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How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge

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Rory Thorne must use the fairy blessings gifted to her to change the multiverse in the second book in this space opera duology. After avoiding an arranged marriage, thwarting a coup, and inadvertently kick-starting a revolution, Rory Thorne is no longer a princess, but a space pirate. Her new life is interrupted when Rory and her crew--former royal bodyguards, Thorsdottir an Rory Thorne must use the fairy blessings gifted to her to change the multiverse in the second book in this space opera duology. After avoiding an arranged marriage, thwarting a coup, and inadvertently kick-starting a revolution, Rory Thorne is no longer a princess, but a space pirate. Her new life is interrupted when Rory and her crew--former royal bodyguards, Thorsdottir and Zhang, and co-conspirator Jaed--encounter an abandoned ship registered under a false name, seemingly fallen victim to attack. As they investigate, they find evidence of vicious technology and arithmancy, alien and far beyond known capabilities. The only answer to all the destruction is the mysterious, and unexpected, cargo: a rose plant. One that reveals themself to be sentient--and designed as a massive biological weapon. Rose seeks to escape their intended fate, and Rory and her friends must act fast when the attackers return with their superior weaponry. As the situation gains the attention of an increasing number of alien races, Rory finds herself acting as negotiator and diplomat, in order to save Rose and her friends--and avert an unprecedented war.


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Rory Thorne must use the fairy blessings gifted to her to change the multiverse in the second book in this space opera duology. After avoiding an arranged marriage, thwarting a coup, and inadvertently kick-starting a revolution, Rory Thorne is no longer a princess, but a space pirate. Her new life is interrupted when Rory and her crew--former royal bodyguards, Thorsdottir an Rory Thorne must use the fairy blessings gifted to her to change the multiverse in the second book in this space opera duology. After avoiding an arranged marriage, thwarting a coup, and inadvertently kick-starting a revolution, Rory Thorne is no longer a princess, but a space pirate. Her new life is interrupted when Rory and her crew--former royal bodyguards, Thorsdottir and Zhang, and co-conspirator Jaed--encounter an abandoned ship registered under a false name, seemingly fallen victim to attack. As they investigate, they find evidence of vicious technology and arithmancy, alien and far beyond known capabilities. The only answer to all the destruction is the mysterious, and unexpected, cargo: a rose plant. One that reveals themself to be sentient--and designed as a massive biological weapon. Rose seeks to escape their intended fate, and Rory and her friends must act fast when the attackers return with their superior weaponry. As the situation gains the attention of an increasing number of alien races, Rory finds herself acting as negotiator and diplomat, in order to save Rose and her friends--and avert an unprecedented war.

30 review for How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    There are so few books about sentient plants with the potential to wipe out life as we know it that it's a pity this one isn't better. I enjoyed its predecessor and its nimble subversion of fairy tales and science fiction tropes, but How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge reads as though it has lost its narrative thrust and got bogged down in alien politics instead. Which are, if anything, less interesting than current US politics. Not a good thing, by the way. Rory Thorne & co are back, not as a pr There are so few books about sentient plants with the potential to wipe out life as we know it that it's a pity this one isn't better. I enjoyed its predecessor and its nimble subversion of fairy tales and science fiction tropes, but How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge reads as though it has lost its narrative thrust and got bogged down in alien politics instead. Which are, if anything, less interesting than current US politics. Not a good thing, by the way. Rory Thorne & co are back, not as a princess and her retinue but as private citizens who work in salvage (princess --> pirate seems like quite a natural career trajectory). On one of their salvage missions, they board an abandoned Tadeshi ship that turns out to have a lot of corpses and some very strange cargo on board. Sentient plants are one thing - sentient plants with the ability to incite diplomatic chaos throughout the multiverse are quite another. I really, really wanted this book to work for me. I mean, how wrong can you go with killer roses? But it was a slog that didn't really pick up until the final quarter, with characters who feel distant and static. The nameless narrator, chronicling from many years later, is smug, digressive, and windy, and so prone to telling rather than showing that even the action scenes are perfectly put-downable. For example: We will not include details of what it is like, because although it is a chronicler's job to sift through such details, it is also their job to decide which to include. the personal experience of battle is recounted in interviews and testimonies, or perhaps conversations with too much alcohol, late at night. Such details, such stories, are important. This chronicler wishes to make that very clear. But battle, war, is not the point of this story. This history is about how and why things come to pass, how and why people like Thorsdottir, Zhang, Jaed, and Grytt have to fight at all. Yawn. It's not a necessary book - the first one ends at a reasonable place - and not even a very entertaining one. I'm adding 0.5 stars for the final harrowing quarter aboard an alien ship (best alien morgue ever??), but this is my last stop on the Thorne Chronicles.

  2. 4 out of 5

    The Captain

    Ahoy there me mateys!  I really, really enjoyed book one and was excited to get ahold of the next book in this duology.  I was, however, tempered by Matey Tammy @ books,bones&buffy's review which had this to say: Last year I was surprised by how much I loved How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse, so I was very excited to read the sequel. And for the most part, I enjoyed it. Rory Thorne was more upbeat and character focused, and I thought those things were mostly missing in the sequel. Revenge  Ahoy there me mateys!  I really, really enjoyed book one and was excited to get ahold of the next book in this duology.  I was, however, tempered by Matey Tammy @ books,bones&buffy's review which had this to say: Last year I was surprised by how much I loved How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse, so I was very excited to read the sequel. And for the most part, I enjoyed it. Rory Thorne was more upbeat and character focused, and I thought those things were mostly missing in the sequel. Revenge is a darker story that has a more tightly focused setting and whose plot leans more towards political maneuvering and impending war. I have to admit I missed the sparkling “personality” of the first book, and I didn’t think the pacing was as good. However, having said all that, I do think it was a successful conclusion to the duology, and I thought Eason managed to wrap up her big, sprawling story in a satisfying way. Even though I was warned, I really, really missed the humor and tone of the first book.  This book had major pacing issues and I did not find the ending satisfying at all.  That is not to say that I didn't really enjoy some aspects of this story.  Rory took a back seat in this one and I loved getting to see more of Thorsdottir.  I also really enjoyed that the characters get separated at various points of the book and so ye get to see the conflict evolve on both sides.  Many of the action scenes on the various ships were excellent.  I loved the secret weapon though how the subplot unfolded made me grumpy.  I thought it was a bit too easy.  I continued to love Rupert, Grytt, and Zhang.  Jaed grew on me as a character and I did like how the author changed his trajectory from where he ended up in book one.  I have to admit that I did get many of the xeno characters confused and couldn't tell many of them apart.  I did love Rory's relationship with one of the "aliens" though I cannot remember her name.  I disliked the Chronicler immensely this time around and wish that framing had been removed.  I overall thought that the ending was too rushed and unfocused.  It felt like the author skipped over several books worth of material and world building because she didn't want to write about it and just gave a whirlwind summary. I do enjoy the world immensely and Matey Tammy says that the author is writing more set in the world.  Though I didn't love this installment, I would be interested in trying another book in the multiverse.  I just hope it recaptures the delight of the first book.  Arrr!

  3. 4 out of 5

    laurel [the suspected bibliophile]

    Not feeling the writing at all. Totally a me thing, not this book thing. I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Dacyczyn

    2.5 stars? I hate to say it, but I struggled to get through this book. I LOVED the first book. I loved the fairy-tale elements and the fast pace and the witty narrator.......All of those elements seemed missing in this one. Despite the sentient killer plant named "Rose" there wasn't any kind of fairy-tale relevance that I could detect. The pacing felt way off; pretty much the entire book takes place on one derelict space ship and in some ways it felt like one long scene. And the wry style from th 2.5 stars? I hate to say it, but I struggled to get through this book. I LOVED the first book. I loved the fairy-tale elements and the fast pace and the witty narrator.......All of those elements seemed missing in this one. Despite the sentient killer plant named "Rose" there wasn't any kind of fairy-tale relevance that I could detect. The pacing felt way off; pretty much the entire book takes place on one derelict space ship and in some ways it felt like one long scene. And the wry style from the first book was barely there in this one. Or, maybe I missed it because my eyes did a lot of skimming during this book, rereading the same paragraphs over and over without absorbing them. Possibly one of the saddest parts of this book for me was when Rory "released a breath she didn't realize she'd been holding". Noooo!!! Not that tired cliché!! I literally groaned out loud when I read that line. Maybe this was a wrong-book-wrong-time situation, part of my Great CoronaSlump of 2020. In any case, I felt hugely disappointed after my adoration of the first book. What happened??

  5. 4 out of 5

    KristynRene SwissCheese JellyBean

    UPDATE: ohmygod The Cover....ohmygod it's Beautiful... You best not hurt my children. They worked hard for their survival! THEY DESERVE HAPPINESS!! Okay, I need this book. I have found a sequel to toss money at, and I would like to toss that money now thankyouverymuch. UPDATE: ohmygod The Cover....ohmygod it's Beautiful... You best not hurt my children. They worked hard for their survival! THEY DESERVE HAPPINESS!! Okay, I need this book. I have found a sequel to toss money at, and I would like to toss that money now thankyouverymuch.

  6. 5 out of 5

    agatha

    ‘co-conspirator’? is that what the kids are calling it now?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: An enjoyable but slightly uneven sequel in K. Eason's imaginative Star Wars inspired space opera series. Last year I was surprised by how much I loved How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse , so I was very excited to read the sequel. And for the most part, I enjoyed it. Rory Thorne was more upbeat and character focuse I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: An enjoyable but slightly uneven sequel in K. Eason's imaginative Star Wars inspired space opera series. Last year I was surprised by how much I loved How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse , so I was very excited to read the sequel. And for the most part, I enjoyed it. Rory Thorne was more upbeat and character focused, and I thought those things were mostly missing in the sequel. Revenge is a darker story that has a more tightly focused setting and whose plot leans more towards political maneuvering and impending war. I have to admit I missed the sparkling “personality” of the first book, and I didn’t think the pacing was as good. However, having said all that, I do think it was a successful conclusion to the duology, and I thought Eason managed to wrap up her big, sprawling story in a satisfying way. And do beware of minor spoilers for the first book! The sequel takes place two years after the events of Rory Thorne . Rory, formerly the Princess of the Confederation of Liberated Worlds, has given up her title in lieu of a less complicated life, i.e. traveling through space with her friends Jaed, Zhang and Thorsdottir and looking for salvage opportunities on abandoned ships. Back on firm ground, Rupert, the former Vizier, and Grytt, Rory’s former bodymaid, are now living a life of ease on Lanscot. One day, Rupert gets a concerning message from a fairy (one of Rory’s fairies from the first book) who tells him that Rory might be in danger, and so he arranges a flight on a ship and heads out into Confederate space. Meanwhile, Rory and her friends have found a derelict ship, and they’ve decided to board it to see if there is anything good to salvage. The unexpected discovery of what proves to be an unusual Tadeshi weapon puts them on a dangerous path: a xeno race called the vakari are enroute to intercept the weapon, which if used could have dire consequences. With Rupert headed for the impending conflict to rescue Rory, and Rory and her friends standing between a lethal weapon and a murderous alien race, it will take all of Rory’s Princess skills of negotiation to survive. Revenge continues to build on Eason’s fascinating idea of arithmancy, an interesting combination of magic and hard sci-fi, although in this book the emphasis is definitely more on the “hard” aspects with the science front and center. For those who haven’t read the first book, arithmancy is the ability to access different layers of reality with one’s mind and use computer code to create hexes (or disable them), unlock doors, and do all manner of sneaking around. Arithmancers like Rory and Jaed can also see and read auras, and although this ability sounds really cool, like most magic, it takes a physical toll on the person involved. In this book we meet a new alien species called the vakari who are far superior at arithmancy than humans are, and I loved seeing Rory and Jaed struggle with the fact that they are being outwitted (Rory, being a former Princess, has a bit of an ego!) Because the characters are scattered across space, more or less, we didn’t get the cohesive ensemble story that I enjoyed so much in the first book. However, on a positive note, this gave us a chance to get to know some of the side characters more, and I have to say my favorites this time were without a doubt Thorsdottir and Jaed. Rory is still a main character, but I didn’t like her storyline as much in this book, since she’s more embroiled in politics, and that wasn’t nearly as interesting as what was going on with Thorsdottir and Jaed. Jaed was Rory’s “sort of” romantic interest in the last book, but apparently she gave him the dreaded “let’s just be friends” speech (off page), which leaves Jaed open to other pursuits. Thorsdottir and Jaed spend lots of time together in this book, and I loved their interactions and slowly blossoming something --I won’t call it romance, but it felt like a slow burn and I loved it. I would seriously love a Thorsdottir and Jaed story in the future! As far as negatives go, I would say my biggest disappointment was the resolution of the weapon and everything that happened when it was discovered. I really don’t want to spoil things so I’m going to be vague, but let’s just say that I absolutely loved the idea of it, and the fact that the weapon is sentient (sorry, small spoiler!), and the fact that the weapon and Thorsdottir have some very cool interactions. But I wanted more, and it sort of felt like the weapon’s storyline fizzled out at the end, even though things were more or less resolved.  Once again Eason frames her story by having a “chronicler” relate the events. It didn’t bother me much in Rory Thorne, but for some reason, this time I had more trouble with the formality of the prose and the frequent interruptions by the chronicler. This really is a great story with lots of interesting characters, tense political situations and plenty of action, but unfortunately these positives are sometimes buried in the tedious “asides” that the chronicler loves to throw in. I did happen to read an interview with Eason recently that said she got her inspiration from the narration style of The Princess Bride , which actually explains a lot, but I do wonder how the story would read without so much filler. Ultimately, I did end up enjoying How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge , and I actually loved the way Eason wrapped everything up. At least for the ending, I thought the narrative format actually worked, as it gives the story a definitive ending, even if it’s implied that Rory and the gang still have many more adventures ahead of them. This is only a duology, however in that same interview, Eason says she’s already working on another story set in the same world, but this time in the future with different characters. I have to admit I’m intrigued! Big thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy. Read my review of How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    *Source* NetGalley/Publisher *Genre* Science Fiction *Rating* 3.5 *Thoughts* How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge is the second book in the space opera Rory Thorne Chronicles. This is Princess Leia meets The Princess Bride combining science fiction and fantasy with a snarky heroine, fairy blessings, a galaxy-spanning adventure, and political intrigue. This story is once again told via a Chronicler, rather than any character in this story or series. It has been (2) years since the former Princess Rory *Source* NetGalley/Publisher *Genre* Science Fiction *Rating* 3.5 *Thoughts* How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge is the second book in the space opera Rory Thorne Chronicles. This is Princess Leia meets The Princess Bride combining science fiction and fantasy with a snarky heroine, fairy blessings, a galaxy-spanning adventure, and political intrigue. This story is once again told via a Chronicler, rather than any character in this story or series. It has been (2) years since the former Princess Rory Thorne renounced her title and became a privateer working to stop smuggling. Also, aboard the Vagabond, which she pretty much stole from the Tadesh, are former royal bodyguards Thorsdottir and Zhang as well as co-conspirator Jaed Moss, son of the deposed leader of the Free Worlds of Tadesh. *Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews* https://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/20...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rhode

    I’m a meh on this one, it’s a 2.5 except for the fact that Rory doesn’t have a romance in it which bumped it to a 3 because I’m so damn tired of books about adventurous young women inevitably including a romantic element. (Note: I’m a big romance genre fan, but requiring romantic elements in all stories about women is sexist.) So, what went wrong? Part of my disappointment is that this is a very different book than the first. It might not be a bad thing on its own, it’s just I expected more of t I’m a meh on this one, it’s a 2.5 except for the fact that Rory doesn’t have a romance in it which bumped it to a 3 because I’m so damn tired of books about adventurous young women inevitably including a romantic element. (Note: I’m a big romance genre fan, but requiring romantic elements in all stories about women is sexist.) So, what went wrong? Part of my disappointment is that this is a very different book than the first. It might not be a bad thing on its own, it’s just I expected more of the first. This one is more violent, with visible dead bodies, lots of weapons and action moments, which was not what I wanted to read. It also features no fewer than three different alien races, plus a sentient nanotech and the fairies from book one. This was a mistake of the author both because clutter and because they aren’t terribly interesting. The aliens all feel fairly human in fact, not alien at all aside from physical differences. I know of human cultures that are more different from each other than these were. I’m also increasingly uneasy about this whole princess bit. The importance of Rory’s title made sense in the first book when it was diplomatic shenanigans in a royalist setting. But, why would her former human title mean anything to aliens? Or to human non royalist governments for that matter? The book seems to hint at her princess-ness being something deeper and more mystical even. Given that we eliminated ideas about the divine right of the aristocracy generations ago, I’m not thrilled to see even this hint of reversion. Clutter. There are a lot of different players and honestly not a good reason for all of them. Why do we need the fairies now? Why do we need so many alien races? Why do we need all of these various characters? I didn’t feel like there was a theme or narrative arc through the book. It felt like a lot of elements thrown in with some danger to spice it up. But ultimately what was the story’s core? The ending gave away the rest of Rory’s story - what happens in her career. So I suppose we won’t get another book. That’s ok with me. I enjoyed the first book. I don’t see the point of this one completely. We’re set. I’ll keep watching the author though. There’s some talent there.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Please Note: This is the second book in a series that should be read in order. This review may contain spoilers from book one.  If you are new to this series, you can check out my review of Book one HERE How the Multiverse Got its Revenge is the second book in the Thorne Chronicles by K. Eason. The Thorn Chronicles is a young adult science fiction series. It is a like a fairytale set in space! I loved the idea of this series. Book two felt like even more of a feminist kick butt journey than the fi Please Note: This is the second book in a series that should be read in order. This review may contain spoilers from book one.  If you are new to this series, you can check out my review of Book one HERE How the Multiverse Got its Revenge is the second book in the Thorne Chronicles by K. Eason. The Thorn Chronicles is a young adult science fiction series. It is a like a fairytale set in space! I loved the idea of this series. Book two felt like even more of a feminist kick butt journey than the first book did. which I loved! The writing is just as witty as the first book, and the characters have really all come into their own, especially Rory. If you like Science Fictions with fun plots and great characters then I think you will really enjoy The Thorne Chronicles immensely. How the Multiverse Got its Revenge takes place two years after the events of the first book. Rory has successfully avoided marrying her betrothed, but as a result her and her gang is now on the run. We learned some about the plants of space in the first book, but they take on a much bigger role in this second installment. In fact, the plants have a mind and an agenda of their own, which was super interesting. I got a little bit of a Terraformer by Colleen Houck vibe while reading this book, which was pretty cool. This must be the year of the plants in novels! I enjoyed this follow up to book one, but the pacing of this one felt a little slower to me. I loved the fast pace of the first book. I felt like there was always something happening, and I didn't feel like that while reading this book. What I did really enjoy was that the problem solving seemed to step up its game in this book. The big bads here were really smart, and Rory struggled with that a bit. I really enjoyed seeing her and the gang push themselves to try and gain back their upper hand against these new aliens. It was a great challenge for them, and I really loved seeing more Arithmancy, and seeing more of the various aspects of Arithmancy, like Aura reading and complex code work. It was really fascinating and I think it was my favorite element of the story. With villains, plenty of political issues, action and another romp across space, How the Multiverse Got its Revenge was a fun book. There is no cliffhanger ending and the story indicates that this is the end, but it leaves the reader to guess whether this is truly the end of Rory's exploits or if there could be more adventure in her future. I liked the way everything ended, but I am personally hoping for another installment or two because I feel like there are so many other adventure out there for her and her friends. How the Multiverse Got its Revenge was a solid book, and I really enjoyed it. I think I liked the first book just a smidge more, but How the Multiverse Got its Revenge will appeal to character driven readers of science fiction. Plus, it has a fun mix of fairy tale elements and creatures that added a bit of whimsy to the story. The Thorne Chronicles were a fun read for me.  Let me know your thoughts below if you have read this series!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jen (That's What I'm Talking About)

    How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge is the follow up tale to one of my favorite books from last year, How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse. The books are fantastic adventures, existing somewhere in the gray areas between fantasy and science fiction. The story takes place in space, with interplanetary travel, and some cool techie things, but it’s also based in fantasy, with fairies, alchemy, and arithmancy. The multiverse behind the series is fascinating and complex, and I strongly urge reader How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge is the follow up tale to one of my favorite books from last year, How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse. The books are fantastic adventures, existing somewhere in the gray areas between fantasy and science fiction. The story takes place in space, with interplanetary travel, and some cool techie things, but it’s also based in fantasy, with fairies, alchemy, and arithmancy. The multiverse behind the series is fascinating and complex, and I strongly urge readers to start with the first book as the events in How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge are a direct result from the fallout of the first book. 
Taking place roughly a couple years after the conclusion of How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse, the book opens with one of the fairies sending a message to Rupert regarding a dangerous new weapon that would result in the end of humankind. Even though they haven’t seen her in many months, Rupert and Grit just know that Rory must somehow be involved. Meanwhile, Rory and her gang are living life as privateers way out on the edge of the ‘verse, when they come across a Royalist ship that was destroyed by an unknown xeno-species. They also discover sentient nanotech whose programming is to destroy worlds. How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge is a complex political space adventure with each character serving a roll, from the diplomats and leaders to those playing the conscience and heart. But those rolls are not one-dimensional character traits. Our main characters undergo growth and development over the course of the tale. Rory realizes she may denounce her title, but she will always be a princess; the group coming to terms that while they function well as a team, that team may not always be what is best or even a possibility. Smaller voices learn to become bigger voices. New alliances and friendships are forged. The series is relayed to listeners via an unknown historian/chronicler who sometimes shares facts with the reader that the characters did not know at that time and place, giving readers a working knowledge of the larger picture. Additionally, the narrator and several of the characters share an intelligent wit with readers, making obscure references or snide commentary on those around them. Narration: Because the story is shared via a chronicler, listeners get a mix of third person and omniscient POVs. Ms. Poole’s performance adds much to this wonderful tale. She provides an excellent neutral narrator voice; strong and clear. She alters the dialogue of each character slightly, but more than enough to identify individual characters. She varies the voices to match gender, species, etc. and smoothly jumps from third person to third person without confusion. As the book blurb notes this is the second book in a duology, and How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge provides a fitting end to Rory’s adventures. The historian sharing the tale gives listeners insights to what will happened down the road, providing more than adequate closure. However, I feel like there are many more tales that could come from this multiverse and would welcome future adventures should they be published. My Ratings: Story: B+ Narration: A Review copy provided by Tantor Audio. Originally posted at That's What I'm Talking About

  12. 5 out of 5

    Telthor

    After loving the first book with all my heart and soul, the sequel is an incredibly bland letdown. Some of the minor characters from the first book, especially Thorsdottir, are delightfully built up into strong, memorable characters, but the major ones, especially Rory and Jaed and to some degree Grytt and Rupert, fade off into the background despite major scenes revolving around them. They feel disinterested and distant from the plot. There are sparks of excellence. The morgue on the space ship, After loving the first book with all my heart and soul, the sequel is an incredibly bland letdown. Some of the minor characters from the first book, especially Thorsdottir, are delightfully built up into strong, memorable characters, but the major ones, especially Rory and Jaed and to some degree Grytt and Rupert, fade off into the background despite major scenes revolving around them. They feel disinterested and distant from the plot. There are sparks of excellence. The morgue on the space ship, the action sequences, Rose. The dialogue is frequently sharp and witty, though the sly side-winks of the narrator feel more tired and hammered in than an indelible component of the story. But almost the entirety of the book takes place on two derelict space ships. It feels like one long endless breathless scene, exhausting to get through. There's no real break in the action despite swapping between Rory's crew and Rupert's team. It just feels like one long slog, and it should not have taken me so long to get through it (and, yes, I admit, I skimmed the last twenty or so pages, having lost all patience). After the riotously entertaining Princess-Bride-Sarcastic-Witty-Space-Ship-Exploring-Magic-Math ride of the previous book, this second one, while theoretically larger in scope, feels so much smaller and claustrophobic. I would like to get out of these dingy alien hallways and go have fun in the universe somewhere with these characters. The fairy tale references and building of the prior book do not show up, other than perhaps in Rose's character, and even then it's so small and unimportant that it doesn't apply. All in all, if you loved the characters like I did, it's worth skimming (especially if you liked the royal guards and wanted more of them being wonderful, because Thorsdottir really becomes her own delightful thing), but if you're hoping for even a glimmer of the same excitement as the first book, I'm afraid this sophomore novel suffers too much empty space and dark halls. 2.5. I liked sections of it, without a doubt, and when reading it, I was really interested in where it was going. But if I put it down for any reason, to make tea or glance at my phone, or anything...I was out of the story and didn't care anymore, and that's not the fiery excitement I remember from the first fine book in the duology.

  13. 4 out of 5

    mackenzie

    I have to say that I really enjoyed the first book “How Rory Thorne Destroyed The Multiverse”. I thought it was interesting and well paced, that the characters were well developed with varied motives and goals, and that the world Easton built was original and included great sci-fi/fantasy elements. This second book, however, did not sit with me as well as the first one did. My main gripe is that it felt like the entire book only included 3 scenes, each told from various points of view. I was bor I have to say that I really enjoyed the first book “How Rory Thorne Destroyed The Multiverse”. I thought it was interesting and well paced, that the characters were well developed with varied motives and goals, and that the world Easton built was original and included great sci-fi/fantasy elements. This second book, however, did not sit with me as well as the first one did. My main gripe is that it felt like the entire book only included 3 scenes, each told from various points of view. I was bored, I wanted to know when Easton was going to move on and bring us to something new but we never really got there. The entire story is set in exactly the same position in space so even physically, the story never moves. How is it that in 400 pages we covered so little information? Especially when there are so many questions to be answered and points to be explored? I don’t know, the book was alright. I enjoy Easton’s writing style (although I liked it more in the first book) but I think she went a little too far with it this time. It is a riot of em dashes, parentheses, and asides in the chronologers voice. The story also did not do a great job of using the observations of the character to read an ending that tied those together. What I mean is that, I thought the characters were very smart and noticed interesting, and (seemingly) important details but they were never fully capitalized on in a satisfying way. Overall, I am glad I read it (mostly because I would have been mad at myself if I didn’t after having loved the first one that much) but I had much much higher hopes for the story than were realized. ***Spoiler*** Also??? If Easton didn’t want to write romance she just... oh, I don’t know.. shouldn’t have? The VERY subtle romantic storyline between Jaed and Thorisdottir just didn’t do it for me, especially after he was JUST in /love/ with Rory? And they all more or less work for her, I don’t know that might just have been me but, yeah!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    Most readers will enjoy How The Multiverse Got Its Revenge by K Eason -= even without reading the prequel. I read it in small snatches because (well, life, you know) but every time I had a half hour, or thought I would, I came happily right back to this book to see what happens next. The book is well written, powerfully plotted, but skips around point of view among several sub-groups of the main characters in the previous novel. It shows clearly how their team has remained intact, even though they Most readers will enjoy How The Multiverse Got Its Revenge by K Eason -= even without reading the prequel. I read it in small snatches because (well, life, you know) but every time I had a half hour, or thought I would, I came happily right back to this book to see what happens next. The book is well written, powerfully plotted, but skips around point of view among several sub-groups of the main characters in the previous novel. It shows clearly how their team has remained intact, even though they split up physically at the end of the previous adventures. They won, and "retired' to new lives. Only - well, life happens. Now they are back at saving the Multiverse as they know it, with several species of people trying to form and hold profitable alliances. The narrative does not dwell on the politics -- you grasp the sparse sketch of the politics instinctively. It is a nicely set up situation that showcases the main characters combat abilities -- in skirmish after battle, after danger after near-miss. So in a vague way, this novel does illustrate what happens when you mess with the Multiverse as these characters did in the prequel. But I didn't see that it really lived up to its title about the nature of reality, the nature of life, the definition of "person" and the adversarial relationship between Reality (or THE Multiverse) and a small group of unlikely friends and allies. Given the title, Multiverse, I expected more modern science, math and theoretical physics explaining what the Multiverse is doing, why it is doing it, and what these characters can do about that. Why "revenge" -- why is "the" Multiverse so petty, small, childish, petulant, and impotent? Only the truly impotent seek "revenge" so why would some macrocosmic All regard this ragtag band of political adventurers as a threat to be swatted back at? None of those questions are addressed or answered or even sketched. in this volume. So if the title alone attracts you, maybe you should read the prequel, HOW RORY THORNE DESTROYED THE MULTIVERSE, or wait for the sequel and read all 3 at once. Clearly the Multiverse was not totally destroyed, as the princess's thirteen fairy blessings still function, so some multidimensionality, or alternate universe structure is functioning. The misleading title is the reason I took off one star. Everything else about this novel is just fine work.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Full review at The Quill to Live: https://thequilltolive.com/2020/10/20... No no, not this time. I am not letting another book in The Thorne Chronicle series slip under my radar. How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge (called Revenge going forwards) is the sequel to How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse (Rory) by K. Eason. I somehow missed the first book when it came out last year and I refused to commit the same crime twice. You can find my review of Rory here, and you can find some bonus thought Full review at The Quill to Live: https://thequilltolive.com/2020/10/20... No no, not this time. I am not letting another book in The Thorne Chronicle series slip under my radar. How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge (called Revenge going forwards) is the sequel to How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse (Rory) by K. Eason. I somehow missed the first book when it came out last year and I refused to commit the same crime twice. You can find my review of Rory here, and you can find some bonus thoughts on it in our Best of Science Fantasy List here. It’s a wonderful story about female empowerment, everyone empowerment, creative problem solving, and how to use words and diplomacy to solve problems. The sequel lives up to the high bar that Rory set, with some minor change-ups that are worth talking about. Revenge picks up a little while after the ending of Rory. One of my only complaints about the first book was how Eason handled the ending of the story. In essence, at the end of book one Eason waves her hands, lightly summarizes a number of big events that change the status quo of the universe, and announces that the remaining cast of characters from the book disappears into the void. It felt like a hard reset of all the progress the characters had made in Rory, and I am not a huge fan of major off-page events being quickly summarized in epilogues. However, this reset did do a great job setting up the stakes for Revenge. Revenge’s narrative is split into two stories, each focusing on a different group of people. One follows Rupert (Rory’s old teacher) and Grytt (Rory’s old bodyguard), which I am calling team parental, as they receive a nebulous message that Rory is in danger and they should try to help her. Their story revolves around locating where Rory has gone, building an alliance to go help her, and trying to avoid igniting a war between different races that have a lot of friction. The second storyline follows Rory and the remaining side characters from book one. After too much time in the spotlight, they have decided to carve out a quiet life as salvagers – until they run into salvage that multiple galactic species are fighting over. So in one story, you have Rory and the crew fighting to stay alive while protecting their dangerous find. And in the other story, you have Rory’s parental figures marshaling the troops to come to rescue her. It’s a really interesting story with a fun fusion of different science fiction and fantasy concepts that kept me engaged the entire time. The plot is generally satisfying, but the ending once again does the thing where it has a large number of major off-page events announced to you in a few pages. This is a bigger problem for me in Revenge than it was in Rory because it exacerbates the second book’s biggest issue – there isn’t enough there. I very much like Revenge, and the paragraphs following this one will talk all about the amazing things the book accomplishes. Yet, I can’t help but feel like I was cheated out of a full book. While the plot of book two was very engaging, there doesn’t feel like there was enough of it for a single book. I didn’t feel like the story had progressed enough to devote one of three books in a trilogy to this story. I found myself feeling starved of content and really wishing that Eason had explored almost everything in the book more. It was pretty disappointing. I get a distinct feeling that this is a classic “bridge book problem,” where the second novel in a trilogy spends too much time setting up the finale and loses some of its own identity. Yet, all of these feelings are born from the fact that what is there in Revenge is so good. In Rory, Eason focused primarily on the titular character, and the themes revolved around female empowerment, solving situations that feel like they require violence with words, and exploring the idea of diplomacy more than all parties being unhappy with a compromise. These themes are all there in Revenge, but Eason shifts the focus primarily from Rory and her personal growth to the full cast. She elevates the supporting characters and builds a fleet of protagonists with Rory at the helm. This is a wonderful experience because much like Rory all five side characters that got elevated are amazing. In addition, Eason brings in a whole new set of side characters that fill the void left by the old. The result is the chance to read about a ton of meaningful character growth from six (Rory still grows herself) different personalities. It is a buffet of excellent character writing. Thanks to the expansion of the character focus, we also get a much larger diversity of themes in Revenge. Rory is still dealing with the problems of being a woman in a man’s world, but she also has a whole slew of new problems that divide her focus. One person is coping with the idea of being loved as a person instead of as a possession. One person is coping with the complete loss of their identity and looking for new meaning. One person is coping with the pressures of duty vs friendship. And everyone is dealing with themes like the first contact, the value of lesser evils, and weighing personal loss against the greater good. On top of all of this, Eason does a fabulous job exploring the nature of friendship. There are a number of interesting relationships and dichotomies between different characters that I never see explored, and it was so refreshing to see a more diverse set of connections. How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge is a fantastic book that checks all of my boxes for something I highly recommend. In my opinion, its only failing is how short it feels, but given the pressures of working in a plague riddled world, it is easy to forgive the book for its singular issue. This series is shaping up to be one of the best in recent memory, and I highly recommend you find the time to read it. Its heartfelt and emotional take on the bonds between people helped me feel more connected to those around me despite being locked inside to socially distance. Rating: How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge – 8.0/10

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tara (Spinatale Reviews)

    Oh how I wanted to love this book. How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse was one of my favorite books of 2019. It was quirky, it was unique, and it was absolutely original. Eason did a fantastic job of adapting a classic fairytale into a space setting and adding so many wonderful layers of politics. Unfortunately, How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge didn’t quite live up to its predecessor. The writing style that worked so beautifully in the first one got bogged down as we follow multiple POV c Oh how I wanted to love this book. How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse was one of my favorite books of 2019. It was quirky, it was unique, and it was absolutely original. Eason did a fantastic job of adapting a classic fairytale into a space setting and adding so many wonderful layers of politics. Unfortunately, How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge didn’t quite live up to its predecessor. The writing style that worked so beautifully in the first one got bogged down as we follow multiple POV characters and multiple storylines. I did like getting to know the side characters more but it felt rather disjointed. I adored the political intrigue in the first book and, while there was some of that here, the majority of the storyline was taken up with shoot-outs, violence, and general destruction. Also, I felt like the sentient plant storyline was kind of a let-down. Plus so much of the plot ultimately revolved around Rory still being a Princess and having some sort of galactic destiny that she had to fulfill. Which would have been fine if the entire first book hadn’t been about her wanting to move beyond the role she was born into and repudiating the idea of destiny. So it just kind of felt wrong that she was being forced into that role again. Overall, it just felt like How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge couldn’t quite decide what type of a story it wanted to be. I do think that Eason is a talented writer and I plan on picking up any future books she writes. *Disclaimer: I received an advance digital copy of this book for free from the publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Madeline (The Bookish Mutant)

    How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge came out in early October of this year, and so far, it’s been getting fairly average reviews (the Goodreads rating for this one is currently 3.66, as opposed to book 1’s rating of 3.91). And…I just don’t understand why, because somehow, Multiverse was even better than book 1! Okay, first off, SPACE PIRATES. I couldn’t think of a more fitting profession for Rory after abandoning her royal ways. I loved the chemistry and banter between her and her crew, and the wh How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge came out in early October of this year, and so far, it’s been getting fairly average reviews (the Goodreads rating for this one is currently 3.66, as opposed to book 1’s rating of 3.91). And…I just don’t understand why, because somehow, Multiverse was even better than book 1! Okay, first off, SPACE PIRATES. I couldn’t think of a more fitting profession for Rory after abandoning her royal ways. I loved the chemistry and banter between her and her crew, and the whole plot line with the sinister rose managed to be both hilarious and tense. And even though they were separated from the rest of the gang, I loved seeing Grytt and Messer Rupert again, especially the latter. (I just…MESSER RUPERT MUST BE PROTECTED AT ALL COSTS, OKAY? 🥺) Oh, and my whole complaint about not seeing many aliens in book 1? RESOLVED! We’ve got a whole host of interesting species in Multiverse, and I loved seeing some of them. Admittedly, Eason fell into the trap of the “aliens, but basically humans with slightly differing appearances” trope with one species, but they actually acknowledge that it’s unusual in the grand scheme of the galaxy, so at least there’s that. Plus, the other two alien species that were focused on made up for it. The plot for this one was super fast-paced, and with the cast of characters, it meshed perfectly. Multiverse honestly just sucked me in to the point that I put off studying for my (godforsaken) AP Bio final just so I could see what happened. Again, the politics of the world(s) are still a tad convoluted, but it was still well-thought-out, and a whole lot of fun at that. My only major complaint is the ending. It was just…unsatisfying? I wish we would have had a bit more certainty, and maybe…y’know, having some of the characters reunite? My space children deserved it, c’mon. All in all, a heartstring-tugging and thrilling sequel that was more than worthy of its predecessor. 4.5 stars!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I gave the first one 5 stars - this one gets less for a few reasons - the biggest reason is that while I liked the first one a lot I couldn't remember the details of the plot nor the different characters between the first book and the second book so I felt a bit confused by trying to remember who everyone was in the second book and how the plot of book 2 comes from the events of book 1. Why don't authors who write multi-book stories refuse to start the next book in the series with a brief recap I gave the first one 5 stars - this one gets less for a few reasons - the biggest reason is that while I liked the first one a lot I couldn't remember the details of the plot nor the different characters between the first book and the second book so I felt a bit confused by trying to remember who everyone was in the second book and how the plot of book 2 comes from the events of book 1. Why don't authors who write multi-book stories refuse to start the next book in the series with a brief recap -what-you can't write an extra hundred words? And because the political events of the first book were not locked in my memory I found that the politics of the second book bewildering and at times uninteresting. There were so many fractions; an empire, a protectorate, a confederacy, blah blah blah - What I really liked about book one were the characters - especially Rory Thorne - I still liked the characters but am glad this is only two books because I can just imagine my confusion if there is a third book.. Let me say here that this is originally a duology but I wonder if that will hold -

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kirstyn Yosick

    Previously I had not read the first book in this duology, but ended up doing so to properly review this book and get a real feel for the series and characters. This duology is a lot of fun and entertaining and the spacey vibes definitely add to the vibes of the story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mythili

    Huh. It seems like people dislike this one a lot more than I would have expected! I definitely did not (dislike it, that is). Before I delve into reasons why, I’ll note that yes, I also found the numerous alien/xeno factions confusing. Who is/was the Consortium, what was/is the Confederate, the Empire, the Protectorate, and do we eventually run out of words? Is the Imperial Remnant also floating around somewhere? That would be funny, if they were all the same universe but many years later. The Fo Huh. It seems like people dislike this one a lot more than I would have expected! I definitely did not (dislike it, that is). Before I delve into reasons why, I’ll note that yes, I also found the numerous alien/xeno factions confusing. Who is/was the Consortium, what was/is the Confederate, the Empire, the Protectorate, and do we eventually run out of words? Is the Imperial Remnant also floating around somewhere? That would be funny, if they were all the same universe but many years later. The Force becomes arithmancy. I just flat out like this world, though, and the writing style as well. In a way that is not at ALL dismissive—and if you know me, you know that to be the case—the style is very similar to a certain vein of fanfic writing style that became decently popular right around my coming of age in fandom (or, say, the third epoch in Mythili’s fanfic life. I shall now describe them thusly: First Epoch, Or There Is Such A Thing As Fanfiction But I Have Yet to Find Repositories Second Epoch, Or The Discovery of FF.net And Bookmarks But Not Saving Things to My Personal Drive, A Fact I Will Always Regret Third Epoch, Or I Discover the SugarQuill and Schoogle And Other Curated High End Sources of Work Fourth Epoch, Or the Lull Where I Am Mostly Re-Reading Works I Enjoy and Intermittently Finding New Fandoms But Mostly Read One Shots and Drabbles Fifth Epoch, The Current, Or Many Year Later When I Get On AO3 And Promptly Lose 10% Of My Free Time Your Interlude is Finished) Do you see now how the writing above, heavily influenced by this fanfic style, would endear me to this book? It’s that snarky, omniscient narrator (named or otherwise) who gently breaks the fourth wall either consistently or intermittently, or maybe it’s not a narrator but a sort of all encompassing character POV. So in any case, I really did enjoy this book. The combination of military and diplomacy and math-y magic was entirely up my alley, and I think that the books end in a way that make it clear that this is meant to be the end but there were many more adventures in this universe.

  21. 4 out of 5

    gwendalyn _books_

    This book was received from the Author, and Publisher, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own. This is a non spoiler review, because you as reader need to read this book. Also, I feel sometimes I have in the past gave away to much of the plot line. This has diminished the pleasure for would be readers. An action packed space opera, How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge is the second book in the space opera Rory Thorne Chronicles. Rory thw This book was received from the Author, and Publisher, in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own. This is a non spoiler review, because you as reader need to read this book. Also, I feel sometimes I have in the past gave away to much of the plot line. This has diminished the pleasure for would be readers. An action packed space opera, How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge is the second book in the space opera Rory Thorne Chronicles. Rory thwarted the plot, saved the betrothed, incited a revolution, and renounced her title. Now a salvager privateer! How the Multiverse Got Its Revenge, the sequel to How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse, released on October 27th! For those who haven’t read Rory Thorne, what are you waiting for? To me this book was definitely more Starwars with darker action packed space battles. Set two years after the first book, How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse. Rory is struggling to be a normal citizen working as salvager. Things are still heating up even though she tries to distance her self from the political upheaval. The storyline takes off when she happens to find a dead ship carrying a sentient super-weapon, bioengineered and capable of eradicating an entire planet. Rory along with some of her former bodyguards are privateers and when several different factions arrive to claim the highly dangerous weapon, things heat up and she is separated from her allies. This was great second installment in a exciting and fun duolgy. I did find the pacing somewhat off. Not that it bothered me. Just something I noticed. The tone of the book was different than the first book and with so much action sequences that it might have caused the authors writing to speed up and slow down on purpose. A spunky heroine, action adventure, along with political intrigue, makes for a fascinating tale. All in all it was an enjoyable reading experience. Are You planing on reading it? If so come back and share your thoughts! Have a wonderful day, Gwendalyn {GiGi}

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hwango

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Not everything I hoped that it would be. I was few pages in before I realized that I needed to re-read the previous book, because I'd forgotten more than I thought. Then I enjoyed the first one more than I originally did, I think, so that was nice. Then I returned to this one and...I don't know, it seemed like not a lot was happening and the story wasn't moving. Characters I wanted to spend time with were left mostly in the background, and everyone seemed to have changed a lot since the first bo Not everything I hoped that it would be. I was few pages in before I realized that I needed to re-read the previous book, because I'd forgotten more than I thought. Then I enjoyed the first one more than I originally did, I think, so that was nice. Then I returned to this one and...I don't know, it seemed like not a lot was happening and the story wasn't moving. Characters I wanted to spend time with were left mostly in the background, and everyone seemed to have changed a lot since the first book. I'd rather see characters grow and change while I'm reading about them, not in between books. * spoilers * It was very jarring for me that suddenly there are three new xeno races, and they're all bipeds. I had enjoyed that the first book established a setting in which alien races were truly alien (and tangential to the story), and so suddenly introducing not one but three races that are varying degrees of less alien felt off. The whole book takes place in about a day. I was not expecting that. I kept wanting them to finish with the current situation and move on to interesting things, but that situation was the entire story. I was also irked by the number of times the book said things like "it would have been a better story if..." or "if this were fiction then..." I realize that it's a device intending to make the book feel more like a piece of history than fiction, but at the time it just felt like an admission that the story could have been better. I wish the involvement of the fairies had been handled better. A fairy shows up and gets half of the characters involved in the story, but apparently that's only so they'll be in the story. It felt very contrived, and I'd been hoping for a payoff that would make it feel less contrived, and there wasn't one.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Meigan

    There’s trouble on the horizon as the revolution gains traction. Warring factions are fighting for their respective causes and of course, being the catalyst for said revolution, Princess Rory Thorne has gained her fair share of enemies. Even though she’s stepped down from her royal position, she’s still renowned in the universe and finds herself in a tricky position as she and her crew are forced to board an unknown ship. Despite being on all different sides, the Protectorate, the Confederation, There’s trouble on the horizon as the revolution gains traction. Warring factions are fighting for their respective causes and of course, being the catalyst for said revolution, Princess Rory Thorne has gained her fair share of enemies. Even though she’s stepped down from her royal position, she’s still renowned in the universe and finds herself in a tricky position as she and her crew are forced to board an unknown ship. Despite being on all different sides, the Protectorate, the Confederation, and the Tedeshi have a new enemy on the horizon — something far worse than anything they’ve encountered so far and only by working together can they overcome this new threat. The characters continue to delight me in this second and final installment in the Rory Thorne series and I love how even though Rory and her crew have chosen different paths since the events of the first book, they manage to come together when necessary and their loyalty to one another remains as strong as ever. Rory once again proves that she’s capable and strong both with and without her people, and I love her self-reliant streak. It’s very rare that I say I wish a series had more books, but this is an instance where I wish this series had at least another book coming. Not because it left readers with questions and felt unfinished, it didn’t, but simply because I love this world and these characters. Rory’s tale is complete though and sad as it may be, even the best series have to end. 5 stars and I highly recommend this delightful duology. *eARC received courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary Soon Lee

    This is the sequel to "How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse," and, as with the first book, proved a pleasure. I love Eason's characters, both in these two books and in her other work. They are deeply likable, distinctive, idiosyncratic characters whose ties to each other soften this reader's heart. If labels are helpful, I would call this book space opera, lying on the adventure end of science fiction, complete with starships, aliens, and fantastical elements. The narrative switches between m This is the sequel to "How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse," and, as with the first book, proved a pleasure. I love Eason's characters, both in these two books and in her other work. They are deeply likable, distinctive, idiosyncratic characters whose ties to each other soften this reader's heart. If labels are helpful, I would call this book space opera, lying on the adventure end of science fiction, complete with starships, aliens, and fantastical elements. The narrative switches between multiple points of view, all well drawn. In addition, the author (labeling herself as the chronicler), steps forward rather frequently to address the reader either overtly or slantwise. These asides are divertingly, elegantly done, but they also stepped me out of the story, making it less immersively immediate. If a third book appears in this series, I'll be reading it. Indeed, if K. Eason writes any new book, I'll be reading it, because, to repeat myself, I love her characters. Highly recommended. About my reviews: I try to review every book I read, including those that I don't end up enjoying. The reviews are not scholarly, but just indicate my reaction as a reader, reading being my addiction. I am miserly with 5-star reviews; 4 stars means I liked a book very much; 3 stars means I liked it; 2 stars means I didn't like it (though often the 2-star books are very popular with other readers and/or are by authors whose other work I've loved).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. *****SPOILERS****** I went back and forth a lot about how to rate this but ultimately, I think it deserves 4 stars for the writing but one taken away for how disappointed I was by it. I absolutely ADORED the first book in this series but was a bit disappointed in this one. I just felt like Jaed, Thorsdottir and Zhang’s characters grated on me a bit more. I loved them in this first book but in this one, for some reason they came across as more selfish and mean somehow? I felt like they spent most *****SPOILERS****** I went back and forth a lot about how to rate this but ultimately, I think it deserves 4 stars for the writing but one taken away for how disappointed I was by it. I absolutely ADORED the first book in this series but was a bit disappointed in this one. I just felt like Jaed, Thorsdottir and Zhang’s characters grated on me a bit more. I loved them in this first book but in this one, for some reason they came across as more selfish and mean somehow? I felt like they spent most of the book blaming Rory for things that were out of her control. In the first book, there was a very strong sense of found family within the group and in this one it felt like they were suddenly excluding Rory from that. Maybe it was just because she spent most of the book on her own. I still love Rory, Rupert and Grytt as characters, love the worldbuilding and love the writing style. Will def read any more books in the series. I didn’t love that Rory had to go back to being a politician/princess after she specifically wanted to give that up. Felt a bit like the moral there was that you don’t get to choose who you want to be, which sucks. Also the relationship between Thorsdottir and Jaed weirded me out a bit, only because I kinda thought they were like 15 years apart in age. But as I said, still a good story. I’m only disappointed because I loved the characters so much in the first one and this one took some turns I didn’t like.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Fondriest

    After loving the first entry in this series, it pains me to say that this book was so “meh.” Did I actively hate it? No. But I also didn’t actively like it either. There are certainly elements I liked (the further development of side characters from the first book, for the most part), but they were few and far between. My biggest issues: - This novel didn’t feel like it was properly edited. The overuse of the word “throat” and particularly “the back of his/her/their throat” was awful. Once notice After loving the first entry in this series, it pains me to say that this book was so “meh.” Did I actively hate it? No. But I also didn’t actively like it either. There are certainly elements I liked (the further development of side characters from the first book, for the most part), but they were few and far between. My biggest issues: - This novel didn’t feel like it was properly edited. The overuse of the word “throat” and particularly “the back of his/her/their throat” was awful. Once noticed, I couldn’t unsee (or, I suppose, as I listened on audio, unhear) it. - Not much happens. This could have easily been a novella with large chunks of this cut out or condensed. When I think about how much time was covered in the first book (18 years) vs the couple of days in this one, it’s apparent that the author could have handled the political maneuvering in a much more brief fashion. - The stakes, particularly in the second half, felt very low. I liked the beginning, and found it thrilling because there were stakes. But the second half was just people talking and none of it mattering very much. I never felt like there was really conflict or characters’ safety at risk. Would I be willing to try another entry in this series? Maybe? But honestly, I might prefer to pretend the first book is a stand alone and just keep my warm fuzzy feelings about that from being contaminated from more blah sequels.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Autumn Herah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. While I absolutely adored the first book in this chronicle the second one kind of lost me. The entire book spans what is basically only a single day until the very end where it skips forward a few days to bring some sort of resolution to the drawn out but at the end of the day singular story. Despite the multiple year passage in time where characters drastically change the multiverse so they no longer hold their appointments, the characters remain wholly unchanged, most of whom revert back to (o While I absolutely adored the first book in this chronicle the second one kind of lost me. The entire book spans what is basically only a single day until the very end where it skips forward a few days to bring some sort of resolution to the drawn out but at the end of the day singular story. Despite the multiple year passage in time where characters drastically change the multiverse so they no longer hold their appointments, the characters remain wholly unchanged, most of whom revert back to (or if we are honest never seemed to leave) their original functions almost immediately when pressed. And despite all that we are then meant to take, without any backstory or context a complete shift in characters social entanglements. Ones that directly counter social entanglements the whole first book had you rooting for. It seems like the passage of time was meant only for the sake of neatly moving to a new plot line and removing a singular romantic engagement than any other change in character development. At the end of the day it was an entertaining story and I look forward to more in this universe in this unique writing style, but I lacked the engagement with the characters I felt in the first chronicle.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Loren

    This book feels different from the first - definitely more space opera and less fairy tale. It took a bit for me to match speeds with that, but it's appropriate when you figure that the fairy tale was over at the end of the last book. It's also appropriate that Thorsdottir, Zhang, and Jaed get more attention and a different feel to their own passages. Rory's sections still feel like she has a chronicler, and Rupert and Grytt have always had understated roles (which makes you wonder who is chroni This book feels different from the first - definitely more space opera and less fairy tale. It took a bit for me to match speeds with that, but it's appropriate when you figure that the fairy tale was over at the end of the last book. It's also appropriate that Thorsdottir, Zhang, and Jaed get more attention and a different feel to their own passages. Rory's sections still feel like she has a chronicler, and Rupert and Grytt have always had understated roles (which makes you wonder who is chronicling it all...hmm). I too, love and miss some of the feel of the first book, but I don't think that feel is appropriate to these new circumstances, so I'm willing to follow the lead and evolve with the characters. The old feel is there, it's just more closely associated with the Rory sections. Along with the tone changes there is a definite widening of scope for the worldbuilding, with more xenos featured and further development of the ways in which the world is a multiverse. And I won't complain that some of the climactic action takes place "offscreen" because none of that action is done by any of the POV characters. That's all in the hands of others at the end, so yeah, it's a bit external, but better that than gratuitous inclusion.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Galloway

    I enjoyed this one pretty well, if not quite as much as the first book. It definitely leaves me desperately hoping that there is a third book coming and that it will explore the Tenju and Rory’s crew more! It’s odd, but even though the stakes are higher — pretty much the galaxy rather than just one galactic nation — the story didn’t have a higher tension level for me. I also didn’t love Rory nearly as much here, though the Vakari were fascinating. And Rory’s crew was fantastic, so I was glad they I enjoyed this one pretty well, if not quite as much as the first book. It definitely leaves me desperately hoping that there is a third book coming and that it will explore the Tenju and Rory’s crew more! It’s odd, but even though the stakes are higher — pretty much the galaxy rather than just one galactic nation — the story didn’t have a higher tension level for me. I also didn’t love Rory nearly as much here, though the Vakari were fascinating. And Rory’s crew was fantastic, so I was glad they had a lot of screen time on their own. I also keep waiting for more information about the “Multiverse.” The titles of both novels are fantastic, but it just feels like there needs to be more “multi” going on (though I suppose the layers they use for arithromancy might be the multi part of things). Anyway, that sounds pretty down on the book, but I’m not really. It definitely a strong four stars and a great ride with a great voice. It’s worth the read and I think it could be read on its own, though, obviously, everything is deepened by ready the first novel ahead of time.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

    I can only echo the sentiments of other reviewers. I loved the first volume in the Thorne chronicles and especially the main character Rory, who was politically astute, skilled at the near-magical mathematical art of arithmancy, and also a flawed but deeply likeable person. Her personality took a real beating in this book, which portrays her as snide and unkind to her friends, without a lot of growth to her character in the end. Eason deserves credit for letting the other characters have some li I can only echo the sentiments of other reviewers. I loved the first volume in the Thorne chronicles and especially the main character Rory, who was politically astute, skilled at the near-magical mathematical art of arithmancy, and also a flawed but deeply likeable person. Her personality took a real beating in this book, which portrays her as snide and unkind to her friends, without a lot of growth to her character in the end. Eason deserves credit for letting the other characters have some limelight, but the tedious plot, which mostly centered on people arguing with each other on the bridges of space ships, didn't use this effectively. If you really, really enjoyed the first one, this book might be worth the time, but I'd honestly advise letting it stand alone. The sequel, sadly, is pretty missable.

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