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Kim Addonizio’s sharp and irreverent eighth volume, Now We’re Getting Somewhere, is an essential companion to your practice of the Finnish art of kalsarikännit—drinking at home, alone in your underwear, with no intention of going out. Imbued with the poet’s characteristic precision and passion, the collection charts a hazardous course through heartache, climate change, den Kim Addonizio’s sharp and irreverent eighth volume, Now We’re Getting Somewhere, is an essential companion to your practice of the Finnish art of kalsarikännit—drinking at home, alone in your underwear, with no intention of going out. Imbued with the poet’s characteristic precision and passion, the collection charts a hazardous course through heartache, climate change, dental work, Outlander, semiotics, and more. Combatting existential gloom with a wicked, seductive energy, Addonizio investigates desire, loss, and the madness of contemporary life. She calls out to Walt Whitman and John Keats, echoes Dorothy Parker, and finds sisterhood with Virginia Woolf. Sometimes confessional, sometimes philosophical, these poems weave from desolation to drollery and clamor with raucous imagery: an insect in high heels, a wolf at an uncomfortable party, a glowing and self-serious guitar. A poet whose “voice lifts from the page, alive and biting” (Sky Sanchez, San Francisco Book Review), Addonizio reminds her reader, "if you think nothing / no one can / listen I love you joy is coming."


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Kim Addonizio’s sharp and irreverent eighth volume, Now We’re Getting Somewhere, is an essential companion to your practice of the Finnish art of kalsarikännit—drinking at home, alone in your underwear, with no intention of going out. Imbued with the poet’s characteristic precision and passion, the collection charts a hazardous course through heartache, climate change, den Kim Addonizio’s sharp and irreverent eighth volume, Now We’re Getting Somewhere, is an essential companion to your practice of the Finnish art of kalsarikännit—drinking at home, alone in your underwear, with no intention of going out. Imbued with the poet’s characteristic precision and passion, the collection charts a hazardous course through heartache, climate change, dental work, Outlander, semiotics, and more. Combatting existential gloom with a wicked, seductive energy, Addonizio investigates desire, loss, and the madness of contemporary life. She calls out to Walt Whitman and John Keats, echoes Dorothy Parker, and finds sisterhood with Virginia Woolf. Sometimes confessional, sometimes philosophical, these poems weave from desolation to drollery and clamor with raucous imagery: an insect in high heels, a wolf at an uncomfortable party, a glowing and self-serious guitar. A poet whose “voice lifts from the page, alive and biting” (Sky Sanchez, San Francisco Book Review), Addonizio reminds her reader, "if you think nothing / no one can / listen I love you joy is coming."

52 review for Now We're Getting Somewhere: Poems

  1. 5 out of 5

    Geoff

    It does not at all surprise me that Kim Addonizio compares herself to Bukowski in the title of her memoir, as in everything I've read from her she shares his glorying in the low and rotten and wrong and dissipated, but also shares his central core of hope and love; her cynicism is driven by disappointed hope (of course, since I haven't read that memoir yet, she could also be making a pointed joke about the crappy person Bukowski was. Addonizio seems to effortlessly be able to operate on at least It does not at all surprise me that Kim Addonizio compares herself to Bukowski in the title of her memoir, as in everything I've read from her she shares his glorying in the low and rotten and wrong and dissipated, but also shares his central core of hope and love; her cynicism is driven by disappointed hope (of course, since I haven't read that memoir yet, she could also be making a pointed joke about the crappy person Bukowski was. Addonizio seems to effortlessly be able to operate on at least four levels at the same time). This is on full display in this collection in poems like "Signs": "This morning the East River Ferry is just a boat pulling up to the ugly little park in Williamsburg & Manhattan isn't the underworld projecting its eternal office buildings into those clouds The seagull landing on my balcony isn't an image of transcendence or being destroyed by love There isn't any meaning in things There probably aren't even any things which is hard to think about & this morning I don't want to think about anything but I do, I think about...things as each special, unique individual in the long line below my window steps onto the ferry as rain slips down not representing the Many cleaved from the One & black umbrellas unfold I think about the giant wax man in the museum with three wicks in his head slowly burning & the hollow as his face starts to melt from the inside & the heartsick woman who jumped from the bridge, hauled up & covered with a tarp on the dock I'm sick of death & sick to death of romantic love but I still want to live if only to rearrange the base metals of my depression like canned lima beans on a mid-century modern dinner plate My last love had beautiful green eyes Eyes like two caged parrots refusing to say anything Eyes like two rivers filling with toxic runoff Maybe later today the sun will come out and smile like a kind nanny but it won't be a kind nanny, or even a mean nanny, shaking me hard One day it will just cool, like...a star When the clock says 11:11 it doesn't mean the design of things has risen to the surface & been made manifest It means I'm still here hours later watching the boats dock & then leave without me It means the people who commuted across the river to work on Wall Street are still there, their eye like suitcases of small, unmarked bills & everything is going to change for the worse" Wow. Just....wow. The three similes she sneaks in there in a poem about how nothing is a simile are brutal and raw and hurting and amazing. This is the second collection of Addonizio's that I've read and loved and it won't be my last. **Thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley for a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

    Having studied poetry with Addonizio's book "Ordinary Genius", it was no surprise that I fell in love with her words once again. Her diction is stunning, even from the first poem alone, "Night In The Castle", it's evident that her words are picked with absolute precision. I adored her attention to nature and bugs throughout the collection. Combining this attention to the world and Addonizio's subtle cheeky vulgarness, I thought the works as a whole were entertaining and eye-opening. I can't wait Having studied poetry with Addonizio's book "Ordinary Genius", it was no surprise that I fell in love with her words once again. Her diction is stunning, even from the first poem alone, "Night In The Castle", it's evident that her words are picked with absolute precision. I adored her attention to nature and bugs throughout the collection. Combining this attention to the world and Addonizio's subtle cheeky vulgarness, I thought the works as a whole were entertaining and eye-opening. I can't wait to hold this collection in my hands and be able to annotate it, as well as share it with my poet friends! — read as DRC

  3. 5 out of 5

    Isaiah Vianese

    In her latest collection, Kim Addonizio examines the confessional mode with a critical eye. In her books Tell Me and What Is This Thing Called Love, she used the confessional, lyric mode to explore the life of speakers who drank hard and loved harder, but in recent years she has pulled back from that style and become more observational about the world, especially in her collections Lucifer at the Starlight and Mortal Trash. In this new book, Now We're Getting Somewhere, she takes her more observ In her latest collection, Kim Addonizio examines the confessional mode with a critical eye. In her books Tell Me and What Is This Thing Called Love, she used the confessional, lyric mode to explore the life of speakers who drank hard and loved harder, but in recent years she has pulled back from that style and become more observational about the world, especially in her collections Lucifer at the Starlight and Mortal Trash. In this new book, Now We're Getting Somewhere, she takes her more observational stance to exam the confessional work of her past and how that has been received. For example, the second section of the book, titled "Songs For Sad Girls," appears to nod at the hollow criticism that confessional poetry is "sad girl stuff." Section Three, titled "Confessional Poetry," is a free association work that jabs at the critics--especially male critics--who have dismissed the gritty and personal nature of some of her work. The first and final sections, "Night in the Castle" and "Archive of Recent Uncomfortable Emotions," mix confessional work, work written directly to poets who used the romantic confessional lyric (namely Whitman and Keats), and poems about writing. This book seems to show Addonizio simultaneously occupy two spaces--the confessional mode, as well as stand outside of that mode to both praise and criticize it. Like Keats, she's playing with negative capability here, and that makes this book an interesting effort--maybe not emotional in the way earlier poems could be, but still very interesting.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Jordan

    There are poetry volumes that will end up being exactly what you were hoping for, delighting and inspiring just the way you imagined when you first sat down to read. Maybe you've purchased the latest by a favorite poet, maybe you've been gifted a new volume from a trusted friend, or perhaps a positive review has raised your expectations about a new work. Now We're Getting Somewhere by Kim Addonizio is one of those books. I could not have been more pleased to discover that my enjoyment of this po There are poetry volumes that will end up being exactly what you were hoping for, delighting and inspiring just the way you imagined when you first sat down to read. Maybe you've purchased the latest by a favorite poet, maybe you've been gifted a new volume from a trusted friend, or perhaps a positive review has raised your expectations about a new work. Now We're Getting Somewhere by Kim Addonizio is one of those books. I could not have been more pleased to discover that my enjoyment of this poet's work and my fascination with her creativity were well-rewarded with an impressive new new collection of fantastic poems. There are a lot of winners here, but I'd be willing to bet "To The Woman Crying Uncontrollably in the Next Stall" might alone justify the purchase price of the whole book. I'm looking forward to coming back to this one over and over. "Archive of Recent Uncomfortable Emotions" is another standout for me, and I'm looking forward to sharing this one with a therapist friend who enjoys reading whatever has me worked up this week. I'm tempted to share something specific that I enjoyed about every poem in the book, but I'll let you enjoy discovering the delights contained in each for yourself. Don't miss this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ioana Teodorescu

    These poems seem very well crafted but lack the heart her previous volumes had. I couldn’t connect to any of them (perhaps except “To the Woman Crying Uncontrollably in the Next Stall”) the way I had to almost all the poems in “Tell Me” for example.

  6. 5 out of 5

    LE Foshee

    First book I read in one sitting in a coffee shop since the covid shutdowns. Gloomy, sultry, bombastic--great stuff!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC of this title. I really struggled to connect with the themes Addonizio put forth in this volume of poetry, and didn't find any particular language that stopped me in my tracks, which is usually what I look for in poetry. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC of this title. I really struggled to connect with the themes Addonizio put forth in this volume of poetry, and didn't find any particular language that stopped me in my tracks, which is usually what I look for in poetry.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Serena

    Now We're Getting Somewhere by Kim Addonizio is as much of an introspective emotional and existential journey as it is a confession that we are no where near perfect human beings. We all have a lot of work to do emotionally, spiritually, and philosophically, but as we struggle with these internal paradigms, we're also watching the world suffer around us and degrade. How do we break through the malaise and paralysis to make progress with ourselves and the world? Perhaps by being less serious abou Now We're Getting Somewhere by Kim Addonizio is as much of an introspective emotional and existential journey as it is a confession that we are no where near perfect human beings. We all have a lot of work to do emotionally, spiritually, and philosophically, but as we struggle with these internal paradigms, we're also watching the world suffer around us and degrade. How do we break through the malaise and paralysis to make progress with ourselves and the world? Perhaps by being less serious about everything, allowing ourselves to fall apart, and taking action that makes actual progress as opposed to the actions that people deem as "making progress." Review on the blog will post June 2, 2021.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  10. 5 out of 5

    Leanna

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matt Feltman

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Parker

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Tait

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gab Nug

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sage Curtis

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maris

  17. 4 out of 5

    William

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  19. 4 out of 5

    Simeon Berry

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christie

  21. 4 out of 5

    David price

  22. 4 out of 5

    Liz Baldwin

  23. 5 out of 5

    LA Finfinger

  24. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Lingo

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bathory Spells

  27. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Lane

  28. 4 out of 5

    M.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megan Alyse

  30. 4 out of 5

    India

  31. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  32. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  33. 4 out of 5

    Linda Holmes

  34. 4 out of 5

    Casey

  35. 5 out of 5

    Bek

  36. 4 out of 5

    Kate Peterson

  37. 5 out of 5

    Leo

  38. 5 out of 5

    Erika Best

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jenni

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  41. 4 out of 5

    Kara Nesvig

  42. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  43. 5 out of 5

    Rachel White

  44. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

  45. 4 out of 5

    Jpiccs

  46. 5 out of 5

    Alexandrea Jarvis

  47. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  48. 5 out of 5

    Terry

  49. 5 out of 5

    Sasha

  50. 4 out of 5

    Alien 39

  51. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

  52. 5 out of 5

    Cori Amato

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