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Noble Volunteers: The British Soldiers Who Fought the American Revolution

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Redcoats. For Americans, the word brings to mind the occupying army that attempted to crush the Revolutionary War. There was more to these soldiers than their red uniforms, but the individuals who formed the ranks are seldom described in any detail in historical literature, leaving unanswered questions. Who were these men? Why did they join the army? Where did they go when Redcoats. For Americans, the word brings to mind the occupying army that attempted to crush the Revolutionary War. There was more to these soldiers than their red uniforms, but the individuals who formed the ranks are seldom described in any detail in historical literature, leaving unanswered questions. Who were these men? Why did they join the army? Where did they go when the war was over?     In Noble Volunteers: The British Soldiers Who Fought the American Revolution, Don N. Hagist brings life to these soldiers, describing the training, experiences, and outcomes of British soldiers who fought during the Revolution. Drawing on thousands of military records and other primary sources in British, American, and Canadian archives, and the writings of dozens of officers and soldiers, Noble Volunteers shows how a peacetime army responded to the onset of war, how professional soldiers adapted quickly and effectively to become tactically dominant, and what became of the thousands of career soldiers once the war was over.      In this historical tour de force, introduced by Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson, Hagist dispels long-held myths, revealing how remarkably diverse British soldiers were. They represented a variety of ages, nationalities, and socioeconomic backgrounds, and many had joined the army as a peacetime career, only to find themselves fighting a war on another continent in often brutal conditions. Against the sweeping backdrop of the war, Hagist directs his focus on the small picture, illuminating the moments in an individual soldier’s life—those hours spent nursing a fever while standing sentry in the bitter cold, or writing a letter to a wife back home. What emerges from these vignettes is the understanding that while these were “common” soldiers, each soldier was completely unique, for, as Hagist writes, “There was no ‘typical’ British soldier.” 


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Redcoats. For Americans, the word brings to mind the occupying army that attempted to crush the Revolutionary War. There was more to these soldiers than their red uniforms, but the individuals who formed the ranks are seldom described in any detail in historical literature, leaving unanswered questions. Who were these men? Why did they join the army? Where did they go when Redcoats. For Americans, the word brings to mind the occupying army that attempted to crush the Revolutionary War. There was more to these soldiers than their red uniforms, but the individuals who formed the ranks are seldom described in any detail in historical literature, leaving unanswered questions. Who were these men? Why did they join the army? Where did they go when the war was over?     In Noble Volunteers: The British Soldiers Who Fought the American Revolution, Don N. Hagist brings life to these soldiers, describing the training, experiences, and outcomes of British soldiers who fought during the Revolution. Drawing on thousands of military records and other primary sources in British, American, and Canadian archives, and the writings of dozens of officers and soldiers, Noble Volunteers shows how a peacetime army responded to the onset of war, how professional soldiers adapted quickly and effectively to become tactically dominant, and what became of the thousands of career soldiers once the war was over.      In this historical tour de force, introduced by Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson, Hagist dispels long-held myths, revealing how remarkably diverse British soldiers were. They represented a variety of ages, nationalities, and socioeconomic backgrounds, and many had joined the army as a peacetime career, only to find themselves fighting a war on another continent in often brutal conditions. Against the sweeping backdrop of the war, Hagist directs his focus on the small picture, illuminating the moments in an individual soldier’s life—those hours spent nursing a fever while standing sentry in the bitter cold, or writing a letter to a wife back home. What emerges from these vignettes is the understanding that while these were “common” soldiers, each soldier was completely unique, for, as Hagist writes, “There was no ‘typical’ British soldier.” 

33 review for Noble Volunteers: The British Soldiers Who Fought the American Revolution

  1. 5 out of 5

    Evan

    If you want dry facts that reflect repeating literally the research from original source material about British soldiers who fought in the Revolutionary War, then this is the book for you. The book has no writing style whatsoever, and is quite dull to read. The author seems constrained to merely re-state his research. Very disappointing book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    C

  3. 5 out of 5

    Simone99

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elon Slootweg

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kris

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alan

  8. 4 out of 5

    James Harrison

  9. 4 out of 5

    Will Hickox

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mikeygraf .

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brian Guillaume

  14. 4 out of 5

    'Aussie Rick'

  15. 4 out of 5

    Krzysiek (Chris)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  19. 4 out of 5

    Derrick Lapp

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael Kovan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jww5du85

  24. 4 out of 5

    Randy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Phil

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary Anne

  27. 5 out of 5

    William

  28. 5 out of 5

    Borgin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vick Singh

  30. 4 out of 5

    SmoothLikeJello

  31. 4 out of 5

    Steve Burd

  32. 4 out of 5

    Tony Taylor

  33. 4 out of 5

    Dbell

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