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A collection born of polyphony and the rhythms of our cosmos--intimate in its stakes, celestial in its dreams. Tethered to Stars inhabits the deductive tongue of astronomy, the oracular throat of astrology, and the living language of loss and desire. With an analytical eye and a lyrical heart, Fady Joudah shifts deftly between the microscope, the telescope, and sometimes ev A collection born of polyphony and the rhythms of our cosmos--intimate in its stakes, celestial in its dreams. Tethered to Stars inhabits the deductive tongue of astronomy, the oracular throat of astrology, and the living language of loss and desire. With an analytical eye and a lyrical heart, Fady Joudah shifts deftly between the microscope, the telescope, and sometimes even the horoscope. His gaze lingers on the interior space of a lung, on a butterfly poised on a filament, on the moon temple atop Huayna Picchu, on a dismembered live oak. In each lingering, Joudah shares with readers the palimpsest of what makes us human: "We are other worms / for other silk roads." The solemn, the humorous, the erotic, the transcendent--all of it, in Joudah's poems, steeped in the lexicon of the natural world. "When I say honey," says one lover, "I'm asking you whose pollen you contain." "And when I say honey," replies another, "you grip my sweetness / on your life, stigma and anthophile." Teeming with life but tinged with a sublime proximity to death, Tethered to Stars is a collection that flows "between nuance and essentialization," from one of our most acclaimed poets.


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A collection born of polyphony and the rhythms of our cosmos--intimate in its stakes, celestial in its dreams. Tethered to Stars inhabits the deductive tongue of astronomy, the oracular throat of astrology, and the living language of loss and desire. With an analytical eye and a lyrical heart, Fady Joudah shifts deftly between the microscope, the telescope, and sometimes ev A collection born of polyphony and the rhythms of our cosmos--intimate in its stakes, celestial in its dreams. Tethered to Stars inhabits the deductive tongue of astronomy, the oracular throat of astrology, and the living language of loss and desire. With an analytical eye and a lyrical heart, Fady Joudah shifts deftly between the microscope, the telescope, and sometimes even the horoscope. His gaze lingers on the interior space of a lung, on a butterfly poised on a filament, on the moon temple atop Huayna Picchu, on a dismembered live oak. In each lingering, Joudah shares with readers the palimpsest of what makes us human: "We are other worms / for other silk roads." The solemn, the humorous, the erotic, the transcendent--all of it, in Joudah's poems, steeped in the lexicon of the natural world. "When I say honey," says one lover, "I'm asking you whose pollen you contain." "And when I say honey," replies another, "you grip my sweetness / on your life, stigma and anthophile." Teeming with life but tinged with a sublime proximity to death, Tethered to Stars is a collection that flows "between nuance and essentialization," from one of our most acclaimed poets.

36 review for Tethered to Stars: Poems

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    This book is a bit of work with its play between concrete and abstraction and its vocabulary flashiness (maybe warranted, maybe not), so maybe it's me just not being up to it. Yes, I found some fine lines and sentences in poems that I enjoyed, but it's also one of those collections where two bad signs keep lifting their heads: 1.) some of the wording lacks flow, reads awkwardly, causes me to wonder why it is arranged this way if it is not achieving a desired effect. 2.) many times I stopped, mid-p This book is a bit of work with its play between concrete and abstraction and its vocabulary flashiness (maybe warranted, maybe not), so maybe it's me just not being up to it. Yes, I found some fine lines and sentences in poems that I enjoyed, but it's also one of those collections where two bad signs keep lifting their heads: 1.) some of the wording lacks flow, reads awkwardly, causes me to wonder why it is arranged this way if it is not achieving a desired effect. 2.) many times I stopped, mid-poem, feeling like I'd completely dropped the thread and now found myself in some dark labyrinth, untethered to star or any other bright hope of comprehension. When that happens, you second guess yourself and retrace your steps. When it happens yet again over the same terrain, you shrug and trudge on, leaving meaning to the poet and to those readers whose ears are tuned to the same note. Perhaps it is insiders' music, I don't know, but I feel like an Outsider at such junctures. Like Ponyboy trying to stay gold in a world of bronze.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Luke Gorham

    Review coming shortly to Library Journal. Review coming shortly to Library Journal.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elissa Mann

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leanna

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emily Shearer

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Melia

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sam Maltezos

  9. 4 out of 5

    -end-

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katja

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Holstrom

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lane

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fareeda

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lavran

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susy Britton

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robin Petty

  17. 4 out of 5

    Loretta Gaffney

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Hutchison Cervantes

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kendra Phillips

  23. 4 out of 5

    emma

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nora

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shaney

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex Robertson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Cowgill (LanternsJourney)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dallas Klein

  31. 4 out of 5

    Hann

  32. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

  33. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Ladeby

  34. 4 out of 5

    Macaela

  35. 5 out of 5

    Tera Slawson

  36. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

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