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Prozac Monologues: A Voice from the Edge

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She was going to stab her doctor, but she wrote a book instead. Years later, Willa Goodfellow revisits her account of the antidepressant-induced hypomania that hijacked her Costa Rican vacation and tells the rest of the story: her missed diagnosis of Bipolar 2, how she’d been given the wrong medications, and finally, her process of recovery. Prozac Monologues is a book withi She was going to stab her doctor, but she wrote a book instead. Years later, Willa Goodfellow revisits her account of the antidepressant-induced hypomania that hijacked her Costa Rican vacation and tells the rest of the story: her missed diagnosis of Bipolar 2, how she’d been given the wrong medications, and finally, her process of recovery. Prozac Monologues is a book within a book―part memoir of misdiagnosis and part self-help guide about life on the bipolar spectrum. Through edgy and comedic essays, Goodfellow offers information about a mood disorder frequently mistaken for major depression as well as resources for recovery and further study. Plus, Costa Rica. · If your depression keeps coming back . . . · If your antidepressant side effects are dreadful . . . · If you are curious about the bipolar spectrum . . . · If you want ideas for recovery from mental illness . . . · If you care for somebody who might have more than depression . . . . . . This book is for you.


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She was going to stab her doctor, but she wrote a book instead. Years later, Willa Goodfellow revisits her account of the antidepressant-induced hypomania that hijacked her Costa Rican vacation and tells the rest of the story: her missed diagnosis of Bipolar 2, how she’d been given the wrong medications, and finally, her process of recovery. Prozac Monologues is a book withi She was going to stab her doctor, but she wrote a book instead. Years later, Willa Goodfellow revisits her account of the antidepressant-induced hypomania that hijacked her Costa Rican vacation and tells the rest of the story: her missed diagnosis of Bipolar 2, how she’d been given the wrong medications, and finally, her process of recovery. Prozac Monologues is a book within a book―part memoir of misdiagnosis and part self-help guide about life on the bipolar spectrum. Through edgy and comedic essays, Goodfellow offers information about a mood disorder frequently mistaken for major depression as well as resources for recovery and further study. Plus, Costa Rica. · If your depression keeps coming back . . . · If your antidepressant side effects are dreadful . . . · If you are curious about the bipolar spectrum . . . · If you want ideas for recovery from mental illness . . . · If you care for somebody who might have more than depression . . . . . . This book is for you.

30 review for Prozac Monologues: A Voice from the Edge

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    Prozac Monologues is a refreshingly raw and brutally honest look at the trials and tribulations, ups and downs and the rollercoaster of emotions associated with mental health issues, and in particular with regard to Ms Goodfellow bipolar disorder. Given most of us experience such issues in our lifetime or know someone who has experienced such troubles this book serves as a reminder that you are not alone in the struggle. As someone who went through many, many years of misdiagnosis after misdiagn Prozac Monologues is a refreshingly raw and brutally honest look at the trials and tribulations, ups and downs and the rollercoaster of emotions associated with mental health issues, and in particular with regard to Ms Goodfellow bipolar disorder. Given most of us experience such issues in our lifetime or know someone who has experienced such troubles this book serves as a reminder that you are not alone in the struggle. As someone who went through many, many years of misdiagnosis after misdiagnosis in relation to physical symptoms, rather than mental, I can definitely empathise with Willa and feel her pain rise from the pages when detailing the disheartening feelings that come with been repeatedly labelled, stigmatised and prodded and poked for a decade before finally being diagnosed with an illness that somewhat fits your symptoms and even now I'm not fully convinced they got it right. One thing I hear time and time again is that you shouldn't feel afraid or anxious to come forward and seek professional help should you need it in terms of your mental health and many proclaim you'll not be judged; unfortunately, it still remains that there is a stigma attached to mental health problems no matter where you live in the world. This shouldn't be the case but it is and it stops many coming forward. This isn't a book you enjoy per se but one that is important with its part memoir part self-help guide really having a lot of interesting information to share. I was surprised at the humour throughout but as they say — laughter is the best medicine. My only real gripe, which I probably should've seen coming, was that it was quite chaotic in places but it was apparently written during a time of mania so that makes logical sense. I commend the author on a unique, insightful and refreshingly sincere look into the life of someone living with bipolar disorder, and I truly hope she continues to thrive now she has the correct diagnosis. Thank you for sharing your story, Willa. Many thanks to She Writes Press for an ARC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Pratt

    I finally finished the book!! I am excited about this book. I loved it and it was hilarious in some parts. This book talks about a woman's journey through mental illness. I can totally relate to her. I have a couple different mental illness and it is quite hard to find the right meds. I know about Prozac and all the tiny details it entails but it had work great for me until they took it off the shelves. Now I am on Wellabutran. Not sure how you spell it but it works great for me. When you read t I finally finished the book!! I am excited about this book. I loved it and it was hilarious in some parts. This book talks about a woman's journey through mental illness. I can totally relate to her. I have a couple different mental illness and it is quite hard to find the right meds. I know about Prozac and all the tiny details it entails but it had work great for me until they took it off the shelves. Now I am on Wellabutran. Not sure how you spell it but it works great for me. When you read the book, I will guarantee you will say, yep did that, did this. You might also agree on a lot of things. You will laugh, cry and laugh some more. You will also be learning. In the back of the book i s s resource chapter and it explains everything. @booksforwardpr #booksforwardfriends

  3. 5 out of 5

    WS_BOOKCLUB

    Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This will be available for purchase on August twenty fifth. This is a tough one for me to review, and I don’t know if I can give an honest opinion without giving a little background. I have bipolar disorder. I have a different kind than the author of this book (I have type 1 while the author says they have type 2), but they are two sides of the same coin. I have personal experience with both mania and hypo-m Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with this book in exchange for my honest opinion. This will be available for purchase on August twenty fifth. This is a tough one for me to review, and I don’t know if I can give an honest opinion without giving a little background. I have bipolar disorder. I have a different kind than the author of this book (I have type 1 while the author says they have type 2), but they are two sides of the same coin. I have personal experience with both mania and hypo-mania, and I can say with absolute certainty that this book captures the essence of mania perfectly. I can also say that, due to the nature of the beast, this book is very difficult to follow. First of all, I want to commend author Willa Goodfellow. Being unflinchingly honest, especially about a misunderstood mental illness, takes an incredible amount of bravery. I think that people who have gone through manic episodes will feel a sense of camaraderie, and that his book can be very beneficial. Mania heightens emotions and sensations. It denies you sleep and makes thoughts run wild. Everything you do when in that state reflects it back later on. Things are more vivid, but they make less sense. The author’s writings during their hypo-manic episodes are fascinating from a “I’ve been there” standpoint, but- true to bipolar form -they are also frenetic. I’ve read several books about bipolar disorder that detail manic episodes, but never one written mainly during mania. If you are reading this in search of a better understanding of bipolar disorder, be aware that this book will be challenging. It is also a valuable tool, but I would suggest reading An Unquiet Mind by Kay Redfield Jamison as well, just so you can get a more complete picture of the entirety of bipolar. I do think that the author achieved what they intended when writing Prozac Monologues, which was to give an accurate view of what bipolar mania is. The switch between the entries written during a manic episode, and the information the author provided afterward, was often jarring. At times, it was difficult to follow the timeline and I had to go back once or twice to make sure I hadn’t missed something. However, that could have been an intentional choice, to assert the differences in thinking patterns when someone is having a manic episode. The information itself is fascinating. I already knew a good chunk of it (I believe strongly in knowing as much as I can about a medical condition I have), but there were a few new bits of information that I’m glad I learned. One thing that was mentioned is how very long it often takes to get a correct diagnosis of bipolar. I honestly thought my diagnosis took much longer to figure out than was normal, but I guess it’s actually common to have several misdiagnoses and take years to get the right answer. Would I suggest this book? Yes, but go into it knowing that at times it will be confusing and hard to follow. Basically, understand that this book is mania in a nutshell. https://wittyandsarcasticbookclub.hom...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I really enjoyed this book! She begins the book by saying she was going to stab her doctor but wrote a book instead! My brother in law suffers from bipolar/manic depression so I was totally interested to learn more. The author wrote this book to give us an inside look at her different antidepressants, countless doctors and psychiatrists before being properly diagnosed with Bipolar II. I felt the book was actually very funny. I appreciated her essays which were written when she was "up" during her I really enjoyed this book! She begins the book by saying she was going to stab her doctor but wrote a book instead! My brother in law suffers from bipolar/manic depression so I was totally interested to learn more. The author wrote this book to give us an inside look at her different antidepressants, countless doctors and psychiatrists before being properly diagnosed with Bipolar II. I felt the book was actually very funny. I appreciated her essays which were written when she was "up" during her manic stages. I enjoyed the rather weird thoughts and endless words. It was like talking to my brother in law or someone with bipolar so you get a raw look at the disorder. I really enjoyed this book and I know I will refer back to it in the future when it comes to researching medicine or motivation. Thanks to Books Forward and She Writes Press for my gifted copy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Long

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. Reading books about bipolar disorder makes for an interesting story. This one is somewhat disjointed and I found it hard to follow although this shows how a bipolar m ou nf operates. I have a friend who has bipolar so I'm used to it. It must be very frustrating when a doctor prescribes a medication and it sends you either into a massive depression or a manic state only to find out later you were mi Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. Reading books about bipolar disorder makes for an interesting story. This one is somewhat disjointed and I found it hard to follow although this shows how a bipolar m ou nf operates. I have a friend who has bipolar so I'm used to it. It must be very frustrating when a doctor prescribes a medication and it sends you either into a massive depression or a manic state only to find out later you were misdiagnosed and actually have bipolar disorder. Then the trial and error of finding the right combination of medications that work can be challenging. Overall, I felt this book was pretty good.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grant Johnson

    This book provided me the confidence to have a conversation in regards to a potential misdiagnosis with anti-depressants and manic episode with a loved one. This book is a great introduction to the topic and is prepared in a format that is very easy to digest. Very thankful for finding this book in Sisters, Oregon. Thank you Willa!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Nagrodski

    Although I understand this book is about the struggles of a woman with bipolar disorder, this book was still far too manic for me to follow or enjoy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Story Circle Book Reviews

    Author Willa Goodfellow's dedication page simply states: “I wrote this for you.” She sure did. This book is for the myriad people diagnosed—or misdiagnosed—with Bipolar I or Bipolar II disorder. Having been misdiagnosed for years by several psychiatrists and mental health therapists, and prescribed a vast array of antidepressants, Goodfellow's quest is to get the right diagnosis and the right treatment—without all the negative side effects. “Recovery” is her objective. She wants her readers to kno Author Willa Goodfellow's dedication page simply states: “I wrote this for you.” She sure did. This book is for the myriad people diagnosed—or misdiagnosed—with Bipolar I or Bipolar II disorder. Having been misdiagnosed for years by several psychiatrists and mental health therapists, and prescribed a vast array of antidepressants, Goodfellow's quest is to get the right diagnosis and the right treatment—without all the negative side effects. “Recovery” is her objective. She wants her readers to know there is realistic hope to recover and successfully live with Bipolar disorder. Goodfellow's journey begins with this bizarre thought: to stab her mental health therapist in the neck with a nail file. She actually attempts to do the same to herself while driving, steering with her knees while holding the nail file to her throat, searching for her jugular. Fortunately, she doesn't follow through. But the idea to harm herself or others triggers Goodfellow to examine her own mind and thought processes. She does this while vacationing in Costa Rica, where she not only stops taking Prozac cold turkey, but also manages to frantically write the foundation of "Prozac Monologues: A Voice from the Edge" in the space of just one week. She knows that Prozac is not working; in fact, it was causing diarrhea and making her more depressed. Goodfellow examines the repercussions of untreated or mistreated Bipolar disorder. She says, “If you have tried a number of antidepressants, if you dutifully 'keep trying,' if your depression keeps coming back, and it keeps getting worse, something has to give.” One needs to take action and be their own advocate for mental health. She speaks from her own experience, with uncanny insight, using laymen's terms. Goodfellow believes that recovery begins with having a sense of humor, which opens up the mind to objectively examine the thought processes of those on the Bipolar spectrum. She explains in an easily understandable manner the complexities of Bipolar I vs. Bipolar II. Having been finally diagnosed with Bipolar II, she clears up the misconception that those suffering from Bipolar disorder are simply “wild and crazy.” Goodfellow treats with empathy, compassion and humor, the topic of living with and successfully treating mental illness. Most importantly, Goodfellow offers help and hope to those on the Bipolar spectrum. Her diligent research revealed that up to “65 percent of those with Bipolar I or II attempt suicide.” Goodfellow provides an array of resources, references and tools in her Appendix to assist with diagnosis and treatment, such as the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), and the Bipolar Spectrum Diagnostic Scale (BSDS). Readers can use these tools and then present them to their psychiatrist or mental health therapist to get on the correct treatment path. I highly recommend this engaging book to anyone who has or wants to understand Bipolar disorder. It can make a significant difference. As Goodfellow powerfully states at the end of her monologues, “You are not alone. Even in the darkness, you are not alone. Choose life.” This book was reviewed for Story Circle Book Reviews by Paula Robertson.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jill Reads

    “Prozac Monologues” is a book about the ups and downs of the Bipolar spectrum. But it’s also a book about becoming self-aware. And how to be your own mental health advocate. Did you know that at any given time about 1 in 20 of us “just feel like crap?” We’re in our pajamas, don’t want to leave the house and feel a bit hopeless. The good news is that doctors and pharmaceutical companies want to get us out of our said pajamas. After all, it will keep them employed and bringing in billions of revenue “Prozac Monologues” is a book about the ups and downs of the Bipolar spectrum. But it’s also a book about becoming self-aware. And how to be your own mental health advocate. Did you know that at any given time about 1 in 20 of us “just feel like crap?” We’re in our pajamas, don’t want to leave the house and feel a bit hopeless. The good news is that doctors and pharmaceutical companies want to get us out of our said pajamas. After all, it will keep them employed and bringing in billions of revenue. The downside is that a lot of folks—like author Willa Goodfellow—are being misdiagnosed and mistreated with medication that make them feel even worse. That’s why Goodfellow wrote this book. To take us on her journey of how she went through six different antidepressants, and countless doctors and psychiatrists, before getting really honest with her medical providers in order to be diagnosed with Bipolar II. A former Priest, Goodfellow is quite funny, and I enjoyed her comedic wit. That said, half of “Prozac Monologues” is VERY hard to read. I didn’t love the essay sections that were written over a three-week time period when she was “up” or manic. Her thoughts are a bit nutty. Her continuous stream of words, ideas and sentences last for days. It sort of felt like hanging out with someone who drank a case of beer even though I was stone cold sober. It wasn't fun, but I got the point. I much preferred the sections titled “A Voice from the Edge.” Those were more educational, organized thoughts that were, dare I say, “normal”? “Prozac Monologues” is part-memoir, and part mental health research guide. I recommend it if you’re on your pharmaceutical quest for happiness. And especially if you’re still in your pajamas at 5pm and need the motivational and/or chemical kick-in-the-butt to get showered and out the door. It's also a great read to learn more about the Bipolar spectrum. Thanks to NetGalley, Goodfellow and She Writes Press for an electronic copy of the book in exchange for my honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Book review of the Prozac Monologues by Willa Goodfellow. This is described as a part memoir, part self help book however I would definitely say it's more memoir based. I enjoyed aspects of this book and disliked others. On one hand, it's an excellent example and true to life account of living with bipolar including a missed diagnosis. It's clear in the first few chapters that the author is feeling manic and says she finished this whole book in two weeks! However because of this, I did skip a lot o Book review of the Prozac Monologues by Willa Goodfellow. This is described as a part memoir, part self help book however I would definitely say it's more memoir based. I enjoyed aspects of this book and disliked others. On one hand, it's an excellent example and true to life account of living with bipolar including a missed diagnosis. It's clear in the first few chapters that the author is feeling manic and says she finished this whole book in two weeks! However because of this, I did skip a lot of the first few chapters as I felt the writing was 'scrambled' in a sense. It felt as though the writing and style could have been 'tidied up' a bit. This is not necessary a bad thing, as it's a very honest way of writing. I did like the layout, the chapters and the headings of the traits and characteristics of bipolar listed throughout. I also appreciated the addition of the resources at the end and the sources too! I also think its essential to commend the author for her bravery, not only in balancing her mental health but in being open enough to release such an honest memoir. I would recommend this book to those who have mental health difficulties and those who want to learn more about mental health and the challenges associated with it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nisha Joshi (in the midst of an Austengasm)

    When a description starts with the words, "She wanted to stab her doctor, but she wrote a book instead," i simply can't resist reading it. Hence requested and Netgalley and She Writes Press kindly granted me the ARC. It is always interesting to read about mental disorders, especially bipolar disorder which no one seems to talk about much. Prozac Monologues describes (perfectly) the trials one faces when they have a mental illness. Willa Goodfellow's story of continuous check-ups, diagnoses, misdia When a description starts with the words, "She wanted to stab her doctor, but she wrote a book instead," i simply can't resist reading it. Hence requested and Netgalley and She Writes Press kindly granted me the ARC. It is always interesting to read about mental disorders, especially bipolar disorder which no one seems to talk about much. Prozac Monologues describes (perfectly) the trials one faces when they have a mental illness. Willa Goodfellow's story of continuous check-ups, diagnoses, misdiagnoses, treatments, and stigma is compelling and very raw. Her struggle comes through the pages. Even at the end, I am not sure she was diagnosed correctly. The writing is good, though jumpy in parts when Goodfellow was in her manic phases. It is heart wrenching to see her struggle while the others just label and stigmatize. Do read if you have suffered from a mental illness or a close one has while you looked on helplessly.

  12. 4 out of 5

    LiteraryMarie

    Any book summary that begins with, "She was going to stab her doctor, but she wrote a book instead." will catch my attention. Prozac Monologues is Willa Goodfellow's account of an antidepressant-induced hypomania, missed diagnosis of Bipolar 2, wrong medications and process of recovery. Part self-help, part memoir, Willa lets her voice from the edge be heard through essays. I hate to sound like an infomercial but, if you or a loved one has more than depression, antidepressant side effects, curiou Any book summary that begins with, "She was going to stab her doctor, but she wrote a book instead." will catch my attention. Prozac Monologues is Willa Goodfellow's account of an antidepressant-induced hypomania, missed diagnosis of Bipolar 2, wrong medications and process of recovery. Part self-help, part memoir, Willa lets her voice from the edge be heard through essays. I hate to sound like an infomercial but, if you or a loved one has more than depression, antidepressant side effects, curious about mental illness or lives with Bipolar disorder then Prozac Monologues may be for you. Be warned that it is very hard to follow (hence the low rating). I get the impression that the author was going through a manic episode while writing so some essays are disjointed, jumping from one topic to another without a smooth transition. An editor was needed to organize the scrambled thoughts on paper drafted in only two weeks. But again, you may already be familiar with the manic flow if you or someone you love is on the Bipolar spectrum. Give it a try if you can get past this. LiteraryMarie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katherine E

    Realistic, Relatable, Educational, Inspiring Fun easy read with an insightful, relatable, perspective of what it’s like to be a person who has Bipolar Disorder and what the common experience STILL is for patients in the mental healthcare system- misdiagnosis & misguided courses of treatment. With online resources and books neatly organized in the back matter— my browsers “Mental Health” bookmark folder & Kindle Acct are full up!!! Includes: The 2 diagnostic forms doctors use- the MDQ & BSDS- with t Realistic, Relatable, Educational, Inspiring Fun easy read with an insightful, relatable, perspective of what it’s like to be a person who has Bipolar Disorder and what the common experience STILL is for patients in the mental healthcare system- misdiagnosis & misguided courses of treatment. With online resources and books neatly organized in the back matter— my browsers “Mental Health” bookmark folder & Kindle Acct are full up!!! Includes: The 2 diagnostic forms doctors use- the MDQ & BSDS- with the importance of collateral emphasized. & A gentle inspiring call to action— to advocate to your congressperson to FUND BIOMEDICAL BRAIN RESEARCH— to change the picture because mental health patients deserve better!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rashida

    I picked up this book because of my own mental health misdiagnosis and recovery from being treated wrongly for depression for many years, simply because many mental health practitioners can't be bothered enough to even look beyond depression and anxiety for other signs like ADHD, or bipolar as in Willa Goodfellow's case. This is a book, I wish I'd had the guts to write. If you've been diagnosed for a mental illness and haven't gotten better, I bet you'd recognize yourself in this book, whether i I picked up this book because of my own mental health misdiagnosis and recovery from being treated wrongly for depression for many years, simply because many mental health practitioners can't be bothered enough to even look beyond depression and anxiety for other signs like ADHD, or bipolar as in Willa Goodfellow's case. This is a book, I wish I'd had the guts to write. If you've been diagnosed for a mental illness and haven't gotten better, I bet you'd recognize yourself in this book, whether it's bipolar or something else. Just "hearing" Ms Goodfellow's inner dialogue will remind you that you're not alone.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I could not finish this book. I am not really sure what it’s point is, except, perhaps, to meander around in the maze of getting an appropriate psychiatric diagnosis. Written in a primarily stream of consciousness style, the author either purposefully twists the reader around so that the reader understands the merry go round of bipolar disorder, or to get a laugh (it’s not funny), or make a buck. There are much better ways to bring a reader into and along this difficult challenge. I received thi I could not finish this book. I am not really sure what it’s point is, except, perhaps, to meander around in the maze of getting an appropriate psychiatric diagnosis. Written in a primarily stream of consciousness style, the author either purposefully twists the reader around so that the reader understands the merry go round of bipolar disorder, or to get a laugh (it’s not funny), or make a buck. There are much better ways to bring a reader into and along this difficult challenge. I received this book as an ARC from the publisher and NetGalley.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    I hope to go back to this book one day.... I am not currently in the right headspace to appreciate it. The parts that were written while the author were on 'an up' exhausted me. This review is in no way a reflection of the author's brutal honesty and talent. I admire both. I just could not finish the book due to my own mental health battles. I applaud the tackle of the subject matter and hope others continue to take something from this book. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the ARC. I hope to go back to this book one day.... I am not currently in the right headspace to appreciate it. The parts that were written while the author were on 'an up' exhausted me. This review is in no way a reflection of the author's brutal honesty and talent. I admire both. I just could not finish the book due to my own mental health battles. I applaud the tackle of the subject matter and hope others continue to take something from this book. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the ARC.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline Allan

    A sincere thank you to the publisher, author and Netgalley for providing me with an ebook copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest reviewl. This is not my usual genre, I’m more into crime books and psychological ones too however I wanted to take the opportunity to read something from outside my norm. And I am glad I did!! Thank you for  opening up my mind to something totally different.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maria Doss

    As someone who has experienced the same circumstances of misdiagnosis of bipolar and subsequent treatment with all kinds of SSRI's, I was relieved and grateful for this book. The author describes what it is like to be in a hypomanic state and how that can be brought on by improper treatment. She also provides so much information about bipolar in the brain. It is very helpful to others who have been through it but also to those who may want to understand the people they support. As someone who has experienced the same circumstances of misdiagnosis of bipolar and subsequent treatment with all kinds of SSRI's, I was relieved and grateful for this book. The author describes what it is like to be in a hypomanic state and how that can be brought on by improper treatment. She also provides so much information about bipolar in the brain. It is very helpful to others who have been through it but also to those who may want to understand the people they support.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ann Zenk

    Provocative, Educational and Inspiring I find Willa’s words comforting and wonderful. I met her online on a Bipolar Advantage group that I happened upon. I have bipolar 2, major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder as well as inflammatory conditions, asthma and Diabetes 2. The educational and informative resources she covers are invaluable. I highly recommend this book and her blog.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Monica Starkman

    A wonderful book full of creativity and realistic, important advice Reviewed in the United States on November 29, 2020 Full of creativity, wit, sorrow, determination and the passion to help others. The author gives tough love and heartfelt advice to others with bipolar disease, including chapters with a curated reading list and a list of organizations that are helpful.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Linda Olson

    Fascinating high-speed ride through the author's brain as we cycle with her through mania and depression of bi-polar disease. Her writing effectively evokes the rushed style of speaking common during manic phases and is so effective that it makes one tired just reading it. A compelling read through her years of misdiagnosis and poly pharmacy with very useful appendices and references. Fascinating high-speed ride through the author's brain as we cycle with her through mania and depression of bi-polar disease. Her writing effectively evokes the rushed style of speaking common during manic phases and is so effective that it makes one tired just reading it. A compelling read through her years of misdiagnosis and poly pharmacy with very useful appendices and references.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Louise Gray

    This appears to be just some sort of media pack. A shame as I was really interested in the book. It is such an important topic to raise awareness about and the fact that it was linked to personal experience is likely to make it more compelling to the reader.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    This was a really enlightening book by Episcopal, sweet corn loving Willa Goodfellow. Who spent many years on a journey to a true diagnosis, self care, and the right medication. I'm not a really big non-fiction reader and I try to stay away from mental health books just because of my own depression, anxiety, and occasional (undiagnosed) manic episodes because reading about it tends to be a bit of a trigger, but I'm glad I read this one. Reading the inner thought of someone in the throws of mania This was a really enlightening book by Episcopal, sweet corn loving Willa Goodfellow. Who spent many years on a journey to a true diagnosis, self care, and the right medication. I'm not a really big non-fiction reader and I try to stay away from mental health books just because of my own depression, anxiety, and occasional (undiagnosed) manic episodes because reading about it tends to be a bit of a trigger, but I'm glad I read this one. Reading the inner thought of someone in the throws of mania and withdrawal from Prozac was one of the most illuminating things I've ever read. Along with the mania there are after notes from when the author is in recovery mode and goes back and explains her ramblings in a more coherent way. Throughout the book there are statistics and studies sprinkled in without it being too overwhelming or "educational". There are a ton of fantastic resources, from books to podcasts to support groups if you or someone you know may be suffering from Bipolar disorder or depression. We learn that the steps to recovery are crisis, rebuilding, and transformation. And most importantly we learn that you never...EVER...put margarine on sweet corn. This review will be available on my blog 8/21/20

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ria Talken

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Stojevich

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Shortell

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bianca Bowers

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aimee Andrews

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