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A young girl discovers a portal to a land filled with centaurs and unicorns in Seanan McGuire's Across the Green Grass Fields, a standalone tale in the Hugo and Nebula Award-wining Wayward Children series. Welcome to the Hooflands. Were happy to have you, even if you being here means somethings coming. Regan loves, and is loved, though her school-friend situation has become A young girl discovers a portal to a land filled with centaurs and unicorns in Seanan McGuire's Across the Green Grass Fields, a standalone tale in the Hugo and Nebula Award-wining Wayward Children series. “Welcome to the Hooflands. We’re happy to have you, even if you being here means something’s coming.” Regan loves, and is loved, though her school-friend situation has become complicated, of late. When she suddenly finds herself thrust through a doorway that asks her to "Be Sure" before swallowing her whole, Regan must learn to live in a world filled with centaurs, kelpies, and other magical equines―a world that expects its human visitors to step up and be heroes. But after embracing her time with the herd, Regan discovers that not all forms of heroism are equal, and not all quests are as they seem…


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A young girl discovers a portal to a land filled with centaurs and unicorns in Seanan McGuire's Across the Green Grass Fields, a standalone tale in the Hugo and Nebula Award-wining Wayward Children series. Welcome to the Hooflands. Were happy to have you, even if you being here means somethings coming. Regan loves, and is loved, though her school-friend situation has become A young girl discovers a portal to a land filled with centaurs and unicorns in Seanan McGuire's Across the Green Grass Fields, a standalone tale in the Hugo and Nebula Award-wining Wayward Children series. “Welcome to the Hooflands. We’re happy to have you, even if you being here means something’s coming.” Regan loves, and is loved, though her school-friend situation has become complicated, of late. When she suddenly finds herself thrust through a doorway that asks her to "Be Sure" before swallowing her whole, Regan must learn to live in a world filled with centaurs, kelpies, and other magical equines―a world that expects its human visitors to step up and be heroes. But after embracing her time with the herd, Regan discovers that not all forms of heroism are equal, and not all quests are as they seem…

30 review for Across the Green Grass Fields

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    Every time I tell myself I won't read the next book in this series. Every time I end up picking it up anyway. Honestly its' probably because the writing, themes and representation (intersex main character this time!) are awesome. I just don't think I'm the right audience (except book 4, I loved book 4!). Unicorns, horses and centaurs fans and middle grade readers (not sure if it's officially how it's categorized but it read like one to me!) will love it!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss 1.) Every Heart a Doorway ★★★★★ 2.) Down Among the Sticks and Bones ★★★★★ 3.) Beneath the Sugar Sky ★★★★ 4.) In an Absent Dream ★★★★★ 5.) Come Tumbling Down ★★★ "She knew better now. The world was bigger now. She was bigger now, and that made all the difference." In this story, we get to grow up alongside Regan Lewis! We are introduced to Regan at seven years old, where she is quickly already learning the expectations that society puts on girls, ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss 1.) Every Heart a Doorway ★★★★★ 2.) Down Among the Sticks and Bones ★★★★★ 3.) Beneath the Sugar Sky ★★★★ 4.) In an Absent Dream ★★★★★ 5.) Come Tumbling Down ★★★ "She knew better now. The world was bigger now. She was bigger now, and that made all the difference." In this story, we get to grow up alongside Regan Lewis! We are introduced to Regan at seven years old, where she is quickly already learning the expectations that society puts on girls, especially girls who are different. Regan comes from a good family, who love and care about her, and she has a big space in her heart for horses! She also has two best friends, and they do everything together! That is, until she really learns the consequences of what it means to be different, and what happens to girls who don’t play by the rules that society place on them. "They thought children, especially girl children, were all sugar and lace, and that when those children fought, they would do so cleanly and in the open, where adult observers could intervene." We get to see Regan at 11, becoming worried that her body isn’t developing the way other girls’ bodies are. She doesn’t need to wear a bra yet, she doesn’t need deodorant yet, and she hasn’t started her period yet. And once the pressure gets too great to bear, she asks her parents who (very kindly, knowledgeably, and empathetically) explain to her that her body hasn’t started developing these things (or maybe won’t start developing these things on their own without some help) because she is intersex. This book really made me realize how much I am slacking as a reader and reviewer with reading books with intersex main characters. Off the top of my head, I can think of only two others, and that makes me feel very bad and I hope to change that soon. But, regardless of chromosomes or androgen insensitivity, Regan is a girl and has always been a girl. And I really loved how her parents constantly reminded her that she was exactly as she was meant to be. Truly, I had so many happy tears over her parents, truly a tier above. Regan is still very unsure of herself and this new information, and after confiding in someone who she probably should not have, and after they say some incredibly hurtful things to her, she runs away into the woods to try to get home, yet a magical door appears and she steps into a world filled with horses, and kelpies, and centaurs, and unicorns! I loved this world, like, I loved this world so much. Also, I have never been and will never be a horse girl, and this hooved world was still everything to me. And once Regan is discovered in this world by a pack of centaurs who herd unicorns, we find out about a prophecy that states all humans must be given to the queen, because whenever a human shows up in this magical land that means that something bad is about to happen! But it is not stated anywhere when the human must be given to the queen, therefore Regan gets to spend a lot of time with her centaur family. The heart of this book is about destiny, and what it means to be destined for something. Whether it’s about your gender, your childhood, your family, or even maybe saving a whole magical world filled with horse-like creatures! All these expectations can be so very heavy, but they do become lighter when you have a found family to help with them. They also become pretty light when you are able to realize that you and your journey and your life are worth so much more than the expectations placed on you from society, from friends, and from any kind of destiny that you did not ask for. "She still didn’t believe in destiny. Clay shaped into a cup was not always destined to become a drinking vessel’ it was simply shaped by someone too large to be resisted. She was not clay, but she had been shaped by her circumstances all the same, not directed by any destiny." This entire story has a really beautiful message about found family, and finding your people, and how unconditional love is all about unapologetically choosing the people you love over and over again. Blood will only ever be blood, but choosing the people who are your home is another level of love. We also get to see Regan at 15, when it is time for her to fulfill her destiny after spending four years being unconditionally loved. Side note: I would die for Gristle and Zephyr. The reason I am giving this four stars is because I didn’t love the end of this one. I truly enjoyed the reveal, and the symbolism about destiny was not lost on me, but I just truly wanted a more concrete ending. I am scared to wish for another book in this world, since I didn’t love the revisit to the Moors, but (without going into spoiler territory here) I just really wanted to see things that I didn’t get to see! Also, in part one, I feel like this author may not spend a lot of time with children in 2020, but that is a very minor critique that I have. Overall, I really enjoyed this one and I truly felt so much happiness flipping these pages. I love seeing all the different ways you can belong in the Wayward Children series, and I think these stories contain a lot of hope, and healing, and light. And, how I close off every review of each book in this series, I’m going to keep praying that we get Kade’s story next. Trigger and Content Warnings: blood descriptions, bullying, intersexphobia, abduction, and brief captivity. Blog | Instagram | Youtube | Ko-fi | Spotify | Twitch Buddy read with Maëlys, & Destiny! ❤ ❤ Reading Rush 2020

  3. 4 out of 5

    karen

    3 1/2 rounded up. i still love this series, but if im being honest, the last two have been, in my heart, more very good friends to me than soulmates. its not down to me losing interest in this concept or (heaven forbid) any diminishment in mcguires skills, because Juice Like Wounds, a short story i read weeks after this one, is both a perfect short story and my absolute favorite wayward children piece yet. i still havent managed to review book 5, Come Tumbling Down, because i felt like there was 3 1/2 rounded up. i still love this series, but if i’m being honest, the last two have been, in my heart, more “very good friends” to me than “soulmates.” it’s not down to me losing interest in this concept or (heaven forbid) any diminishment in mcguire’s skills, because Juice Like Wounds, a short story i read weeks after this one, is both a perfect short story and my absolute favorite wayward children piece yet. i still haven’t managed to review book 5, Come Tumbling Down, because i felt like there was something wrong with me for not loving it. i really liked jack and jill in the other books, and i’d been looking forward to more of their story as soon as i learned they’d be returning, so when i was left underwhelmed after reading it, i worried that i’d become too damaged for that particular door to open for me again or maybe even too broken to take joy in anything anymore &blah &blah &emo weeping. and then there was this one, this one about a portal to a world with friggin’ unicorns in it, which is all i've ever wanted since my babydays. wayward children + unicorns sounds like something i made up in a dream as the cure for all of 2020 (so far), and while i’d be grateful for a portal anywhere right now, and tho' i DID love what dum dums these particular unicorns were, the story as a whole just struck a medium chord with me. i’m going to reread this when it comes out in january, with the expectation that 2021 will find us all in a better place and i will be able to enjoy everything more, but i think i figured out why it didn't transport me over the moon. each of these books is different, not only in the nature of the world behind the door, but also in the "why" of the story, which is something i love and admire with mcguire/grant in general—her imagination and conceptual risk-taking, but here the storyweight didn't work for me. i don’t consider anything i’m about to say here a spoiler, but i’m going to put it under a spoiler tag for reasons that should be clear to anyone who has been on this site for a minute. (view spoiler)[the shape of the story is more or less the same as the others: character doesn't 'fit' into their birth-world, finds a door that opens onto a place and people more suited to/aligned with their particular misfit qualities, conflict/action sequence leads to choice (made by or FOR the character) to stay or return to their 'old' world. all of which is true here, but there's not much in the way of tension or "rising action." it's not all cake and ice cream, but even for a very short book, the conflicts are mild. quoting too much but still not giving away anything crucial: ...everything about the moment was inevitable; everything about the moment had been coming for her since the moment she’d walked through a door that wasn’t and into a world that somehow knew enough to know that it was going to need saving. Not just saving: saving by someone who loved it. If the door had opened now, today, and dropped a gangly, long-limbed Regan wearing fresh new jeans and smelling of her mother’s perfume into the field, she wouldn’t have been fit for saving anything at all. She had never been given the opportunity to become that version of herself, but she knew in her heart that the other Regan wasn’t somehow the better one. The other Regan would never have understood the simple joy of fishing in the lake during her morning bath, hooking fat, slow bass under the gills with her fingers and flipping them onto the shore. She wouldn’t have seen the colts growing up, or lay with Chicory in fields of sweet grass, wondering about the shape of the future. If she was going the save the Hooflands, she had to be this version of herself, this awkward, half-wild, uncertain girl who’d grown up on a centaur’s back, racing through woods and breathing in air that always smelled, ever so faintly, of horsehair and hay. That other Regan had been the first sacrifice necessary to save the world, and she had made it without even knowing, and still she had no regrets. i really appreciate the acknowledgment that in order to make anything better, you first have to understand what about it is broken—or even able to be fixed, and that only by immersing herself into the world, the culture, getting a sense of the people, being invested in its success, can she even consider an attempt to save it. mcguire’s sort of addressing one of those pervasive tropes of kidlit—the human savior come to 'fix' everything in a fantasyland that seems 'backwards' or 'weird;' a situation much less charming in its real-world equivalent. so the whole ‘point’ of the first 3/4 of the book is regan being groomed to save the world—not necessarily through training for the role, just…making her love the realm and its people, making her a part of its fate. so, i love the message, but the path to the lesson isn't as rich or fraught as some of the earlier installments, and the Great Big Standoff was...not very intense. (hide spoiler)] TL;DR: this isn't my favorite in the series, story-wise, but i'm forever in awe of her writing ability—her worldbuilding, her conceptual range, the way she's always trying out new storytelling angles within this series. even the ones i don't love in my reader-heart i admire from a critical standpoint. also, unicorns. *************************************** hahaha yoonicorns, y r u so dum? review to come. *************************************** THAT'S ENOUGH WORK FOR THE DAY GOTTA READ ABOUT UNICORNS NOW SORRY BYE *************************************** seanan mcguire. unicorns. i think i just found my will to live. come to my blog!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    Centaurs, unicorns, selkies, fauns ... horse-loving Teenage Me wouldve loved this book. Ten-year-old Regan has great parents (YAY), adores horses and rides them regularly, and has a close school friend named Lauren, who's a toxic queen bee type, but Regan hangs on to Lauren, even after Lauren turns against their other best friend ... not realizing, or maybe just not wanting to admit to herself, that Lauren could turn against her equally as quickly and terribly. When Regan finds out some upsetting Centaurs, unicorns, selkies, fauns ... horse-loving Teenage Me would’ve loved this book. Ten-year-old Regan has great parents (YAY), adores horses and rides them regularly, and has a close school friend named Lauren, who's a toxic queen bee type, but Regan hangs on to Lauren, even after Lauren turns against their other best friend ... not realizing, or maybe just not wanting to admit to herself, that Lauren could turn against her equally as quickly and terribly. When Regan finds out some upsetting news, she makes the mistake of confiding in Lauren. Things go wrong fast, Regan runs away from school - and finds herself in the woods, faced with a magical doorway that leads to the Hooflands. In the Hooflands, everyone has hooves of some kind, and humans are exotic creatures that show up once in a blue moon, and are expected to heroically save the Hooflands from some terrible trouble and then disappear. Destiny? or perhaps not. This entry in the Wayward Children series doesn't have any links to Eleanor's Home for Wayward Children or the characters in the other books, at least not yet. It has some great moments, but lacked some of the impact for me that the best books in this series have, and I really wanted more of an epilogue ... in both worlds. Well worth reading for any fan of the series, though! Full RTC. Initial post: YES! Approved for the ARC of the latest Wayward Children book on NetGalley ... and immediately started reading it, because I have no self-control whatsoever with some series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy Imogene Reads

    yes yes YES! my heart will break the day we stop receiving installments in this series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    Did I want a Kade prequel book more than anything else? Yes. But will I read anything Seanan McGuire puts out until the end of time. HELL YES. The wait for January 2021 is going to be torture!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    #1 Every Heart a Doorway ★★★★★ #2 Down Among the Sticks and Bones ★★★★★ #3 Beneath the Sugar Sky ★★★★★ #4 In An Absent Dream ★★★★★ #5 Come Tumbling Down ★★★★★ #6 Across the Green Grass Fields ★★★★★ I say this all the time, but... I really don't know what I ever did to deserve the existence of this series. I'm in tears just writing this little snippet. This series means so damn much to me, words can never even describe. This was honestly everything I wanted it to be. At first, I thought this was my new #1 Every Heart a Doorway ★★★★★ #2 Down Among the Sticks and Bones ★★★★★ #3 Beneath the Sugar Sky ★★★★★ #4 In An Absent Dream ★★★★★ #5 Come Tumbling Down ★★★★★ #6 Across the Green Grass Fields ★★★★★ I say this all the time, but... I really don't know what I ever did to deserve the existence of this series. I'm in tears just writing this little snippet. This series means so damn much to me, words can never even describe. This was honestly everything I wanted it to be. At first, I thought this was my new second fave in the series, but it might even be my #1 when I think about how badly I forever need characters like Regan, reminding me that it's okay to mourn for myself and every other little girl who wasn't allowed to fit in for one reason or another — and who had to find, or create, her own world to exist happily in. Full review coming soon! Buddy read with Melanie ♥ ————— original pre-review: I love this series so much, and... there are kelpies in this one? Be still, my former horse girl, eternal equine fae-loving heart. 😭💖 If you need me, I'll be over here screaming. Forever. Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with this review copy in exchange for an honest review!

  8. 5 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    1.) Every Heart A Doorway ★★★★ 2.) Down Among The Sticks and Bones ★★★★.5 3.) Beneath The Sugar Sky ★★★★.5 4.) In An Absent Dream ★★★.5 5.) Come Tumbling Down ★★★★ 6.) Across the Green Grass Fields ★★★★ ----------------------------------------------- "She still didnt believe in destiny. Clay shaped into a cup was not always destined to become a drinking vessel it was simply shaped by someone too large to be resisted. She was not clay, but she had been shaped by her circumstances all the same, not 1.) Every Heart A Doorway ★★★★ 2.) Down Among The Sticks and Bones ★★★★.5 3.) Beneath The Sugar Sky ★★★★.5 4.) In An Absent Dream ★★★.5 5.) Come Tumbling Down ★★★★ 6.) Across the Green Grass Fields ★★★★ ----------------------------------------------- "She still didn’t believe in destiny. Clay shaped into a cup was not always destined to become a drinking vessel’ it was simply shaped by someone too large to be resisted. She was not clay, but she had been shaped by her circumstances all the same, not directed by any destiny." representation: intersex MC. [trigger warnings are listed at the bottom of this review and may contain spoilers] ★★★★ This wasn't my favourite in the series, but it definitely wasn't my least favourite either! I'm not a horse girl and never have been but that didn't stop me from loving The Hooflands and all of its interesting creatures such as centaurs and unicorns! It was also refreshing to read about an intersex main character because let's be real, intersex people are severely underrepresented in books. In this book, we follow Regan as she finds out that she's intersex and that's why she isn't going through puberty like her friends. She finally confides in her best friend but is deeply hurt when she immediately calls her a boy and yells at her to get away from her. So she runs and stumbles across a door and of course, she goes through and finds herself fitting in with a herd of wonderful centaurs who raise her like one of their own. Things change though when the Queen of the Hooflands demands to see her and even attempts to kidnap her and take her away from her new found family. As per usual, Seanan McGuire's writing is just otherworldly. No one else writes like her and you can immediately tell whenever you pick up one of her books that it's one of hers due to her distinct writing style. It's also so impressive how she manages to flesh out characters and worlds in so few pages. So while I really enjoyed this one, the ending was a little bit anti-climactic for me and therefore wasn't 5 star worthy, but it was still a wonderful read, even if we (unfortunately) don't see any of our favourite characters from the previous books. I can't wait for the next one! trigger warnings: snakes and snake bites, fantasy violence, bullying, interphobia, kidnapping. Thank you so much to NetGalley & Macmillan-Tor/Forge for the review copy!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hamad

    Every Heart a Doorway ★★★ 1/2 Down Among the Sticks and Bones ★★★ 3/4 Beneath the Sugar Sky ★★★★ In an Absent Dream ★★★★ Come Tumbling Down ★★★ 1/2 Across the Green Grass Fields ★★★ 1/2 RTC..

  10. 4 out of 5

    Boston

    I will never not be amazed at Seanan McGuires ability to put years of a life into a 150 page book and not make it feel rushed at all. From worldbuilding to character depth to meaningful conversations, Across the Green Grass Fields is just as adventurous and fun as the rest of the books. I will never not be amazed at Seanan McGuire’s ability to put years of a life into a 150 page book and not make it feel rushed at all. From worldbuilding to character depth to meaningful conversations, Across the Green Grass Fields is just as adventurous and fun as the rest of the books.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mikorin

    Is this a new character? I don't remember her. I'm always happy to find a new book in this series, but I'm always hoping to finally get a book about Kade.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mara

    This book pretty much had me in the bag as soon as we found out the magical world is called "the Hooflands." Unicorns? Yes. Centaurs? Yes gawd. This really is a fantasy for the inner horse girl in my heart, plus we get intersex rep to boot. I think this will be a crowd pleaser for all those who love this series, and I personally was jazzed to see the pacing set just right, which has been my main issue with the previous books.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julie Zantopoulos

    This is the first of the Wayward Children series that I am not giving a five stars to. It's not that I didn't appreciate the themes being discussed, but the book felt rushed, and lacking compared to the rest of the books. I appreciate the diversity, as always, but I didn't connect with the characters the way I usually do. I have my favorite storylines and characters and it was okay that this didn't follow a known student (I knew it wouldn't) but I don't really care for equine themes and I found This is the first of the Wayward Children series that I am not giving a five stars to. It's not that I didn't appreciate the themes being discussed, but the book felt rushed, and lacking compared to the rest of the books. I appreciate the diversity, as always, but I didn't connect with the characters the way I usually do. I have my favorite storylines and characters and it was okay that this didn't follow a known student (I knew it wouldn't) but I don't really care for equine themes and I found myself not being as immersed in the world or the creatures. It was still whimsical, but the themes she discussed ended up being a little less advanced and intricately woven than I've come to expect, though I appreciate the inclusion of intersex characters. Not a favorite but I will, of course, continue with the series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    TABI⁷ (ᕗツ)ᕗ

    I WAS RIGHT THAT THIS SERIES AIN'T ENDING ANY TIME SOON HEY EDELWEISS THANKS FOR GIVING ME AN EARLY DEATH BY HAPPINESS but where's my Kade-centric book okay the series isn't allowed to end until we get that

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maëlys

    Previous books in this series: Every Heart a Doorway (Book 1): 4 / 5 Down Among the Sticks and Bones (Book 2): 4.5 / 5 Beneath the Sugar Sky (Book 3): 3 / 5 In an Absent Dream (Book 4): 4 / 5 Come Tumbling Down (Book 5): 2 / 5 ☆ 3.5 / 5 ☆ She knew better now. The world was bigger now. She was bigger now, and that made all the difference. I really enjoyed my time in the Hooflands and following this new characters adventures. The first part of this book starts off in the real world where we see our main Previous books in this series: Every Heart a Doorway (Book 1): 4 / 5 Down Among the Sticks and Bones (Book 2): 4.5 / 5 Beneath the Sugar Sky (Book 3): 3 / 5 In an Absent Dream (Book 4): 4 / 5 Come Tumbling Down (Book 5): 2 / 5 ☆ 3.5 / 5 ☆ “She knew better now. The world was bigger now. She was bigger now, and that made all the difference.” I really enjoyed my time in the Hooflands and following this new character’s adventures. The first part of this book starts off in the real world where we see our main character Regan navigate the politics of childhood friendships. While I think the exploration of her dynamics with her friends and the expectations that came with that was interesting, none of these characters talked like they were 10 years old. It feels ineffective to have to use my suspension of disbelief card so early on in the book and when we have yet to step into any magical world. I really felt for Regan as we see her try to navigate the cruelty of other children and how difficult it is for her to feel outside of the norm. Her body is not developing at the same rate her classmates are and that makes her feel uncomfortable with herself. As she goes to her parents they finally let her know she is intersex. In my opinion that conversation was handled tactfully but that doesn’t mean it made Regan feel better about herself and sets her on her journey to become confident with herself, outside the norm This book does start off describing “white and blonde” as being part of the norm and while this whole book discusses different ways in which the norm is to be challenged, this one never is. It wasn’t a major point but for a book about not subscribing to societal norms I was expecting it to challenge this notion. In parts 2 and 3, we follow Regan as she steps into the Hooflands and this was the most enjoyable part of the story for me. I love how the forest she steps in is described, truly establishing the whimsy of this world straight away. Regan is discovered and adopted by centaurs, and I love the strong found family aspect, and in particular her budding friendship with the youngest one, Chicory. She is being accepted for every part of herself and the love this new family has for her is never put into question. The centaurs are very interesting even though I wanted to know more about how they exist in the parameters of this world. They seem to be part of a matriarchal society and I wish that aspect had been delved into a bit more. I had a great time reading about Regan’s day to day life with them and see the strong connections she established over the years. “Anything with enough brain to know itself as an individual will reach out to others, looking for companionship, looking for other eyes with which to see the world.” In the final part of this book, Regan goes on to fulfill her destiny of saving the Hooflands. Except she doesn’t believe in destiny and wants to do it her way. On her journey she meets two of my favourite characters in this book: a kelpie and a peryton. Their personalities were unique and so well established in very little time, I wish we’d seen more of them throughout this book! I do however get that this is to establish how little Regan actually knows about the creatures of this world she hasn’t spent time with and show how easily bias can wrap your perspective on others. They just stole my entire heart and I would absolutely love a spinoff following these two. The twist at the end of this book was a little predictable for me but I still really enjoyed it and the perspective it gave on what destiny is. Unfortunately the actual ending of this book left me unsatisfied and wishing for more. This instalment suffered on occasion from plot convenience and I didn’t get as much out of it as some other books in this series. I did have a good time reading it though, which when compared to my experience with Come Tumbling Down, I count as a solid win. Youtube ☆ Twitter Buddy read with Melanie ♡ All quotes are taken from an arc and aren’t final. Please refer to a finished copy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    ♡ jules ♡

    I LOVED THIS, as if I don't love each book with my entire heart! Full RTC!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rian *fire and books*

    I thought I loved Lundya story. I thought I loved Jack and Jills story. I love Regans most. What a fickle heart I have. To fall for Regan and the Hooflands. What an absolute blessing. **attempts at writing a proper review will commence when I wake up because 5:30 am is no time to assemble my thoughts into coherence. I thought I loved Lundy‘a story. I thought I loved Jack and Jill‘s story. I love Regan’s most. What a fickle heart I have. To fall for Regan and the Hooflands. What an absolute blessing. **attempts at writing a “proper” review will commence when I wake up because 5:30 am is no time to assemble my thoughts into coherence.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Roxie |The Book Slayer| Voorhees

    Yes I was one of those people and rated the book a year before it is released, but I wanted to save my spot for my future review. Besides, I already know I am going to love it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Just saying... i feel like Tina from Bobs Burgers would flip her sh*t if she found out that this world existed. 😂 Just saying... i feel like Tina from Bob’s Burgers would flip her sh*t if she found out that this world existed. 😂

  20. 5 out of 5

    Colby

    RTC. Thank you to Edelweiss and to Tor/Forge for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anubha (BooksFullOfLife, LifeFullOfBooks)

    I think I am the only one who awaits reading a book about Eleanor!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marzie

    This is a beautiful novella that couldn't be timelier. It has much to say about the heroism of being who you are, and of gaining wisdom as to what justice looks like. I will post a longer review closer to release date. This is one I'm not just pre-ordering for myself. I've got gifts to give with this novella. I received a digital review copy of this novella in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ellyn → Allonsythornraxx

    02/05/2020 Oh my good lord, we've got kelpies, people! I absolutely can't wait for this!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex Can Read

    SO GOOD. RTC.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Becky Boudreau

    Between a 3.5-4/5 I'll be uploading a full review a bit closer to the release date. But this was the first time I felt like the novella content was detrimental to the story. I felt like there were some really interesting themes that were starting to be explored before being quickly skipped over. I felt like we didn't get enough time in the world, enough time with Regan to allow for her character growth, and I wanted a little bit more from the epilogue as well. I did enjoy what a quick read this Between a 3.5-4/5 I'll be uploading a full review a bit closer to the release date. But this was the first time I felt like the novella content was detrimental to the story. I felt like there were some really interesting themes that were starting to be explored before being quickly skipped over. I felt like we didn't get enough time in the world, enough time with Regan to allow for her character growth, and I wanted a little bit more from the epilogue as well. I did enjoy what a quick read this was though and I really hope we get more from Regan in future installments ----- Any book in this series is going to get me excited, but this one sounds SO GOOD

  26. 4 out of 5

    Beth Cato

    I received an advance copy of this novella via NetGalley. The Wayward Children series has been inconsistent for me. The first book ,Every Heart a Doorway is one of the best things I've ever read. And yet, later books in the sequence didn't emotionally resonate in the same way or felt off in terms of plot. Therefore, I approached this one with some trepidation... and ended up delighted and enraptured. I had to read the whole thing in the course of an evening. These novellas bring a fresh angle to I received an advance copy of this novella via NetGalley. The Wayward Children series has been inconsistent for me. The first book ,Every Heart a Doorway is one of the best things I've ever read. And yet, later books in the sequence didn't emotionally resonate in the same way or felt off in terms of plot. Therefore, I approached this one with some trepidation... and ended up delighted and enraptured. I had to read the whole thing in the course of an evening. These novellas bring a fresh angle to the classic trope of the portal fantasy, a la Narnia: children find doorways into other realms, where they are often saviors or enact some great change, only to find their way back to Earth again years later. Some of the novellas have focused more on the hardship of that return to Earth, when they really want to return to the fantasy/scifi realm that they consider their true home. This one focuses on the life in that other realm: in this case, Regan, in the Hooflands, a realm populated by centaurs, unicorns, and other mythological creatures made real. COULD THIS BOOK BE MORE PERFECT FOR ME. I mean, come on, I was a horse-obsessed kid, and I still love horses. The word "Hooflands" alone hooked me in an instant. Fortunately, the book lived up to all of my expectations. McGuire is masterful at writing about the very psychology of her characters. Her children, in particular, feel so real it hurts. Here, Regan is a kid who is friends who a wretched girl, but stays her friend because that's what she's supposed to do. When Regan discovers something about herself and tries to go to her friend for support... well, she finds out the truth of their relationship, too. Distraught, she flees school and finds the doorway to the Hooflands. She's taken in by a herd of centaurs--wow, McGuire does some amazing world-building to make centaurs and unicorns comes across in a fresh way--and resists the call to be the destined human who will save the realm. She discovers truths about friendship, herself, and what destiny really means. There's an incredible message here, but not for an instant is it preachy. This novella is a beautiful, breezy read, but it's deep. There are layers here. This book could be an academic study on the technical side of writing and how to make it work. And wow, does it work. This is almost up there with Every Heart a Doorway, and that is saying something. For certain, this novella is starting off my list of works to consider for awards next year (as this book is being released in January 2021).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bridgette

    This might be my favorite of the series. I read this novella in a day, something I haven't done since the pandemic started. McGuire's prose is beyond lovely. I wish I lay in a field of it. I loved what this said about girlhood and destiny, and how they're connected and not connected, and how others view both. Regan's story drew me in from the very beginning and kept me reading until the very end. I wasn't super sure about this, not being into horses and this seemed like a horse book, but it's so This might be my favorite of the series. I read this novella in a day, something I haven't done since the pandemic started. McGuire's prose is beyond lovely. I wish I lay in a field of it. I loved what this said about girlhood and destiny, and how they're connected and not connected, and how others view both. Regan's story drew me in from the very beginning and kept me reading until the very end. I wasn't super sure about this, not being into horses and this seemed like a horse book, but it's so much more. Horses are barely a part of it. The Hooflands might be my favorite world we've explored in this series. The amount of plot and character development McGuire packs into the novella is nothing short of masterful. Fans won't be disappointed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brianna - Coffee Books and Bullet Journals

    This book was a little bit disappointing after reading the last 3 in quick succession and enjoying those. This one is so disconnected from the rest of the series and the part that I love is when they all kind of come together. I dont know, this one felt like a filler episode. I enjoyed the land of hoof lands, but the stakes were just so low and everything was over so quickly. This book was a little bit disappointing after reading the last 3 in quick succession and enjoying those. This one is so disconnected from the rest of the series and the part that I love is when they all kind of come together. I don’t know, this one felt like a filler episode. I enjoyed the land of hoof lands, but the stakes were just so low and everything was over so quickly.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Acqua

    ohhh it has a cover!! can't wait

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jacqie

    Thanks to Netgalley for providing a copy of this book for review. I was a horse girl. I got to have riding lessons starting at the age of eight. I learned all the horse colors and breeds and had a poster by Sam Savitt featuring them on my bedroom wall. I read Black Beauty, all the Marguerite Henry books along with all the other horse books I could find in the library, Walter Farley's Black Stallion series, the Timber Trail Riders, and I even read Steinbeck's The Red Pony, which did not go at all Thanks to Netgalley for providing a copy of this book for review. I was a horse girl. I got to have riding lessons starting at the age of eight. I learned all the horse colors and breeds and had a poster by Sam Savitt featuring them on my bedroom wall. I read Black Beauty, all the Marguerite Henry books along with all the other horse books I could find in the library, Walter Farley's Black Stallion series, the Timber Trail Riders, and I even read Steinbeck's The Red Pony, which did not go at all as I thought it would. Scarred for life. I had a closet full of Breyer horses and I even have some of them in my basement today. I never owned a horse. We didn't have nearly enough money for that. I rode lesson horses, helped train horses who were then bought by wealthier girls when I was a teenager, rode horses that were not my own in shows . Anyway, I was a horse girl. And, although I enjoyed this book, this is not a horse girl's book. Regan rides because she likes horses, but she is not enthralled by, enamored of, bewitched by them. She does not dream of owning a horse or of being lost on a desert island with only a horse for a friend. She likes them because she can be herself around them and because they allow her some sense of agency, because Regan has chosen the path of least resistance with her friends. She can have her friends as long as she blends in perfectly, and horses are the only thing that she does for anything beyond that blending in. But horses are an acceptable eccentricity. A real horse girl would be one in spite of friends and conformity, not because of it. For horse girls, horses are the only things they need- friends fit around horses not the other way around. Regan has gotten to the point where she can't blend in perfectly no matter what she does now, though. As her friends enter puberty, she feels left behind and feels betrayed by a body that refuses to change. Her parents can and do explain to her why this is (and this explanation hit me in the heart; it's very close to a conversation that my parents had with me when they thought I was old enough) but all Regan knows is that she is doomed to be different, which is social suicide among her group of friends. Honestly, I didn't care for Regan at the beginning of this book; she's the worst sort of follower. Regan tells her secret to her best friend, the queen bee of the group, and receives the treatment that any queen bee gives someone who has given her ammunition to pick on them, and Regan realizes that she has made a terrible mistake. This is when her door opens. I was looking forward to this book because I'm a horse girl and one of the things a horse girl does is learn every equine related myth, learn all the fantasy animals related to horses. And Regan finds the Hooflands, where every sentient creature has hooves. There haven't been humans to this land for some time. But- there are no horses. There are centaurs and unicorns, perytons and satyrs, minotaurs and selkies, but no actual horses. So- no herds of wild sentient horses running free, ready for a girl to ride. Nothing like the Companions of the Mercedes Lackey books or the great Ranyhyn of the Thomas Covenant Chronicles. No Shadowfax for Regan. Regan joins a centaur herd and a teenage centaur becomes her friend and steed, but. It's not the same as a horse/human partnership. Regan finds that she might be a chosen one, but she is not interested in destiny, and her centaur herd help her avoid scrutiny for as long as they can before the Kirin queen begins to hunt her down. Chosen Ones never are good news for royalty. I actually really liked the message of this book. Destiny is not obligation. Destiny might be out there, but free will is too, and destiny can be altered if you just have a little imagination and sense of self. Regan spends her time in the Hooflands developing her sense of self, and that's what saves her. So, this book is one of the stronger ones in this series. I like the message, I identified with Regan's plight (although not with her personality). But it is not a horse book, so one star docked.

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