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They built a civilization ahead of its time, and dominated the ancient world.They defined an era of war, love, passion, power, and betrayal.They were a people of mystery whose secrets have turned to dust -- but who inspire our awe and wonder even to this day....The ancient Egyptians They showed us how to live. And how to die.Christian Jacq, author of the international trium They built a civilization ahead of its time, and dominated the ancient world.They defined an era of war, love, passion, power, and betrayal.They were a people of mystery whose secrets have turned to dust -- but who inspire our awe and wonder even to this day....The ancient Egyptians They showed us how to live. And how to die.Christian Jacq, author of the international triumph Ramses, brings the people and the passions of ancient Egypt to life in an enthralling epic novel in four volumes.


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They built a civilization ahead of its time, and dominated the ancient world.They defined an era of war, love, passion, power, and betrayal.They were a people of mystery whose secrets have turned to dust -- but who inspire our awe and wonder even to this day....The ancient Egyptians They showed us how to live. And how to die.Christian Jacq, author of the international trium They built a civilization ahead of its time, and dominated the ancient world.They defined an era of war, love, passion, power, and betrayal.They were a people of mystery whose secrets have turned to dust -- but who inspire our awe and wonder even to this day....The ancient Egyptians They showed us how to live. And how to die.Christian Jacq, author of the international triumph Ramses, brings the people and the passions of ancient Egypt to life in an enthralling epic novel in four volumes.

30 review for Nefer the Silent

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    It was Christian Jacq who introduced me to historical fiction, mostly I employed a 'just the facts, marm' approach. Yet here was an Egyptologist plucking sequences off the walls of tombs and spinning out a tale that would make these characters come to life for us moderns. Fantastic concept. However since then we have others who do the same job so much better. A soft spot I retain, yet in the light of honest feedback I cannot recommend The Stone of Light series. Opening: Around midnight, in the lig It was Christian Jacq who introduced me to historical fiction, mostly I employed a 'just the facts, marm' approach. Yet here was an Egyptologist plucking sequences off the walls of tombs and spinning out a tale that would make these characters come to life for us moderns. Fantastic concept. However since then we have others who do the same job so much better. A soft spot I retain, yet in the light of honest feedback I cannot recommend The Stone of Light series. Opening: Around midnight, in the light of the full moon, nine craftsmen left the Place of Truth and began to climb up a narrow path, guided by their overseer. Summer 2013 Egyptian Encounters: Cleopatra (1963) 3* The Mummy Curse 2* Alexandria: The Last Nights of Cleopatra 4* The Complete Valley of the Kings 1* Ancient Egypt by George Rawlinson 4* Tutankhamen: Life and death of a Pharoah 2* The Luxor Museum 3* Tutankhamen's Treasure 3* The Black Pharaoh\ 3* Nubian Twilight.../ complimentary reading! CR River God 4* House of Eternity The Egyptian (1954) Agora (2009) TR Justine Death on the Nile (1978) 2* The Stone of Light

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Christian Jacq evokes a fascinating period in Ancient Egyptian history. As a child I loved reading about the achievements of this civilisation. Christian Jacq goes one step further however, initiating us into the minutiae of everyday life. If you love history or Egypt then you'll love this book. Wonderful setting, superb characters and a real flavour of the time. Christian Jacq evokes a fascinating period in Ancient Egyptian history. As a child I loved reading about the achievements of this civilisation. Christian Jacq goes one step further however, initiating us into the minutiae of everyday life. If you love history or Egypt then you'll love this book. Wonderful setting, superb characters and a real flavour of the time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. [Reviews book I and book II; mild spoilers] Christopher Jacq, author of the pop-historical fiction series Ramses, has written another series in the same genre entitled Stone of Light. This series focuses on the "Place of Truth", a closed-off village of artists that work on king's tombs, temples, etc. No one except the artists themselves (and their children) is allowed inside the village, and the inhabitents enjoy unparalleled access to food and water, which are delivered to them from the outside. [Reviews book I and book II; mild spoilers] Christopher Jacq, author of the pop-historical fiction series Ramses, has written another series in the same genre entitled Stone of Light. This series focuses on the "Place of Truth", a closed-off village of artists that work on king's tombs, temples, etc. No one except the artists themselves (and their children) is allowed inside the village, and the inhabitents enjoy unparalleled access to food and water, which are delivered to them from the outside. They also have a workforce outside the walls which washes their clothes and takes care of other duties. Book I: Nefer the Silent and Book II: The Wise Woman The Place of Truth thrived under the rule of Ramses, in spite of the objections of many government officers. However, when Ramses dies and his son, Mehnepta (that is not the correct spelling), ascends the throne, things at the Place of Truth become uncertain. The governer of their area, charged with protecting them, is secretly plotting to shut the village down. The main characters in the series are Nefer the Silent, who was born in the Place of Truth, but left to wander because he hadn't "heard the call". On his journeys, he meets Paneb the Ardent, who saves his life, and the woman who becomes his wife. Paneb, a farmer's son, has renounced his heritage and resolved to be a painter. However, entrance to the Place of Truth is not easy, and he encounters many trials. Of course, he eventually makes it. There are two or three additional books in the series, which I haven't yet read. Book III will focus on the fate of the Place of Truth after Mehnepta's death. Overall, I find these books engaging but not particularly stimulating. The story is intruiging and the characters likeable. For me, the major appeal of Jacq's books is the historical background. Obviously, this type of fictional historical reconstruction isn't terribly accurate, but still adds an additional dimension to the story. 2005-10-13

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alix

    A four novel series, I read them from my local library as they came out or were translated. These are wonderful books, well written, historically accurate and immensely entertaining and enthralling. I have been looking for his Ramses series, but no luck. Don't miss these books. If you are a fan of ancient Egypt, fascinated by the pyramids or just want a really really good read, these are the books for you. A four novel series, I read them from my local library as they came out or were translated. These are wonderful books, well written, historically accurate and immensely entertaining and enthralling. I have been looking for his Ramses series, but no luck. Don't miss these books. If you are a fan of ancient Egypt, fascinated by the pyramids or just want a really really good read, these are the books for you.

  5. 5 out of 5

    J. Else

    A solid step up from his other book series I read. His characters are more deeply motivated. The landscape feels very authentic (as did his other, but I feel more historically indulged in this book). I just wanted to sit and read this book all day and night! Surprisingly, one of the main characters is really hard to get behind, Paneb, but you see development here and there with him. Jacq has the talent to somehow get you interested in him though. He is quick to anger, he does not show appreciate A solid step up from his other book series I read. His characters are more deeply motivated. The landscape feels very authentic (as did his other, but I feel more historically indulged in this book). I just wanted to sit and read this book all day and night! Surprisingly, one of the main characters is really hard to get behind, Paneb, but you see development here and there with him. Jacq has the talent to somehow get you interested in him though. He is quick to anger, he does not show appreciate to women, and he even cheats on a wife expecting his baby (granted, she did impose herself on him as basically a servant because she was in love with him, which is, well, demeaning in my opinion). Yet you can see his maturity sprinkle in the mix. I really went back and forth on him. While he seemed to begin to show growth in one chapter, he would revert in the next, and then I would not like him as much as the previous chapter. But near the end of this book, he did end up being more thoughtful and a better listener. He had a love of learning. Still, I’m not a huge fan due to his outlook on women. In the Queen of Freedom (QoF) series, most characters had names that were a personality or facial tribute versus an actual Egyptian name. This story combines both an Egyptian name and a descriptive name, which makes more sense than the former. Having someone go by the name “the Arab” and “Moustache,” while they were great characters, felt a bit like a give up to me on the author’s part. In this story, characters are given names as they enter the Brotherhood. As I mentioned before, the characters in this book have deep feelings. They are motivated by internal desires. You can really feel the emotion in this story. Most of the characters of the QoF series were pretty shallow and showed almost no emotional depth until the end. Strong men and women do not have to be devoid of emotions! This book seemed to get that. While many different characters can take the stage in this novel, their personalities really define them and make you want to keep reading (even if you don’t like them!). I seriously did not want to stop reading this book! I was a little disappointed that Nefer the Silent’s development seemed to stop after his got his name Nefer. He became a stoic side character to Paneb’s more dominating personality. I wanted more from Nefer after he began advancing up the ranks of craftsmen, not Paneb’s observations of his ascent. The landscape felt more authentic in this story. Jacq put in a great blend of mystical and realism. People were inspired and driven by their beliefs, but they had to work hard, show dedication, lead an honest life, and were masters of their own fate. They did not rely on signs from the gods before taking action. What I do find interesting is that Jacq emphasizes the one God who gave birth to many. He hardly mentions the rest of the multitude of gods by name except for a few like Thoth, Hathor, and Sekhmet. The emphasis is on one all-powerful God. This seems a rather Christian emphasis, especially after the hearsay of Akhenaten’s one god. Historically speaking, there were many different versions of the creation story for the Egyptians. So I would conclude this use of “God” versus god could be because Jacq kept the story in Thebes, and Thebes’ patron god is Amon. The other cities would have their worship and prayers centered on other gods. I can say that I liked the way it was handled. Jacq had some beautiful allegories with it too. His language and expressed enlightened thoughts were a delight in this book, which all stemmed from the religious beliefs. This belief also was the foundation for the Brotherhood and guided their methods and rituals. There were so many layers to the culture through the religious belief system. Everything branches out from this strong foundation. I just ate it up the way Jacq used it in the story. As with QoF, the time period is hard to follow. Jacq will occasionally throw in a “for 10 years now” statement, but overall, the passage of time is difficult to tell. I did not find it a deterrent though as the characters and storyline were so strong. But what I most loved was the details and the way life was carried out in this village. Their work has survived thousands of years. They created and decorated the tombs, and we still adore them today. This story really expands on life. Its not just throwing an ancient world on us to show it off. Its about how the pigments of colors were made, the division of work groups and how they functioned together, the way things were measured, how grids were used and the proportions of drawings on these grids, their mathematics, the way a stone was checked to be level, rituals of purification, how medicines were created and used, etc. The culture is so thick, and the storyline is made so much richer with these added details of life. It highlighted how people behaved and what was important to them. I loved learning the trade of these tomb builders along with the characters’ experiences. The book wow’d me. It had great respect for the people of this time period. I’m glad I read this after QoF, otherwise that series would have seriously disappointed me after the dazzling depth of this story. I can’t wait to keep going into book 2!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hypatia

    Read this ages ago in French, now finally re-reading it (and soon the rest of the series) in English. I honestly don't think it's a great translation - it seems like it's a lot of short simple sentences, which I don't remember finding in French. But maybe that says more about my French skills than the translation. Still interesting, despite the detestability of many of the characters. I'm hoping the rest of the series is better on that score. Read this ages ago in French, now finally re-reading it (and soon the rest of the series) in English. I honestly don't think it's a great translation - it seems like it's a lot of short simple sentences, which I don't remember finding in French. But maybe that says more about my French skills than the translation. Still interesting, despite the detestability of many of the characters. I'm hoping the rest of the series is better on that score.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lauren White

    Set myself a challenge to read our ‘old books’ bookshelf and this was first on the list. It was a decidedly battered paperback and I was convinced it would be joining the charity pile, but it’s actually fantastic! Will definitely be surviving for another day. Loved the intrigue of the ancient egyptians, and the individual characters.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sonja

    Christian Jacq is an established Egyptologist, but while he is able to communicate his knowledge in written form, he hasn't entirely succeeded in stepping away from an essay-like writing style. The events in this book series are based on historical events and on primary sources from the New Kingdom workman's village of Deir el-Medina, lifting certain character(name)s directly from those sources. Paneb, one of the main characters, is one of the most notorious inhabitants of the village. Among oth Christian Jacq is an established Egyptologist, but while he is able to communicate his knowledge in written form, he hasn't entirely succeeded in stepping away from an essay-like writing style. The events in this book series are based on historical events and on primary sources from the New Kingdom workman's village of Deir el-Medina, lifting certain character(name)s directly from those sources. Paneb, one of the main characters, is one of the most notorious inhabitants of the village. Among others, we have ostraca accusing him of theft, assault and rape, though it's not clear whether these accusations were factual or slanderous. Stone of Light presents Paneb as a protagonist - if an impatient, belligerent and aggressive one. His personality, like the personalities of every character in this book, is despite this flat. There's no unexpectedness; every character acts precisely in the way they are required to act in order for the linear plot to move forward. Combined with large time skips and plot points that are resolved quickly (often in one or two pages) this makes the story feel bland and more like reading a paper than actual, suspenseful fiction. Antagonist Mehy's scheming is so incredibly transparent that it requires a serious amount of suspension of disbelief to even start entertaining the thought that his success might be credible - the entire Theban administration under Ramses II must consist of complete incompetents! It would have taken only a single official to actually act according to his station for the conspiracy to come crashing down, but because the plot has been predetermined, there is no room to make it quite that hard for the antagonist. There is also a clear division between The Good and The Bad, both in terms of their looks (The Bad are often ugly, fat, or both; The Good handsome or pretty), but also in their motivation and character arcs. There is on the whole nothing good about bad characters, and nothing bad about good characters. Even Paneb's insistence to jump to conclusions and use violence to solve his problems is mostly presented as a good quality. Disappointing, because even the Egyptians knew that it wasn't that simple. What bothers me on a personal level is the sexism; sexism that isn't inherent in the treatment of women in pharaonic Egypt (which wasn't quite as bad as the treatment of women in contemporary neighbouring countries, which the book ironically mentions), but the kind that comes from the author's - subconscious or not - perception of women. The highly stereotypical presentations and descriptions of women are embarassing. Only two types of women are described with any kind of positivity: the docile and the lascivious - and the latter only in the case of one particular character. Not a good look. The Stone of Light series spans four books, and this first book already spans 10 years. Because of this, the book doesn't manage to do anything but feel like a prologue, a 336-page background exposition to prepare for the events to come in the other three books. I can't help but feel this whole first book could have been scrapped and its background information seeded throughout the other three. But in all fairness, those who read this book will inevitably learn something about New Kingdom Egypt; a few Egyptian words, the purpose of Deir el-Medina, New Kingdom administrative structure, even a few pharmaceutical treatments for various ailments. It's still unfortunate that this information is presented in either dry info dumps or stilted, overly explanatory dialogue, rather than organically throughout the narrative. The historical fiction author's pitfall: wanting to present all their information to the tiniest detail, whether it has any bearing on or importance for the story they're telling or not. Still, Jacq knows his New Kingdom Egypt and the story is reasonably amusing for those who care more for learning-through-fiction than a perfect narrative. Because of that, three stars instead of two.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jade

    The story revolves around the Place of Truth, a mysterious village around Thebes, where many secrets are held, and very few allowed to access them. There are 3 "main" protagonists : Ardent, a sixteen years old boy who wants to get in the Place of Truth and become a painter, Silent, who was born in the Place of Truth and left it to hear 'The call" of art that will let him come back to the village, and Mehy, a curious counsellor, who wants nothing more than to acess the Place of Truth's secrets an The story revolves around the Place of Truth, a mysterious village around Thebes, where many secrets are held, and very few allowed to access them. There are 3 "main" protagonists : Ardent, a sixteen years old boy who wants to get in the Place of Truth and become a painter, Silent, who was born in the Place of Truth and left it to hear 'The call" of art that will let him come back to the village, and Mehy, a curious counsellor, who wants nothing more than to acess the Place of Truth's secrets and destroy the village along. This is my first Christian Jacq book and I'm delighted by it. As a big history and ancient Egypt lover, I was excited to dive into this story, set in one of my favorites era ! I was not disappointed. I'm still surprised by the speed with which I read. It took me less than a week to read, when I thought it would take me twice that time. However, I was a little scared about all the historical references I might find and the difficulty of it. Thankfully, everything that needed explaining was explained easily, in a few line. No page long footnote ! The writing style is fast paced, I never got bored, and the change of character's "POVs" is very coherent within the story, which is not the case in all books. I'm glad I never felt like I was reading too much or too few about anyone. The balance was perfect, and it makes a good chunk of why I enjoyed this so much. Not only that, but the characters are really likeable. From the beginning. They all evolve throughout the story, and yet, I loved them since the beginning, which is exceptionnal for me, as I usually have a hard time getting into books. Even Mehy is one of those "love to hate" villains, and I'm really curious about his plans in the next book (which I already have and plan to read next month) I really felt like I was in the Place of Truth with the characters, like I was living in that era and was interacting with everyone. Somehow, that book is truly alive, and captivated me as I had not been in a while (since Skyward in February/March, I think). Christian Jacq was a hit a few years ago and was kind of forgotten since. Terrible mistake ! I hope his books get rediscovered soon, because they're really worth it if you're a historical fiction fan. Even if you're not, it's still pretty enjoyable.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Campbell

    While the writing seemed rather "wooden" at the start, the story line became so very interesting, that I became quite involved in the lives of the characters in Thebes. Perhaps some of the awkwardness at the beginning came from its translation (from the French), but the author and translator clearly found their stride in the second half of the book. As others have said, the author is a renowned Egyptologist, and it clearly shows in the descriptions of the town layouts, roles of political and eco While the writing seemed rather "wooden" at the start, the story line became so very interesting, that I became quite involved in the lives of the characters in Thebes. Perhaps some of the awkwardness at the beginning came from its translation (from the French), but the author and translator clearly found their stride in the second half of the book. As others have said, the author is a renowned Egyptologist, and it clearly shows in the descriptions of the town layouts, roles of political and economic figures, means of holding power, religious beliefs, and artworks - including how such works are made and the symbolic importance of certain motifs. I am eagerly looking forward to the next book,.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Max Jones

    Although the book is interesting and follows a history and culture I've little knowledge of, the translated books I've read are seriously lacking in depth and quality. To the extent that it appears written by a child. There is a serious lack of detail in characters, environments and actions. Parts of the story seem abrupt and tenuously linked due to this lack of flourish, which I accredit to the poor translation, rather than Jacq's own abilities as an author. I'd hope to possibly find another Eng Although the book is interesting and follows a history and culture I've little knowledge of, the translated books I've read are seriously lacking in depth and quality. To the extent that it appears written by a child. There is a serious lack of detail in characters, environments and actions. Parts of the story seem abrupt and tenuously linked due to this lack of flourish, which I accredit to the poor translation, rather than Jacq's own abilities as an author. I'd hope to possibly find another English translation of this series and hopefully I'd be able to give more credit to this series. Because, as I've said, the story is genuinely interesting and despite the lack of quality in the writing, I still found myself reading this book with interest

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Despite the simple nature of the writing, I enjoyed this novel. It was a very easy read, and the plot was very basic. The characters were, for the most part, very one dimensional. Nevertheless, I thought that the novel gave a good look at Egypt during the time of Ramses the Great. The plot follows the craftsman of the Place of Truth and the trials they must go through to build and maintain the tombs in the Valley of the Kings. The novel does a good job showing the history of the period, and is ve Despite the simple nature of the writing, I enjoyed this novel. It was a very easy read, and the plot was very basic. The characters were, for the most part, very one dimensional. Nevertheless, I thought that the novel gave a good look at Egypt during the time of Ramses the Great. The plot follows the craftsman of the Place of Truth and the trials they must go through to build and maintain the tombs in the Valley of the Kings. The novel does a good job showing the history of the period, and is very informative. I think it is an accurate summation of what happened inside the Place of Truth.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    I enjoyed this and it clearly is based on historical knowledge. My one criticism is that the characters are quite one-dimensional and nothing out of the ordinary really happens to them. I am going to read the rest of the series, however.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ashwin

    Liked reading this. Was delighted to meet one of my favorite Christian Jacq's character, Ramses, make special appearance. Was happy to see mention of one of Ramses's best friend, with inexhaustible energy, Ahmeni too getting mentioned :-) Now starting with next book in series. Liked reading this. Was delighted to meet one of my favorite Christian Jacq's character, Ramses, make special appearance. Was happy to see mention of one of Ramses's best friend, with inexhaustible energy, Ahmeni too getting mentioned :-) Now starting with next book in series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tina Chandler

    Kept jumping around

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan Elizabetha

    Very well written and fascinating read in my humble opinion.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eldora

    The humor and wit shown by the characters was surprising.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Welz

    Just loved it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pernille Kragelund

    Christian Jacq was the person who introduced me to both historical fiction and ancient Egypt. And I've loved it ever since. I still remember reading his Ramses series for the first time! This book has very black/white characters, meaning they're either good or bad, strong or soft, and so on. There aren't that much variation in his characters, but that's a part of what I love about his writing. Also the insight into his interpretation of Egyptian culture is amazing. I love it. Christian Jacq was the person who introduced me to both historical fiction and ancient Egypt. And I've loved it ever since. I still remember reading his Ramses series for the first time! This book has very black/white characters, meaning they're either good or bad, strong or soft, and so on. There aren't that much variation in his characters, but that's a part of what I love about his writing. Also the insight into his interpretation of Egyptian culture is amazing. I love it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Neetha Philip

    This is the first books of the last series that i read by Christian Jacq. While I drank in every detail that reflected ancient egyptian history in the other books by jacq, this book really made me think about more than just history. The story itself emphasises hard work,honesty and determination. Values that I have realised Jacq includes in most of his books. One cant help falling in love with Jacq's characters. This is the first books of the last series that i read by Christian Jacq. While I drank in every detail that reflected ancient egyptian history in the other books by jacq, this book really made me think about more than just history. The story itself emphasises hard work,honesty and determination. Values that I have realised Jacq includes in most of his books. One cant help falling in love with Jacq's characters.

  21. 5 out of 5

    C.M.T. Stibbe

    I was hoping this book would be a little more substantial. I enjoyed it but I can't say it left that residue of 'WOW' that so many other books do. Jacq is a great writer, popular with both European and American audiences which is why I picked it up. I haven't tried his other books yet but hope to after my list of 'want to read' books decreases. I was hoping this book would be a little more substantial. I enjoyed it but I can't say it left that residue of 'WOW' that so many other books do. Jacq is a great writer, popular with both European and American audiences which is why I picked it up. I haven't tried his other books yet but hope to after my list of 'want to read' books decreases.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ray

    Like the "Ramses: The Son of Light" saga, it takes place in the ancient Egypt era. The first book in this trilogy correlates with the last book of the "Ramses" saga. Even though it was a bit "dumbed down" for myself, the main characters were more emotionally complex and more in depth. Onto the second book of the trilogy! Like the "Ramses: The Son of Light" saga, it takes place in the ancient Egypt era. The first book in this trilogy correlates with the last book of the "Ramses" saga. Even though it was a bit "dumbed down" for myself, the main characters were more emotionally complex and more in depth. Onto the second book of the trilogy!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

    This book sucked neutronium. It sucked it hard. It sucked it often. An infantile plot line with cardboard characters. I mean "all I want to do is cut trees, the trees are all cut now, now I leave" If Christian Jacq had an international best selling series (Ramses) before this, I'm guessing he had a Walmart lobotomy around 1999. This book sucked neutronium. It sucked it hard. It sucked it often. An infantile plot line with cardboard characters. I mean "all I want to do is cut trees, the trees are all cut now, now I leave" If Christian Jacq had an international best selling series (Ramses) before this, I'm guessing he had a Walmart lobotomy around 1999.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Cougler

    The Stone of Light by Christian Jacq is made up of 4 long volumes--Nefer The Silent, The Wise Woman, Paneb The Ardent, and The Place of Truth, each about 600 pages, so it is a lovely read. The characters are well developed and the story is captivating as we learn of the wonderful role of the Place of Truth and its member in creating the tombs of the pharoahs of Egypt. Good stuff.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Clare S-B

    I did not actually read this book but my mum did and she skimmed the second half before getting rid of the series. She decided that it is not worth reading. Reasons being that the characters are not believable, it had a very week story line, and unnecessary sex. Also the historical side was not interesting, and it could have been accurate but she does not know if it is or not.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rendier

    Couldn't finish it - abandoned it halfway through. The story and characters feels like it was dreamt up by a 6 year old, and it never felt like a serious attempt by a serious author. I'm supposed to swallow this crap!? Couldn't finish it - abandoned it halfway through. The story and characters feels like it was dreamt up by a 6 year old, and it never felt like a serious attempt by a serious author. I'm supposed to swallow this crap!?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    really enjoyed this series about the artisans who created the tombs of the pharaohs

  28. 5 out of 5

    dara

    I always love something about Egypt

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    It was okay, not as good as the Ramses series. Not sure I will read the rest!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Smith

    I really liked this book. Although it lacked the eloquent flow of language exhibited in Jacq's Ramses Son of Light, the story is great. I look forward to reading Volume II. I really liked this book. Although it lacked the eloquent flow of language exhibited in Jacq's Ramses Son of Light, the story is great. I look forward to reading Volume II.

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