hits counter Why Women Are Blamed For Everything: Exploring Victim Blaming Of Women Subjected to Violence and Trauma - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Why Women Are Blamed For Everything: Exploring Victim Blaming Of Women Subjected to Violence and Trauma

Availability: Ready to download

She asked for it. She was flirting. She was drinking. She was wearing a revealing dress. She was too confident. She walked home alone. She stayed in that relationship. She was naïve. She didn’t report soon enough. She didn’t fight back. She wanted it. She lied about it. She comes from a bad area. She was vulnerable. She should have known. She should have seen it coming. Sh She asked for it. She was flirting. She was drinking. She was wearing a revealing dress. She was too confident. She walked home alone. She stayed in that relationship. She was naïve. She didn’t report soon enough. She didn’t fight back. She wanted it. She lied about it. She comes from a bad area. She was vulnerable. She should have known. She should have seen it coming. She should have protected herself. Victim blaming of women is prevalent and normalised in society. What causes us to blame women who have been abused, raped, trafficked, assaulted or harassed by men? Why are we uncomfortable with placing all of the blame on perpetrators for their crimes against women? Based on three years of doctoral research and ten years of practice with women and girls, Dr Jessica Taylor explores the many reasons we blame women for male violence committed against them. Written in her unique style and backed up by decades of evidence, this book exposes the powerful forces in society and individual psychology which compel us to blame women subjected to male violence.


Compare

She asked for it. She was flirting. She was drinking. She was wearing a revealing dress. She was too confident. She walked home alone. She stayed in that relationship. She was naïve. She didn’t report soon enough. She didn’t fight back. She wanted it. She lied about it. She comes from a bad area. She was vulnerable. She should have known. She should have seen it coming. Sh She asked for it. She was flirting. She was drinking. She was wearing a revealing dress. She was too confident. She walked home alone. She stayed in that relationship. She was naïve. She didn’t report soon enough. She didn’t fight back. She wanted it. She lied about it. She comes from a bad area. She was vulnerable. She should have known. She should have seen it coming. She should have protected herself. Victim blaming of women is prevalent and normalised in society. What causes us to blame women who have been abused, raped, trafficked, assaulted or harassed by men? Why are we uncomfortable with placing all of the blame on perpetrators for their crimes against women? Based on three years of doctoral research and ten years of practice with women and girls, Dr Jessica Taylor explores the many reasons we blame women for male violence committed against them. Written in her unique style and backed up by decades of evidence, this book exposes the powerful forces in society and individual psychology which compel us to blame women subjected to male violence.

30 review for Why Women Are Blamed For Everything: Exploring Victim Blaming Of Women Subjected to Violence and Trauma

  1. 5 out of 5

    Psych Lady

    This is a book I was looking forward to reading and I bought several copies as gifts. Having read it, I wish I had waited before buying copies for other people. The author is undoubtedly an expert on victim blaming and she has some interesting ideas, but this book has some serious problems. It is marketed by the author as being based on her PhD and ten years of working in the field. However, it is sloppily written, contains factual and grammatical errors, is littered with generalisations and the This is a book I was looking forward to reading and I bought several copies as gifts. Having read it, I wish I had waited before buying copies for other people. The author is undoubtedly an expert on victim blaming and she has some interesting ideas, but this book has some serious problems. It is marketed by the author as being based on her PhD and ten years of working in the field. However, it is sloppily written, contains factual and grammatical errors, is littered with generalisations and the author sometimes cherry picks from the research literature and as a result, gives a misleading impression of what the research tells us about certain topics. The book is written for a general audience which is a good thing. The phenomenon of victim blaming is a serious issue and should be widely understood. The problem with this book is that it does not do justice to the topic. This book would not be published by an academic publisher because it would not withstand peer review - at least not in its current form. The text taken from her PhD is generally fine. The problem is the large amount of additional text, some of which is taken from the author’s blogs, and this material is of poor quality. The book contains sentences in need of some simple editing. For example, on p. 195 there is a single sentence that is 120+ words long. On nearby pages, there are sentences that are 70-80 words in length (pp. 192, 193). Poorly constructed sentences like these appear throughout the book and could easily have been revised by a competent copy editor. Rape myths are defined differently by the author in different parts of the book. This does not add to clarity of understanding, particularly when Taylor’s version of a definition differs to the definition found in the source she cites: pp. 39, 61, 92. It would have been easier to quote the source and this would have avoided Taylor’s use of a circular definition that includes: ‘Rape myths are common societal myths…’ (p 61). In another example of sloppiness, on p. 47 the author states: ‘I have found the use of specific examples to be useful and effective when demonstrating the impact and prevalence of victim blaming’. It should go without saying that examples cannot prove the prevalence of anything. In her list of key terms on p. 13, Taylor gets the legal definition of rape wrong. It is not a UK definition as she claims, and she misses out the reasonable belief element of the definition. Competent peer reviewing would have identified such basic errors. Equally concerning is the author’s seeming lack of awareness of key research. As a result, Taylor makes claims that are either factually wrong or are in dispute. We see this in her discussion of topics, including self-defence classes for women; safety campaigns that focus on women and alcohol consumption; policing and victim blaming; pornography and the impact of online games on attitudes and behaviour. She dismisses self-defence classes for women as victim-blaming, yet never properly engages with the relevant literature on the feminist self-defence movement which has been written about for the last four decades. I agree with Taylor’s criticism of posters that warn women about their drinking and vulnerability – it is classic victim blaming. There are, however, campaigns that focus on the rapist/abuser and are arguably a model for other public education campaigns. Her claims regarding the impact of online games and pornography are directly contradicted by studies that she ignores. Another problem is that Taylor cites research that is years out-of-date and from outside the UK as if it gives insight into contemporary professional practice in the UK. It doesn’t. One area which I feel compelled to comment on is how Taylor deals with data on sexual violence in schools. On a single page she makes multiple errors – some are minor and others, are more serious. Either way, the number of errors on p. 158 illustrate the sloppy way parts of this book have been put together. First, on p. 158 she states: ‘5500 sexual offences were committed by school children against other school children within the school between 2012-2015 which included 600 rapes’. Taylor is referencing the Women and Equalities Committee Parliamentary report on sexual violence in schools. This is what the report states: ’Data published in September 2015 showed that 5,500 sexual offences were recorded in UK schools over a three-year period, including 600 rapes’ (p. 5, see also: p. 7). The report refers to offences that ‘were recorded’, not ‘committed’ as Taylor incorrectly claims. The distinction is significant – there is an important difference between recorded offences and offences that can be proven to have been committed – particularly in cases involving children under the age of criminal responsibility. Second, the report makes no reference to the 5,500 cases being perpetrated by school children. The reason for this is clear, if one goes to the BBC news source in footnote 1 of the Committee report. The source states: ‘At least a fifth of offences were carried out by children, so called “peer-on-peer” abuse, but details about the rest of the assaults are not known’. The Committee report is accurate in its use of the source, while Taylor is not accurately recounting what the report says. Third, there appears to be a word or words missing on p. 158 when Taylor states: ‘59% of girls had been sexually harassed in their school or environment’. It is unclear what she means by 'environment' and it doesn't make much sense. The Women and Equalities Committee report, which is her source, refers to ‘school or college’ (p. 7). Fourth, on p. 158 Taylor states the following: ‘22% of girls aged 7-12 years old reported experienced [sic] “sexual jokes” or “sexual banter” from boys at school’. Leaving aside another error in written English, the Committee’s version (p. 7), and its source, Girlguiding (para. 10) says: ‘22% of girls aged 7-12 had experienced jokes of a sexual nature from boys’. Nothing is said about these things only happening at school as claimed by Taylor. Further, her two quotes do not appear in the text (or in either source generally) so there is no reason to put the words in quotation marks. This assortment of errors on a single page is not only a product of poor writing and copy editing, but is also a failure to accurately convey what a source has said.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Davina Daniels

    As a feminist, I believe the subject matter of this book is incredibly important. However as a professional and as an academic, I have no choice but to admit this book is badly researched, full of misleading "quotes" which aren't quotes at all and sloppily cited. the jumbled mix of thesis and blog is low-quality, and this book does a disservice to the incredibly important and under-researched topic of victim blaming. I'm not at all surprised the book is self-published. In this review I have high As a feminist, I believe the subject matter of this book is incredibly important. However as a professional and as an academic, I have no choice but to admit this book is badly researched, full of misleading "quotes" which aren't quotes at all and sloppily cited. the jumbled mix of thesis and blog is low-quality, and this book does a disservice to the incredibly important and under-researched topic of victim blaming. I'm not at all surprised the book is self-published. In this review I have highlighted some of Dr Taylor's many oversights as well as some of the deliberately misleading information in the book. On p. 160 there is quote: ‘shock tactics’ which Dr Taylor claims comes from the Women and Equalities Committee Parliamentary report on sexual violence in schools. The quote does not appear anywhere in the report. On the same page, Taylor states that ‘Teachers excused the sexual assault ...’ The report on p. 10 refers to teenagers, not teachers. Still on p. 160, Taylor discusses sexting and quotes from an NSPCC report: ‘girls are sluts but boys are congratulated’. This quote does not appear anywhere in the NSPCC report. Presumably, this is Taylor’s interpretation of comments on p. 7 of the report. Why it appears in quotation marks is unclear. On p. 161 there is another quote that does not appear in the NSPCC report: ‘it wasn’t like they were raping them, it was only touching them up’. Again, this is presumably Taylor’s interpretation of comments made on p. 32 of the report, but it is still a made up quote. Drawing from the NSPCC report (pp. 27-29, 31, 44, 50), Taylor tells the story of Kylie who was in a relationship with a boy who ‘would try and dictate what she wore’ (NSPCC p. 29). Taylor claims that Kylie ‘told an interviewer that she was asked to write ‘JASON OWNS ME’ across her breasts by her boyfriend’. While reference is made to this phrase in the report (p. 28), It is only in the context of giving an example of typical behaviour by boys and nothing to do with Kylie. Taylor also claims Kylie’s boyfriend said to her that if she wore shorts under her skirt ‘no one could say she was asking for it’. Kylie never said any such thing and the phrase ‘asking for it’ does not even appear in the NSPCC report. In response to other claims made by Taylor on p. 161 — Kylie did not say her boyfriend advised her to wear shorts under her skirt, nor does Kylie say he checked under her skirt everyday to see if she wore shorts, nor that he expected her to wear shorts in hot weather. In fact, Kylie says she wore shorts precisely because the weather was hot. Kylie challenged her boyfriend when he complained about her wearing shorts and wanted to know why she wasn’t wearing tights: ‘it’s hot, why do I have to wear tights, I’m wearing shorts’, ‘I don’t care, I’m wearing shorts, so in summer you are telling me I can’t go out in shorts’ (p. 29). Taylor claims that Kylie’s boyfriend’s name is Jason (p. 161). His name is never mentioned by Kylie. This is shocking because the author is an advocate of encouraging women and girls to speak out. The story of Kylie could have been recounted by respecting her words and experience rather than creating a fake narrative. Kylie’s words concerning her boyfriend’s behaviour are powerful. Beyond that, I struggle to understand why an author would construct a false narrative. One of the unusual reactions to negative reviews of this book has been the author’s declaration that her legal team checked all her ‘references and citations’ and found ‘no issues’. The legal team can’t have checked very carefully. The book contains multiple citation errors. The problem is that some authors/co-authors cited in the main body of the book are not listed in the bibliography and when they are, they are not necessarily in alphabetical order so it is worth carefully checking before concluding a source is not listed. To get to specifics, when reading the book there was a citation to a source I wanted to read. I discovered the source wasn’t listed in the bibliography. So when I spent ten minutes checking nearby pages this is what I found. From p. 154 to p. 173 there are a total of 19 citation errors involving 13 different authors/co-authors. In these instances, anyone wanting to know where Taylor gets her information from will be disappointed because no source is listed. On p. 115 Taylor claims victims: ‘are often asked victim-blaming questions about what they were wearing, their prior sexual history, their prior relationship with the perpetrator, how they behaved during and after the assault, their reasons for not reporting sooner and the nature of their previous sexual encounters or relationships with men’. For such an extraordinary claim, one would expect to see the citation of rigorously conducted domestic research. That’s not what we get. Taylor doesn’t tell us in which specific police forces these things are happening, but claims the questioning ‘often’ occurs during ‘achieving best evidence’ interviews. ABE interviews are used by domestic police forces to interview children, vulnerable and intimidated witnesses. ABE guidance and training does not endorse the questioning regime she describes. To put it simply, her sources provide zero evidence that such questioning ‘often’ occurs in ABE interviews in the U.K. The evidence she does reference is from North America. This is where she gets her reference to clothing, late reporting etc. The studies cited are 11, 14 and 15 years old. This tells us nothing about contemporary practice and because her sources are North American they are simply irrelevant to the ABE claim she makes. Taylor could have cited relevant domestic sources on police questioning of sexual offence victims, but none would support her sweeping generalisation. She also cites something she calls ABE (2013), which is not listed in the bibliography. Taylor makes poor use of the important research of Peggy Reeves Sanday who has examined the existence or absence of rape in different cultures. Taylor claims that ‘Sanday (2003) could not identify any rape-free cultures in the world’ (p. 134). Before summarily dismissing her findings, Taylor also states that a key issue in the context of Sanday’s work is whether rape free cultures ‘were in fact feminist cultures that challenged patriarchy’ (p.134). Contrary to Taylor’s claim, Sanday found that in 47% of the 95 societies she surveyed rape was ‘absent or rare’ (Sanday, p. 340). ‘Rape free’, according to Sanday’s definition, means there is ‘no evidence rape [is] commonplace’ (p. 359). Sanday identifies key differences between ‘rape free’ and ‘rape prone’ cultures throughout her chapter. Some of the ‘rape free’ societies might be described as having a feminist cultural ethos of mutual care, nurture, and respect between males and females. Taylor appears to have missed all of this. Perhaps unsurprisingly, we find yet another citation error - Sanday (2003) appears in a collection edited by Cheryl Brown Travis, called Evolution, Gender and Rape (2003). I give the title so any interested reader can find the source. It is not listed in Taylor’s bibliography. Taylor also claims (p.134) that in her 2003 chapter, Sanday references the work of Otterbein (1979). First, no she doesn’t. Second, Otterbein (1979) is not listed in Taylor’s bibliography - as a reviewer, I am getting very bored saying this. The quality gap between the content of the book taken from Taylor’s PhD and her blogs/other added text is huge. Ranting on social media is one thing, but to charge money for a book with so many errors, fake quotes and a fake narrative is inexcusable. Since I have a day job, I do not plan on spending more time reviewing this book. It is a disappointing read. The subject matter deserves better.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Haven Hightower

    This was such a significant read for me on so many levels. Knowing my own experience with assault and having heard the stories of so many other women, the accounts in this book reflected emotions that are all too familiar. We focus so much on the modifiable factors that lead to instances of violence against women, all our efforts go to what we can do to protect ourselves in bad situations. This makes it easy to lose sight of the fact that the fault is not on the victim when it comes to rape. It This was such a significant read for me on so many levels. Knowing my own experience with assault and having heard the stories of so many other women, the accounts in this book reflected emotions that are all too familiar. We focus so much on the modifiable factors that lead to instances of violence against women, all our efforts go to what we can do to protect ourselves in bad situations. This makes it easy to lose sight of the fact that the fault is not on the victim when it comes to rape. It seems clear to me that if we spent the same amount of time talking to boys/men about their actions as we do teaching women how to respond/protect themselves against rape we'd perhaps have more encouraging statistics.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kit

    A little terf-y, VERY swerf-y, extremely repetitious (literal paragraphs and sentences were transposed), some sus citations, made ZERO mention of trans women (in a book about rape culture and victim blaming? C'mon.) It was good if you ignored all that stuff, though. That sounds shitty but I mean it. When she was on she was ON. Don't buy it though. If you want to read it get it from the library. A little terf-y, VERY swerf-y, extremely repetitious (literal paragraphs and sentences were transposed), some sus citations, made ZERO mention of trans women (in a book about rape culture and victim blaming? C'mon.) It was good if you ignored all that stuff, though. That sounds shitty but I mean it. When she was on she was ON. Don't buy it though. If you want to read it get it from the library.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Salomé Doré

    This book made me angry (which I expected) ! It was such an interesting read and I strongly recommend everyone to read it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gayle

    This book is brilliant. It's challenged my thinking, made me angry and WILL push me to be aware of the issues raised AND campaign to do something about them This book is brilliant. It's challenged my thinking, made me angry and WILL push me to be aware of the issues raised AND campaign to do something about them

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sian A

    Very thorough and powerful book on victim blaming of women after sexual violence committed by men. Lots of food for thought but also some disturbing segments. Would have preferred less of the "methods section of a PhD thesis" parts however. I would also have liked more specifics from the author of how she would recommend teaching about/preventing violence against women rather than just what was shown to be harmful. Very thorough and powerful book on victim blaming of women after sexual violence committed by men. Lots of food for thought but also some disturbing segments. Would have preferred less of the "methods section of a PhD thesis" parts however. I would also have liked more specifics from the author of how she would recommend teaching about/preventing violence against women rather than just what was shown to be harmful.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Siddoway

    I think this is a book that was long overdue. That said, I am going to start with some of the problems. The first of which is that the layout is a little distracting. The body of the text should have been spaced a little better, and the text should have been justified, because on the page the layout grated for me. I know I shouldn't judge a book by its layout, but as it was an irritant for me, I thought this was something that could easily be rectified. Also, while her reference list is handy, w I think this is a book that was long overdue. That said, I am going to start with some of the problems. The first of which is that the layout is a little distracting. The body of the text should have been spaced a little better, and the text should have been justified, because on the page the layout grated for me. I know I shouldn't judge a book by its layout, but as it was an irritant for me, I thought this was something that could easily be rectified. Also, while her reference list is handy, what I also really wished for was an index. That too should go into any further editions of the book. With my little irritations out of the way, it is best to move on to what is really important, the content of the book itself. The subject matter was presented in a powerful and informed manner, and left me simmering with rage. Male power, male privilege, male dominance and male violence are at the heart of this book and Dr Taylor confronts head on any of the plaintive cries of "not all men" and what she calls the "whatboutery", which she directly correlates with misogyny, where whenever any issue is raised in connection with women, the endless echo back seems to be whatabout the men? As she states, rather bluntly, if you are looking for a section in the book about men and boys, this is not the book for you. In placing women's trauma at the heart of the book, Dr Taylor is able to deconstruct the narratives that lead to the blaming of women subjected to male violence for their own trauma and the reasons underlying this. Dr Taylor relies on her extensive research and experience within the field in doing so. The book challenges you to confront your own internalised prejudices and assumptions in your consideration of male violence against women and it also allowed me to reconsider some of my own responses to male aggression and to stop looking for what I did to 'encourage' or 'invite' that aggression. This is not an easy book to read. I think if it wants to reach a broader audience it could do with being a little less academic, but it is a book that should be read more widely. We need to stop blaming women for male violence. Women have no responsibility for the violence of men. None. She should not have needed to say this, but because of the way in which society does blame women for their own trauma, her book does say this, and says it loudly.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Based on the title you would expect this book to be a lot of speeches with emotionally evocative language and anecdotal examples. It is exactly the opposite though. The author organizes and lays out extremely clearly and specifically the reasons women are blamed for rape and male violence and then outlines exactly how they are applied in the general population, in the criminal justice system, in our culture, in family and friend groups, in the media, in the education system, by mental health pro Based on the title you would expect this book to be a lot of speeches with emotionally evocative language and anecdotal examples. It is exactly the opposite though. The author organizes and lays out extremely clearly and specifically the reasons women are blamed for rape and male violence and then outlines exactly how they are applied in the general population, in the criminal justice system, in our culture, in family and friend groups, in the media, in the education system, by mental health professionals, and by the women themselves. Her approach is so thorough and so logical it would be extremely difficult to argue with. I actually learned about this book because I read a social media post regarding the intensely threatening tactics online stalkers and trolls used to try to stop the author from publishing. It’s horrifying but I can see why. It has real potential to change things. There’s nothing about this that’s very rhetorical or subjective, it’s all very clear and specific and would be quite easy to refer to for anyone interested in changing their conversations, policies or approaches to sexual violence both personally and in schools, law enforcement, the media, etc. I hope this book gets the attention it deserves.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Williams

    I'm out of the habit of writing reviews, but wanted to add a quick note to contextualise my rating of this book. To start with the positives, I really appreciate Taylor's straightforward style of writing. So many seem to think academic writing is about showing how clever you are, rather than communicating effectively. The book provides a sorely-needed analysis of victim blaming and the forces that drive it. However, this edition suffers from a common issue self-published books face: it needs a go I'm out of the habit of writing reviews, but wanted to add a quick note to contextualise my rating of this book. To start with the positives, I really appreciate Taylor's straightforward style of writing. So many seem to think academic writing is about showing how clever you are, rather than communicating effectively. The book provides a sorely-needed analysis of victim blaming and the forces that drive it. However, this edition suffers from a common issue self-published books face: it needs a good editor. There are a lot of grammatical errors and the overall structure feels disjointed. More worryingly, multiple citations aren't included in the bibliography. I am not sure if the newer edition published by Little, Brown has been edited, but I hope it has. The subject matter and Taylor's voice deserve to be presented at their very best.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Catalina Vieru

    Pretty good book. Difficult to digest as one would expect from a book based on phd research into violence against women. I borrowed it and was skeptical to read it, because the author is a terf and swerf (and she shares some of her views in the beginning regarding the porn and sex work industry), but overall she didn't let it seep through the rest of the book. Would not buy the book myself, but if you are researching the topic and need stats and references, and can borrow it from someone, then g Pretty good book. Difficult to digest as one would expect from a book based on phd research into violence against women. I borrowed it and was skeptical to read it, because the author is a terf and swerf (and she shares some of her views in the beginning regarding the porn and sex work industry), but overall she didn't let it seep through the rest of the book. Would not buy the book myself, but if you are researching the topic and need stats and references, and can borrow it from someone, then go for it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tim Pieraccini

    Dr Taylor can be applauded for putting together a work which is rigorous, comprehensive and yet very readable. The examination of how well-meaning advice to women is part of victim-blaming was particularly helpful to this reader. Because of the complexity of the data and the numerous factors involved in the attribution of blame, solutions to the problem seem hard to come by, but Dr Taylor's concluding statement is unequivocal: "Men are 100% responsible for male violence. Women and girls carry 0% o Dr Taylor can be applauded for putting together a work which is rigorous, comprehensive and yet very readable. The examination of how well-meaning advice to women is part of victim-blaming was particularly helpful to this reader. Because of the complexity of the data and the numerous factors involved in the attribution of blame, solutions to the problem seem hard to come by, but Dr Taylor's concluding statement is unequivocal: "Men are 100% responsible for male violence. Women and girls carry 0% of the blame. Ever. None. Nada. Zero."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susanna

    This book is a must read - especially for men. And excellent, eye opening and important read. Found this incredibly hard hitting and, at times, upsetting so I’d recommend reading this slowly so that you can take necessary breaks as well as time to absorb each section. Would have gave this 5 stars but I found some elements a tad ‘research method’ heavy towards the end - but I understand that to be a necessary part of psychological research.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine Guffick

    A brilliantly insightful read made so anyone could read and understand it. Dr Jessica Taylor is a brilliant human being and has done some amazing work in writing this book. I have learnt a lot. It took me a while to read as It triggered a lot of awful memories for me at times but I finished it and its definitely helped me reflect on a lot of things, educate other people as well as make steps to challenge thoughts on victim blaming.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Minshull

    Reading this was something of a rollercoaster, ranging from anger at the misogyny faced by women who have already experienced sexual violence and trauma to sadness at how this is perpetuated via education, media and familial attitudes ie socialisation which blames women for their own oppression. Essential reading which should inspire change. Will be using extracts with my students this year.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Judd Taylor

    A very important and necessary book about sexual violence, victim blaming and why it is most definitely the perpetrators who are fully to blame. This work should be widely read and discussed as this is very important information. A probably unnecessary note: this is a difficult book to read if you have been a victim of abuse. Be gentle with yourself and take your time.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Amazing book and the content is so interesting and spot on. Minus one star for the spelling/grammatical errors and the kind of odd layout of the book. But overall I would definitely recommend and it's so important! Amazing book and the content is so interesting and spot on. Minus one star for the spelling/grammatical errors and the kind of odd layout of the book. But overall I would definitely recommend and it's so important!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mia

    Interesting, eye opening, inspiring, empowering, informative, it is all there. Great and easy read for all humans. It is not text book like, so it is great for young folks as well. Lovely read! Be prepared to get emotional and deeply passionate about women!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jenifer Lavery

    The overriding message of this book is that whilst there are many complicated factors involved in the victim blaming of women, the only people responsible for male violence are men. Women are never ever ever responsible. Please read this book

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I found this a hard read, as the women's stories were really harrowing in places. Lots of food for thought. I found this a hard read, as the women's stories were really harrowing in places. Lots of food for thought.

  21. 5 out of 5

    El Amethyst

    This was excellent an eye-opening We need more of this!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Spencer-Lewis

    This is a must read book!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Linda Rowan

    This topic is very important, and this book could have been great but it wasn't. The writing felt messy, unnecessarily wordy and very repetitive. I was disappointed. This topic is very important, and this book could have been great but it wasn't. The writing felt messy, unnecessarily wordy and very repetitive. I was disappointed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    One star off for grammatical/editing errors but I love you, Dr. Taylor! It took me a while to read the whole book because the statistics are depressing, but this type of work is very important.

  25. 5 out of 5

    ORSAS Equality Hub

  26. 4 out of 5

    Natalie McCarthy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Williams

  29. 5 out of 5

    Allie Morgan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emma Parke

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.