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The fairy court is restored. Who will win the game of crowns? In the aftermath of Ireland's battle with her ancient enemies, Queen Isolde orders her cousin, smuggler Duncan O'Malley, to assume the throne of fairy as King Finvara. He's a fish out of water when it comes to nurturing the alliance between Ireland's mortal and fairy peoples. And the queen wants him to wed the da The fairy court is restored. Who will win the game of crowns? In the aftermath of Ireland's battle with her ancient enemies, Queen Isolde orders her cousin, smuggler Duncan O'Malley, to assume the throne of fairy as King Finvara. He's a fish out of water when it comes to nurturing the alliance between Ireland's mortal and fairy peoples. And the queen wants him to wed the daughter of Ireland's enemy, the king of Icelandic shadow elves, to help keep the peace. But the Irish think of the elves as goblins, and Finvara refuses. Elven princess Koli, affronted by the king's rejection—along with his decision to bring her to court as little more than a captive—vows vengeance. Shortly after her arrival, she uncovers a plot that would bring swift satisfaction. A dark and powerful fairy lord, Far Dorocha, wants to take Finvara's crown and lead both the fairy and elven people to war against the Irish. And he wants Koli to help him. It's the perfect setup for revenge, but Koli soon discovers that Finvara's not the haughty lord she believed him to be. And as she navigates treacherous waters inside the court, she gets glimpses of the magic and passion that have been slumbering inside her. She must choose a side in the new battle for Ireland—will it be the fearsome father she has served for nearly a century, or the fairy king who has helped awaken her to herself?


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The fairy court is restored. Who will win the game of crowns? In the aftermath of Ireland's battle with her ancient enemies, Queen Isolde orders her cousin, smuggler Duncan O'Malley, to assume the throne of fairy as King Finvara. He's a fish out of water when it comes to nurturing the alliance between Ireland's mortal and fairy peoples. And the queen wants him to wed the da The fairy court is restored. Who will win the game of crowns? In the aftermath of Ireland's battle with her ancient enemies, Queen Isolde orders her cousin, smuggler Duncan O'Malley, to assume the throne of fairy as King Finvara. He's a fish out of water when it comes to nurturing the alliance between Ireland's mortal and fairy peoples. And the queen wants him to wed the daughter of Ireland's enemy, the king of Icelandic shadow elves, to help keep the peace. But the Irish think of the elves as goblins, and Finvara refuses. Elven princess Koli, affronted by the king's rejection—along with his decision to bring her to court as little more than a captive—vows vengeance. Shortly after her arrival, she uncovers a plot that would bring swift satisfaction. A dark and powerful fairy lord, Far Dorocha, wants to take Finvara's crown and lead both the fairy and elven people to war against the Irish. And he wants Koli to help him. It's the perfect setup for revenge, but Koli soon discovers that Finvara's not the haughty lord she believed him to be. And as she navigates treacherous waters inside the court, she gets glimpses of the magic and passion that have been slumbering inside her. She must choose a side in the new battle for Ireland—will it be the fearsome father she has served for nearly a century, or the fairy king who has helped awaken her to herself?

30 review for The Raven Lady

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Giveaway Win!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Niki (mustreadalltheromance)

    After the fierce battle between the modern and ancient peoples of Ireland, smuggler Duncan O’Malley is forced by his cousin, Queen Isolde, to take over the fairy throne as King Finvara. He’s completely out of his depth attempting to foster peace and when he’s further instructed to marry the daughter of Ireland’s enemy, the King of Iceland’s Shadow Elves, Finvara is done being agreeable and draws the line, hosting the princess as a political hostage instead. Princess Koli is deeply offended at thi After the fierce battle between the modern and ancient peoples of Ireland, smuggler Duncan O’Malley is forced by his cousin, Queen Isolde, to take over the fairy throne as King Finvara. He’s completely out of his depth attempting to foster peace and when he’s further instructed to marry the daughter of Ireland’s enemy, the King of Iceland’s Shadow Elves, Finvara is done being agreeable and draws the line, hosting the princess as a political hostage instead. Princess Koli is deeply offended at this rejection and determined to seek revenge. It doesn’t take her long to learn of a plot that will quickly see her goal realized. Ancient and powerful Druid Far Dorocha is fed up with his long life of servitude to the queens of Finvara and to usurp Finvara’s rule, unite with the elves and lead them, along with the fairy population, into war against Ireland. Koli is the perfect ally. This is the perfect revenge she wanted, but when Koli comes to know him, she realizes Finvara is nothing like she thought him to be. She develops an uneasy friendship with him which she suspects could become much more, but she must choose between the manipulative father she has always loyally served and the man who has helped her come into her own as an individual. This book had a bit of everything: reimagined history, a very steampunk, fantasy feel, and lots of references to both Celtic and Icelandic folklore. Duncan was in so far over his head with his unexpected leadership role and the high level of responsibility that came with it and no training whatsoever. It’s no wonder he struggled. Koli was full of anger and determined to hate him, while Duncan mostly just resented being forced into anything else, along with all the other changes in his life. I loved the parts in which Duncan and Koli worked together as a team, I just wish we’d had more of those moments. As it was, even as they grew closer and their relationship developed into something real and strong, Koli and Duncan didn’t really have much time together at all. I also felt bad for Duncan given how much happened at his expense; Koli helping and saving him was cute and endearing, but I wanted him to have more opportunity to prove himself as well. The final battle scenes were gripping and kept my attention, but at the same time, Koli’s actions at this point felt just a bit repetitive for me and it seemed like a lot of story/myth/legend was getting stuffed into not a lot of book when it could’ve been better served with a bit more fleshing out perhaps. Beyond that, I really loved the relationship growth and repair, as well as respect, we saw in the end between Duncan and his father, the Earl of Mayo. For some reason that relationship was very endearing to me. Overall, even though I wanted a bit more relationship development to be shown between Koli and Duncan (especially on Koli’s part), I enjoyed this story immensely. I’m enthralled with this concept and excited to see where the series goes next. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Annemieke / A Dance with Books

    Thank you to Blackstone Publishing and Netgalley for the review copy in exchange for an honest review. This does not change my opinion in anyway.   Last year I was fortunate enough to read The Absinthe Earl, the first book of the Faerie Rehistory trilogy. It took me by surprise. So I was excited to pick up this sequel. It didn't quite give me the same feeling.  This book focuses on two different characters. Duncan O'Malley, who we met in the first book, and a completely new character, Koli, an Elv Thank you to Blackstone Publishing and Netgalley for the review copy in exchange for an honest review. This does not change my opinion in anyway.   Last year I was fortunate enough to read The Absinthe Earl, the first book of the Faerie Rehistory trilogy. It took me by surprise. So I was excited to pick up this sequel. It didn't quite give me the same feeling.  This book focuses on two different characters. Duncan O'Malley, who we met in the first book, and a completely new character, Koli, an Elven princess. I think what mostly let me down in this book were the characters and the romance.  I enjoyed Duncan in the first book where we met him from afar. And I was glad that we got him as a main character now, not in the least because he is a black man. And might I point out that the longer I stare at the cover the more white looking I find him on there? Like could they have not gone a little darker? In this book however he feels immensely naive and trusting despite his situation of having inherited a whole court of people that don't care for him after having been inhabited by Finvara.  Koli didn't really strike a chord with me either. Her switch to the other side felt unnatural almost when she came with so much will power. Adding in their romance, it was a bit messy. They really hadn't had that many talks. She really wasn't there that long and there were days where they didn't see each other. The quickness of their feelings was too much for me.  Other than that I think the writing and fantasy plot surrounding them was fine and fit in with the continuation of the Absinthe Earl.  I am curious who we will focus on in the last book and how that book will play out. I'm still interested in reading it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Riley

    Elven princess Koli was born to be a bridge between disparate peoples. Initially between the human icelanders and the northern elves and now between the elves and the Irish. As her father’s servant, Koli’s life was not her own. Which is how she ended up in Ireland in the household of Duncan O’Malley. From the beginning, I did not like that Koli served others before herself, regardless of whether that was right or wrong. However, this flaw gives Koli a direction to grow as a character. Duncan O’Ma Elven princess Koli was born to be a bridge between disparate peoples. Initially between the human icelanders and the northern elves and now between the elves and the Irish. As her father’s servant, Koli’s life was not her own. Which is how she ended up in Ireland in the household of Duncan O’Malley. From the beginning, I did not like that Koli served others before herself, regardless of whether that was right or wrong. However, this flaw gives Koli a direction to grow as a character. Duncan O’Malley, also known as Finvara because the ancient fairy king once inhabited his body, is also a servant. He serves his cousin, Irish Queen Isolde. He would much rather be at sea, but his life is not his own either, so he becomes the fairies’ King Finvara at Isolde’s command. Finvara seems to be a fish out of water, struggling to find his place. So both main characters start out in unhappy positions. Finvara will make the best of it and do his duty for his queen. Koli will spy on Finvara as her father dictated. To shake things up Far Dorocha (Doro) works for Finvara, but his allegiance is questionable. There is a knave in every good tale. Finding common ground leads to romance. This serves to bring Finvara and Koli together to defeat the villains, making this a lesson in empathy and cooperation. The title refers to Koli who is able to manifest ravens to protect herself when she is in danger or angry. The Morrigan, who sometimes appears as a crow, is also part of the story, making the black bird a theme in this story. Spells, incantations and magical devices add to the fantasy of this story. Characters often travel through ‘the gap’ in order to get in and out of Faery and travel quickly between places. The gap sounds a little like the scifi concept of warp space but limited to the Earth. There are also some very cool magical, if a bit scary, trees. In my advance copy, there was a glossary in the front of the book. For e-books it is so nice to get this out front so the reader knows it is there to be referenced. The Raven Lady is a standalone story, though reading The Absinthe Earl first will enhance your reading experience. I love this series! Irish legend and history are deftly and beautifully combined and embellished in the amazing story of The Faery Rehistory. The publisher provided a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kat Caric

    What a fun adventurous read! I really enjoyed this book, and it settles in my being after the read as a really fun romp, with certain moments still simmering trying to tell further stories themselves in my mind. That is the mark of a good book and time well spent reading. Recommended. This is the first book I've read in this series "The Faery Rehistory," and it can be read as a standalone. In the advanced reader copy I received from NetGalley, the book opens with a glossary, and I think this is t What a fun adventurous read! I really enjoyed this book, and it settles in my being after the read as a really fun romp, with certain moments still simmering trying to tell further stories themselves in my mind. That is the mark of a good book and time well spent reading. Recommended. This is the first book I've read in this series "The Faery Rehistory," and it can be read as a standalone. In the advanced reader copy I received from NetGalley, the book opens with a glossary, and I think this is the first book I've read where I poured through every single entry of a glossary *before* beginning the main text, because every single entry sparked colorful story thoughts behind the entry, fascinating! And I do know much Icelandic and Celtic lore, so this was surprising! Unless you are up on the words and lore, I recommend not skipping the glossary. Yes, it's a bit of an info dump, but I considered it sort of like receiving a map before entering a land, and it leaves itself as general Celtic and Icelandic knowledge enhancement after the quick read. The prologue could become a book itself as well, and I still find myself mulling over in my mind that life that is only discussed briefly in the prologue, really just a set up of a life to come and the main character life framing. An entire life is only teased at, and I'm left salivating and hoping and wondering, ...and then we're directed to the actual story,.... The book itself has a pacing that begins slow covering the span of only a day or so, and then moves perhaps too fast through the rest of the book, as so much happens so quickly, I found myself wishing for a longer book. I understand the publishing drive and ROI need to trim pages and present stories more concisely, but the feeling arc in this telling becomes more a feeling hard turn, perhaps partly for brevity's sake, yet nevertheless remains interesting and captivating. The story is so captivating that I staying up very late finishing it. We have villains and nature consciousness and different types of fae and lords and ladies, we have steampunk elements and a great goddess (I would have loved the story from the goddess POV!), we have poetry and ancient lore brought fresh, we have a bit of mystery and of course sizzling hot romance. (Explicit sex scenes included.) It's all there and it's a full delicious meal. If I could make changes as a reader, I'd draw out the timeline just a bit to feel more believable. I cannot think of a human I know that made such a hard turn in feeling and judgement so swiftly. That small plot moment leaves the reader a bit pulled away, but this is myth and myth can do such things as move with lightning speed, and so I voided out my human expectation and continued on. Honestly, the turn was expected anyway, just a bit slower burn to ride the wave upward was what I thought coming. If timeline could not be altered, I'd at least make the feeling tone arc move at a decent crescendo instead of hard turns, but it might be difficult to do in this tight storytelling. The book remains very enjoyable if we suspend that expectation. This book is told in dual POV (with the exception of prologue), and that has benefits and costs as most probably know. Here, we know what is happening in the minds of two characters; but we slightly loose the very deep emotional bond that can come with one POV / first person done well, where we travel a feeling-train hand in hand with one and only one being, and we become the champion of that character, (with good writing) knowing their deepest pain *and feeling it deeply ourselves.* Here, with dual POV and this going back and forth, that incredible depth potential is sacrificed. This ends up feeling like a really fun romp and adventure, and we're left curious for more, yet without the deep bond that can tie us inexorably to a character's future imagined well-being and success. The meal becomes satisfying but not earth-shattering or belief amending. Multiple POV is a trend it seems, and it leads to a different outcome, certainly more egalitarian. That is the benefit. I have this perspective that diving into books is like a reincarnation, and we can grow from a life lived in the mind only, and here we have two. There are steampunk elements that are interesting but could have been done another way, with magic and beings and nature instead of devices. It does add a novel twist on fae lore indeed. But the many plot moves and twists are very well crafted, devices or no. It is tight and moves along with increasing speed and becomes quite the ride. There are no glaring holes, and the way the author writes is wonderful to read for a book like this, the words step out of the way of the story and the reader is carried smoothly through buildup and high-action moments. I really enjoy and appreciate this author's way with words, a finely tuned vehicle for visionary travel indeed. 4 stars for an invigorating story thick with fae and Celtic-Icelandic lore, thank you Sharon Lynn Fisher! And thank you NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for the ARC. ---------- My star ratings: 5 stars: Incredible read, cannot get it out of my mind, will read again and again, perhaps has effect on self identity or belief 4 stars: Very enjoyable, no glaring plot or writing issues, added to my idea or knowledge or lore bank, glad to have read 3 stars: Enjoyable on some level but something was missing or in the way - a writing style, plot holes, pacing or emotional connection 2 stars: At some point I was probably screaming at the book and wondering where was the editorial team, or was there a helping team at all 1 star: probably DNF unless I felt obligated, will forget it existed sadly, the idea kernel squandered

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nissanmama

    In describing the series, Fisher says, “The Faery Rehistory weaves Ireland’s ancient mythological races with Victorian-era technology and manners into an Ireland that was never conquered by the British.” So imagine an alternative world where the fairies of Ireland’s folklore are real, but closed off from the Ireland inhabited by humans. They’re in a different dimension, but inhabiting the same spaces. After the battle of Ben Bulben in The Absinthe Earl, the barrier between those worlds is taken In describing the series, Fisher says, “The Faery Rehistory weaves Ireland’s ancient mythological races with Victorian-era technology and manners into an Ireland that was never conquered by the British.” So imagine an alternative world where the fairies of Ireland’s folklore are real, but closed off from the Ireland inhabited by humans. They’re in a different dimension, but inhabiting the same spaces. After the battle of Ben Bulben in The Absinthe Earl, the barrier between those worlds is taken down and they must all learn to live with each other along with coping with changes in landscape and structures. Finvara aka Duncan O’Malley is the fourth son of the Earl of Mayo and cousin of Queen Isolde, queen of the Irish humans. Duncan is appointed by Queen Isolde as the Faery King. We were introduced to him in the first book and got a taste of his playful nature, but he’s out of his league as Faery King. He needs help and doesn’t know who to trust. His instincts lead him to trust Koli and that trust is tested to the Nth degree. Koli is daughter of the Elven King from the north. She was supposed to have been betrothed to Finvara by a peace agreement between Queen Isolde and the Elf King, but the shadow elves of the north are reputed to be gnarly goblins and Finvara was having none of it. So she is sent instead as an official envoy, basically a prisoner so as to limit her ability to spy for her father. I was impressed that Fisher included this. It’s a little-known fact, at least in the United States, that Ireland was actually invaded by Nordic warriors early in its history over a period of about 200 years. I only learned this fact when my husband’s Ancestry DNA kit came back almost to the village in Ireland because of specific Viking markers. He likes to tell me he has proof now that he’s basically Thor which means he’s Chris Hemsworth. That’s total logic, right? He’s not even blonde. I digress… Ancient records record Viking invaders that were light and later “heathen” warriors which we dark. Historians don’t know if that referred to their skin, their hair, weapons, or armor. Koli is described as having raven black hair and has a flock of ravens that protect her, perhaps the impetus for the book’s title. I liked Koli very much. She’s been subject to abuse, been a pawn in other people’s plans, and still she makes the best of every situation she’s been in—always thinking for herself. She’s fierce and never goes down without a fight in a story where no one is as they seem. There is a steampunk flare to the story. I have not read a great deal of steampunk literature. What I have read I felt was clever, but in its own sub-genre of fantasy where the rules of the alternate universe are known. Fisher has taken what I know of that sub-genre and did something completely new with it. Rather than industrialization simply developing that way, in The Raven Lady it is overlaid with faery and druid magic—there’s a reason for it being the way that it is. In Fisher’s fantasy, things that shouldn’t make sense suddenly do. My one criticism is that even though we get a tidy bow that wraps up the story, it felt just a little abrupt. I flipped the page and was startled that it was the end. I can deal with that if book three, The Warrior Poet, is forthcoming soon! Right now its release is TBA. My Rating: A- Enjoyed A Lot Read this full review and more at That's What I'm Talking About: https://twimom227.com/2020/10/review-...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Mythology, romance, magic and intrigue collide in Sharon Lynn Fisher’s latest lively and sexy fantasy. Sharon Lynn Fisher continues her Faery Rehistory series in this sparkling sequel, which by the way, can easily be read as a stand-alone if you haven’t read The Absinthe Earl first. Although a couple of familiar charac I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Mythology, romance, magic and intrigue collide in Sharon Lynn Fisher’s latest lively and sexy fantasy. Sharon Lynn Fisher continues her Faery Rehistory series in this sparkling sequel, which by the way, can easily be read as a stand-alone if you haven’t read The Absinthe Earl first. Although a couple of familiar characters from the first book make an appearance, the story has a completely different focus and expands on the unique world that Sharon introduced us to in the first book. The story is set in 1883 Ireland. In The Absinthe Earl , we met Duncan O’Malley, a sea captain who was good friends with Ada, the main female character in that story. Duncan has become King Finvara, the lord of the Irish fairies, after the real King Finvara took over his mind and body. All this happens after the Battle of Ben Bulben, a clash between Ireland and the Faery realm that left the seal between the two worlds broken. Now these worlds—the ancient and modern—overlap in some very interesting ways. Finvara has banished the old King from his mind, but he still retains a bit of the magic from their "encounter." As King, he lives in the Faery castle Knock Ma and tries to establish peace between the humans and fairies, who are able to easily move between the realms.  Koli Alfdóttir is an Icelandic shadow elf, the daughter of the cruel elf King, who is able to control Koli via a magical tattoo on her back. The elf king arranges a supposed peace treaty by offering up Koli to King Finvara, but in fact he’s sending her as a spy because he plans to attack Knock Ma and end the peace between their people. Koli and Finvara expect to hate each other, and indeed their first meeting is filled with tension. But Finvara isn’t the cruel King Koli expected him to be, and Finvara sees a woman with a fighting spirit and hidden depths, not to mention he’s immediately attracted to her exotic looks. When Koli meets a fairy named Doro who has joined forces with her father to bring down Finvara, she reluctantly joins him in his nefarious plans. But the more time she spends with Finvara, the harder it becomes to betray him. The Raven Lady is a well balanced fantasy romance with plenty of both those elements for whichever type of reader you are. I really loved the relationship between Koli and Finvara. There were enough twists to keep it interesting—you know, the whole “I’m going to betray you” storyline—and even I was fooled a few times, not really knowing what Koli was going to do. I also loved that Koli isn’t inexperienced when it comes to romance and sex. She is almost one hundred years old, after all! (I guess elves have long lives) During one hot and heavy scene, she tells Finvara that she’s “done this before,” and it doesn’t hurt when one of her past lovers enters the story and causes some friction between Koli and Finvara. And I really appreciated the fact that Finvara accepts her past without being a jerk about it. I’m often turned off by romances that feature jealousy between the characters, and I was pleasantly surprised at how adult Finvara acts. As for Sharon’s fantasy world, it’s a fascinating blend of Nordic, Icelandic and Irish folklore. There is a bit of set up in the beginning, while Sharon sets the stage for her tale, but it's necessary in order to understand why the characters act the way they do. I loved the descriptions of the castle, which straddles the worlds of humans and fairies and causes all sorts of bizarre occurrences. For example, when Koli arrives, Finvara explains that strange, mechanical devices have been popping up all over the castle, presumably items that came through the portals from Faery. Fairies and other magical creatures from that realm are able to cross over at will and can be found coming and going all the time. We also learn about the mystical, magical place between the two worlds called the Gap, and I loved the scenes set there, which are full of unexpected danger. Sharon also introduces some steampunk elements, which I loved. In addition to mechanical and steam powered objects, there are two airships that play important parts in the story. And I have to mention Koli’s “furies,” magical ravens that literally burst out of her chest whenever she experiences strong emotions. The furies are a protective device that Koli doesn’t have any control over—at least in the beginning. And in that same vein, there is a character who appears near the end called the Morrigan, the Irish goddess of death and battle. She’s depicted with ravens in the artwork I found while doing a little research (which is one of the things I love about Sharon’s stories, she inspires me to go on Google searches whenever I read her books!), and I loved the way these two raven elements tied together. In fact, I wish we had seen more of the Morrigan in this story, I really loved her! Sharon’s pacing is excellent and her action scenes are so cinematic. The last third of the book is a non-stop race to the finish line, with all sorts of danger for our characters. My only complaint is that this last section seemed to have too many elements going on at once, and some of the action is a little confusing. New characters and elements are introduced late in the story, and while I loved those ideas, there wasn’t quite enough time to fully develop them. Still, I was so satisfied with the way things ended, and yes, The Raven Lady has a HEA ending—which isn’t a spoiler. This is romance, after all! I can’t begin to guess where Sharon will go in the next book, but I am very excited to find out. Big thanks to the author and the publisher for providing a review copy. Read my review of The Absinthe Earl I'm currently running a U.S. only giveaway for The Raven Lady ! Click here to enter now! This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy

  8. 4 out of 5

    thewoollygeek (tea, cake, crochet & books)

    I found this was quite slow going at the start, I think there was too much information just thrown at you in the beginning, rather than letting us learn as you read the author tried to introduce too much at once and I found it made it hard to get into. It’s a shame as once I got into it I did really enjoy it, I found the story and plot unique and clever, the dual POV I feel is done well. It is really entertaining if you can get past the first quarter of the book, overall a fun read, just needs w I found this was quite slow going at the start, I think there was too much information just thrown at you in the beginning, rather than letting us learn as you read the author tried to introduce too much at once and I found it made it hard to get into. It’s a shame as once I got into it I did really enjoy it, I found the story and plot unique and clever, the dual POV I feel is done well. It is really entertaining if you can get past the first quarter of the book, overall a fun read, just needs work on the start. Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for a free copy for an honest opinion

  9. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    "But now you are in love…And that is the greatest risk of all." The Raven Lady is a captivating tale of transformation and finding one's true place in an ever-changing world, where loyalty is of the utmost importance. Author Sharon Lynn Fisher tells the legend of an unlikely romance between two souls bound by duty, both of whom diverge to unforeseen paths paved by respect and solidarity. Within its pages, a battle rages in the shadows for a foothold in the coveted Emerald Isle, and loyalties "But now you are in love…And that is the greatest risk of all." The Raven Lady is a captivating tale of transformation and finding one's true place in an ever-changing world, where loyalty is of the utmost importance. Author Sharon Lynn Fisher tells the legend of an unlikely romance between two souls bound by duty, both of whom diverge to unforeseen paths paved by respect and solidarity. Within its pages, a battle rages in the shadows for a foothold in the coveted Emerald Isle, and loyalties are tested, shattered, reformed. This is a beautifully told story of following one's heart while skirting deadly intrigue and wrathful deities, finding a place to call home in the most unexpected of places. With relatable characters, an enchanting world, and skillful storytelling, this modern fairytale is a true treat for those looking for a little magic. The core of this story is its focus on the the budding relationship between its two main characters, Koli Alfdóttir and King Finvara, formerly known as Duncan O'Malley. Those that have read The Absinthe Earl will be familiar with the latter, but rather than a charming ship captain, we witness a man so completely out of his element when the mantle of responsibility is placed upon his shoulders. Koli, dutiful daughter of Iceland's Elf King, one of Ireland's most notorious enemies, battles what's been planted in her mind, and what lies in the shadows of her heart. What originally begins with a healthy level of apprehension blossoms into an accord of mutual respect, followed by a sizzling desire, however there's always a pang of distrust itching to come to the forefront. Only together will they be able to overcome the nefarious plotting intended to topple a kingdom, but first they must learn to set aside misconceptions and hold fast to the building trust. The world Fisher crafts is wonderfully enchanting, drawing readers in with its dangerous beauty. The story takes place in Ireland during the late 19th century where the veil between the world of man and Faery, the realm of fairies, is thin, and a merging of the past and present can be seen around each and every corner. The in-between is made of stars shimmering in the darkness, a portal to and fro where time is of no consequence. Barrows home to long-forgotten kings and enchanted forests pepper the land, and it's not altogether uncommon to see a skyship drifting on the horizon. The entirety of this tale is about the joining of old and new, shifting and evolving, yet keeping true to your roots; castles made of ancient stones, but powered by mysterious alchemical sciences, timeworn magics meet steampunk technology, secrets of old brought to light by curious minds. It's easy to lose yourself in this world, and I hope to explore more of it in the future. The author smoothly tells a story that takes you on a journey into another place and time, feeding your imagination and allowing it to take flight. As soon as I picked up the first book in this series, I fell in love with her writing style – fully captivated by the level of immersion and charm she infused into each of its pages. The Raven Lady follows suit, but I found it to be more…untamed, with less of a focus on propriety, and more on the needs of the body and soul. I truly appreciated this shift, as it perfectly indicated we were no longer concerned with the restrictions of society, and were free to embrace the wildness. More audacious, yet more introspective. More savage, yet more passionate. After a slow build up, there's an explosive race to the finish, and I just couldn't put the book down. Fisher has a way of ensnaring readers with her flowing prose and knowledge on the many historical aspects of the tapestry she continues to weave. When it's clear an author has a passion for the content they include in their stories, it makes for a thoroughly enjoyable adventure. The Raven Lady is a story I've been waiting for since I turned the final page of its predecessor last year, and I wholly enjoyed making my way through this book. It's a perfect example of what a modern fairytale for adults should be, grasping the magic, infusing myth and lore of the past, and presenting it in a relatable way to dazzle its audience. The story itself ties up nicely, albeit maybe just a tad too quickly, and can most definitely be read as a standalone novel. If you're hoping to transport yourself into an alluring, spellbinding world, The Raven Lady may just be the book you're looking for to help you get there. I highly recommend. Note: A huge thank you to the author and Blackstone Publishing for providing me with a complementary advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    This is a story of what happens when the games characters play to gain power get a little complicated in a world where everyone is fighting for control while secretly plotting behind each other's backs. Koli is an elven princess who is forced into an arranged marriage with Finvara, the fairy king, to create an alliance in an effort to keep the peace. Finvara's people don't think too highly of the elves, so things get off to a rocky start between the two of them. In addition, Koli is approached b This is a story of what happens when the games characters play to gain power get a little complicated in a world where everyone is fighting for control while secretly plotting behind each other's backs. Koli is an elven princess who is forced into an arranged marriage with Finvara, the fairy king, to create an alliance in an effort to keep the peace. Finvara's people don't think too highly of the elves, so things get off to a rocky start between the two of them. In addition, Koli is approached by a fairy lord who is plotting against Finvara to take over his kingdom. In the meantime, Finvara and Koli get closer after they are affronted with events that test their survival. Koli becomes torn over her feelings and position with Finvara, which inadvertently leads her down a path to uncover her true magical potential. Will it be enough for her to choose the right side in a battle for the kingdom? This book is a mash-up of a few genres - fantasy, alternate history, romance, and steampunk - and takes place following the events of the first installment of this series. I had not read the first installment (The Absinthe Earl) before picking this one up and didn't find myself too lost due to the author providing some backstory on the high points that impact the events in this second installment. The world building was unique for me with the ancient beliefs and present day world colliding in a multitude of ways. There is a lot going on in this series due to the complexity of the world and I appreciate the author's ability not to throw everything at a reader in a chapter or two. However, I did feel like there was a bit too much backstory and inner dialogue going on at times which made the story move a bit slow for me at times. This was especially true during the beginning and towards the end of the story. I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    Since Ravens are my favorite birds the book title already won me over. I was completely mesmerized by the story. It was so poetic, colorful and exhilarating. I instantly clicked with the main characters, and the dual POV only added to the wonderful connection. I enjoyed The Absinthe Earl references, mainly because I was dying to find out what happened to Miss Quicksilver and the Earl of Meath. However, I was very pleased that this book focused on the new characters Koli and Finvara and their sto Since Ravens are my favorite birds the book title already won me over. I was completely mesmerized by the story. It was so poetic, colorful and exhilarating. I instantly clicked with the main characters, and the dual POV only added to the wonderful connection. I enjoyed The Absinthe Earl references, mainly because I was dying to find out what happened to Miss Quicksilver and the Earl of Meath. However, I was very pleased that this book focused on the new characters Koli and Finvara and their story. I loved the Celtic mythology and Norse mythology vibe, along with the touch of magic and history. I am crazy about both Ireland and Iceland and it was a treat to see those two intertwined. I also enjoyed the “steampunk” aspect with the addition of mechanical creatures and objects mingled with the world of the Fairy creatures. Oh, and let me tell you the erotic scenes will make your toes curl! Most sequels lack the zest of the first book but this sequel was electric! Wow!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    3.5 stars I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. I requested The Raven Lady prior to learning it was part of a series, and while I have since acquired the first book, I didn’t have time to read it beforehand. However, this book works fairly well as a stand-alone, even noting that the prior book will serve to fill in background details about the world and past events, but giving the reader enough that this could serve as a suita 3.5 stars I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. I requested The Raven Lady prior to learning it was part of a series, and while I have since acquired the first book, I didn’t have time to read it beforehand. However, this book works fairly well as a stand-alone, even noting that the prior book will serve to fill in background details about the world and past events, but giving the reader enough that this could serve as a suitable starting point on its own. I did feel at times it did feel a little too info-dump-y, giving you a lot of information early on and throwing it at you, while expecting you to follow along. The issue waned as I got into the book, but I did struggle a bit at first. However, once you get past that first hurdle, it’s pretty much unputdownable. It has that blend of semi-historical and fantasy, and the world building, steeped in myth and legend is truly compelling. While first person dual remains my least favorite POV type, this story makes it work, easily distinguishing Koli and Finvara as characters, both of whom are caught up in chaos and end up falling in love in the midst of it. This book is so much fun, and I will definitely be reading more from this author. And if you love historical/paranormal mash-ups (including steampunk, mannerpunk, and gaslamp fantasy), I think you’ll enjoy this one.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katie Bogdan

    3.5 stars The second book in Fisher's The Faery Rehistory series, The Raven Lady is a fascinating look into Irish and Icelandic mythology through a thoroughly enjoyable steampunk lens. Having found the first book in this series a little too heavy-handed with the exposition, this automatically got points from me for really setting up the conflict and the stakes right away. I felt like this made Duncan and Koli far more interesting and their motivations all the more clear. I also really appreciated 3.5 stars The second book in Fisher's The Faery Rehistory series, The Raven Lady is a fascinating look into Irish and Icelandic mythology through a thoroughly enjoyable steampunk lens. Having found the first book in this series a little too heavy-handed with the exposition, this automatically got points from me for really setting up the conflict and the stakes right away. I felt like this made Duncan and Koli far more interesting and their motivations all the more clear. I also really appreciated the greater prominence of the steampunk elements and how they were used in the plot. However, the best choice Fisher made in this book was the additional fantastical elements through the Icelandic characters. It not only makes the magic system more dynamic, but creates more tension for the leading couple. I really hope that Fisher finishes out this series with one more book because I would love to see a story with Queen Isolde at the center of things! Thank you to NetGalley and to Blackstone Publishing for an ARC of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    The Raven Lady is a true marvel that will capture your heart and enthrall your mind. You will find yourself wonderfully lost and hopeless surrounded by lethal beauty and questionable loyalty. Through it all, a small but steady hope will be all that will carry you through the danger and intrigue at every turn. Not everything is as it seems for the heart will fight viciously for what it wants. Finvara is in over his head. He knows and so does everyone around him. However, in keeping with decorum an The Raven Lady is a true marvel that will capture your heart and enthrall your mind. You will find yourself wonderfully lost and hopeless surrounded by lethal beauty and questionable loyalty. Through it all, a small but steady hope will be all that will carry you through the danger and intrigue at every turn. Not everything is as it seems for the heart will fight viciously for what it wants. Finvara is in over his head. He knows and so does everyone around him. However, in keeping with decorum and tradition, life carries on. It isn't until his mysterious new guest arrives that he finally realizes what he really wants in the midst of his chaos. Koli has been sent with a purpose. One that runs counter to the survival of her new home. However, she soon realizes that all is not as she was told. Her enemies aren't trying to kill her. In fact, they only mean to help her. Who can she trust, and in whom will she give her loyalty? One wrong move, and her very life could be forfeit. Who will kill her and who will save her? I had no idea this book would be so wonderful compelling and delightfully entertaining. The characters were intriguing and the landscape itself left me breathless at its ancient beauty. What a fascinating take that kept me glued to it's pages! Sharon Lynn Fisher is a true sorceress as she weaved layer after layer of surprise, danger, and love in the midst of upheaval and chaos. She stole my heart, and had me guessing the entire time. I cheered, I hoped, and I savored the depth and breath of this stunning world. Oh to be lost in a world of dangers untold and even still to retain and grow my heart, my hope, and my mind.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kate Church

    I volunteered to read this book, through netgalley in exchange, for an honest review. This book is well written and the characters are described well. This is the second book in The Faery Rehistory series. I would recommend reading the first book in this series to get to know the characters better. But overall the characters are enjoyable. The layout is great. The pacing of this story is good. I would recommend this book to anyone and everyone. This book will be in stores on October 13th for $15 I volunteered to read this book, through netgalley in exchange, for an honest review. This book is well written and the characters are described well. This is the second book in The Faery Rehistory series. I would recommend reading the first book in this series to get to know the characters better. But overall the characters are enjoyable. The layout is great. The pacing of this story is good. I would recommend this book to anyone and everyone. This book will be in stores on October 13th for $15.99 (USD).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jamie W

    What I enjoy most about the Faery Rehistory Series is how unique it is, weaving elements of Irish folklore and 1800's history in with Icelandic myths and the faery court, with a dash of alchemy and steampunk thrown in! The amount of research the author has done is abundantly evident, and it's wonderful! ⁣ In this second book of the series, we have Koli, princess of the shadow elves, forced into alliance with Irishman Duncan O'Malley, newly-crowned King Finvara of the fairy court. Can you say enemi What I enjoy most about the Faery Rehistory Series is how unique it is, weaving elements of Irish folklore and 1800's history in with Icelandic myths and the faery court, with a dash of alchemy and steampunk thrown in! The amount of research the author has done is abundantly evident, and it's wonderful! ⁣ In this second book of the series, we have Koli, princess of the shadow elves, forced into alliance with Irishman Duncan O'Malley, newly-crowned King Finvara of the fairy court. Can you say enemies to lovers? ⁣ Koli is a warrior who definitely runs the show with her calculated ruthlessness, so I do end up feeling sorry at times for our sweet, gallant Finvara. ⁣But he holds his own and is definitely one of those perfectly flawed characters we love to root for. ⁣ The book is packed with action and political intrigue, and I only wish that the book had been a bit longer so we could have lingered a little more over the complex relationship of our characters...plus I'm a sucker for the romance! I can't wait to see what happens in the next book! ⁣

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

    DUUUUUUUDE... READ THIS BOOK! That is all. No, kidding. If you like historical fantasy, magic, steampunk, vulnerable but strong characters, searing lovers chemistry, and relationship building that is achingly beautiful, then this book is for you! Sharon's writing is intelligent, intricate, and just phenomenal. She weaves words like they're tools to whip your brain and soul into shape. Her creativity in both world-building details and character development are a wonder to behold. If you haven't rea DUUUUUUUDE... READ THIS BOOK! That is all. No, kidding. If you like historical fantasy, magic, steampunk, vulnerable but strong characters, searing lovers chemistry, and relationship building that is achingly beautiful, then this book is for you! Sharon's writing is intelligent, intricate, and just phenomenal. She weaves words like they're tools to whip your brain and soul into shape. Her creativity in both world-building details and character development are a wonder to behold. If you haven't read the first book in the series, The Absinthe Earl, it's okay, this one can stand alone, but you should, because it's also one of the most unique and beautiful stories I've ever read. Can't wait for the third one!!!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Asrar Lydia

    This is the first book I’ve read by Sharon Lynn Fisher, and I really enjoyed it. The world building was well executed, although sometimes it got a bit confusing which time period they were in. I enjoyed the switching of POV’s, both Finvara and Koli’s chapters were equally intriguing and I really contacted to both characters! One think I have to remark on was the mountain of info-dumping in the first chapters. It made the book really hard to get into and could have been done much smoother, but afte This is the first book I’ve read by Sharon Lynn Fisher, and I really enjoyed it. The world building was well executed, although sometimes it got a bit confusing which time period they were in. I enjoyed the switching of POV’s, both Finvara and Koli’s chapters were equally intriguing and I really contacted to both characters! One think I have to remark on was the mountain of info-dumping in the first chapters. It made the book really hard to get into and could have been done much smoother, but after a few chapters I couldn’t put it down and I really look forward to reading other books by the author!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jo Dawson

    The Raven Lady was a great second novel in the Faery Rehistory series. Koli is the heroine, fierce and brave, she has been sent by her father the Elf King to be the consort to King Finvara (Duncan O’Mally in his other world). Starting on all the wrong feet, this is no marriage of convenience, rather an awkward political alliance. Despite all reservations, Koli and Finvara begin a tentative friendship that grows as they unite against common enemies. This was a fast-paced, feel good, action-packed The Raven Lady was a great second novel in the Faery Rehistory series. Koli is the heroine, fierce and brave, she has been sent by her father the Elf King to be the consort to King Finvara (Duncan O’Mally in his other world). Starting on all the wrong feet, this is no marriage of convenience, rather an awkward political alliance. Despite all reservations, Koli and Finvara begin a tentative friendship that grows as they unite against common enemies. This was a fast-paced, feel good, action-packed romance. Many characters from book 1 make an appearance, although this could be a stand-alone read. I really enjoyed the book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    There are some very cool concepts here integrating historic fantasy, steampunk, and myth and legend. It was just a little hard to get into at first, but once I was engaged, I was fully engaged. Somethings were set up very well, but occasionally there were missed opportunities or things I felt had not been set up at all. Overall, I can definitely recommend The Raven Lady, particularly if you are looking for something new and different.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    An engaging and highly entertaining story that kept me hooked. Great world building and character development, good storytelling and plot development. I thoroughly enjoyed this story and look forward to reading other books by this author. Recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Edelweiss for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    I cannot adequately express how much I enjoyed this book. I devoured it in a day. This is not my usual genre but the mix of faery fantasy and romance turned out to be exactly what I needed. The romance was handled with a deft hand, not sappy or trite in any way. Do yourself a favor and run, not walk, to buy a copy. You will not regret it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Whaley

    Really good story! I highly enjoyed it. The main heroine is gutsy and spunky. Thermo got on my nerves at first but he grew on me. The story is really interesting and I loved all the paranormal aspects of it. Definitely want to read more by this author.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sibil

    DNF

  25. 4 out of 5

    Csuigar

  26. 5 out of 5

    Debbi Murray

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paul Begin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessie

  30. 5 out of 5

    nikkia neil

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