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10 Questions Every Teen Should Ask (and Answer) about Christianity

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Written by Rebecca McLaughlin, Author of Confronting Christianity In a world of increasing ideological diversity, kids are being challenged to think through their own beliefs at an early age. Questions like How can you believe the Bible is true?; Why can't we just agree that love is love?; and Isn't Christianity against diversity? can seem like roadblocks for kids who are Written by Rebecca McLaughlin, Author of Confronting Christianity In a world of increasing ideological diversity, kids are being challenged to think through their own beliefs at an early age. Questions like How can you believe the Bible is true?; Why can't we just agree that love is love?; and Isn't Christianity against diversity? can seem like roadblocks for kids who are following Jesus, as well as for those who might otherwise consider faith in Christ. In this helpful book--written both for Christian kids and for those who think Jesus is just a fairy tale character--Rebecca McLaughlin invites readers ages 12-15 to dig deep into hard questions for themselves and perhaps discover that the things that once looked like roadblocks to faith might actually be signposts.


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Written by Rebecca McLaughlin, Author of Confronting Christianity In a world of increasing ideological diversity, kids are being challenged to think through their own beliefs at an early age. Questions like How can you believe the Bible is true?; Why can't we just agree that love is love?; and Isn't Christianity against diversity? can seem like roadblocks for kids who are Written by Rebecca McLaughlin, Author of Confronting Christianity In a world of increasing ideological diversity, kids are being challenged to think through their own beliefs at an early age. Questions like How can you believe the Bible is true?; Why can't we just agree that love is love?; and Isn't Christianity against diversity? can seem like roadblocks for kids who are following Jesus, as well as for those who might otherwise consider faith in Christ. In this helpful book--written both for Christian kids and for those who think Jesus is just a fairy tale character--Rebecca McLaughlin invites readers ages 12-15 to dig deep into hard questions for themselves and perhaps discover that the things that once looked like roadblocks to faith might actually be signposts.

30 review for 10 Questions Every Teen Should Ask (and Answer) about Christianity

  1. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    Loved how she helps students understand concepts with references to Harry Potter! Easy read but enjoyable and clear.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brad Hough

    4.0 // This is a wonderful resource for teens who are wrestling with any of the questions that Rebecca McLaughlin addresses here. She covers a wide range of topics—race, believability of Scripture, gender, and suffering, among several others—and does so in a compassionate, biblical way without talking down to teenagers. The book doesn’t necessarily seek to address and answer every possible question, and older teens might may see this as more of a springboard for further research. Two things knoc 4.0 // This is a wonderful resource for teens who are wrestling with any of the questions that Rebecca McLaughlin addresses here. She covers a wide range of topics—race, believability of Scripture, gender, and suffering, among several others—and does so in a compassionate, biblical way without talking down to teenagers. The book doesn’t necessarily seek to address and answer every possible question, and older teens might may see this as more of a springboard for further research. Two things knocked down my rating. First, there were certain sections I wish McLaughlin had expounded on a bit more (a discussion of justice in the chapter about Heaven and Hell could have been helpful and appropriate, for example), and one or two places that would have benefited from a slower pace, which would have allowed for a more empathetic tone. Secondly, the first chapter felt oversimplified in a way that could actually be harmful unless a teenager has someone wise in their life to talk through it with. It could come across that a believer’s life is devoid of trouble and difficulty, when Jesus tells his followers just the opposite (John 16:33). Overall, though, I think she accomplishes what she sets out to do: invite teens to ask hard questions, and provide some helpful, biblical answers.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Bridcut

    A few minor quibbles but generally I thought this was excellent. The aesthetics/presentation are good too. The little pictures on the front represent the different chapters and are carried through the book as is the colour scheme. There are bullet point summaries at the end of each chapter which I think is a particularly good idea in a context where teens are used to online media which encourages you to hop about and not really plug into a long read. A not terribly commited reader could use the A few minor quibbles but generally I thought this was excellent. The aesthetics/presentation are good too. The little pictures on the front represent the different chapters and are carried through the book as is the colour scheme. There are bullet point summaries at the end of each chapter which I think is a particularly good idea in a context where teens are used to online media which encourages you to hop about and not really plug into a long read. A not terribly commited reader could use the bullet points to pinpoint the bits they are interested enough to read properly to understand how those conclusions were reached/supported.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    When I was a teenager, I always felt suspicious of any book adapted for teens. Generally, authors watered down the original material, included stereotyped illustrations, and talked down to the reader, assuming that they would only keep reading if the writer kept their attention with a quirky tone, slang, and pop culture references. This book, however, epitomizes a teenage version done well. I would have loved this when I was the target age for it, and enjoyed reading it in addition to McLaughlin When I was a teenager, I always felt suspicious of any book adapted for teens. Generally, authors watered down the original material, included stereotyped illustrations, and talked down to the reader, assuming that they would only keep reading if the writer kept their attention with a quirky tone, slang, and pop culture references. This book, however, epitomizes a teenage version done well. I would have loved this when I was the target age for it, and enjoyed reading it in addition to McLaughlin's adult book. This isn't just an abridged version of Confronting Christianity, but is an entirely rewritten work that is specifically geared towards teenagers, their developmental stages, their concerns, and the common questions that they have about Christianity. Audience In this book, McLaughlin addresses the same common questions and objections that she responded to in her work for adults. However, she writes about them differently, with sensitivity to the thoughts and social contexts of today's teenagers. She shares similar personal and real-life illustrations, and draws in much of the same cited material, but she changed, added, or removed elements based on what her audience would find most relevant and be intellectually or emotionally read for. In the introduction, she encourages readers who are sixteen or older to consider reading Confronting Christianity, and this book is for younger teens. She takes teens' questions and concerns very seriously and talks to them as equals, but does so in a way that avoids extremely heavy or complex content that would turn off reluctant or highly sensitive readers. Issues In the first chapter, McLaughlin writes about the scientifically indicated benefits of the Christian life, showing how Christianity can impact people's physical and mental health. After this, she writes about common objections to Christianity or questions about the faith. She addresses concerns about race, pluralism, the basis for morality, evidence for the gospels and the resurrection, reasons why science hasn't disproved Christianity, issues about sexuality and gender, the problem of suffering, and beliefs about heaven and hell. She shares personal stories and testimonials from friends and associates throughout the book, showing how real people have navigated their questions about life and found meaningful, life-changing answers in the Christian faith. I appreciate McLaughlin's vulnerability and insight, and she writes to teens in a way that is engaging, compassionate, and personal. Also, even though she weaves in lots of pop culture references, none of them are studied attempts at coolness. She doesn't try to act or talk like a teenager, but engages with familiar books and movies in a way that is totally natural and supports her writing. Her references to the Harry Potter stories include some significant spoilers, which she warns readers about up front, but she draws on stories and examples from Harry Potter and movies like Moana and Frozen to create vivid illustrations and examples that teens can relate to. Conclusion I would highly recommend this book to teenagers who are asking deep questions about Christianity. If they are skeptics, they will find McLaughlin thought-provoking and fair, and if they are Christians, they can deepen their faith by understanding the reasons behind what they believe. McLaughlin's arguments, real-life examples, and cited sources can also help teens know how to respond to the objections and questions of people around them. A single book can't cover everything, and some readers will have different areas of disagreement with the author, but this is a fantastic guide for teens who are asking tough questions about faith. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tomsugi

    Summary Rebecca McLaughlin’s first book, Confronting Christianity: 12 Hard Questions for the World’s Largest Religion, was named Christian Book of the Year in 2020 by Christianity Today magazine. Her second book, which simplifies many of those concepts for teens, intrigued me from the beginning with its table of contents. My boys, on the cusp of the teen years, are already asking these questions. So I read this book as a father thinking how to instruct my boys and as a pastor considering how it w Summary Rebecca McLaughlin’s first book, Confronting Christianity: 12 Hard Questions for the World’s Largest Religion, was named Christian Book of the Year in 2020 by Christianity Today magazine. Her second book, which simplifies many of those concepts for teens, intrigued me from the beginning with its table of contents. My boys, on the cusp of the teen years, are already asking these questions. So I read this book as a father thinking how to instruct my boys and as a pastor considering how it would be received by our youth. Strengths This book was well-written, humorous, and filled with pop culture references familiar to teens (i.e., Harry Potter and Disney movies). McLaughlin also quotes experts in their fields to show the evidence backing her claims and describes how scientists, psychologists, and philosophers have scrambled to the top of the hill to come to the same conclusions the Bible had been saying all along. She also references many historical examples as a way to broaden young people’s minds as they navigate the confusion in our world today. McLaughlin writes from a conservative evangelical background, but she doesn’t tell the reader exactly what to think. Instead, she teaches Christians how to better talk about these questions and to engage in honest conversations about the hard parts of Christianity. Readers may not always agree with McLaughlin as she addresses difficult subjects such as abortion (ch. 4), transgenderism (ch. 8), sexual abuse, and same-sex attraction (ch. 7). She also asserts the “Big Bang” theory of the universe’s origin is more in line with science (100-101). She writes, however, in a gentle manner that is greatly needed among Christians today. McLaughlin also writes conversationally about challenging apologetic questions to encourage opportunities for discussion. Most importantly, she presents the clear gospel message and invites the reader to believe in Jesus. I enjoyed this book from start finish and would encourage parents to read it with their kids. Suggestions I only have a few suggestions for improvement due to the book’s limited purpose. Those who read Confronting Christianity will find many of the ideas repackaged and watered down for teens. In addition, although McLaughlin has a degree in theology, don’t expect a Bible study. She talks a lot about the Bible, but doesn’t get too preachy. I think a discussion guide or questions at the end of each chapter would be helpful in a small group or discipleship setting. I would also like to see video material available as McLaughlin is an excellent communicator. Her multiple references to Harry Potter and Disney movies might fall flat with certain audiences or with future readers. Conclusion McLaughlin has written an excellent conversation piece for parents and teens to converse about today’s social issues and sticky questions Christians face. Each chapter concludes with a punchy summary to refresh the main points. The book is written for youth, but provides a plethora of academic footnotes should the reader desire to study more. Topical and Scripture indices also fill out the back matter. Readers who enjoyed this book might explore further with Confronting Christianity. * Crossway has provided a media copy of this book for my honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michele Morin

    I pray differently (and perhaps more ferociously) for my grandchildren than I ever did for my four sons, because it feels to me as if there is more at risk for those growing up in 2021. It does seem as if Rebecca McLaughlin’s book for teens and young adults couldn’t have come at a better time. 10 Questions Every Teen Should Ask (and Answer) about Christianity reframes the content of her excellent adult non-fiction Confronting Christianity. (Named Book of the Year 2020 by CT) She tackles the majo I pray differently (and perhaps more ferociously) for my grandchildren than I ever did for my four sons, because it feels to me as if there is more at risk for those growing up in 2021. It does seem as if Rebecca McLaughlin’s book for teens and young adults couldn’t have come at a better time. 10 Questions Every Teen Should Ask (and Answer) about Christianity reframes the content of her excellent adult non-fiction Confronting Christianity. (Named Book of the Year 2020 by CT) She tackles the major questions confronting this generation, for myths and misconceptions about Christianity (and, therefore, reality itself!) abound in our world. Kids and teens have complex questions, and parents who feel ill-equipped to address them will find in McLaughlin’s work a resoundingly confident voice who dares to be both clear and orthodox about Christianity’s deepest beliefs. Organized around ten questions, the book provides a solid foundation for great conversations between parents and kids–particularly if they commit to reading the book together. What a relief to discover that it is not our calling as Christians to arrive at a perfectly curated set of pat answers, and, thereafter, never to ask again! Does Your Teen Know…? One solid conclusion from each chapter (and it was hard to choose just one!) provides a helpful overview, and also some substantial food for thought on today’s mental menu (Kindle locations cited): 1. “Jesus never promised us an easy life now… But following Jesus and living as the Bible calls us to live turns out to be really good for us–even here and now” (473),” 2. “Christianity isn’t against racial and cultural diversity. It’s the most racially and culturally diverse movement in all of history” (637). 3. “Saying all religions are equal paths to God sounds respectful, but it actually isn’t, because it doesn’t take the truth claims of any religion seriously” (775). 4. “If there is no God who created the universe, there is no universal right and wrong. We can all just have different opinions. But if there is a Creator God, he has the right to tell us what to do” (996). 5. “Some of the smartest people in the world–including people who know all about modern science–believe that the Bible is true” (1179). 6. “Science can tell us many amazing and important things, but it can’t tell us the most important things about who we are and why we matter” (1392). 7. “Jesus’s love is the greatest love there is. It’s worth giving up any other relationship for him” (1682). 8. “Christianity is not against women. There have always been more Christian women than men. In fact, Christianity is the greatest movement of and for women in all of history” (1954). 9. “There are times when God intends for us to suffer, not because he doesn’t love us but because he does” (1983). 10. “When we come to Jesus, we find out two things: (1) we are more sinful than we ever thought, and (2) we are more loved than we ever dreamed” (2229). We can’t just assume that our teens and children (even the ones who have grown up in a pew!) are ready to engage in hard conversations or to respond to big questions on these topics. As parents, let’s initiate a few dangerous conversations around the dining room table. Allowing our own minds to be challenged is the first step! Many thanks to Crossway for providing a copy of this book to facilitate my review, which is, of course, offered freely and with honesty.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bella Schroeder

    When I began reading, I could not put this book down. McLaughin used a mix of Biblical Theology and Disney to perfectly illustrate how our questions are answered. From childhood memories to Moana quotes all the way to quotes from the Bible, I was sucked into a world filled with answers to many questions that I had been asking. Most theology books are geared towards children or adults. So much so that I was jumping for joy when I found that an author had taken time away from writing to Children o When I began reading, I could not put this book down. McLaughin used a mix of Biblical Theology and Disney to perfectly illustrate how our questions are answered. From childhood memories to Moana quotes all the way to quotes from the Bible, I was sucked into a world filled with answers to many questions that I had been asking. Most theology books are geared towards children or adults. So much so that I was jumping for joy when I found that an author had taken time away from writing to Children or Adults to write a story for me. For all teens. A book for just us to learn that it is ok to have questions about our faith, but it is not ok to leave them unanswered because that is when doubt creeps in. I loved being able to see McLaughin use Disney quotes to better explain the points that she made. It was unlike anything that I had ever seen. I never thought movies that I use to watch as a child would be able to point me to the Lord. I also loved the way that McLaughin gave a short background of each Disney character or Harry Potter reference. I felt as though each background allowed every reader to understand the point McLaughin was trying to make without the need to read or watch the movies. This book was not written for the purpose to answer all questions perfectly. No, it was written to teach us the importance of being in the word. To going to Him when we struggle with doubt and not allowing the enemy to draw us away from the word. Now do not get me wrong. This book is able to answer ten questions over the course of this book, but since this book is so short and geared for any teen during their walk, there are some points that the author did not go too deep into. **I received this book from crossway's blog review program. My thoughts are my own and not paid for.**

  8. 5 out of 5

    Evan

    "So does Jesus rush to bring Lazarus back from the dead? No. Instead, they talk. Your brother will rise again, says Jesus. Many Jews at that time believed that God would raise his people to life again at the end of time. So Martha responds, I know that he will rise again in the resurrection on the last day. And yet, we can almost hear her thinking, what about now Jesus? What about now? Why won't you help me now? The Bible promises that God will put everything right for his people in the end. Whe "So does Jesus rush to bring Lazarus back from the dead? No. Instead, they talk. Your brother will rise again, says Jesus. Many Jews at that time believed that God would raise his people to life again at the end of time. So Martha responds, I know that he will rise again in the resurrection on the last day. And yet, we can almost hear her thinking, what about now Jesus? What about now? Why won't you help me now? The Bible promises that God will put everything right for his people in the end. When Jesus comes back as king, there will be no death, or mourning, or crying, or pain, but sometimes that doesn't feel very comforting. Martha believes that her brother will come back to life at the end of time, but she wants him back now. She knows how powerful Jesus is. She knows he could raise Lazarus right away, but he doesn't. Instead Jesus looks into this heartbroken woman's eyes and says these astonishing words: I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live. And everyone who lives and believes in me shall never die. Do you believe this? Martha wants to have her brother back more than anything in the world. She's desperate. Jesus could make her deepest wish come true. But instead of giving Martha her wish, Jesus tells her what she most needs is not Lazarus but Jesus himself. He is the resurrection and the life. Sometimes, if we're honest, we want the gift more than the giver...when Jesus looks into Martha's eyes, he tells her the greatest truth that you and I could ever learn. What we need the most is not what Jesus can give us. It's Jesus himself. He is the resurrection and the life...God is not a means to an end. He is the end...He's not just the greatest gift giver in the history of the world. He's the greatest gift."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    A clear and concise summary of several important questions many teens ask (or at least consider) about Christianity that causes skepticism, covering topics such as heaven/hell, world religions, gender, sexuality, and more. McLaughlin is extremely relatable and does an expert job in encouraging her audience to consider these issues for themselves and to form their own conclusions, while still providing succinct answers to the questions from a historically orthodox Christian perspective. If the boo A clear and concise summary of several important questions many teens ask (or at least consider) about Christianity that causes skepticism, covering topics such as heaven/hell, world religions, gender, sexuality, and more. McLaughlin is extremely relatable and does an expert job in encouraging her audience to consider these issues for themselves and to form their own conclusions, while still providing succinct answers to the questions from a historically orthodox Christian perspective. If the book has any drawback, it's the overuse of the Harry Potter series as a connection point. For teens that have read/love Harry Potter, they're great. For others, the connections are not quite as clear, and that's likely to cause the book to lose immediate value over time. I would highly recommend this as a great introduction to Christian apologetics for pre-teens and younger teens (11-13), but think most later teens could handle her full title (Confronting Christianity: 12 Hard Questions for the World's Largest Religion) and can skip this one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pauline

    Wisely recommended by our Women’s Bible Study director, it’s not just a book for teens as the title states. It’s a straightforward book for anyone who has questions about Christianity or finds themselves wanting to have a better foundation for discussing with teens the ten questions raised in the book. The topics are ones our young people deal with daily, as do most people in our culture—racism, feminism, morality, abortion, science and faith, pornography, same sex attraction, transgender and no Wisely recommended by our Women’s Bible Study director, it’s not just a book for teens as the title states. It’s a straightforward book for anyone who has questions about Christianity or finds themselves wanting to have a better foundation for discussing with teens the ten questions raised in the book. The topics are ones our young people deal with daily, as do most people in our culture—racism, feminism, morality, abortion, science and faith, pornography, same sex attraction, transgender and non-binary identities, suffering, evidence for the gospels, heaven and hell. Rebecca McLaughlin, a Cambridge PhD, adresses these issues with intelligence, logic, and honesty. You may be a bit uncomfortable with the honesty and discussion at times, but you will see the strength and truth of her faith and appreciate her clear dealing with hard topics.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    This is an extremely accessible book for teens, and would serve as both a book on discipleship and apologetics. Author Rebecca McLaughlin is essentially rewriting her previous book "Confronting Christianity" for teens, and does a marvelous job of hitting a number of important issues facing teens today. This is not intended to be a book with all the answers, and it reminds me a lot of Dan Kimball's "How Not to Read the Bible", published late last year. They are different books for sure, with Kimb This is an extremely accessible book for teens, and would serve as both a book on discipleship and apologetics. Author Rebecca McLaughlin is essentially rewriting her previous book "Confronting Christianity" for teens, and does a marvelous job of hitting a number of important issues facing teens today. This is not intended to be a book with all the answers, and it reminds me a lot of Dan Kimball's "How Not to Read the Bible", published late last year. They are different books for sure, with Kimball focusing on the hermeneutical aspects of difficult questions, whereas McLaughlin focuses on the logic of difficult questions. They compliment one another I think, and when read together, teens should have a great framework from which to begin thinking through those issues.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Julie Reynolds

    Oh boy. What to write to review this book. It’s pitched as a teen book, but most teenagers have finished Harry Potter and so the Harry Potter analogies wouldn’t work. I also am in two minds as to whether Harry Potter should be read by Christians. Also the author obviously uses scripture references which is fine, but not every teen will know which books are in the OT/NT let alone chapters and verses. So although it’s pitched to Christian and non Christian teens, I would think that non Christian t Oh boy. What to write to review this book. It’s pitched as a teen book, but most teenagers have finished Harry Potter and so the Harry Potter analogies wouldn’t work. I also am in two minds as to whether Harry Potter should be read by Christians. Also the author obviously uses scripture references which is fine, but not every teen will know which books are in the OT/NT let alone chapters and verses. So although it’s pitched to Christian and non Christian teens, I would think that non Christian teens wouldn’t bother reading the scripture passages as the concept would be alien. Anyway, I was going to get my non Christian child to read the book, but probably will pass and find other material.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marc Sims

    This book, hands down, will now be my go to resource to hand young people, especially before they leave for college. I think an appropriate age range for this book (depending on the maturity of the teen) would be from ages 12-17. I worked as a youth pastor for a number of years and would try to take teenagers through Keller’s Reason for God before they left for college, hoping to prepare them for the challenges they would face. But often the teenagers struggled to make it through the book. I wish This book, hands down, will now be my go to resource to hand young people, especially before they leave for college. I think an appropriate age range for this book (depending on the maturity of the teen) would be from ages 12-17. I worked as a youth pastor for a number of years and would try to take teenagers through Keller’s Reason for God before they left for college, hoping to prepare them for the challenges they would face. But often the teenagers struggled to make it through the book. I wished that there was a resource like Keller that was geared for young people. Well, here it is! Look no further! For full review, read here: https://simsmarc.wordpress.com/2021/0...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    Her arguments felt over simplified and unsatisfactory to me. This might be in part because it is more geared towards middle and elementary school kids than teenagers or young adults. She talked about Christianity as though it is a monolith. On page 70, she claims that “Christians were the first people to invent hospitals, where poor people who got sick could be cared for” without a citation. She then goes on go say that “if there is no God, these things [our ideas of right and wrong] are just ou Her arguments felt over simplified and unsatisfactory to me. This might be in part because it is more geared towards middle and elementary school kids than teenagers or young adults. She talked about Christianity as though it is a monolith. On page 70, she claims that “Christians were the first people to invent hospitals, where poor people who got sick could be cared for” without a citation. She then goes on go say that “if there is no God, these things [our ideas of right and wrong] are just our preferences and opinions. They’re not universal truths to which everyone must agree” (71). She also spends two chapters attempting to justify homophobia and transphobia. I read the first 40% before putting it down. I suggest you find another book. I wish I was able to give it fewer stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Zeke

    Read this to see if I'd recommend it to my students - Rebecca has written another great book (plenty of the content overlaps with Confronting Christianity) that only gets a star taken off because I think it aims more at the pre-teen set than what we usually think of as teenagers. There's a lot of Disney movie and Harry Potter references in here that most kids probably know but kids above a certain age may roll their eyes at - I don't think I'd give this to a kid who was past something like 6th o Read this to see if I'd recommend it to my students - Rebecca has written another great book (plenty of the content overlaps with Confronting Christianity) that only gets a star taken off because I think it aims more at the pre-teen set than what we usually think of as teenagers. There's a lot of Disney movie and Harry Potter references in here that most kids probably know but kids above a certain age may roll their eyes at - I don't think I'd give this to a kid who was past something like 6th or 7th grade. But the content is really solid and engages with tough questions in a winsome, intelligent way - I'd gladly give it to any 10-12 year old to read and talk through.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey D'alessandro

    I teach middle school Bible and am always looking for solid apologetics resources to use with my students. After reading this book, I will definitely be integrating it into my curriculum. It can be challenging to find resources that are solid, while being accessible to younger teens. This book tackles challenging topics with accessibility and compassion. With any book on apologetics, this is not a book that will answer every question about Christianity, but is an excellent jumping off point for I teach middle school Bible and am always looking for solid apologetics resources to use with my students. After reading this book, I will definitely be integrating it into my curriculum. It can be challenging to find resources that are solid, while being accessible to younger teens. This book tackles challenging topics with accessibility and compassion. With any book on apologetics, this is not a book that will answer every question about Christianity, but is an excellent jumping off point for important conversations and further study. Highly recommend!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Breezee

    Loved Confronting Christianity so I knew I would love this just as much. Even though this book says it’s for 12-15 yr olds, I think it’s definitely more for 15+ as it tackles mature topics. Aiden is currently reading it, but Gavin won’t be for at least a few more years. Highly recommend parents read it prior to their teens, but once they are ready, I highly recommend it for teens (if that makes sense).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Borwick

    I have mixed reviews on this book. Without a doubt, many of the chapters that are written are rich with sound-doctrine and careful teaching. But, the very first chapter of the book was frustrating for me to read. I personally believe that the first chapter included dangerous teaching with heavy-handed articulation—I would not recommend this book for a teenager, unless it was read in a group setting with the filter of an experienced ministry leader.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robin Langford

    I want to say it’s an excellent simplification of Confronting Christianity, but that could imply that CC wasn’t implemented or clear. It was! This book just makes the topics accessible to readers who might not have the life/maturity to fully engage with a more in-depth treatment of these topics. As I read it I loved thinking that I could easily hand anyone who wanted to read/discuss further the “adult” version. My hope is to have a book club with 10 Questions this summer for my sons.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nickolas Hartman

    An excellent book that would be good to build a student ministry study based off of. Definitely written for the 11 to 15 age range but if you have a good mix, this book is perfect, just May have to take it a bit deeper with the older students. McLauglin lays it all out on the table, doesn’t sugar coat and deals with real issues which is something we need to do as well.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    This is a good book if you have questions about Christianity and it debunks popular lies. It doesn't go too in depth because it is a YA book but she does have an adult version called Confronting Christianity. Loved how she used pop culture references like Harry Potter. It was a nice surprise. This is a good book if you have questions about Christianity and it debunks popular lies. It doesn't go too in depth because it is a YA book but she does have an adult version called Confronting Christianity. Loved how she used pop culture references like Harry Potter. It was a nice surprise.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Barnes

    This was a fun, vivid read—and yet so good at explaining the answers to each question. I read the “adult version” and thought it was super helpful, but I loved the way she referenced common stories and cultural references (specifically Harry Potter) in this version to help illustrate each point and being a greater depth of understanding.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kait

    I loved this book. The author is gifted at explaining things using examples from popular stories for youth such as Harry Potter and Moana. I appreciated that, as well as her compelling arguments and user-friendly apologetics, very much. Would highly recommend to any youth in my life, probably older than age 12 or 13.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tim Littleford

    Raises and answers 10 questions young people might have today. Generally very good. I thought the chapters on suffering, can we trust the Bible and heaven and hell were the strongest. A good resource for teens and those who work with teens. Heavy on the pop culture illustrations and references, particularly heavy on the Harry Potter references, but used to great effect.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Prince

    Easy to read and addresses questions teens are asking. Strongly recommended for anyone who wants to make disciples of students. Lots of Harry Potter references, but she does a good job of explaining the illustrations.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jason Fletcher

    A really good book for: - students wrestling with tough questions - leaders walking with students through Christianity’s claims - any person invested in the life of students / student ministry Check it out!

  27. 4 out of 5

    J. J.

    What an incredible, incredible gift to the Church. Read it aloud before bed to my sweet twelve year old daughter this past month, and I know it will be a significant part of her catechesis. Praise God for Rebecca McLaughlin!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dan Nale

    Helpful for tweens and teens to navigate some of the tough questions of Christianity and our culture. Great examples from youth culture and literature to clarify the issues and search for truth.

  29. 5 out of 5

    MRS ALLISON DYER

    Fantastic book!! Rebecca deals with the questions teenagers and adults are faced with day in day out and it’s been so helpful to consider each one. Thank you 👌

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Loved it! This was an excellent book that handles some really heavy and needed topics in an inaccessible way for teens. I also loved her use of Harry Potter illustrations! 👍🏻😄

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