t tell what’s going on. Only two characters are distinctive enough to distinguish between them, and the oversaturated colors combined with photoshop blurring with a general darkness makes it nearly impossible to tell what the hell is going on. Maybe it’s just me, but perhaps you can tell me what I’m looking at here: Oh well, live and learn.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nikola

    The issue-by-issue format claims another victim, as a lovely premise gets bogged down by unnecessary cliffhangers and confusing time jumps, rushing from one mystery to the next readers as long as the readers keep buying. So, there are giant dead gods floating in space, and humans are decomposing their remains for food and technology. The intriguing setup is unfortunately the highpoint of this comic. Soon we are off down the well trodden path of evil corporations, struggling space miners, and gene The issue-by-issue format claims another victim, as a lovely premise gets bogged down by unnecessary cliffhangers and confusing time jumps, rushing from one mystery to the next readers as long as the readers keep buying. So, there are giant dead gods floating in space, and humans are decomposing their remains for food and technology. The intriguing setup is unfortunately the highpoint of this comic. Soon we are off down the well trodden path of evil corporations, struggling space miners, and generic space battles. As a result of its breathless pace, the characters remain just sketches that I found difficult to care about, or even tell apart at times (which is something, considering there's only 5 of them). The artwork wasn't helping either - in all its technical mastery, it's often too busy with digital effects and emotionless. (Also, I understand that worldbuilding requires exposition, but there has to be a better way to put it in than experienced crew members explaining everything to each other.) I guess I'm just being critical of the mainstream sci-fi comic genre, which is obviously not my cup of tea. So why on earth am I still reading it? The reason is actually pretty dumb: recently I ran into a random listicle about "The 15 most influential sci-fi comics of the past 15 years". Naively, I had my hopes up, and so far I've been underwhelmed at best, but mostly disheartened. Still the list goes on, and if it means reading 10 more books about space truckers who are actually space emperors nephews, so be it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Hell yeah. This is fucking great. This is like... that kind of sci fi you experience only rarely that captures your imagination and blows your mind. It has heart, gorgeous neon pages, big concepts that are always tethered to the human condition. I was sad when I finished and I can’t wait for more. I may have to add this title to my pulls and keep rocking the ::gasp:: floppies. Don’t think I can trade wait this out. You’ll see. Big time yes, def read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Aside from any review, the series owes a deep, deep debt to James Morrow's Godhead books. On it's own merits, blame can be equally split between the author and illustrator. The series timeline jumps are unclear early on and require frequent page-flipping to keep track, and the overly dark palette and swooping layouts lead to problems appreciating scales and actions. Aside from any review, the series owes a deep, deep debt to James Morrow's Godhead books. On it's own merits, blame can be equally split between the author and illustrator. The series timeline jumps are unclear early on and require frequent page-flipping to keep track, and the overly dark palette and swooping layouts lead to problems appreciating scales and actions.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alan Flores

    First of all I want to acknowledge how great of a writer Al Ewing is; in 7 words title alone he makes a better story than must writers do. The story is good, has an interesting set up, a sci-fi pulp adventure feeling with hints of cosmic horror. But it never catches on because of the chaotic nature of Di Meo’s drawings. He is amazing at capturing the enormous scale of thing like spaceships or planets, and the fast action fulled starship fights, but when he needs to slow down so we can feel a pers First of all I want to acknowledge how great of a writer Al Ewing is; in 7 words title alone he makes a better story than must writers do. The story is good, has an interesting set up, a sci-fi pulp adventure feeling with hints of cosmic horror. But it never catches on because of the chaotic nature of Di Meo’s drawings. He is amazing at capturing the enormous scale of thing like spaceships or planets, and the fast action fulled starship fights, but when he needs to slow down so we can feel a personal struggle a character is going through he’s not as good. Which means you can’t fully connect with the characters. It’s a fun weekend read and leaves the story open for a chance to grow into something better.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Kelsey

    I'm curious about what's going on in the larger story, but I couldn't care less about these characters. I'm curious about what's going on in the larger story, but I couldn't care less about these characters.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    This is a great book! I buddy of mine recommended it, and I was not disappointed. The artwork and the story are both great. Many times I felt I was looking at and reading poetry. I am very intrigued with where this storyline goes. Great introduction of characters and the world they live in. I have so many questions about the characters and their world, but not in a frustrating way. In a way that makes me want to read more. I can't wait for the next issue. If you like sci-fi and/or philosophical This is a great book! I buddy of mine recommended it, and I was not disappointed. The artwork and the story are both great. Many times I felt I was looking at and reading poetry. I am very intrigued with where this storyline goes. Great introduction of characters and the world they live in. I have so many questions about the characters and their world, but not in a frustrating way. In a way that makes me want to read more. I can't wait for the next issue. If you like sci-fi and/or philosophical stories, then this is a book you should check out for sure!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Johanna

    In the 2300s, humans have to search the far ends of the galaxy for giant alien corpses and harvest them for resources. Autopsy space ships collect meat, metals and minerals from these beautiful dead bodies they call gods and no-one’s ever seen an alive one. A grew of four on an autopsy ship wants to be the first ones. The setting of the story was super interesting! It’s like a space mystery and I was dying to learn more about these celestial bodies future humans depend on. Who are the gods? Wher In the 2300s, humans have to search the far ends of the galaxy for giant alien corpses and harvest them for resources. Autopsy space ships collect meat, metals and minerals from these beautiful dead bodies they call gods and no-one’s ever seen an alive one. A grew of four on an autopsy ship wants to be the first ones. The setting of the story was super interesting! It’s like a space mystery and I was dying to learn more about these celestial bodies future humans depend on. Who are the gods? Where do they come from? Why are they always dead? Unfortunately, the story didn’t quite deliver in many parts. What I liked: - The world and the setting. It makes me want to know more and it motivated me to continue reading despite losing interest in the story itself. - The artwork and especially the colours! I loved how vivid they were. If I ever make a scifi comic, I want it to have a similar colouring style. - How disgusting the thought and sight of harvesting meat off of the gods is. There’s something about it that almost makes it feel like a metaphor for humans’ way to destroying beautiful things for resources. - Diverse characters and interesting female characters in active, expert roles. What I didn’t like: - I was confused by the story a lot. I kept re-reading parts but still couldn’t quite get what was the meaning of it all and what exactly happened. - The way action and movement was drawn. I couldn’t always tell if something was moving or shooting and which ship was which. This made it even harder to follow the story. - I didn’t care about any of the characters. This wouldn’t have been a problem if the characters had been treated mostly as ”tools” to progress the story to unravel the mystery of the giant corpses but the story focused so much on the characters’ backstories and histories it felt like I should care. - The story felt both too large and too small. The setting was so mysterious and inspiring that it felt like it’d need multiple volumes for the story to do justice to it but I felt like the story was rushing through the important bits and that made them feel less epic. But at the same time, the character development and their backstories felt a bit too much and took too much time. I want to know more about the world and the gods so I will most likely read any future volumes too but I wished the story had done more justice to the god mystery.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    “The Gods are always beautiful. And the Gods are always dead.” There is so much about this that I loved, but it didn’t quite come together enough to make me care about it all that much. Ewing’s imagination is terrific, and the world he’s developing here is dense, fascinating, and steeped in anti-capitalistic ideals (among other timely themes) that I’m all about. But the character work is painted in broad strokes, and motivations never coalesce in a way that makes them feel tangible. I like th “The Gods are always beautiful. And the Gods are always dead.” There is so much about this that I loved, but it didn’t quite come together enough to make me care about it all that much. Ewing’s imagination is terrific, and the world he’s developing here is dense, fascinating, and steeped in anti-capitalistic ideals (among other timely themes) that I’m all about. But the character work is painted in broad strokes, and motivations never coalesce in a way that makes them feel tangible. I like the characters well enough—I’m just not remotely invested in them at the end of the day. It does help that the art has one of the more distinct styles I’ve seen in a while. Simone Di Meo (with some coloring help from Mariasaea Miotti) makes the comic look like an anime in still-form, which works surprisingly well. I dug a lot of his layouts, too, as they gave the action a sharp sense of motion and energy. It’s the panels themselves that didn’t work for me, not entirely. There’s so much packed into each frame that it sometimes made it difficult to keep track of where the characters are in the space around them. Part of it is the colors, which are so vibrant they’re almost distracting, but most of it is the “blur-effect” used a lot. It works for some scenes, but for others, it only muddles the scene. For a debut, this is a mixed bag. Ewing is a great writer, and the way the volume ends has me intrigued enough to stick around for the next one, but I hope the series can better define itself outside its (admittedly stellar) premise. I’m giving this 2.5 stars, but I'll round up because the ending did surprise me, and I gotta see how it plays out.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Red🏳️‍⚧️

    Fun and weird and daring. Feels like a horror story set on the sea in the distant past, which it basically is though ironically I’d probly never be interested in one of those. But make the story a bit more SPACE and I’m on board!! The only things that get in the way of all this joy is 1) too many new characters are thrown at us at times and I can rarely tell who any of them are because either 2) they’re wearing a helmet or 3) they don’t clearly tell us their names and their relation to the other Fun and weird and daring. Feels like a horror story set on the sea in the distant past, which it basically is though ironically I’d probly never be interested in one of those. But make the story a bit more SPACE and I’m on board!! The only things that get in the way of all this joy is 1) too many new characters are thrown at us at times and I can rarely tell who any of them are because either 2) they’re wearing a helmet or 3) they don’t clearly tell us their names and their relation to the other characters are. These are minor quibbles (though the confusing artwork on the last page of issue #3 really is jarring) because hey who cares about Thierry’s uncle or Paula’s coworker Li, because most of the time it’s just being whiplashed by twists and turns. The future is a capitalist hellscape ala Alien by way of Becky Chambers’ Wayfarers series with a heavy dose of The Hyacinth Disaster miniseries. Are they all on a doomed mission to find meaning in their lives? Tune in and find out. The flashbacks and scene changes are confusing, but the ride is unique enough to bear out these speed bumps.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    While the story went off the rails a bit at the end, I'm intrigued to read the next chapter. It has a solid sci-fi premise: fuel miners collect energy from the corpses of dead gods in a world that is heavily regulated by the military. It veers away from tropes. It includes a diverse cast where the queer interracial relationship between two of the main characters is never mentioned as out of the ordianary, it's just two of the characters have a relationship, they're both male-identified and from While the story went off the rails a bit at the end, I'm intrigued to read the next chapter. It has a solid sci-fi premise: fuel miners collect energy from the corpses of dead gods in a world that is heavily regulated by the military. It veers away from tropes. It includes a diverse cast where the queer interracial relationship between two of the main characters is never mentioned as out of the ordianary, it's just two of the characters have a relationship, they're both male-identified and from different cultural backgrounds. I appreciate that choice. The art in this book is either going to floor you, or put you off. The colors are vibrant and contrast with the often black background of space. The angular layouts balance the rounder character features perfectly, for me. Al Ewing is one of my favorite current writers at Marvel, and so far, I'm on board for picking up more creator owned work by him. This is a blast. If you like Guardians Of The Galaxy, but don't have time for forty years of continuity, this is your book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Will Brown

    I got strong Love, Death, & Robots vibes from this. In the far flung future, a Captain and his crew struggle to make ends meet and live fulfilling lives as they continually venture out to carve off pieces of giant corpses. It’s a slow burning story that prefers to focus on the juicy interpersonal drama more than the sci-fi setting it’s created (which’s great, but I would LOVE to see explored more). That’s probably this volume’s biggest flaw. It really feels like it’s just act 1 of a story that ha I got strong Love, Death, & Robots vibes from this. In the far flung future, a Captain and his crew struggle to make ends meet and live fulfilling lives as they continually venture out to carve off pieces of giant corpses. It’s a slow burning story that prefers to focus on the juicy interpersonal drama more than the sci-fi setting it’s created (which’s great, but I would LOVE to see explored more). That’s probably this volume’s biggest flaw. It really feels like it’s just act 1 of a story that had to be split up. What’s here is good, but not entirely satisfying. Another critique I have is the coloring in this book. The palettes are very dark and make it hard to see everything. The neon lights pop because of this, but at the cost of readability, and that’s a pretty big no-no for me. This is definitely a series to watch, but I’d wait until there’s more volumes to pick up.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Panagiotis G.

    Well, I don't know. Main characters were kind of interesting, but they get scattered around the universe right when we get to know them better through a back story. Main story is vague enough, feels too much stretched and up to a point meaningless. Creatures called "gods" are lying around space.. even when they are alive and seem to have no purpose, none other than that of them being scavenged from our humans. Artwork is very good and powerful, only the element of too much blurring tired me a bi Well, I don't know. Main characters were kind of interesting, but they get scattered around the universe right when we get to know them better through a back story. Main story is vague enough, feels too much stretched and up to a point meaningless. Creatures called "gods" are lying around space.. even when they are alive and seem to have no purpose, none other than that of them being scavenged from our humans. Artwork is very good and powerful, only the element of too much blurring tired me a bit (probably artists are trying to depict speed through this way). Lettering is sad to poor. Basic covers suck with all this lettering and are disappointing. I still wonder why this book got so many printings and is so hyped about..?!?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nelson

    What this book does right: - Awe-inspiring premise that carries a huge part of the story. - Good sense of character voice, mostly good characterization (see cons). - The art is breathtaking and properly captures the scope of the book. Where it falters: - Pacing. Flashback placement in the later issues hinders the action. - Partly due to the above, emotional anchorage could have been better delivered (show, don't tell). Nitpicks: - The art, while mostly breathtaking, could use more variety in framing, th What this book does right: - Awe-inspiring premise that carries a huge part of the story. - Good sense of character voice, mostly good characterization (see cons). - The art is breathtaking and properly captures the scope of the book. Where it falters: - Pacing. Flashback placement in the later issues hinders the action. - Partly due to the above, emotional anchorage could have been better delivered (show, don't tell). Nitpicks: - The art, while mostly breathtaking, could use more variety in framing, though that is mostly due to the series taking place in a ship in space so I'm not sure how much better Di Meo could make it. Maybe more varied or contrasting color choices would help. - Ewing needs to chill with the bold words.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elias

    Almost 4 stars. Really strong entrance to a series. There were a few pages of copy-pasted panels and speech bubbles that were supposed to create a montage and enhance a relationship between characters, but I'd much prefer more details and scenes between those characters. The characters were just on the edge of being fully realized, so I'm looking forward to the next volume. I'd also love some more worldbuilding as to how this "industry" functions: how are the parts of the gods used in society? H Almost 4 stars. Really strong entrance to a series. There were a few pages of copy-pasted panels and speech bubbles that were supposed to create a montage and enhance a relationship between characters, but I'd much prefer more details and scenes between those characters. The characters were just on the edge of being fully realized, so I'm looking forward to the next volume. I'd also love some more worldbuilding as to how this "industry" functions: how are the parts of the gods used in society? How had it shaped the economy and other parts of life? These questions were hinted at and hardly addressed. This is a job that apparently supports an entire Galaxy of people, and we don't ever see how. The art is incredible, and the scope is clearly depicted. Definitely the best part.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lukas Holmes

    So. I just love this concept. It's such a great, high concept and I want it! But, this is poorly done so far. The art is just incredible. But the story is so, muddled and stumbling and we are not being given much in terms of character development and the stuff you want to hear, how we got here, what it means, where we're going, is forsaken for really poorly executed plot points about this ship and a family. Now, the end of this issue/volume I hope speaks to a direction that we really want this t So. I just love this concept. It's such a great, high concept and I want it! But, this is poorly done so far. The art is just incredible. But the story is so, muddled and stumbling and we are not being given much in terms of character development and the stuff you want to hear, how we got here, what it means, where we're going, is forsaken for really poorly executed plot points about this ship and a family. Now, the end of this issue/volume I hope speaks to a direction that we really want this to go and that all of this was just a very short (but very long feeling) preamble to the real story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Absolutely gorgeous artwork by Di Meo makes this a worthy buy all on its own. The story, though the premise is super unique and interesting, doesn’t quite live up to the high caliber illustrations. I enjoyed the prose, especially the back and forth conversations between the crew, but the main conflict between Georges and Paula felt a bit too one-note. Some parts of the world are so interesting, but haven’t been explained or explored at all yet. That end twist was great though, and I’ll definitel Absolutely gorgeous artwork by Di Meo makes this a worthy buy all on its own. The story, though the premise is super unique and interesting, doesn’t quite live up to the high caliber illustrations. I enjoyed the prose, especially the back and forth conversations between the crew, but the main conflict between Georges and Paula felt a bit too one-note. Some parts of the world are so interesting, but haven’t been explained or explored at all yet. That end twist was great though, and I’ll definitely be reading the second volume.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    Such a let down :( I was expecting something different, I guess. Something Expanse-y? Interesting concept, meh storyline. It was a bit disjointed, so in a few parts I was confused. I didn't care about the characters at all, and after a while I stopped caring about what happens next, and I hate that feeling. It was the title that drew my attention most of all. Very catchy. The illustrations were amazing! They were the best thing about this. Such a let down :( I was expecting something different, I guess. Something Expanse-y? Interesting concept, meh storyline. It was a bit disjointed, so in a few parts I was confused. I didn't care about the characters at all, and after a while I stopped caring about what happens next, and I hate that feeling. It was the title that drew my attention most of all. Very catchy. The illustrations were amazing! They were the best thing about this.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matty Dub

    I thought it started great with 3 solid issues but quickly lost steam in the last two. The setting and world seems so important but is mostly unexplained and feels undercooked while the story almost exclusively focuses on the animosity between Richter and George. Story-wise I felt let down a bit. The art is stunning but the same environment are present over and over again and I started feeling like I was looking at the same thing for 100+ pages by the end.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wouter Dhondt

    Amazing setting and world building. Giant dead alien beings (Gods?) floating in space are harvested by autopsy ships for resources (meat, bone, ...) while the government is using escort fighter ships to suppress the black market of said resources. While the setting is great and unique, the story itself is pretty basic. The art and coloring is phenomenal. I'd like to continue reading, but more out of interest in the setting and the art. Amazing setting and world building. Giant dead alien beings (Gods?) floating in space are harvested by autopsy ships for resources (meat, bone, ...) while the government is using escort fighter ships to suppress the black market of said resources. While the setting is great and unique, the story itself is pretty basic. The art and coloring is phenomenal. I'd like to continue reading, but more out of interest in the setting and the art.

  30. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    A weird, violent, space opera mixed with family drama that ends as confusing as it starts. I really can't speak much on the story as I understood the baseline of it and the family part but the actual gods part? Still confused as fuck what was happening, why they do what they do, and the ending was weird. I will however say the art is gorgeous and some of the coolest looking space shots I've ever seen. I'm intrigued to try book 2 but didn't love this. a 3 out of 5. A weird, violent, space opera mixed with family drama that ends as confusing as it starts. I really can't speak much on the story as I understood the baseline of it and the family part but the actual gods part? Still confused as fuck what was happening, why they do what they do, and the ending was weird. I will however say the art is gorgeous and some of the coolest looking space shots I've ever seen. I'm intrigued to try book 2 but didn't love this. a 3 out of 5.

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