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Horton, Thidwick, Yertle, the Lorax, the Grinch, Sneetches, and the Cat in the Hat are just a handful of the bizarre and beloved characters Theodor S. Geisel (1904–1991), alias Dr. Seuss, created in his forty-seven children's books, from 1937's And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street to 1990's Oh, the Places You'll Go! During his lifetime Dr. Seuss was honored with n Horton, Thidwick, Yertle, the Lorax, the Grinch, Sneetches, and the Cat in the Hat are just a handful of the bizarre and beloved characters Theodor S. Geisel (1904–1991), alias Dr. Seuss, created in his forty-seven children's books, from 1937's And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street to 1990's Oh, the Places You'll Go! During his lifetime Dr. Seuss was honored with numerous degrees, three Academy Awards, and a Pulitzer, but the man himself remained a reclusive enigma. In this first and only biography of the good doctor, the authors, his close friends for almost thirty years, have drawn on their firsthand insights as well as his voluminous papers; the result is an illuminating, intimate portrait of a dreamer who saw the world "through the wrong end of a telescope," and invited us to enjoy the view.


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Horton, Thidwick, Yertle, the Lorax, the Grinch, Sneetches, and the Cat in the Hat are just a handful of the bizarre and beloved characters Theodor S. Geisel (1904–1991), alias Dr. Seuss, created in his forty-seven children's books, from 1937's And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street to 1990's Oh, the Places You'll Go! During his lifetime Dr. Seuss was honored with n Horton, Thidwick, Yertle, the Lorax, the Grinch, Sneetches, and the Cat in the Hat are just a handful of the bizarre and beloved characters Theodor S. Geisel (1904–1991), alias Dr. Seuss, created in his forty-seven children's books, from 1937's And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street to 1990's Oh, the Places You'll Go! During his lifetime Dr. Seuss was honored with numerous degrees, three Academy Awards, and a Pulitzer, but the man himself remained a reclusive enigma. In this first and only biography of the good doctor, the authors, his close friends for almost thirty years, have drawn on their firsthand insights as well as his voluminous papers; the result is an illuminating, intimate portrait of a dreamer who saw the world "through the wrong end of a telescope," and invited us to enjoy the view.

30 review for Dr. Seuss & Mr. Geisel: A Biography

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Barrow Wilfong

    "You're crazy to be a professor," she blurted after class. "What you really want to do is draw." She glanced at another page and smiled. "That's a very fine flying cow!" These are the words of Helen, a young woman Theodor Geisel met at Oxford, who later became his first wife. And I have to say that this is a very fine biography of one of my very favorite authors and illustrators in the whole world. You cannot beat Mr. Geisel, aka Dr. Seuss for creative genius. I remember as a child being so deligh "You're crazy to be a professor," she blurted after class. "What you really want to do is draw." She glanced at another page and smiled. "That's a very fine flying cow!" These are the words of Helen, a young woman Theodor Geisel met at Oxford, who later became his first wife. And I have to say that this is a very fine biography of one of my very favorite authors and illustrators in the whole world. You cannot beat Mr. Geisel, aka Dr. Seuss for creative genius. I remember as a child being so delighted with the illustrations of Hop on Pop and The Foot Book that I felt I could almost eat the pages (you know I love something if I associate it with food). Judith and Neil Morgan give an exuberant, yet honest narrative of Theodore Geisel's life, growing up in Springfield Massachusetts, trying to become an academic and failing (he dropped out of college, including Oxford). It took Geisel a while to find himself, traveling across Europe, falling in love with and marrying Helen and then finding success as an advertiser illustrator, propaganda cartoonist during both wars. He was part of the "Hollywood Five" where he became lifelong friends with the famous director Frank Capra and Chuck Jones of Bugs Bunny fame. Eventually he and Jones would collaborate to make one of the most firmly rooted American Christmas traditions: watching How the Grinch Stole Christmas (with my favorite horror actor, Boris Karlov as the voice of the Grinch). We learn not only of Geisel's genius, but also his darker side. He suffered from his demons like everyone else. He was concerned with poverty, never quite understanding how much money he was making from his books. He loved children, although never had any of his own. He was a champion and warrior of making books that would build children's reading vocabulary without dulling their imagination. Unfortunately he also felt qualified in his later years to make anti-war and environmentalist propaganda books as well. Both of which were as naive as they were preachy. I mean, I think everyone knows that if people would just do the right thing there'd be no war or pollution. It's called sinful behavior. If you can't acknowledge the latter, don't complain about the former. I was also a little shocked that he threatened legal action against pro life groups who were chanting "A person's a person no matter how small!" I mean, what the...? I guess only the people Geisel considers people are people. Very disappointing. He also had an extramarital affair that probably led to his first wife's suicide. He married the affair and, by all accounts, were happy until death they did part, which was 25 years later. What I conclude from all of this is that Theodore Geisel was a simply brilliant wordsmith and illustrator. As a philosopher he was certainly entitled to his opinions, but the rest of us can give them all the credit they're worth, at least, according to our own viewpoints. I highly recommend this book, because there is so much information about Geisel, how he created his famous books, each book is given special description, the publishing business and, really, how does one create a whole book inside the limitations of a young child's vocabulary, while stretching his reading skills? No easy task that, and Geisel accomplished better than anyone else.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lani

    I can agree with some criticism about this book being a little fluffy - it is written by friends of Dr Seuss and his family. However, I appreciate that they don't shy away from his troubles, nor do they revel in digging up dirt on a beloved author. I had no idea about his fairly scandalous second marriage, or his first wife's death. But the entire situation is handled gracefully and without too much tittering. Mostly I just loved this book for the way it opened up this person I had never thought m I can agree with some criticism about this book being a little fluffy - it is written by friends of Dr Seuss and his family. However, I appreciate that they don't shy away from his troubles, nor do they revel in digging up dirt on a beloved author. I had no idea about his fairly scandalous second marriage, or his first wife's death. But the entire situation is handled gracefully and without too much tittering. Mostly I just loved this book for the way it opened up this person I had never thought much about. I love Dr Seuss, and knew about some of his more adult endeavors, but had never read anything about him as a person. What a shame, because he is nearly as intriguing as the worlds he created. I borrowed this book from Jill, and ended up buying a copy for my dad for Fathers' Day. Awesome awesome awesome book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    jill

    I love Dr. Seuss. I can recite How the Grinch Stole Christmas! by heart. I don't understand how anyone can not love Dr. Seuss. But if you don't, read this biography, and you will. The authors are journalists from his adopted hometown of La Jolla, CA, and it is clear that they love not only his work, but the man himself. Their biography doesn't ignore his flaws, but it doesn't dwell on them either. Without getting into details, the handling of his first wife is great. If I were ever to write a biog I love Dr. Seuss. I can recite How the Grinch Stole Christmas! by heart. I don't understand how anyone can not love Dr. Seuss. But if you don't, read this biography, and you will. The authors are journalists from his adopted hometown of La Jolla, CA, and it is clear that they love not only his work, but the man himself. Their biography doesn't ignore his flaws, but it doesn't dwell on them either. Without getting into details, the handling of his first wife is great. If I were ever to write a biography of a friend, I hope this is how it would turn out. It would have to be a pretty damn interesting friend to compete, of course. I want to find a book on Frank Capra's Hollywood army unit in WWII -- in addition to Capra and Geisel/Seuss, it included Chuck Jones, of Looney Tunes fame. I scoured the endnotes of this book, and it looks like the authors got their info on that time period mostly from correspondence and interviews, but there must be a book written about that unit. Right? Right. I love artists who love life; I cannot abide the tortured artist myth that romanticizes depression and suicide. Geisel is sensitive, and a perfectionist, and kind of a loner, granted. But he loved practical jokes and silliness and people. Some artists are depressed, but depression is not artistic. One of the few lines I still remember from my times on the Gallery poetry staff went "talent is more erotic when it's wasted." That is such a stupid sentiment, I still want to punch someone in the face for thinking it. But I digress. My point, is that Geisel is the sort of creative personality that doesn't depress you, but inspires you to be creative. Reading about his creative enthusiasm, I look at all my blank walls and want to get a sketchbook and do something about them. Then I remember that I can't draw. Oh well. My copy is all marked up now, and I couldn't possibly list all the parts I found notable, but I do have to mention one part I loved: "Among Ted's first fan letters at Judge was a curt note from a condemned murderer on death row in Huntsville, Texas, written on the eve of his electrocution. 'If your stuff is the kind of thing they're publishing nowadays,' the prisoner took the time to write, 'I don't so much mind leaving.' Ted was enraptured with the letter and kept it in his desk throughout his long life, always feigning fear of running into the felon, whose sentence had been commuted at the last minute." (62-3) I kind of hope I'm that vindictive on my death bed.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Leandra Cate

    I certainly enjoyed the historical background for Seuss's work and some of the biographical information (particularly childhood to early career years) was interesting. My favorite part was the story of the writing of Cat in the Hat and the founding of Beginner Books. However, the way the subject matter is handled, where details are included or omitted - to me, this book is an excellent example of biography done badly. The authors seem to have been good friends of the subject and that shows. Ther I certainly enjoyed the historical background for Seuss's work and some of the biographical information (particularly childhood to early career years) was interesting. My favorite part was the story of the writing of Cat in the Hat and the founding of Beginner Books. However, the way the subject matter is handled, where details are included or omitted - to me, this book is an excellent example of biography done badly. The authors seem to have been good friends of the subject and that shows. There's a strong emphasis on the minutiae of the Geisel's social life - what somebody said at a random dinner party, what sort of clothes one of their many friends liked to wear, etc - details that don't give me any insight about the author's work or its cultural significance. How many times do they give a blow by blow account of one of Geisel's pranks? I get it - he was a prankster. I guess out of affection for their friend, they mentioned nothing of Geisel's affair that led to Helen's suicide. If you're going to write a meaningful biography, you need to include such details, however unsavory they may be. As it is, Helen's suicide is just this pop-up event - we get perhaps 2 pages of suggestions that she might be sad then BOOM! she kills herself. I would have liked to see a lot more discussion of the actual books. I know it's a biography, but this man's life is interesting because of what he wrote. I feel like we hear much more about the dollar amount grossed by sales than we do about the content of his writing and why it was so remarkable. Though when they do spend time discussing that sort of thing, it is pretty fascinating.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam Kellar-long

    This book is for all the old fuddy-duddies who hate Dr. Seuss and prefer Dick, Jane and Spot. It talks about some stupid things that he's done, but it also talks about the points that he was trying to prove through his books. It's not all nonsense. I like this book, because it's not the stereotypical, dull autobiography. It was written by 2 of his close friends, which probably gave the book more information, but they may have left out some truly bad details about his life. Over all, this book is This book is for all the old fuddy-duddies who hate Dr. Seuss and prefer Dick, Jane and Spot. It talks about some stupid things that he's done, but it also talks about the points that he was trying to prove through his books. It's not all nonsense. I like this book, because it's not the stereotypical, dull autobiography. It was written by 2 of his close friends, which probably gave the book more information, but they may have left out some truly bad details about his life. Over all, this book is humorous and satisfying. Everyone should read it. Even you, Grandpa Joe. Even you.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This book was mediocre. It went into to depth about the life of Dr. Seuss but at some points got boring. I think they could have left out some of the aspects of the book and I would've liked it a lot better. For example, in the beginning of the book I found the story line was dull, and not worth a chapter in the book. But overall, not a bad read, just kind of boring. This book was mediocre. It went into to depth about the life of Dr. Seuss but at some points got boring. I think they could have left out some of the aspects of the book and I would've liked it a lot better. For example, in the beginning of the book I found the story line was dull, and not worth a chapter in the book. But overall, not a bad read, just kind of boring.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    A fascinating look at the man behind so many of our childhood tales. Though a household name in countries across the globe, few can attest to anything more than the titles of his works, including the man's real name! Theodore Geisel was was first and foremost an artist. Of both language and visual media. He was secondly a brilliant political commentator. This biography is incredibly inclusive, chronicling the entire life of this literary champion from Mulberry Street to the hills of La Jolla and a A fascinating look at the man behind so many of our childhood tales. Though a household name in countries across the globe, few can attest to anything more than the titles of his works, including the man's real name! Theodore Geisel was was first and foremost an artist. Of both language and visual media. He was secondly a brilliant political commentator. This biography is incredibly inclusive, chronicling the entire life of this literary champion from Mulberry Street to the hills of La Jolla and around the world. Long and detailed, it most certainly takes time to get through, but the story of Mr. Geisel's life is well worth it. From his unending quirkiness to unrestrained sense of mischief, Dr. Seuss embodied the child in all of us. Finally, may it be noted that there are perhaps no words more pertinent than those Seuss left to his biographers as his parting message. "We can. . .and we've got to. . . do better than this." Let's do it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adrianna

    I love that this book offers not only a look at its very private subject's very guarded past, but also shares insight into his thinking and creative processes that is invaluable to the collective assumed philosophies we as a culture share regarding reading, learning, and art. Ted's innovative methods and creative genius, which may have gone unheralded but for a chance encounter with an old schoolmate, ushered the world into a new age of thought regarding reading and learning, and fostered the ap I love that this book offers not only a look at its very private subject's very guarded past, but also shares insight into his thinking and creative processes that is invaluable to the collective assumed philosophies we as a culture share regarding reading, learning, and art. Ted's innovative methods and creative genius, which may have gone unheralded but for a chance encounter with an old schoolmate, ushered the world into a new age of thought regarding reading and learning, and fostered the appreciation we have today for the concept of Childhood. He has, irrevocably and for the better, altered the path of storytelling in general, particularly for children's stories, and this book illustrates beautifully Dr. Seuss' careening path as his career gathers momentum, leaving what will surely be a legacy as permanent and prevalent as those of Grimm, Andersen, and Mother Goose.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I loved learning more about Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) and the background surrounding his books. He changed the way that children learn to read. He was very particular about how each book was published from start to finish. I am impressed with his down-to-earth personality. Of course, he began writing/drawing as a way to earn money, but he didn't continue soley for that purpose. He did it because it made him happy and he liked helping children. He ended up being very rich, but lived simply I loved learning more about Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) and the background surrounding his books. He changed the way that children learn to read. He was very particular about how each book was published from start to finish. I am impressed with his down-to-earth personality. Of course, he began writing/drawing as a way to earn money, but he didn't continue soley for that purpose. He did it because it made him happy and he liked helping children. He ended up being very rich, but lived simply. He didn't let his fame go to his head. Little did he know when he began, that into the 21st century children would have parties and all day read-a-thons to celebrate his birthday each year.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    The person who sets out to write a biography of Dr. Seuss ought to be screened for Seussian magic. The Morgans would not have passed the screening. A very ho-hum biography of a man who was never ho-hum. I went into the book curious about Seuss: How does such a writer come about? Instead, the book recites the life events of Seuss, as seen from a distant, remote planet. I sought the secrets of Seuss; instead, I saw a semblance of Seuss.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sherrie

    I love biographies, but I rarely give them 5 stars. And honestly, I'm kinda amazed I'm doing so this time. There just wasn't anything I could say I didn't like about this book. And I'm left with a deep, deep admiration of Theodore Geisel and the life he created for himself. There's nothing groundbreaking in how this book is written. It's very straightforward, chronological, and clearly well researched. It's reads easily and doesn't get bogged down in the details (which so many biographies do). W I love biographies, but I rarely give them 5 stars. And honestly, I'm kinda amazed I'm doing so this time. There just wasn't anything I could say I didn't like about this book. And I'm left with a deep, deep admiration of Theodore Geisel and the life he created for himself. There's nothing groundbreaking in how this book is written. It's very straightforward, chronological, and clearly well researched. It's reads easily and doesn't get bogged down in the details (which so many biographies do). What I love is simply who Ted Geisel was. He was a smart but unfocused kid who kept managing to fail up. He built a career doing what he enjoyed...doodling and making rhymes. He kept the same team around him for virtually his entire career. He lived in his dream home for pretty much his entire adult life. He participated in the charities and projects that he wanted. He traveled the world with those he loved. And he got to make a big difference when it comes to literacy and children's love of books. Like...he literally got to live the dream. He was rich not just in money but in the things that matter. I'm not saying his life was perfect or he was a saint. Clearly not. But at the end of it all...I think that's the kinda life many of us would like to look back on. And he did it in his own weird way, which all of us weirdos should appreciate.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Spence

    Dr. Seuss & Mr. Geisel: A biography By; Judith Morgan, is a great read. Dr. Seuss’ name is actually Ted Geisel. That’s why the book is called Dr. Seuss and Mr.Geisel. Dr. Seuss was a made up name from Ted because during the prohibition he got caught drinking in his dorm and got kicked out of his club for the school paper. He still wanted to write so he made up the name “Seuss” to make it seem like he wasn’t writing the paper. That’s where the name Dr. Seuss comes from. It tells you of a man who Dr. Seuss & Mr. Geisel: A biography By; Judith Morgan, is a great read. Dr. Seuss’ name is actually Ted Geisel. That’s why the book is called Dr. Seuss and Mr.Geisel. Dr. Seuss was a made up name from Ted because during the prohibition he got caught drinking in his dorm and got kicked out of his club for the school paper. He still wanted to write so he made up the name “Seuss” to make it seem like he wasn’t writing the paper. That’s where the name Dr. Seuss comes from. It tells you of a man who revolutionized the way children read books today. I like how they talk about how Ted was making propaganda for the U.S during wwll. He even got caught behind enemy lines during the battle of the bulge. It really brings out his character because Ted felt like he needed to bring americans into the war to stop the Germans. ANother thing that makes Ted Geisel a good person is he was tasked with making a children’s book that was interesting to them. There was a problem that children didn’t find their books interesting so Ted started to write books in rhymes. They were instant classics.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Savannah

    There were a lot of interesting details and reading this taught me a lot about Dr. Suess, but it was a bit drawn out. So many of insignificant little events that had little to do with his life were explained over multiple pages and it got very boring at some times. I wish it would have spent more time explaining the books he wrote and less time telling about small comments that his father made at dinner parties with friends. It was nice to hear some details about his life outside of books, but s There were a lot of interesting details and reading this taught me a lot about Dr. Suess, but it was a bit drawn out. So many of insignificant little events that had little to do with his life were explained over multiple pages and it got very boring at some times. I wish it would have spent more time explaining the books he wrote and less time telling about small comments that his father made at dinner parties with friends. It was nice to hear some details about his life outside of books, but some entire paragraphs were spent explaining theatre shows he went to that in no way affected his writing. Not to mention the book skimmed over his first wife committing suicide. They gave this event a paragraph, maybe two, and then just moved on with everything. I feel like they should have gone into more depth with it. Nonetheless I can say I enjoyed reading this book and learning some new things about Dr. Seuss.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    With the amount of time that I spend reading Seuss books to my children, I was interested in finding out more about the literary legend himself. This book does a good job of following his life, although it is dry and slow at times, particularly the beginning. The authors, being friends with Geisel, tend to be a little too uncritical of him, especially during times of his life that deserve more scrutiny, particularly after the death of his first wife. Overall, it's a good read on the man who rema With the amount of time that I spend reading Seuss books to my children, I was interested in finding out more about the literary legend himself. This book does a good job of following his life, although it is dry and slow at times, particularly the beginning. The authors, being friends with Geisel, tend to be a little too uncritical of him, especially during times of his life that deserve more scrutiny, particularly after the death of his first wife. Overall, it's a good read on the man who remade children's literature.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    It was a fairly captivating biography. Dr. Seuss was an intriguing person and I enjoyed learning more about how he became such a celebrated author. One thing I found fascinating is that they believed that he had a perfect sense of color similar to a person having perfect pitch. He put in countless hours of work and was never really into writing for the money. I loved the challenges he received to write books with very limited word counts. He definitely redesigned the idea of beginning books for It was a fairly captivating biography. Dr. Seuss was an intriguing person and I enjoyed learning more about how he became such a celebrated author. One thing I found fascinating is that they believed that he had a perfect sense of color similar to a person having perfect pitch. He put in countless hours of work and was never really into writing for the money. I loved the challenges he received to write books with very limited word counts. He definitely redesigned the idea of beginning books for early readers. I was saddened to hear about his first wife’s death.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shari Ariail

    This was an entertaining read that needed editing. It was an uplifting account of the creator of the Dr. Seuss persona, Ted Geisel and provided a window into his perhaps agoraphobic existence. It was not a page turner and required a sincere interest in the topic to propell one to continue to turn the pages. A copious amount of quotes detracted from the story. If you enjoyed reading Dr. Seuss books yourself or to your children, then pick up this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I learned a lot about Theodore Geisel otherwise known as Dr. Seuss. I picked this up on a whim when I was babysitting and thankful the family allowed me to borrow it. I knew basically nothing about the man who’s books I read so many of when I was little and when I taught daycare. He led a very interesting life. It made me want to pick up the books by him that I hadn’t read. One of those being The Lorax which I did finally read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kendra McIntyre

    It was a joy to read about the life of a man who brightened so many others’ lives. Ted Geisel lived a secluded and private life, but from the start his mission was to increase literacy. One of the most interesting things to read about was how he was basically in charge when it came to his publisher. Whatever Ted said went. They accepted his genius and didn’t try to change it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Gould

    It's not great literature but you get a lot of insight and detail about the man's life. You learn how influential he was in his arena and how single focused and driven he was. Also gives insight into how much effort goes into every detail of his books - the colors, the words, the phrasing, the rhyme, the intention. It's not great literature but you get a lot of insight and detail about the man's life. You learn how influential he was in his arena and how single focused and driven he was. Also gives insight into how much effort goes into every detail of his books - the colors, the words, the phrasing, the rhyme, the intention.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    As a child I read or had read to me almost all his books. I continued the reading to my own child. This biography shows the private, reclusive, but also fun loving prankster that Theodor S. Geisel was. A pure imaginative genius. An interesting look into his long life.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Edwin Battistella

    I had been wanting to read this Seuss bio for some time and it didn’t disappoint. Engaging and packed with both information and insights about Seuss, the publishing industry, and sweep of the twentieth century.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dan Blackley

    This is a great biography about the great Dr. Seuss. I was fascinated by the information about his life and how he was rejected by so many publishers. Today, we consider him the father of children's books, but it wasn't as easy as he seemed to make it. Very informative. This is a great biography about the great Dr. Seuss. I was fascinated by the information about his life and how he was rejected by so many publishers. Today, we consider him the father of children's books, but it wasn't as easy as he seemed to make it. Very informative.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Allison Johnson

    This is an excellent book. I've always loved Dr. Seuss books and learning about the man behind the magic was engaging and enlightening. I highly recommend this book for anyone who loves biographies, books about books, or and informative non-fiction that spans nearly a century. This is an excellent book. I've always loved Dr. Seuss books and learning about the man behind the magic was engaging and enlightening. I highly recommend this book for anyone who loves biographies, books about books, or and informative non-fiction that spans nearly a century.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carina

    Helps you remember that children's icons are people too. Fascinating read, bit slow at parts (but that's life, and I don't read that many memoirs so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯). Helps you remember that children's icons are people too. Fascinating read, bit slow at parts (but that's life, and I don't read that many memoirs so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯).

  25. 4 out of 5

    joshua aitchison

    A fantastic insight in to the man who became the Dr for not just the imagination of children, but for adults as well.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Just plain enjoyed it! Lots of interesting facts presented in a lively fashion.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Becki Couch tompkins

    Needed to read for a Leadership class. His life was interesting and fun but not the book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Hands down the best biography I’ve ever read. What a fascinating human being. We need more Dr. Seuss in our lives (along with Fred Rogers). ❤️

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Joy

    I have never read anything about Ted Geisel and I absolutely loved this. It did a wonderful job of portraying the wonder and mystery of Dr. Seuss through an intimate look at his life.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Diana Toole

    I didn't think it possible to love this man any more. Now I do. I didn't think it possible to love this man any more. Now I do.

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