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The Complete Buddy Bradley Stories from Hate Comics, Vol. 1: Buddy Does Seattle, 1990-1994

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These legendary stories, from the classic first fifteen issues of Bagge's Hate comic, are a defining icon of Seattle's early 1990s culture (the Seattle Weekly has written, "20 years from now, when people wonder what it was like to be young in 1990s Seattle, the only record we'll have is Hate."), as well as Generation X in general (as seen in such films as Kids and Pecker). These legendary stories, from the classic first fifteen issues of Bagge's Hate comic, are a defining icon of Seattle's early 1990s culture (the Seattle Weekly has written, "20 years from now, when people wonder what it was like to be young in 1990s Seattle, the only record we'll have is Hate."), as well as Generation X in general (as seen in such films as Kids and Pecker). This is the first time these hilarious stories, starring the hapless Buddy Bradley and his cast of loser cohorts, have ever been available under one cover, and never have they been available at such a low price (it would have cost at least three times as much to read all of these classic stories in any previous editions). Bagge's riotous tales of the early 1990s subculture are more hilarious now than ever, find out why he has been praised by R. Crumb, Matt Groening, John Kricfalusi, Publishers Weekly, Entertainment Weekly and many more. Comedy genius.


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These legendary stories, from the classic first fifteen issues of Bagge's Hate comic, are a defining icon of Seattle's early 1990s culture (the Seattle Weekly has written, "20 years from now, when people wonder what it was like to be young in 1990s Seattle, the only record we'll have is Hate."), as well as Generation X in general (as seen in such films as Kids and Pecker). These legendary stories, from the classic first fifteen issues of Bagge's Hate comic, are a defining icon of Seattle's early 1990s culture (the Seattle Weekly has written, "20 years from now, when people wonder what it was like to be young in 1990s Seattle, the only record we'll have is Hate."), as well as Generation X in general (as seen in such films as Kids and Pecker). This is the first time these hilarious stories, starring the hapless Buddy Bradley and his cast of loser cohorts, have ever been available under one cover, and never have they been available at such a low price (it would have cost at least three times as much to read all of these classic stories in any previous editions). Bagge's riotous tales of the early 1990s subculture are more hilarious now than ever, find out why he has been praised by R. Crumb, Matt Groening, John Kricfalusi, Publishers Weekly, Entertainment Weekly and many more. Comedy genius.

30 review for The Complete Buddy Bradley Stories from Hate Comics, Vol. 1: Buddy Does Seattle, 1990-1994

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jan Philipzig

    Yes, it can be a sobering experience to re-read something that meant a lot to you when you were young. I am happy to report, however, that the first half of my beloved Hate series, originally published in the early 1990's and now available in this very affordable phone-book-style collection, stands the test of time. To me, at least, it remains an all-time classic of American comedy. Protagonist Buddy Bradley is a member of the so-called Generation X, a generation that has always been overshadowed Yes, it can be a sobering experience to re-read something that meant a lot to you when you were young. I am happy to report, however, that the first half of my beloved Hate series, originally published in the early 1990's and now available in this very affordable phone-book-style collection, stands the test of time. To me, at least, it remains an all-time classic of American comedy. Protagonist Buddy Bradley is a member of the so-called Generation X, a generation that has always been overshadowed by the more numerous baby-boomer generation that preceded it. Politically and economically marginalized in an increasingly exploitative world, many members of the Generation X developed a rather skeptical, cynical attitude towards life - and Buddy is no exception. In fact, he is arguably the prototype of the underemployed, irony-spewing "slacker" who - despite his smarts - lives in a bubble of commercial culture while drifting aimlessly across America. So what exactly is Buddy up to? Well, not much, really. At least not by the standards of mainstream comics. Too busy swearing, thinking about sex and throwing up, I guess. In the course of the first five of the altogether 15 issues collected in this book, he shows the reader round his cheap Seattle apartment that he shares with two roommates, works in a second-hand bookstore from which he steals on a regular basis to develop his personal collection, is inconveniently visited by his violent younger brother, picks up a freebie from a grumpy old comic-book collector, briefly considers launching some kind of fanzine or making a movie with a camcorder, tries to have dinner with his girlfriend, and finally annoys and offends the few friends he has while getting drunk. What can I say? Essential reading!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I'm a baby boomer, not inclined to focus much on Gen X, but this was funny, about Buddy in Seattle, 90s stuff. Everyone is screwed up, nothing works, everything is messed up, its where the 99% live… or maybe it is what we have called working class or lower middle class America. Very satirical on American society. The American Dream gone south, for a few laughs. Of course now we have had plenty of examples on Adult Swim and other online/tv formats that are send ups of the American family, and sla I'm a baby boomer, not inclined to focus much on Gen X, but this was funny, about Buddy in Seattle, 90s stuff. Everyone is screwed up, nothing works, everything is messed up, its where the 99% live… or maybe it is what we have called working class or lower middle class America. Very satirical on American society. The American Dream gone south, for a few laughs. Of course now we have had plenty of examples on Adult Swim and other online/tv formats that are send ups of the American family, and slackers in general, but this is a good one, hilariously offensive. Owes much to Crumb's satirical analysis of society. I thought a bit when I read it, too, of Hunter Thompson's work, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. American Nightmare, with dark, derisive laughter.

  3. 4 out of 5

    J.T.

    Reread this for no particular reason. Maybe to escape from the brutally depressing year 2020? Anyhow, it obviously still holds up. I love Peter Bagge's drawing style so much. The writing starts off a little shaky, but by the third issue or so (whichever contains the story focusing on Buddy's roommate George), it improves greatly. I imagine there's plenty in here to offend younger generations, but I try to keep the time in which it was written in mind as well as the fact that Buddy is not written Reread this for no particular reason. Maybe to escape from the brutally depressing year 2020? Anyhow, it obviously still holds up. I love Peter Bagge's drawing style so much. The writing starts off a little shaky, but by the third issue or so (whichever contains the story focusing on Buddy's roommate George), it improves greatly. I imagine there's plenty in here to offend younger generations, but I try to keep the time in which it was written in mind as well as the fact that Buddy is not written to be especially endearing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julesreads

    Bagge’s hatred towards his own characters is a cardinal sin to many readers/consumers out in the world. Yet this is what makes Buddy Bradley and his Seattle years worth reading. Hate comics! Hate the comics! Hate Buddy! Hate Bagge! It’s all good. The drawing style is distinct and steaming with frustration and bad attitude. His pathetic characters are a generation of assholes. I somehow can’t argue with disdain for any character epitomizing a generation, and Gen-X is particularly ripe for razzing Bagge’s hatred towards his own characters is a cardinal sin to many readers/consumers out in the world. Yet this is what makes Buddy Bradley and his Seattle years worth reading. Hate comics! Hate the comics! Hate Buddy! Hate Bagge! It’s all good. The drawing style is distinct and steaming with frustration and bad attitude. His pathetic characters are a generation of assholes. I somehow can’t argue with disdain for any character epitomizing a generation, and Gen-X is particularly ripe for razzing. Plus the round, grotesquely featured, cutely furious animation is nicely married to the putrid content. Good stuff. Good comics. I luv Hate.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Luke

    More a comic strip collection than graphic novel. It was crass, grungy, and goofy. Overall a fun read stumbling backwards into the 90s

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I moved to Seattle in 2004, back when I'd just finished undergrad and was a semi-adult. I partied at the (now closed) Belltown Billiards, saw a Seahawks game for less than $50/ticket at Qwest Field (now the Clink), and avoided South Lake Union because there was nothing there - whereas now I avoid it because it's crawling with Amazonians. But back then I wistfully wished I could have been 23 in a different Seattle - the one of the early '90s. How cool would it've been to see Nirvana play at the C I moved to Seattle in 2004, back when I'd just finished undergrad and was a semi-adult. I partied at the (now closed) Belltown Billiards, saw a Seahawks game for less than $50/ticket at Qwest Field (now the Clink), and avoided South Lake Union because there was nothing there - whereas now I avoid it because it's crawling with Amazonians. But back then I wistfully wished I could have been 23 in a different Seattle - the one of the early '90s. How cool would it've been to see Nirvana play at the Crocodile (still there!) before they became a household name? The Complete Buddy Bradley Stories let me live vicariously through Buddy for a hot second and experience this dream. Buddy is a lazy, sex-obsessed, cynical, angry, scheming sexist living in a crappy apartment with his like-minded roommates in the early '90s. As I was reading, I couldn't help but feel like I should hate this guy, and yet... I didn't. He unapologetically just... was who he was. This comic wasn't necessarily "about" anything, other than Buddy's daily life as he worked at a used bookstore, tried (and failed) to manage a band, dated around, got drunk, and complained about life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dominick

    The Buddy Bradley stories (and related ones) from the first 15 issues of Hate! are collected here. They're often funny, but more due to Bagge's hyper-cartoony style, which at times seems at odds with the grim reality and colossal assholishness of the characters. Nobody to like here, really, though it's well-executed. The Buddy Bradley stories (and related ones) from the first 15 issues of Hate! are collected here. They're often funny, but more due to Bagge's hyper-cartoony style, which at times seems at odds with the grim reality and colossal assholishness of the characters. Nobody to like here, really, though it's well-executed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Becca Becca

    This sort of reminded me of the comic version of Reality Bites or Singles. Highly enjoyable.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    i dont usually read comics, but this book was awesome, mostly because Buddy moved from nj to seattle... about 15 years before I did. it was pretty crude. i liked it alot!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jocke

    For me, this was a difficult comic to form an opinion about. I bought Buddy Does Seattle after feeling that I had only consumed superhero comics for a while and needed to branch out, as one does from time to time. Seeing as both Peter Bagge and Buddy Bradley seem to be considered staples of the alternative comics scene I felt that this book was something I needed to have read, and something that I needed to have in my bookshelf in order to maintain my pretentious self-image as a comic aficionado For me, this was a difficult comic to form an opinion about. I bought Buddy Does Seattle after feeling that I had only consumed superhero comics for a while and needed to branch out, as one does from time to time. Seeing as both Peter Bagge and Buddy Bradley seem to be considered staples of the alternative comics scene I felt that this book was something I needed to have read, and something that I needed to have in my bookshelf in order to maintain my pretentious self-image as a comic aficionado. The fact that I had such a difficult time forming an opinion about this particular volume might have to do with the fact that I am reading about the exploits of Buddy Bradley for the first time as a 32-year-old. Reading about people in their early twenties and their relationship issues, struggles with finding a direction in life and so forth does not interest me as much as it probably would have if I were younger. If I had read these comics when I was in my late teens I probably would have loved them from the first panel. Reading the chapter “The Nut” however, I experienced a sensation of déjà vu and realised that I had actually read that episode previously as a nine or ten-year-old (probably in the Swedish anthology comic MegaPyton). I got vivid flashbacks when reading about how Lisa shaves her head, dons a potato sack, stands on the sidewalk outside of Buddy’s apartment for hours and how Buddy eventually, in his mind, date rapes her. I suddenly remembered being extremely upset by this as a child. I think that I was completely unaware of comics with unsympathetic protagonists up until that point, probably only having read a slim selection of the translated superhero comics available in Sweden before that. Both Buddy and Lisa were manipulative, selfish and genuinely despicable characters and this was evidently more than my young, naïve mind could handle, as it made me really, really sad. Ironically, “The Nut” was when I came around while reading this book, as I found that chapter to be especially funny and somehow the point where I started finding the characters a tad bit more sympathetic and started caring about them. The turning point is hard to explain. Maybe I had better morals as a child. Maybe I have a better sense of humour as an adult. Maybe it is the other way around. Peter Bagge’s characters are manipulative, selfish and genuinely despicable, but somehow sympathetic at the same time. I started out thinking that this comic was boring and a chore to get through but somewhere close to the halfway mark, I realised that I nonetheless had formed a relationship with the characters and was interested in what would happen to them next. It is a very interesting, funny and sometimes a little bit upsetting book. Also, (despite it being such a review-thing to say) I just want to point out that the artwork and inking is beautiful.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    3.5 A scathing jab at Gen X-ers and hipsters that somehow still feels modern. The characters are so miserable and horrible it’s kind of painful to read at times. It feels like a more modern cringe-comedy sort of thing. The art is kind of charming in its odd mashup of 30’s rubber-hose-cartoons and edgy underground comix harshness. It’s also kind of weird seeing explicit art from Bagge because I grew up seeing his art in Nickelodeon magazine.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dilara Inam

    Buddy Bradley and all his folks. That was fun to follow all the adventures that they took. I like the way the characters are depicted when they got crazy and they talked to the reader directly (which was rare but nice). That was also good representation of the period and the music industry (I guess, not sure though). Buddy and his folks are openly sexist and homophobic which is not great to witness.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Burley

    Very much of it's time (early to mid 90's) but still holds up due to Peter Bagge's talents as writer and cartoonist. Angry, truthful, disturbing, and often hilarious, "Hate" remains one of the all-time-great "alternative" comics. Very much of it's time (early to mid 90's) but still holds up due to Peter Bagge's talents as writer and cartoonist. Angry, truthful, disturbing, and often hilarious, "Hate" remains one of the all-time-great "alternative" comics.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lori MacAlpine-Smith

    if you can read it with the eyes of a person living at the time you can finish it. it's certainly full of problematic language, and it's a window into living in the 90's, but the characters are interesting, if not flawed and a bit stereotypical. i don't recommend it to anyone. I read it for you. if you can read it with the eyes of a person living at the time you can finish it. it's certainly full of problematic language, and it's a window into living in the 90's, but the characters are interesting, if not flawed and a bit stereotypical. i don't recommend it to anyone. I read it for you.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Thomas

    Great slice of life cartooning, very 90's. I'm a big fan of the exaggerated style. Great slice of life cartooning, very 90's. I'm a big fan of the exaggerated style.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tina Tadic

    I gave up around the 150th page cause I couldn't put up with Buddy's annoying personality anymore I gave up around the 150th page cause I couldn't put up with Buddy's annoying personality anymore

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jon Shanks

    Buddy Bradley is not a nice guy. He smokes, drinks, cheats is a bit of a snob in some areas (music, books, beers) a lot of a slob in other areas and treats his friends like crap. But in spite of all this, you do empathise with him, as he is an everyman and just because he's not that nice, doesn't mean he's a bad guy. You can see where a lot of his "hate" comes from with the situations he ends up in and the people involved in them and that's where a lot of the humour comes in too along with Peter Buddy Bradley is not a nice guy. He smokes, drinks, cheats is a bit of a snob in some areas (music, books, beers) a lot of a slob in other areas and treats his friends like crap. But in spite of all this, you do empathise with him, as he is an everyman and just because he's not that nice, doesn't mean he's a bad guy. You can see where a lot of his "hate" comes from with the situations he ends up in and the people involved in them and that's where a lot of the humour comes in too along with Peter Bagges weird waggly artwork which is also strangely real at the same time. This could so easily have slipped into a dark & depressing road, but Bagge balance the darkness with daftness well, really encapsulating the spirit of the 90s.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Buddy Does Seattle is a fun one for sure. What we have here is a man airing out the shames of his previous life. There is no way someone can lead a life exclusively filled with arguments, casual sex, arguments, beer, arguments, hard liquor, arguments, and forays in to hip jobs like managing a rock band or publishing a magazine. Still, that is all Buddy does for over 300 graphic novel pages. And while there is no denying this is low brow stuff, it is also so funny it is somehow brilliant in its o Buddy Does Seattle is a fun one for sure. What we have here is a man airing out the shames of his previous life. There is no way someone can lead a life exclusively filled with arguments, casual sex, arguments, beer, arguments, hard liquor, arguments, and forays in to hip jobs like managing a rock band or publishing a magazine. Still, that is all Buddy does for over 300 graphic novel pages. And while there is no denying this is low brow stuff, it is also so funny it is somehow brilliant in its own way. Also, it seems pretty clear that this is a cathartic piece of work for the author. It's as though Peter Bagge is saying, "Look at me. Wasn't I despicable?" But as revealed in the introduction, he's O.K. with that because he has changed. The book is about being twenty-something and directionless in the 1990s in Seattle. Didn't something happen in the 1990s in Seattle? Well, in this story you would barely notice. It might as well be Buddy Does Chicago or Buddy Does Houston or whatever. The characters are so apathetic, so sickly committed to instant gratification, and so recognizable to anyone who came of age or went through their twenties in the 1990s, that the story will feel like your hometown no matter what. Hopefully, you didn't endure or do quite as nasty things Buddy and company do though. Instead, you can read about them in Buddy Does Seattle. You probably will not like Buddy (or you'll shudder when you realize you're somewhat like him) but you will be consistently entertained and laugh a lot.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I am a generation Xer - I was born in 1978, survived the 80's and came of age during the fag end of Grunge and straight into the jubilant optimism of Britpop. So yeah I wore flannels, looked mopey and had a slacker attitude - however since my generation was exposed to new learning techniques where we could express ourselves artistically, we were creative, no denying that. We were exposed to Muppets, Jim Henson's storyteller, Sesame street thought us basic alphabet. We had Ren and Stimpy, Simpso I am a generation Xer - I was born in 1978, survived the 80's and came of age during the fag end of Grunge and straight into the jubilant optimism of Britpop. So yeah I wore flannels, looked mopey and had a slacker attitude - however since my generation was exposed to new learning techniques where we could express ourselves artistically, we were creative, no denying that. We were exposed to Muppets, Jim Henson's storyteller, Sesame street thought us basic alphabet. We had Ren and Stimpy, Simpsons and then grew older with the equally creative South Park AND still lived on a diet of Looney Tunes on a 24hour cartoon channel, hell Generation X grew up with the cartoon renaissance . Of course we had sparks of nutty creativity. The great thing about Bragg's Buddy comics was that it reflected the same thing. I know EXACTLY what Buddy and his loser friends are going through cause we witnessed that! So forget about sociological books about the early 90's slacker culture - Buddy does Seattle is the real thing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    The_Mad_Swede

    Collecting Peter Bagge's Buddy Bradley stories from his comic Hate #1-15, this volume is my introduction into Bagge's comics work, and I have to confess that it was a mixed journey, and one that I was initially not at all sure I would appreciate. Why? you may ask; well, simply put, I cannot say that I like Buddy as a character. Nor do I find his supporting cast particularly likeable either. If they were real people, I would likely shun them like plague. Of course, this neither means that they ar Collecting Peter Bagge's Buddy Bradley stories from his comic Hate #1-15, this volume is my introduction into Bagge's comics work, and I have to confess that it was a mixed journey, and one that I was initially not at all sure I would appreciate. Why? you may ask; well, simply put, I cannot say that I like Buddy as a character. Nor do I find his supporting cast particularly likeable either. If they were real people, I would likely shun them like plague. Of course, this neither means that they are not successfully depicted characters in their own right nor that such unlikeable characters cannot be interesting to read about. And in the end these two latter points seem to have won out for me. I come out of this volume quite glad to have read it, and with my mind set to read the second volume somewhere down the line. Also, Bagge is a good cartoonist and he understands his medium well, which adds pleasure to the reading experience for sure.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    3.5 stars -- I was too young during this era to appreciate stuff like this--during the early '90s grunge scene I was too busy trying to dodge bullies and pass math (neither very successfully) to care about what the cool kids in Seattle were doing. Thankfully, Buddy does Seattle is accessible enough for everyone--it's not overly bogged down by long-dead pop cultural references, and more than anything it reminds me of the underground comix of the late 60s such as R. Crumb. Perhaps that's why I ende 3.5 stars -- I was too young during this era to appreciate stuff like this--during the early '90s grunge scene I was too busy trying to dodge bullies and pass math (neither very successfully) to care about what the cool kids in Seattle were doing. Thankfully, Buddy does Seattle is accessible enough for everyone--it's not overly bogged down by long-dead pop cultural references, and more than anything it reminds me of the underground comix of the late 60s such as R. Crumb. Perhaps that's why I ended up enjoying Buddy much more than I expected to.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steven Schneider

    I still have my old Zap comics from the 70's, that was before pretty 'graphic novels,' and hi toney graphic classics. Dark and brooding Green Arrow, which Neal Adams did before that old tired Dark Knight was out of knickers. And I was actually at the first Comic Con in San Diego when I was 14 and it was No Big Deal! I got Ray Bradbury's autograph and was in the loo next to Ensign Chekov. So, I know stuff. Buddy is the 90's grunge version of R. Crumb, Freak Brothers, Fritz the Cat crossed with Ame I still have my old Zap comics from the 70's, that was before pretty 'graphic novels,' and hi toney graphic classics. Dark and brooding Green Arrow, which Neal Adams did before that old tired Dark Knight was out of knickers. And I was actually at the first Comic Con in San Diego when I was 14 and it was No Big Deal! I got Ray Bradbury's autograph and was in the loo next to Ensign Chekov. So, I know stuff. Buddy is the 90's grunge version of R. Crumb, Freak Brothers, Fritz the Cat crossed with American Splendor and lots of yelling. Yow! Go get it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ian Hrabe

    This might have been what "Reality Bites" would have been like if it bore any semblance of actual real life reality. You know, the kind of pessimistic reality where everyone hates each other. Given how much of a jerk Buddy Bradley is, compared to the supporting cast he looks like a saint. But therein lies the humor, and his 100% dysfunctional relationship with Lisa is one of the most trainwrecky depictions of romance I've ever seen in any medium ever, which is no small feat! This might have been what "Reality Bites" would have been like if it bore any semblance of actual real life reality. You know, the kind of pessimistic reality where everyone hates each other. Given how much of a jerk Buddy Bradley is, compared to the supporting cast he looks like a saint. But therein lies the humor, and his 100% dysfunctional relationship with Lisa is one of the most trainwrecky depictions of romance I've ever seen in any medium ever, which is no small feat!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Snem

    I liked how it's certainly a product of it's time and place, but it still feels really timeless and relatable. I enjoyed the cynical and sarcastic humor and all the supporting characters are great. A little crass a little low-brow. While I found this pretty entertaining, I realize this is volume 1 and I'm not sure I would have enjoyed much more for a volume 2. This was good and I recommend this to graphic novel fans and those with a dream of the 90's and a twisted sense of humor. I liked how it's certainly a product of it's time and place, but it still feels really timeless and relatable. I enjoyed the cynical and sarcastic humor and all the supporting characters are great. A little crass a little low-brow. While I found this pretty entertaining, I realize this is volume 1 and I'm not sure I would have enjoyed much more for a volume 2. This was good and I recommend this to graphic novel fans and those with a dream of the 90's and a twisted sense of humor.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Craig Knock

    Among the first series of graphic novels I've read. For a slice of grunge-style gen-x growing up and young adulthood, there is nothing more revealing than these books. Brilliantly funny meets brutal realism. Illustrated in unique exaggerated, expressive caricature and written in a simple first person manner. A perfect afternoon lounge on the sofa read. Among the first series of graphic novels I've read. For a slice of grunge-style gen-x growing up and young adulthood, there is nothing more revealing than these books. Brilliantly funny meets brutal realism. Illustrated in unique exaggerated, expressive caricature and written in a simple first person manner. A perfect afternoon lounge on the sofa read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cameron

    The only book I needed to read to prepare myself for my twenties. Awkward sex, failed relationships, and pop culture elitism, Buddy Bradley is definitely one of my heroes. I've loaned this out to a friend who didn't get through the first story and because she thought it was dumb. That really hurt my feelings. The only book I needed to read to prepare myself for my twenties. Awkward sex, failed relationships, and pop culture elitism, Buddy Bradley is definitely one of my heroes. I've loaned this out to a friend who didn't get through the first story and because she thought it was dumb. That really hurt my feelings.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Wayne

    I love Peter Bagge. I probably became more of a slacker b/c of reading HATE and his other spinoffs. This first anthology of his SEATTLE comics packs a severe wallop to my funny bone. "I scream, you scream, we all scream for heroin". Buddy's mates provide me with a perma-grin to my face...always and forever. I love Peter Bagge. I probably became more of a slacker b/c of reading HATE and his other spinoffs. This first anthology of his SEATTLE comics packs a severe wallop to my funny bone. "I scream, you scream, we all scream for heroin". Buddy's mates provide me with a perma-grin to my face...always and forever.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rob Bockman

    Bagge's hyperkinetic style undercuts the sloth and limited worldviews of his characters in the best way; otherwise, it's a drawing-room drama if the drawing room is an unfurnished living room in the UDistrict. Pretty thoroughly tied into its time & place, sometimes to its detriment, "Buddy Does Seattle" has arced all the way from current to nostalgic without losing its immediacy somehow. Bagge's hyperkinetic style undercuts the sloth and limited worldviews of his characters in the best way; otherwise, it's a drawing-room drama if the drawing room is an unfurnished living room in the UDistrict. Pretty thoroughly tied into its time & place, sometimes to its detriment, "Buddy Does Seattle" has arced all the way from current to nostalgic without losing its immediacy somehow.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt Shaqfan

    this collects HATE #1-15 (just the main buddy stories)... i can't say enough about how great pete bagge's comics are, so i won't say anything. just get this one and BUDDY DOES SEATTLE (hate #16-30). at $15 each, it's probably the best $30 i'll ever spend. this collects HATE #1-15 (just the main buddy stories)... i can't say enough about how great pete bagge's comics are, so i won't say anything. just get this one and BUDDY DOES SEATTLE (hate #16-30). at $15 each, it's probably the best $30 i'll ever spend.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    I was never a comics person (although I was a devoted reader of "Mad" and "National Lampoon" as a kid) and I'm sorry I came late to Peter Bagge. I'm just old enough to remember the world he depicts so brillantly. I was never a comics person (although I was a devoted reader of "Mad" and "National Lampoon" as a kid) and I'm sorry I came late to Peter Bagge. I'm just old enough to remember the world he depicts so brillantly.

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