hits counter A Question of Freedom: The Families Who Challenged Slavery from the Nation’s Founding to the Civil War - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

A Question of Freedom: The Families Who Challenged Slavery from the Nation’s Founding to the Civil War

Availability: Ready to download

The story of the longest and most complex legal challenge to slavery in American history "A rich, roiling history that Thomas recounts with eloquence and skill. . . . The very existence of freedom suits assumed that slavery could only be circumscribed and local; what Thomas shows in his illuminating book is how this view was eventually turned upside down in decisions like D The story of the longest and most complex legal challenge to slavery in American history "A rich, roiling history that Thomas recounts with eloquence and skill. . . . The very existence of freedom suits assumed that slavery could only be circumscribed and local; what Thomas shows in his illuminating book is how this view was eventually turned upside down in decisions like Dred Scott. 'Freedom was local,' Thomas writes. 'Slavery was national.'"—Jennifer Szalai, New York Times "Gripping. . . . Profound and prodigiously researched."—Alison L. LaCroix, Washington Post For over seventy years and five generations, the enslaved families of Prince George’s County, Maryland, filed hundreds of suits for their freedom against a powerful circle of slaveholders, taking their cause all the way to the Supreme Court. Between 1787 and 1861, these lawsuits challenged the legitimacy of slavery in American law and put slavery on trial in the nation’s capital.     Piecing together evidence once dismissed in court and buried in the archives, William Thomas tells an intricate and intensely human story of the enslaved families (the Butlers, Queens, Mahoneys, and others), their lawyers (among them a young Francis Scott Key), and the slaveholders who fought to defend slavery, beginning with the Jesuit priests who held some of the largest plantations in the nation and founded a college at Georgetown. A Question of Freedom asks us to reckon with the moral problem of slavery and its legacies in the present day.


Compare

The story of the longest and most complex legal challenge to slavery in American history "A rich, roiling history that Thomas recounts with eloquence and skill. . . . The very existence of freedom suits assumed that slavery could only be circumscribed and local; what Thomas shows in his illuminating book is how this view was eventually turned upside down in decisions like D The story of the longest and most complex legal challenge to slavery in American history "A rich, roiling history that Thomas recounts with eloquence and skill. . . . The very existence of freedom suits assumed that slavery could only be circumscribed and local; what Thomas shows in his illuminating book is how this view was eventually turned upside down in decisions like Dred Scott. 'Freedom was local,' Thomas writes. 'Slavery was national.'"—Jennifer Szalai, New York Times "Gripping. . . . Profound and prodigiously researched."—Alison L. LaCroix, Washington Post For over seventy years and five generations, the enslaved families of Prince George’s County, Maryland, filed hundreds of suits for their freedom against a powerful circle of slaveholders, taking their cause all the way to the Supreme Court. Between 1787 and 1861, these lawsuits challenged the legitimacy of slavery in American law and put slavery on trial in the nation’s capital.     Piecing together evidence once dismissed in court and buried in the archives, William Thomas tells an intricate and intensely human story of the enslaved families (the Butlers, Queens, Mahoneys, and others), their lawyers (among them a young Francis Scott Key), and the slaveholders who fought to defend slavery, beginning with the Jesuit priests who held some of the largest plantations in the nation and founded a college at Georgetown. A Question of Freedom asks us to reckon with the moral problem of slavery and its legacies in the present day.

32 review for A Question of Freedom: The Families Who Challenged Slavery from the Nation’s Founding to the Civil War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Serge

    A great and necessary book I never appreciated before the centrality of slavery in the history of Maryland, the duplicity of the Jesuits and the animus of Francis Scott Key. This book brings to life the courtroom battles to challenge slavery through freedom suits and the ironic and tragic consequences for the plaintiffs even when juries upheld their claims. This chapter in American history needs to be told more broadly and to wider audiences.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda Jeffries-summers

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tina Brennan

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kami Bates

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  6. 4 out of 5

    Keliko

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shaunterria

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Konarske

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  17. 4 out of 5

    Manda

  18. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

  20. 5 out of 5

    L

  21. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Fulmer Laconi

  25. 5 out of 5

    Judith Thomas

  26. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Gruber

  29. 4 out of 5

    James Marconi

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jim Myers

  31. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

  32. 5 out of 5

    Becky

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.