hits counter The Image Seeker - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Image Seeker

Availability: Ready to download

The Dust Bowl 1936-Battered and near death, Billie Bassett gazes up at the stars from the door of a boxcar wondering if she can go on. Yet, in spite of the violence and privation riding the rails, she endures and becomes one of the finest photojournalists in the nation. From humble beginnings in an Indian boarding school in Minnesota to high society in New York City, Billi The Dust Bowl 1936-Battered and near death, Billie Bassett gazes up at the stars from the door of a boxcar wondering if she can go on. Yet, in spite of the violence and privation riding the rails, she endures and becomes one of the finest photojournalists in the nation. From humble beginnings in an Indian boarding school in Minnesota to high society in New York City, Billie experiences it all. Her pioneering camera work attracts the attention of a group of elite New York journalists who catapult Billie to fame and fortune, but it comes at a price. Her talents are required in the war effort, and she must travel undercover, deep into Nazi Germany as a courier. By her side is the charismatic and acclaimed journalist, Max Rothman, Billie’s harshest critic and dearest friend. But Max does not reveal to her his own clandestine and dangerous agenda. The Image Seeker is a tale of lost youth, strength, and rebirth set in one of our country’s most tragic eras, The Great Depression and in the cauldron of hatred that was Nazi Germany.


Compare

The Dust Bowl 1936-Battered and near death, Billie Bassett gazes up at the stars from the door of a boxcar wondering if she can go on. Yet, in spite of the violence and privation riding the rails, she endures and becomes one of the finest photojournalists in the nation. From humble beginnings in an Indian boarding school in Minnesota to high society in New York City, Billi The Dust Bowl 1936-Battered and near death, Billie Bassett gazes up at the stars from the door of a boxcar wondering if she can go on. Yet, in spite of the violence and privation riding the rails, she endures and becomes one of the finest photojournalists in the nation. From humble beginnings in an Indian boarding school in Minnesota to high society in New York City, Billie experiences it all. Her pioneering camera work attracts the attention of a group of elite New York journalists who catapult Billie to fame and fortune, but it comes at a price. Her talents are required in the war effort, and she must travel undercover, deep into Nazi Germany as a courier. By her side is the charismatic and acclaimed journalist, Max Rothman, Billie’s harshest critic and dearest friend. But Max does not reveal to her his own clandestine and dangerous agenda. The Image Seeker is a tale of lost youth, strength, and rebirth set in one of our country’s most tragic eras, The Great Depression and in the cauldron of hatred that was Nazi Germany.

30 review for The Image Seeker

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Wilkinson

    While I found the beginning of this book to be a bit stiff, I think because in places there was just a lot of narration and not as much dialogue, the rest of the book more than made up for that. While I have read a lot of WWII novels, I had never encountered the Berlin Olympics before and this added a great exclamation to the story. But the crux of the story was riding the rails and this was fabulous. I have never read a book about hobos, and this was fascinating. The native American connection While I found the beginning of this book to be a bit stiff, I think because in places there was just a lot of narration and not as much dialogue, the rest of the book more than made up for that. While I have read a lot of WWII novels, I had never encountered the Berlin Olympics before and this added a great exclamation to the story. But the crux of the story was riding the rails and this was fabulous. I have never read a book about hobos, and this was fascinating. The native American connection was also insightful and so the was so much to digest in this book, I never wanted it to end! Bravo, Ms Hughes!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Amanda Hughes has written a story of an Indian child living on a reservation in Minnesota who follows her dream of photography to become a successful photojournalist with the New York Times! She wrote a book about the hard times during the depression, including the danger and excitement of riding the rails, romance, espionage, returning to her roots to perfect the use of Code Talking using her childhood language, covering the 1936 Olympics and escaping Nazi Germany. This was such a good read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dorothy Wiley

    In a nutshell, this was one of the best books I've ever read. It is a slice of life, and a thick slice at that, that opened my eyes to a fascinating period of American and international history. After a long and difficult journey, the main character becomes one of America's first female photojournalists. Successfully competing in a man's world, and highly creative, she is finally recognized as being among the finest news photographers in the nation. The setting is one of our country’s most tragi In a nutshell, this was one of the best books I've ever read. It is a slice of life, and a thick slice at that, that opened my eyes to a fascinating period of American and international history. After a long and difficult journey, the main character becomes one of America's first female photojournalists. Successfully competing in a man's world, and highly creative, she is finally recognized as being among the finest news photographers in the nation. The setting is one of our country’s most tragic eras--the Great Depression--and later moves to Europe where our heroine finds herself fighting the hatred of Nazi Germany while trying to let herself truly love for the first time in her life. This novel was both heart-breaking and heart-warming. Both tragically poignant and wonderfully inspiring. A great novel about a bold and brave woman by a bold and courageous author.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    I love historical novels that enlighten me to things I hadn't heard about, or about which I knew very little. In this case, I learned about separating Native American children from their family and reservations to force them to become more Americanized on many levels. I learned about hobos riding the rails during the Depression era. I learned a little bit more about how intelligence information was relayed during WWII (not saying more than that to avoid a spoiler problem). And so, I really enjoy I love historical novels that enlighten me to things I hadn't heard about, or about which I knew very little. In this case, I learned about separating Native American children from their family and reservations to force them to become more Americanized on many levels. I learned about hobos riding the rails during the Depression era. I learned a little bit more about how intelligence information was relayed during WWII (not saying more than that to avoid a spoiler problem). And so, I really enjoyed the story of Native American child Wilhelmina "Billie" Bassett and the stories of her life up until she is settled into adulthood after a world of adventures. I am often reminded of stories my father used to tell about the hard life experienced by himself and everyone he knew during the Depression and always admired that people were willing to do whatever it took to survive and to provide for their loved ones. Billie is just such a character and I really appreciated her courage and determination to survive against some really tough odds. Thaks (again) to Bookbub, I have found a new author whose work I really enjoy. I'll be off in search of more of her work.

  5. 5 out of 5

    carolebeckett

    The Image Maker There are so many good things to be said about Amanda Hughes and her books about strong women. Billie, The Image Maker, is but one such story. I believe every woman should read these books. All I can say is “Wonderful Ms Hughes, thank you!”.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stanley McShane

    Billie Bassett is separated from her family and reservation in Minnesota at age 5 and sent to an Indian boarding school. Not allowed to speak her native language, she is fed, sheltered, and educated--until a tragic occurrence forces her decision to escape. She is lucky in that during several summers as she got older she was welcomed into a German farm family exchanging domestic help for another kind of education. And something else--love and support. It is through the encouragement and generosit Billie Bassett is separated from her family and reservation in Minnesota at age 5 and sent to an Indian boarding school. Not allowed to speak her native language, she is fed, sheltered, and educated--until a tragic occurrence forces her decision to escape. She is lucky in that during several summers as she got older she was welcomed into a German farm family exchanging domestic help for another kind of education. And something else--love and support. It is through the encouragement and generosity of this couple she will further her new and growing interest in photography. The storyline grips from the first page, grabs your attention and doesn't let go. Fleeing the boarding school, Billie is now educated in the ways of life on the rails--teaching her the signs and symbols of hobo communication, the "jungles," protection, hunger. It's an amazing lesson and combined with the languages she's learned by immersion, invaluable. The talented Billie has boldly chosen or fought for paths that lead inexorably to achievement, independence, even a wealth of sorts--dollars no less than those of connections. The connections lead to a dangerous mission for her country at the 1936 Games of the XI Olympiad in Berlin, witnessing the rise of Nazi Germany, and while she steadfastly refuses romance in her life, finds it, unbidden. The well-plotted narrative builds upon itself, leading you to cringe more than once over what will happen next, and scared that you think you might know. Dialogue is natural and the storyline easy to follow, though trust me that there will be a few twists along the way. The conclusion is carefully drawn pulling in threads after a harrowing escape, smoothing out the ripples, and allowing the adrenaline to settle back down. I received the ebook download from the author for a read and review and the review is my own and independent opinion. This is the second in the Twentieth Century series, but each of these novels can be read as a standalone. Whether or not you are a historical fiction buff, you'll love this fascinating and engaging narrative. Highly recommended! See my full review at https://rosepointpublishing.com/2019/...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Lauer

    This book had me captivated from page 1. It was such an interesting story, and even though it's fiction, the things that Billie went through as an American Indian child living through the Depression and as a young adult being part of the war effort during WWII, were things real people did experience during those time periods. It wasn't an easy life and there were many harrowing experiences but in the end Billie created the life of which she always dreamed. As an author, I love reading about stro This book had me captivated from page 1. It was such an interesting story, and even though it's fiction, the things that Billie went through as an American Indian child living through the Depression and as a young adult being part of the war effort during WWII, were things real people did experience during those time periods. It wasn't an easy life and there were many harrowing experiences but in the end Billie created the life of which she always dreamed. As an author, I love reading about strong female characters, and Billie is the definition of feminine strength and grace.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I really enjoyed this book. I know it says it is book 3, however, I have never read any of the other ones and found it stood alone without any problem. The book follows a Native American girl throughout her life in the 1920's and beyond. She grows up in a residential school and later goes on to lead a very exciting, albeit harrowing life through WW2. Without giving away any spoilers, let me just say it brought to light aspects of life that I had never thought about and talked about the Native Am I really enjoyed this book. I know it says it is book 3, however, I have never read any of the other ones and found it stood alone without any problem. The book follows a Native American girl throughout her life in the 1920's and beyond. She grows up in a residential school and later goes on to lead a very exciting, albeit harrowing life through WW2. Without giving away any spoilers, let me just say it brought to light aspects of life that I had never thought about and talked about the Native American contributions in both world wars that I knew little about.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    This was one of the best books I have read in awhile. It took place during The Great Depression with vivid accounts of the poverty and desperation of the people. Although they suffered with unemployment and extreme hunger, what this book captured was the unassuming strength and fortitude of the American people. They did what they had to do to survive. Amanda Hughes writes about people living on the fringes of society in lesser known periods of history. I am looking forward to reading more books w This was one of the best books I have read in awhile. It took place during The Great Depression with vivid accounts of the poverty and desperation of the people. Although they suffered with unemployment and extreme hunger, what this book captured was the unassuming strength and fortitude of the American people. They did what they had to do to survive. Amanda Hughes writes about people living on the fringes of society in lesser known periods of history. I am looking forward to reading more books written by her.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Farrar

    Fascinating Read Could not stop reading. Stayed up all night 🌙 to finish book. Whether you are woman or man, you will learn about the great depression and what people were doing to survive American Indian life for children school age and as adults, overcoming obstacles to rise above them to become successful as a photographer/journalist sent to Nazi Germany during the Olympics and surviving the Socialist government there and in America. If you want to talk a walk down history's road, please pick Fascinating Read Could not stop reading. Stayed up all night 🌙 to finish book. Whether you are woman or man, you will learn about the great depression and what people were doing to survive American Indian life for children school age and as adults, overcoming obstacles to rise above them to become successful as a photographer/journalist sent to Nazi Germany during the Olympics and surviving the Socialist government there and in America. If you want to talk a walk down history's road, please pick this book .

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    The beginning of the book of the hard scrap life of the main character was kind of amazing to read and imagine. Her delight with photography started her then on her 1st career path. The transformation of her life when she gave up the rails was almost unbelievable. Her ability blithe the camera and her photojournalism gave her quite a life. And then things just got more deeply connecting her young life with her adult life and with the skills she had developed. I would recommend this book but I sor The beginning of the book of the hard scrap life of the main character was kind of amazing to read and imagine. Her delight with photography started her then on her 1st career path. The transformation of her life when she gave up the rails was almost unbelievable. Her ability blithe the camera and her photojournalism gave her quite a life. And then things just got more deeply connecting her young life with her adult life and with the skills she had developed. I would recommend this book but I sort of think the end of the book does the story a disservice

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Hetzel

    I read to the finish but with the increasing realization that the book was an amalgam of events that may have happened to women during the period covered. But it just seems improbable that it all happened to one woman. The writing was very straightforward. The characters seemed like stereotypes. I appreciate when author’s intent to portray stein women who overcame obstacle. But a more realistic approach would have been more believable.

  13. 4 out of 5

    June

    Yowza this is one wide spanning book. It takes a slice of Americana which rarely spoken or written about namely rail riding and spins it into detailed enriching experience for the reader. Then jump into some time spent with a carny and even then one moves on to New York for another experience! Terrific background, interesting characters and plots galore...what more could a reader ask for!!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Schouten

    I loved everything about this book and actually learned things about some subjects. I liked the American Indian aspect of Billie’s life- her mandatory time at the boarding school. And then her time riding the rails and the life of the hobos. Her subsequent jobs with the carnival and as a photographer for the police dept. Her career with the newspaper and her time as a photographer and code talker during the 1936 Olympics were especially interesting.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Hafar

    No character development The first paragraph grabbed me and I was excited, but that evaporated quickly— by page 2. When any character comes or goes, you feel no emotion as you don’t come to know any of the characters. If they had killed off the main character I would have been fine with it. Cold, rambling, dispassionate, sometimes even disconnected. But I finished it, so two stars for that.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Miriam

    this is a good read set during the great depression when people were desperate to live in a safe place and find a way to keep their families together and fed. the female protagonist wants to be a renowned photographer! not exactly the career of choice for a woman fighting to get out of the dust bowl. this is the second in the series. i read the first book as well, and plan to continue with the next in the series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This was a fascinating story. I love how it had characters and themes that are not usually written about. The idea of a Native American woman achieving these things was wonderful--although I don't know how realistic it could have been, sadly. But I love how the author brought the people and times to life. This was a fascinating story. I love how it had characters and themes that are not usually written about. The idea of a Native American woman achieving these things was wonderful--although I don't know how realistic it could have been, sadly. But I love how the author brought the people and times to life.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    I rounded this up to a 3. It is an interesting story but kind of fluffy as to approach. Lots of history but probably too much crammed into one story. Hard to believe all of this could be a part of one persons life. It was an easy read though. I learned a few things. I prefer a book where it is more in depth and covering a historical event rather than so many.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Oletta

    What a disappointment. The historical elements, setting, and plot twists COULD HAVE been inspirational. Unfortunately, the sophomoric sentence structure, rushed transitions, grammatical errors ("guten morgan" - seriously?!), immature romance scenes (I literally rolled my eyes) and corny ending ruined grand possibilities. What a disappointment. The historical elements, setting, and plot twists COULD HAVE been inspirational. Unfortunately, the sophomoric sentence structure, rushed transitions, grammatical errors ("guten morgan" - seriously?!), immature romance scenes (I literally rolled my eyes) and corny ending ruined grand possibilities.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    I was just swept away by this book. The story was fascinating about people that I didn't know about. It kept me turning pages - not like a thriller but because the story line featured people who I enjoyed leaning about. the author has a whole series of books - all of which are stand along - that feature strong women. I look forward to reading more of her books. I was just swept away by this book. The story was fascinating about people that I didn't know about. It kept me turning pages - not like a thriller but because the story line featured people who I enjoyed leaning about. the author has a whole series of books - all of which are stand along - that feature strong women. I look forward to reading more of her books.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Joan rated it Interesting book set during the depression and later pre World War 2 Germany and the 1936 Olympics. Gives a fascinating peak into the lives of those who rode the railroad box cars from town to town,state to state a life I never knew about. The heroine overcomes many accessories to become a prominent photojournalist.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie N. Frunz

    Spell binding So many twists and turns in the life of one young Native American. She lives a life of deprivation and adventure. She is a survivor and lives to experience some of her dreams. Even those lead her into new and risky situations. She is strong. You will love reading about Billie.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Susan Zehnder

    Loved this book, in depth character development. Learned some facts about native american indians I had previously not known, did some further research in that area. I don't think I have ever read an Amanda Hughes book that I didn't love. Loved this book, in depth character development. Learned some facts about native american indians I had previously not known, did some further research in that area. I don't think I have ever read an Amanda Hughes book that I didn't love.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Linn

    I liked the book, but -I thought it so sad that Billie never reconnected with her native american side, and just became the typical american, when her tribe probably had so much more to offer than the little peak we had in the book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robert Ruesch

    What I loved about this book was the author's willingness to clarify the background of the characters on revealing their past. You learned about the individuals and felt you were part of their adventure, their story. The plot, storyline, is well thought out and excellent. Amanda Hughes digs deep into history to reveal a challenging time in the history of the word and the circumstances for the characters. This book kept me reading well into the night! What I loved about this book was the author's willingness to clarify the background of the characters on revealing their past. You learned about the individuals and felt you were part of their adventure, their story. The plot, storyline, is well thought out and excellent. Amanda Hughes digs deep into history to reveal a challenging time in the history of the word and the circumstances for the characters. This book kept me reading well into the night!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Lifka

    Excellent story of early 1900's struggles Well written story of Billie Bassett, an Indian photographer. Ms Hughes creates believable characters along with realistic events of Billie's life. Excellent story of early 1900's struggles Well written story of Billie Bassett, an Indian photographer. Ms Hughes creates believable characters along with realistic events of Billie's life.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Willie. Van Den Hoek

    Exciting beautiful book It was such an exciting story I could not put it down. One of the best books I have read for a long time .Interesting and lovable and down to earth charaters and full of history woven throughout. A wonderful above average book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tess Ailshire

    Billie is an inspiration, facing racism and sexism with intelligence, wisdom, and a great deal of independent spirit. While the story dumps a lot of activity into a little bit of time, one does not doubt Billie could accomplish the acts. For one person to have the infallible judgment she has of who to trust and who not to is also a bit stretched, but somehow the only sentiment I found myself with was "Wow. She accomplished so much, so young." Billie is an inspiration, facing racism and sexism with intelligence, wisdom, and a great deal of independent spirit. While the story dumps a lot of activity into a little bit of time, one does not doubt Billie could accomplish the acts. For one person to have the infallible judgment she has of who to trust and who not to is also a bit stretched, but somehow the only sentiment I found myself with was "Wow. She accomplished so much, so young."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robert C. smith

    One of the Most Involving Stories Ever! Although not what I expected from the title, this is one of the most fully packed novels ever, bringing to real life amazing people living in the fringes of society. A great benchmark for other writers.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Wray

    This is a good story. The book has all the elements in it that I look for. The book begins at the beginning of the depression and heads towards WW11. Life in America in that time was interesting to read and the hobos and the train travel. Would recommend.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.