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30 review for Chineasy : expresiones para el día a día : el método fácil y divertido para aprender chino

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sooraya Evans

    I had very high hopes for this book after viewing the promotional videos on Youtube (TedX Talk, etc). As it turns out, all the simple Chinese characters featured in the promo videos (such as 'person', 'mountain' 'fire', etc) were chosen for obvious reasons. In reality, I've began to notice that the proposed technique doesn't really work for most characters as the technique seemed forced just for the sake of justifying its effectiveness. An example would be the animal chapter. In terms of productio I had very high hopes for this book after viewing the promotional videos on Youtube (TedX Talk, etc). As it turns out, all the simple Chinese characters featured in the promo videos (such as 'person', 'mountain' 'fire', etc) were chosen for obvious reasons. In reality, I've began to notice that the proposed technique doesn't really work for most characters as the technique seemed forced just for the sake of justifying its effectiveness. An example would be the animal chapter. In terms of production, some pages were printed on rather dark colored paper, making it hard to read. Binding also presented an issue on some pages. For example, the binding accidentally hid the vertical stroke associated with the character 'zhong1' (page 128/129). Regardless, at the end of it all I did learn something. Good effort by the author!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    My favorite baby’s first language is Mandarin, and the family group chat switches between English and Mandarin. Anticipating years of such messages, I decided to learn some Mandarin. The hard parts of learning Mandarin are obvious to outsiders: characters and tones. This book makes the easy parts more obvious. Many of the characters build on each other or are meant to look like what they represent. For example, double the character for “people” and you get “follow;” triple it, you get “crowd.” W My favorite baby’s first language is Mandarin, and the family group chat switches between English and Mandarin. Anticipating years of such messages, I decided to learn some Mandarin. The hard parts of learning Mandarin are obvious to outsiders: characters and tones. This book makes the easy parts more obvious. Many of the characters build on each other or are meant to look like what they represent. For example, double the character for “people” and you get “follow;” triple it, you get “crowd.” With a line through “people,” you get “big.” Put “people” and “big” next to each other and you get “adult.” Combine “big” with “crowd” instead and you get “public.” From a single root, you can start building a constellation of meaning. There is in this an elegance to Mandarin I am only beginning to appreciate. It is not beautiful to the ear like Italian or Portuguese. It is not as accommodating of new and borrowed words as English. And its simple grammar, while useful to the learner, can feel blunt—there is only the verb “to be,” no conjugation of it. But it is the very imperviousness of Mandarin that makes room for its own poetry. Compare the etymology of “distraction” as an example. The English comes from the Latin distrahere, “to pull in different directions.” A literal and sensible root. In Mandarin, there is no alphabet to drag the word in as is. Instead, it must be constructed. This creates space for meditating on sound and meaning. “Distraction” is made by combining the character for “divide” with the character for “heart.” To be distracted is, in Mandarin, to divide one’s heart. From the language’s constraint arises its beauty.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pooja

    Chineasy Everyday making it easy for me to learn a tongue I never thought I would pay attention to. I've never been exposed to Chinese culture, only Kung Fu in Hindi dubbed movies. I'm glad that this book came in my life at a great time. I feel elated. Chineasy Everyday making it easy for me to learn a tongue I never thought I would pay attention to. I've never been exposed to Chinese culture, only Kung Fu in Hindi dubbed movies. I'm glad that this book came in my life at a great time. I feel elated.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Irni Farid

    Very pictorial book which can be finished in the bookshop. I love learning languages. The book fulfills my interest in Mandarin.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tea73

    I got the book because I was going to Hong Kong and have always been fascinated by the Chinese written characters. Thirty years ago I took an adult ed class and found that I was a dunce at hearing or reproducing tones, but I did learn a couple of hundred characters. Interestingly even though I am a very visual person, I was surprised how the illustrations in the book didn't really help me learn the characters, even ones that I met out in the wild like the one for gold or wealth. That said, there I got the book because I was going to Hong Kong and have always been fascinated by the Chinese written characters. Thirty years ago I took an adult ed class and found that I was a dunce at hearing or reproducing tones, but I did learn a couple of hundred characters. Interestingly even though I am a very visual person, I was surprised how the illustrations in the book didn't really help me learn the characters, even ones that I met out in the wild like the one for gold or wealth. That said, there was still a lot that I found really interesting - especially how pairs of characters make new words and how radicals are used to modify characters. I learned a lot about how the Chinese language is structured. This book would be a fun adjunct to a real Chinese course, but it is in no way a substitute for a more structured approach. One caveat - the black and white version on the Kindle is terrible, double page spreads are too small, and the simple drawings do not work at all in shades of gray, but it's not too bad on the phone where you can zoom in on the images and have color. I imagine it would be fine on a tablet. I actually also had the book which is fine, just too heavy to carry around.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mae

    很好 As a beginner learning mandarin 中文, this book works well as an additional resource. It's well presented and easy to flip through, and although there may be some subtle mature content (such as telling the difference between 嬲和嫐) it's great for all audiences! I really enjoyed going through this book today to the point where I finished it in one sitting. As a beginner, the funny stories, logic behind the characters and cute (可爱) illustrations provided me the skills and tricks to understanding wri 很好 As a beginner learning mandarin 中文, this book works well as an additional resource. It's well presented and easy to flip through, and although there may be some subtle mature content (such as telling the difference between 嬲和嫐) it's great for all audiences! I really enjoyed going through this book today to the point where I finished it in one sitting. As a beginner, the funny stories, logic behind the characters and cute (可爱) illustrations provided me the skills and tricks to understanding written Chinese. A really important and useful skill (功力) is looking at a character and figuring out what it represents. This book doesn't cover every character in Chinese, but it'll take a closer look at common symbols anyone may see everyday (每天). A simple example is to spot 木 (wood) in 林 because "two trees make a forest" (林). This book expanded my vocabulary and laid a solid foundation for reading Chinese (学文化)。 I noticed the writer (who is 台湾人) includes both traditional and simplified writings, but she will put a little more emphasis on traditional (for example, 長 and 长). So novices may be confused (I recommend reviewing or taking notes as you go along. Have a dictionary on the side, too). However, I think including both ways of spelling is beneficial. Certain "choice words" make more sense written traditionally (such as 電. It contains 雨 which i associate with water, hence I understand why it represents electricity. However if written in simplified form 电, the story wouldn't make sense.) Another thing to keep in mind is the pinyin format. There are no accents on the English text. Instead, the 4 tones are indicated by numbers. I found this a little challenging since I'm not used to imagining accents on letters. (A dictionary or dictionary app would be recommended). I appreciate the relevant cultural facts. She mentioned Taipei is officially 台北市 (not 京). She also briefly covers 佛 (Buddha),风水 (fengshui),功夫 (kung fu). She covers topics many people may be familiar with (such as 四川 (Sichuan), 上海(Shanghai) and 北京(Beijing)) and in a straightforward manner. She presents a selection of words that sound English, too which may help (or English words that sound Chinese). To wrap up this review, I enjoyed this book as an additional learning tool. The illustrations and explanations kept me engaged and made the learning process much more fun and easy. Traditional and simplified characters were mentioned throughout (so it's not exclusive to ether mainland or Taiwan Mandarin). However, if you are new to learning Mandarin I wouldn't suggest this as an introductory text. Instead, it works really well for learning to read and as a good starting point to practice writing. 谢谢。

  7. 5 out of 5

    Neurocomp

    i wanted to like this book ,cuz its categorized...but i did not like these points 1) BPMF/phonetic - for a taiwan-born author , she did not use BPMF system ,used for children to learn, and opted for pinyin....i am a big fan of the BPMF system -- as I grew up in the west learning it -- because its 1a) unique (and obviously has a phonetic mapping) 1b) doesn't rely on teh the romanicized system 1c) makes the writing system even more pretty ...latin appearing beside chinese writing is UGLY!! Also i i wanted to like this book ,cuz its categorized...but i did not like these points 1) BPMF/phonetic - for a taiwan-born author , she did not use BPMF system ,used for children to learn, and opted for pinyin....i am a big fan of the BPMF system -- as I grew up in the west learning it -- because its 1a) unique (and obviously has a phonetic mapping) 1b) doesn't rely on teh the romanicized system 1c) makes the writing system even more pretty ...latin appearing beside chinese writing is UGLY!! Also i think she used the Mainland chinese pinyin and not the Taiwanese (or the proper phonetic version...that uses the english/latin sounds ie /sh/ & /ch/ vs mainlad converting sounds like X and Q ) 2) FONT - I wished they used the hybrid phonetic font that shows all 3 (character + BPMF+pinyin) rather than separating the pinyin from the character ....BPMF goes on teh right & pinyin on bottom of character. 3) history - i definitely did not like the inclusion of too much history ,especially pertaining to past meanings , within the main body context. They should have saved that for an extra appendix/history (or footnotes). If history was that important, they should ahve included the evolution of the character instead...those old fashion characters are really cool and the display of the evolution is too. 4) LASTLY Volcano is not Fire Tree, but Fire Mountain!!!! (She mapped the chinese character mountain to Tree!!!) ....I would have given this 0-stars but I liked I) its categorized II) the idea to collect the words as related pictures ...though frmo other reviews they said she forced some. The idea for the first book seems better ---- UPDATE: i had it at 2 stars, but i'm downgrading to 1. and adding these points ot teh hate list for this book 5) traditional vs simplified from taiwan, shouldn't the author be focusing predominately on traditional...and then adding subtext for simplified...rather than have alot of simplified 6) way tooooooo verbose (and at points redundant)...rather tahn word the evolution of the charater ....at least show some of those old characters!!!!!!! 7) some of her descriptions of how she rememebrs the character...do not match teh picture illustrated.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie Harder-schauer

    I haven't actually finished this book yet...but I have started reading it, and I'm enjoying it so much that I wanted to get my review written now. I'd never really intended to try to learn Chinese before (I'm having a hard enough time with German and it uses basically the same letters as English, with a few accent exceptions), but this book really makes it interesting. I'm not just learning the word and moving on like cramming for a test, but instead I'm also learning more about the word, which I haven't actually finished this book yet...but I have started reading it, and I'm enjoying it so much that I wanted to get my review written now. I'd never really intended to try to learn Chinese before (I'm having a hard enough time with German and it uses basically the same letters as English, with a few accent exceptions), but this book really makes it interesting. I'm not just learning the word and moving on like cramming for a test, but instead I'm also learning more about the word, which helps it stick better...like the fact that 4 (si) is considered unlucky, so oftentimes it's not verbalized. And the illustrations that accompany the characters that make up the written language sort of help to make them stick. Will I be fluent by the time I finish reading this book? Probably not, but I bet I retain more Chinese than I did Spanish from high school or than I have German that isn't food related (and I still currently live in Germany.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    I am a big fan of Sholan's work with Chineasy. The text introduces Chinese characters in a simple and fun way, avoiding the complicated and intimidating character structure that most books use. The text is not to be used as a solitary means of learning the language, as Sholan herself notes, but as a great way to learn a few basic characters that can be used as building blocks for further use! Some characters are a little more complex, and therefore more difficult to create images for, however, this I am a big fan of Sholan's work with Chineasy. The text introduces Chinese characters in a simple and fun way, avoiding the complicated and intimidating character structure that most books use. The text is not to be used as a solitary means of learning the language, as Sholan herself notes, but as a great way to learn a few basic characters that can be used as building blocks for further use! Some characters are a little more complex, and therefore more difficult to create images for, however, this is to be expected when learning a new language. If the reader is excited to learn, this will not be a barrier.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Terena Bell

    Picked up an ARC at Book Expo because I used to own a translation company & the cover interested me. This book is great. Yes, it's geared for children, but the way it embeds the characters inside the object they describe not only helps readers understand the nature of Chinese writing, but also gives visual learners a fantastic way to learn. Picked up an ARC at Book Expo because I used to own a translation company & the cover interested me. This book is great. Yes, it's geared for children, but the way it embeds the characters inside the object they describe not only helps readers understand the nature of Chinese writing, but also gives visual learners a fantastic way to learn.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Văn Dương

    good

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kimhu

    A simple fun and great primer for anyone learning Chinese.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rice

    Good introduction if never exposed to Chinese characters before

  14. 4 out of 5

    Yuè

    DNF since this is not really a book to read in one go or something.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Myrtle

    I love it but it wrote 8 and 6 wrong with 8 it just put a extra stroke but with 6 it forgot to slant the top line

  16. 5 out of 5

    ✨Jinglemarco✨ Маркуша - Мишутка (Nursery rhymes enthusiast)*

    Not as cool as the first Chineasy, but enchanting.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Thutrambk

    NEED

  18. 4 out of 5

    mistyprose

    as someone whose first language is Chinese but can barely read or write in it, I found this book extremely helpful. I plan to re-read it multiple times!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shay Joemrati

    Convenient and beautifully made!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maria Kovalyova

    Книга, конечно, красивая и приятная во всех отношениях, полистать её сплошное удовольствие. Но дочитать до конца у меня не получилось, иероглифы запомнить выше моих сил, а читать описания надоедает.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Denise DiFalco

    Chineasy Everyday takes one of the most difficult languages to learn and breaks it down into simple, small steps. By making the word part of a picture, even I found myself able to catch on. Initially I received this book to give to my niece who loves studying the Orient. I received from Goodreads in exchange for my honest thoughts. Now I realize, she is much advanced in Chinese and I would enjoy learning this exotic language for myself. Thank you ShaoLan for making it so much fun!!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michiel

    Nice introduction to the confusing world of the characters, pronunciation, and the way to think differently about words in general. Sometimes the characters are created really logically, at times utterly confusing. But what language isn’t? Shaolan Hsueh provides another book to create order in the confusion. It’s fun to read and learn.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mary Tharp

    Interesting.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Timo

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wesley Verboom

  26. 4 out of 5

    D

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eric Stutzman

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cathryn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andy Thomson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Liên Hoàng

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