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DISCOVER YOUR NEXT FAVOURITE SERIES. MEET BRITAIN’S BEST-LOVED BOBBY. “It’s original, it’s funny . . . one of life’s little pleasures.” Yorkshire Post THE BOOKS WHICH INSPIRED HEARTBEAT The brilliantly entertaining and heartwarming books behind the hit 90s TV series Heartbeat. One of the top ten most watched shows of the decade. “Stories of a constable on his village b DISCOVER YOUR NEXT FAVOURITE SERIES. MEET BRITAIN’S BEST-LOVED BOBBY. “It’s original, it’s funny . . . one of life’s little pleasures.” Yorkshire Post THE BOOKS WHICH INSPIRED HEARTBEAT The brilliantly entertaining and heartwarming books behind the hit 90s TV series Heartbeat. One of the top ten most watched shows of the decade. “Stories of a constable on his village beat in North Yorkshire. All very gentle and far, far removed from the hurly burly of modern day city policing.” Daily Telegraph Policeman Nick Rhea has been posted to the country with his wife Mary and their three small children. They move into the police house, high on a ridge overlooking the moors. It sits on the edge of the village of Aidensfield — “probably the most beautiful site in the country”. “These books . . . do for the police service in North Yorkshire what James Herriot did for the vets there . . . very relaxing, very readable.” Manchester Evening News In the beautiful North Yorkshire countryside of the 1960s, Constable Nick's roles are as varied as the eccentric villagers. He handles every encounter with his characteristic humour, humanity and professionalism. His investigations include the case of a clever pony who keeps escaping, a woman running through town naked, and a pack of Canadian timber wolves hanging out in a bus shelter. IT’S NOT THE BIG CITY BUT THE YORKSHIRE COUNTRYSIDE IS STILL FULL OF INCIDENT He soon gets to know all the characters on his beat, from his superior officer Sergeant Blaketon to Claude Jeremiah Greengrass, whose lurcher Alfred lands him with a summons for “allowing a dog to worry livestock on agricultural land.” The ever-resourceful Claude Jeremiah offers the defence that Alfred's victim, a budgie, cannot be described as livestock! Perfect for fans of James Herriot, T.E. Kinsey, Gerald Durrell, J.R. Ellis or anyone who loves a great read. DISCOVER ONE OF BRITAIN’S MOST ENJOYABLE AUTHORS CONSTABLE NICK’S COLLEAGUES Sergeant Oscar Blaketon. A good, solid and dependable character who runs his little police station with fierce efficiency but under a tough exterior, is full of warmth, generosity and kindness. PC Alf Ventress. The old, easy-going constable whose local knowledge is vital to the running of Ashfordly Police Station. He does like Mrs Ventress's hard-boiled eggs! WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT NICHOLAS RHEA “Recommended if it's laughter you're after.” Bolton Evening News “Richly entertaining.” Yorkshire Evening Post “Splendid reading.” Police Journal “To be really blunt, this is not my normal reading fare, but I loved it.” Nancy “I enjoyed this tremendously.” Melissa “A wonderful and relaxing dip into the beautiful North Yorkshire Moors.” David “A highly entertaining book which anyone who is looking for easy and humorous reading will enjoy.


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DISCOVER YOUR NEXT FAVOURITE SERIES. MEET BRITAIN’S BEST-LOVED BOBBY. “It’s original, it’s funny . . . one of life’s little pleasures.” Yorkshire Post THE BOOKS WHICH INSPIRED HEARTBEAT The brilliantly entertaining and heartwarming books behind the hit 90s TV series Heartbeat. One of the top ten most watched shows of the decade. “Stories of a constable on his village b DISCOVER YOUR NEXT FAVOURITE SERIES. MEET BRITAIN’S BEST-LOVED BOBBY. “It’s original, it’s funny . . . one of life’s little pleasures.” Yorkshire Post THE BOOKS WHICH INSPIRED HEARTBEAT The brilliantly entertaining and heartwarming books behind the hit 90s TV series Heartbeat. One of the top ten most watched shows of the decade. “Stories of a constable on his village beat in North Yorkshire. All very gentle and far, far removed from the hurly burly of modern day city policing.” Daily Telegraph Policeman Nick Rhea has been posted to the country with his wife Mary and their three small children. They move into the police house, high on a ridge overlooking the moors. It sits on the edge of the village of Aidensfield — “probably the most beautiful site in the country”. “These books . . . do for the police service in North Yorkshire what James Herriot did for the vets there . . . very relaxing, very readable.” Manchester Evening News In the beautiful North Yorkshire countryside of the 1960s, Constable Nick's roles are as varied as the eccentric villagers. He handles every encounter with his characteristic humour, humanity and professionalism. His investigations include the case of a clever pony who keeps escaping, a woman running through town naked, and a pack of Canadian timber wolves hanging out in a bus shelter. IT’S NOT THE BIG CITY BUT THE YORKSHIRE COUNTRYSIDE IS STILL FULL OF INCIDENT He soon gets to know all the characters on his beat, from his superior officer Sergeant Blaketon to Claude Jeremiah Greengrass, whose lurcher Alfred lands him with a summons for “allowing a dog to worry livestock on agricultural land.” The ever-resourceful Claude Jeremiah offers the defence that Alfred's victim, a budgie, cannot be described as livestock! Perfect for fans of James Herriot, T.E. Kinsey, Gerald Durrell, J.R. Ellis or anyone who loves a great read. DISCOVER ONE OF BRITAIN’S MOST ENJOYABLE AUTHORS CONSTABLE NICK’S COLLEAGUES Sergeant Oscar Blaketon. A good, solid and dependable character who runs his little police station with fierce efficiency but under a tough exterior, is full of warmth, generosity and kindness. PC Alf Ventress. The old, easy-going constable whose local knowledge is vital to the running of Ashfordly Police Station. He does like Mrs Ventress's hard-boiled eggs! WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT NICHOLAS RHEA “Recommended if it's laughter you're after.” Bolton Evening News “Richly entertaining.” Yorkshire Evening Post “Splendid reading.” Police Journal “To be really blunt, this is not my normal reading fare, but I loved it.” Nancy “I enjoyed this tremendously.” Melissa “A wonderful and relaxing dip into the beautiful North Yorkshire Moors.” David “A highly entertaining book which anyone who is looking for easy and humorous reading will enjoy.

30 review for Constable on the Hill

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linda Strong

    This book was the first title in Nicholas Rhea's Constable series, which inspired the largely successful TV series Heartbeat. It is based on the author's own experience as a village constable in the North York Moors. The author passed away in 2007. First in a series, this book introduces Constable Nick Rhea and his wife, Mary, and their three young kids. It is the 60's and Rhea has been posted to a small village filled with little major crime and quirky residents. His job covers just about anythi This book was the first title in Nicholas Rhea's Constable series, which inspired the largely successful TV series Heartbeat. It is based on the author's own experience as a village constable in the North York Moors. The author passed away in 2007. First in a series, this book introduces Constable Nick Rhea and his wife, Mary, and their three young kids. It is the 60's and Rhea has been posted to a small village filled with little major crime and quirky residents. His job covers just about anything and everything as he is the only policeman there. Nick's cases run the gamut from an escape artist in the name of a donkey .... a naked woman running through the middle of town ... even a pack of wolves hanging around the bus station. I especially liked his stories concerning animals .. domestic animals such as dogs, goats, cattle, horses, donkeys, pigs and sheep and the more exotic animals (generally courtesy of the zoo when they escape .... deer, badgers, foxes, hares, even a kangaroo or two and a camel here and there. The residents are a hoot. Some are quirky, some are friendly, some are not so sure about the new constable ... after all, it takes being a resident many years to be accepted as one of them. There are store owners, craftsmen, and it's a place where everyone knows what everyone is doing. Highly entertaining, I look forward to reading the rest of the series. Many thanks to Joffe Books / Books n All Promotions / Netgalley for the digital copy of this cozy mystery. Read and reviewed voluntarily, opinions expressed here are unbiased and entirely my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    Constable Nick Rhea moved with his wife Mary and their three small children to his new post in Aidensfield in North Yorkshire. The police house was high on a hill overlooking the moors, and the family were delighted with their new home. Nick was soon on the job, riding his motor bike around the district, checking on licenses, missing stock and lost dogs among other things. He met many and varied folk and had some interesting experiences. One of his colleagues, Sergeant Oscar Blaketon, was a misc Constable Nick Rhea moved with his wife Mary and their three small children to his new post in Aidensfield in North Yorkshire. The police house was high on a hill overlooking the moors, and the family were delighted with their new home. Nick was soon on the job, riding his motor bike around the district, checking on licenses, missing stock and lost dogs among other things. He met many and varied folk and had some interesting experiences. One of his colleagues, Sergeant Oscar Blaketon, was a mischievous though kindhearted soul and when the twinkle was in his eye, Nick learned to be wary. Nevertheless, he was caught out quite often and took it in good humour. Constable on the Hill is the 1st in the Constable Nick Mystery series by Nicholas Rhea and I quite enjoyed it. Based on the author’s own experiences as a village constable, it is light and entertaining, showing the various anecdotes and innovative ways Nick and his colleagues solved any issues they came up against. Apparently, there was a TV series called Heartbeat that was inspired by these books, which was very popular. I haven’t seen or heard of it, living in Australia, but I can imagine it would run in a similar vein to the James Herriot series. Recommended. With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for my digital ARC to read in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I was a bit disappointed. It was free to read on Amazon and I saw it was part of a long series and it was listed as a mystery series. Win win win I thought. Well there is absolutely no mystery at all. It’s written along the line of the James Herriott vet books or the Miss Read books which i am very fond of. It takes place in the 70’s pre cell phone/computer which to me adds extra interest in how folks did their jobs sans technology. I see by the cover of later books it was made in to a TV series I was a bit disappointed. It was free to read on Amazon and I saw it was part of a long series and it was listed as a mystery series. Win win win I thought. Well there is absolutely no mystery at all. It’s written along the line of the James Herriott vet books or the Miss Read books which i am very fond of. It takes place in the 70’s pre cell phone/computer which to me adds extra interest in how folks did their jobs sans technology. I see by the cover of later books it was made in to a TV series. So, it was a pleasant read but not sure I will read more. Also the author and the main character have the same name so i am guessing based in fact.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    Constable Nick Mystery #1 2.5 stars rounded up to 3 This is the first book in the constable series which inspired the British tv series Heartbeat. Set in the 1960's in the North Yorkshire Moors. Nick Rhea, his wife and three children have just moved to Aidensfield. But the village is not as quiet as he was expecting it to be. Nick is the only police officer in Aidensfield so he's always on duty. The crimes are trivial compared to today's crimes. Refereeing arguments and finding missing animals are Constable Nick Mystery #1 2.5 stars rounded up to 3 This is the first book in the constable series which inspired the British tv series Heartbeat. Set in the 1960's in the North Yorkshire Moors. Nick Rhea, his wife and three children have just moved to Aidensfield. But the village is not as quiet as he was expecting it to be. Nick is the only police officer in Aidensfield so he's always on duty. The crimes are trivial compared to today's crimes. Refereeing arguments and finding missing animals are all in a days work. Maybe it's just me but I did not like Nick's attitude to women. He came across as male chauvinist. There is also lot of repetition. We learn about how a small village was policed back in the day. All the characters that are in the tv show are in the book. Theres quite a lot of quirky characters but ot a lot of action. I would like to thank NetGalley, Joffe Books and the author Nicholas Rhes for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    Constable Nick Mystery #1 2.5 stars rounded up to 3 This is the first book in the series which inspired the British TV series Heartbeat. Set in the 1960's in the North Yorkshire Moors. Nick Rhea, his wife and three children have just moved to Aidensfield. But the village is not as quiet as he was expecting it to be. Nick is the only police officer in Aidensfield so he's always on duty. The crimes are trivial compared to today's crimes. Refereeing arguments and finding missing animals are all in a d Constable Nick Mystery #1 2.5 stars rounded up to 3 This is the first book in the series which inspired the British TV series Heartbeat. Set in the 1960's in the North Yorkshire Moors. Nick Rhea, his wife and three children have just moved to Aidensfield. But the village is not as quiet as he was expecting it to be. Nick is the only police officer in Aidensfield so he's always on duty. The crimes are trivial compared to today's crimes. Refereeing arguments and finding missing animals are all in a days work. Maybe it's just me but i did not like Nick's attitude to women. He came across as male chauvinist. There is also a lot of repetition. We learn about how a small village was policed back in the day. All the characters that are in the tv show are in the book. There's quite a lot of quirky characters but ot a lot of action. I would like to thank NetGalley, Joffe Books and the author Nicholas Rhea for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stina

    I love Heartbeat and was looking forward to reading the books that inspired the series but I was sadly disappointed. To me it read more like "The Life and Times of ..." as it read more like a memoir instead of a procedural story. I hate excessive monologuing without dialogue. And the chapters are too long and never ending. I don't like long chapters that take 40 minutes to read. It is dreary, dull and completely unexciting. I couldn't finish it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    Why this was marketed as a mystery series is really the only mystery in this book. What this actually is is the memoir of a police constable in a small rural village in Yorkshire, circa 1960. Reminiscent of James Herriot's All Creatures Great and Small series or Gervase Phinn's The Dales series. Loses half a star for being marketed as something it isn't. 3.5 stars

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cherry London

    I would say, this has been a mild engaging and entertaining tale. Constable Rhea had an unusual Welcome from the villagers of his new close knit community, being tested with their local culture. He passed the first with flying colors and so initiated himself in the community. A relaxing read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Books 'n' All Promotions

    I enjoyed many a happy hour watching the reruns of Heartbeat with Dad. Therefore, I was very happy when I heard the brilliant Joffe Books are republishing the books that inspired the series. Constable on the Hill is the first book in the series and begins with Nick Rhea arriving in Aidensfield and moving in to the Police house. The fun starts there as we are treated to a humorous description of the antics of the removal company. I enjoyed watching the characters develop over the course of the book I enjoyed many a happy hour watching the reruns of Heartbeat with Dad. Therefore, I was very happy when I heard the brilliant Joffe Books are republishing the books that inspired the series. Constable on the Hill is the first book in the series and begins with Nick Rhea arriving in Aidensfield and moving in to the Police house. The fun starts there as we are treated to a humorous description of the antics of the removal company. I enjoyed watching the characters develop over the course of the book as Nick finds his place among the unique and interesting characters. This is a very relaxing read which cannot fail to make you smile as we learn about the very unique and very 'Yorkshire' characters. I loved reading about the characters and particularly enjoyed the parts where Nick is dropped in the deep end in situations to the amusement of his colleagues who were aware what would happen. It is like a step back in time and definitely the perfect book to enjoy over a cuppa.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anjana

    I was introduced to James Herriot quite early on thanks to an Aunt who had all the four omnibus editions. I saw that this book was on a similar line and decided to give it a shot. I have since found out that this was a very long-running series in Britain and even watched a clip or two. It looked quite good. The biggest realisation I have had is that I like non-fiction to follow a timeline instead of being grouped in order of ‘type’ of occurrence. This book begins with Nicholas Rhea taking up a ne I was introduced to James Herriot quite early on thanks to an Aunt who had all the four omnibus editions. I saw that this book was on a similar line and decided to give it a shot. I have since found out that this was a very long-running series in Britain and even watched a clip or two. It looked quite good. The biggest realisation I have had is that I like non-fiction to follow a timeline instead of being grouped in order of ‘type’ of occurrence. This book begins with Nicholas Rhea taking up a new post as a local constable. He moves into a new home with his wife and children and almost immediately jumps into the daily routine of his job. From that point, the chapters are grouped by occurrences. Animal shenanigans are lumped together, as are religious leaders doing their bit for unity in the town, and so on. Overall it was a quaint read, a look back at a time and place where things were done differently. I liked the read, but for the size of the book, it took me a while to read it entirely. The people have their own quirks and play different roles in the day to day of village/town happenings. It is not hard to like Constable Rhea, who is conscientious as well as a person who looks out for others. I would recommend this to people who are familiar with the show without having read the book to draw comparisons. I received an ARC thanks to NetGalley, but the review is entirely is based on my own reading experience.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Actual rating: 3.5 stars. Reads like a cross between James Herriot and Miss Read, although not the same great caliber of either, with a side of Patrick Taylor ("An Irish Doctor" series.) Also, I have to take exception to the subtitle: Constable Nick Mystery #1) There is no mystery here other than how to move along some protestors without violence! A pleasant collection of incidents that seem to be taking place around the mid-1960's in North Yorkshire as a young police constable is settling into Actual rating: 3.5 stars. Reads like a cross between James Herriot and Miss Read, although not the same great caliber of either, with a side of Patrick Taylor ("An Irish Doctor" series.) Also, I have to take exception to the subtitle: Constable Nick Mystery #1) There is no mystery here other than how to move along some protestors without violence! A pleasant collection of incidents that seem to be taking place around the mid-1960's in North Yorkshire as a young police constable is settling into his job and the locale, although he speaks broad Yorkshire dialect with the best of them. This series is clearly derivative of "The All Things Bright & Beautiful" books which deal with a young vet and his patients in the same surroundings. The descriptions of the landscape are very good, but the "events" are lacking in punch and the writing is slow and turgid. I grew quite restive waiting for something, anything, to happen and it wasn't until the tale of the Yorkshire Terrier and the donkey that it finally made me laugh! Still, an amiable enough read for when I am sick of gruesome or intense books and need a quiet relief!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alyson Read

    This is the first book in the highly popular "Constable" series upon which the TV series "Heartbeat" was based, and which are now in the process of being republished by Joffe Books. Altogether there were 37 books in the series so there will be plenty for fans to go at! It starts where Constable Nick Rhea is relocated to the hilltop police house in Aidensfield in North Yorkshire with his wife and young family. Even the removal van brought its share of characters. It is billed as "Constable Nick M This is the first book in the highly popular "Constable" series upon which the TV series "Heartbeat" was based, and which are now in the process of being republished by Joffe Books. Altogether there were 37 books in the series so there will be plenty for fans to go at! It starts where Constable Nick Rhea is relocated to the hilltop police house in Aidensfield in North Yorkshire with his wife and young family. Even the removal van brought its share of characters. It is billed as "Constable Nick Mystery 1" which I don't think is an accurate title, since this book is in fact a series of anecdotes rather than a mystery story and reads each chapter is more like a short story. However apart from that it really it is everything it says on the tin! A funny, heart-warming and entertaining book set in a bygone time where some people didn't even have (or want) electricity and cars, and led very different lives from today, and where the duties of a policeman varied greatly from what they would be expected to do now. Essentially though, people don't change, and there is the usual mix of good, bad and plain old crafty ones in these stories. Justice normally prevails (or is at least seen to) by one means or another, and very often without an actual arrest! In fact some of the solutions to the incidents involved are downright clever and sure to bring a chuckle from the reader. Good gentle reading which will appeal to a great many readers. 4.5*

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    To be really blunt, this is not my normal reading fare, but I loved it. It's the story of a British policeman who moves to the village of Aidensfield in North Yorkshire to take the job as constable there and the immediate environs. It's a small village where everyone knows everyone, and although you wouldn't find (or at least, at the time of the writing of this book, at least) a lot of big-city type crime there, the author notes that there was enough going on to keep him quite busy. For example, To be really blunt, this is not my normal reading fare, but I loved it. It's the story of a British policeman who moves to the village of Aidensfield in North Yorkshire to take the job as constable there and the immediate environs. It's a small village where everyone knows everyone, and although you wouldn't find (or at least, at the time of the writing of this book, at least) a lot of big-city type crime there, the author notes that there was enough going on to keep him quite busy. For example, take the case of the roaming pony; you might also enjoy the case of the woman wandering the streets naked; then there's the time Constable Nick staked out a pack of Canadian timber wolves at the train station. What I liked most about this book was that it focused on people rather than events, and that Nick used his knowledge of the individuals involved in the pursuit of justice rather than just coming down hard with the full force of the letter of the law, with which he doesn't always agree. He even notes that "Keen socialists are attempting to remove that valuable exercise of discretion from the policeman's armoury -- it will be a sad day when it has gone. When it does go, the feared police state will have arrived when all rules will be obeyed, down to the last cruel letter of the law. Human policemen will no longer exist." (29) Nick (and his sergeant) really epitomize the meaning of "human policemen," and that's what makes this book special, along with the multiple personalities that populate this novel. I would highly recommend this book, and I do believe I'll read more of the "Constable" series -- maybe even pick up the first episode of "Heartbeat," the British tv series based on Rhea's books. Constable on the Hill is a joy for everyone who likes small-town life or likes to read more upbeat kind of stories that often come from the heart. To be really blunt, this is not my normal reading fare, but I loved it. It's the story of a British policeman who moves to the village of Aidensfield in North Yorkshire to take the job as constable there and the immediate environs. It's a small village where everyone knows everyone, and although you wouldn't find (or at least, at the time of the writing of this book, at least) a lot of big-city type crime there, the author notes that there was enough going on to keep him quite busy. For example, take the case of the roaming pony; you might also enjoy the case of the woman wandering the streets naked; then there's the time Constable Nick staked out a pack of Canadian timber wolves at the train station. What I liked most about this book was that it focused on people rather than events, and that Nick used his knowledge of the individuals involved in the pursuit of justice rather than just coming down hard with the full force of the letter of the law, with which he doesn't always agree. He even notes that "Keen socialists are attempting to remove that valuable exercise of discretion from the policeman's armoury -- it will be a sad day when it has gone. When it does go, the feared police state will have arrived when all rules will be obeyed, down to the last cruel letter of the law. Human policemen will no longer exist." (29) Nick (and his sergeant) really epitomize the meaning of "human policemen," and that's what makes this book special, along with the multiple personalities that populate this novel. I would highly recommend this book, and I do believe I'll read more of the "Constable" series -- maybe even pick up the first episode of "Heartbeat," the British tv series based on Rhea's books. Constable on the Hill is a joy for everyone who likes small-town life or likes to read more upbeat kind of stories that often come from the heart. To be really blunt, this is not my normal reading fare, but I loved it. It's the story of a British policeman who moves to the village of Aidensfield in North Yorkshire to take the job as constable there and the immediate environs. It's a small village where everyone knows everyone, and although you wouldn't find (or at least, at the time of the writing of this book, at least) a lot of big-city type crime there, the author notes that there was enough going on to keep him quite busy. For example, take the case of the roaming pony; you might also enjoy the case of the woman wandering the streets naked; then there's the time Constable Nick staked out a pack of Canadian timber wolves at the train station. What I liked most about this book was that it focused on people rather than events, and that Nick used his knowledge of the individuals involved in the pursuit of justice rather than just coming down hard with the full force of the letter of the law, with which he doesn't always agree. He even notes that "Keen socialists are attempting to remove that valuable exercise of discretion from the policeman's armoury -- it will be a sad day when it has gone. When it does go, the feared police state will have arrived when all rules will be obeyed, down to the last cruel letter of the law. Human policemen will no longer exist." (29) Nick (and his sergeant) really epitomize the meaning of "human policemen," and that's what makes this book special, along with the multiple personalities that populate this novel. I would highly recommend this book, and I do believe I'll read more of the "Constable" series -- maybe even pick up the first episode of "Heartbeat," the British tv series based on Rhea's books. Constable on the Hill is a joy for everyone who likes small-town life or likes to read more upbeat kind of stories that often come from the heart.

  14. 5 out of 5

    ☺Trish

    The Manchester Evening News' review of Constable on the Hill by Nicholas Rhea asserted that, "These books . . . do for the police service in North Yorkshire what James Herriot's did for the vets there . . ." . Any reader looking for a traditional cozy mystery will certainly be disappointed. This reads much more as a memoir than a murder mystery (actually, it's a fictionalized account of author Nicholas Rhea's life (pseudonym for Peter N. Walker) and his career as a village policeman - very simila The Manchester Evening News' review of Constable on the Hill by Nicholas Rhea asserted that, "These books . . . do for the police service in North Yorkshire what James Herriot's did for the vets there . . ." . Any reader looking for a traditional cozy mystery will certainly be disappointed. This reads much more as a memoir than a murder mystery (actually, it's a fictionalized account of author Nicholas Rhea's life (pseudonym for Peter N. Walker) and his career as a village policeman - very similar to James Herriot's (actually James Alfred Wight) anecdotal approach to his life experiences as a vet. That said, I found Constable on the Hill to be entertaining in a slow-paced, mildly humorous, and pleasant manner.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eden

    2020 bk 137. Constable on the Hill reminded me of the Miss Read series, although this series starts in 1960's Yorkshire. It has the same quiet recounting of events in a British village - or rather villages as the Police Constable is in charge of several villages at the time. It is written in first person and while it reads as biography, it is cataloged as fiction. After the frentic pace of the prior few books, this was perfect for a quiet, thoughtful reflection on how human nature is basically t 2020 bk 137. Constable on the Hill reminded me of the Miss Read series, although this series starts in 1960's Yorkshire. It has the same quiet recounting of events in a British village - or rather villages as the Police Constable is in charge of several villages at the time. It is written in first person and while it reads as biography, it is cataloged as fiction. After the frentic pace of the prior few books, this was perfect for a quiet, thoughtful reflection on how human nature is basically the same across cultures and times. I can foresee myself spending lots of money - there seem to be about 30 books in the series.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    A hilarious and unforgettable collection of anecdotes from a master storyteller. I found this book very difficult to put down. The tales are well told and the characters very easy to identify with. The only consolation upon reaching the end is the fact that there are so many more to enjoy from the pen of this accomplished storyteller.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    A nice little book about a policeman living in the countryside of England. Reading it is like watching a nice Masterpiece Theater show about life in the English countryside. Nothing much happens, but it's pleasant enough.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sandra McKenna

    A delightful read. This is the first book I have read by Nicholas Rhea, but it won't be the last. I thoroughly enjoyed his tales of life for a policeman in North Yorkshire. The book is witty and entertaining from beginning to end, and I look forward to reading more in this series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This was a delightful discovery. The books that the series Heartbeat was based on. A young policeman moves in with his family and then gets to know his beat and all the neighbours! It was lovely to read a nice, gentle book from a different era and I love the fact that there are a lot more books in this series. A wonderful way to while away anxious evenings

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karren Hodgkins

    Gentle, so very gentle. I am enjoying this book, but have also found trying to read in one sitting was not the approach. Rather the anecdotal nature is best appreciated one chapter at a time. There are definitely some lovely smiley moments and reminders of a different time, with a different approach to policing. I do understand the comparison to the James Herriott series but I think because I am smitten when it comes to animal anecdotes, I didn't quite connect as well as, understandably this is no Gentle, so very gentle. I am enjoying this book, but have also found trying to read in one sitting was not the approach. Rather the anecdotal nature is best appreciated one chapter at a time. There are definitely some lovely smiley moments and reminders of a different time, with a different approach to policing. I do understand the comparison to the James Herriott series but I think because I am smitten when it comes to animal anecdotes, I didn't quite connect as well as, understandably this is not the focus of this book. With thanks to #NetGalley, Joffe and the author for my free advanced reader copy to review in exchange for an honest opinion.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn

    This was a fun read. I wouldn't call it a mystery though. It's more of a memoir of an English bobby serving in rural Yorkshire in the mid-20th century. The chapters are divided into subject matter pertaining to Nick's police duties (the character and the author have the same name, hence the memoir idea). There are chapters about animals in general, dogs in particular, unusual characters of the area, and local sports. It was quite funny in places, and overall a gentle read. I may read another som This was a fun read. I wouldn't call it a mystery though. It's more of a memoir of an English bobby serving in rural Yorkshire in the mid-20th century. The chapters are divided into subject matter pertaining to Nick's police duties (the character and the author have the same name, hence the memoir idea). There are chapters about animals in general, dogs in particular, unusual characters of the area, and local sports. It was quite funny in places, and overall a gentle read. I may read another sometime, but not right away. (There are 37 books in the series). I actually prefer books with a definite plot most of the time.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Policeman Nick Rhea has been posted to the country with his wife Mary and their three small children. They move into the police house, high on a ridge overlooking the moors. It sits on the edge of the village of Aidensfield His investigations include the case of a clever pony who keeps escaping, a woman running through town naked, and a pack of Canadian timber wolves hanging out in a bus shelter. He soon gets to know all the characters on his beat, from his superior officer Sergeant Blaketon to Policeman Nick Rhea has been posted to the country with his wife Mary and their three small children. They move into the police house, high on a ridge overlooking the moors. It sits on the edge of the village of Aidensfield His investigations include the case of a clever pony who keeps escaping, a woman running through town naked, and a pack of Canadian timber wolves hanging out in a bus shelter. He soon gets to know all the characters on his beat, from his superior officer Sergeant Blaketon to Claude Jeremiah Greengrass. This is the first book in the series & introduces us to the endearing characters of Aidensfield. The series went onto to be the basis for the tv series Heartbeat, there are differences between the two, which I enjoyed as I was able to read the book as a separate entity. A nostalgic often amusing read that held my interest all the way through My honest review is for a special copy I voluntarily read

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    I was in the mood for an easy, gentle read when I bought this book. And that is exactly what it is. If you like stories set in the good old days of the 1960's, when everything could be solved with a cup of tea, then this is a book you will enjoy. For me, it was an okay read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    booklover BEV

    1960 North Yorkshire just on the outskirts of Aidenfield this book is a joy to read. There's never a dull moment for P.C Nick Rhea and his family. Been a big fan of the television series Heartbeat I got stuck into this delightful book that has lots of twists and turns. But some added witty and funny moment's as Nick starts his new job. This is such a difference book and I enjoyed every bit of it right till the end. Brilliant

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stephen kinsella

    Really good read, i thoroug.hly enjoyed every piece of wit and humour I would recommend this book to anyone Nicholas Rheas descriptions of North Ridings and the characters who live there are so good it's almost like looking at a painting

  26. 4 out of 5

    Voirrey

    Whilst I did enjoy this look at life as a police constable in the 1960s/70s in rural Yorkshire, I found the regular snide comments about how 'the socialists' would ruin everything so annoying that I almost gave up on the book. I did finish it, but have no great urge to read more of the series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lee Davenport

    An enjoyable read for any one who has ever read James Harriots books about Yorkshire England.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mary Cassidy

    Found some of this to be very dated, especially in its view of women. Oh well. Not James Herriot, that is for sure, but a few charming anecdotes.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mary Yarde

    "Arrest?' he sounded horrified. "We don't arrest people here!" If they did then where would Senior Constable Alwyn Foxton put his prized Chrysanthemums? After all, the solitary woman's cell was perfect for these delicate flowers. When Constable Nick Rhea found himself posted to Aidensfield he had felt some trepidation, as anyone would when starting a new job. But what he had not been prepared for was the realities of walking the beat in this small community. To his delight and, more often than not "Arrest?' he sounded horrified. "We don't arrest people here!" If they did then where would Senior Constable Alwyn Foxton put his prized Chrysanthemums? After all, the solitary woman's cell was perfect for these delicate flowers. When Constable Nick Rhea found himself posted to Aidensfield he had felt some trepidation, as anyone would when starting a new job. But what he had not been prepared for was the realities of walking the beat in this small community. To his delight and, more often than not, bemusement, he encountered some of the most eccentric people that he would ever meet and they would challenge him in ways that he could never imagine. From dealings with the local hunt who insisted on riding through his garden to an escaped donkey and a dog who was fast becoming a public nuisance, not to mention the pack of Canadian timber wolves who had escaped from the local zoo, Constable on the Hill by the late Nicholas Rhea is a book that is as engaging as it is enthralling. Constable on the Hill is the first book in Rhea's fabulous series, and it starts where all good books do — at the beginning. With an elegant turn of phrase and a visceral understanding of what makes a reader laugh, Rhea began his tale of life as a bobby on the day he moved to Aidensfield. Immediately Rhea set the tone for his book — the comical adventures of the removal-van men whose answer for everything was that the "insurance will see you all right," to the rather somewhat unconventional police station where flowers grew in one cell, and roadkill was stored in another! This book is so vastly entertaining because of its honesty, its integrity and of course, its marvellous depiction of the larger-than-life characters who grace the pages. With a compelling narrative and lavish attention to the historical detail, Rhea clearly demonstrated why his books were, and still are, so incredibly popular. Written in the same style as the fabulous James Herriot series which I loved so much as a teenager, Constable on the Hill has an awful lot to recommend it. This book is filled to bursting with anecdotal stories — which were not only incredibly entertaining but laugh-out-loud funny. This is a novel that not only entertains but allows us a glimpse into the not so distant past. In these pages, the reader is introduced to eccentric and fascinating characters such as Claude Jeremiah Greengrass — who, of course, was immortalised forever by the late Bill Maynard's superb portrayal in Heartbeat. I absolutely adored this book. I loved the easy prose style in which it is written, as well as the wonderful stories about the inhabitants of Aidensfield. I also enjoyed reading about how different policing was in the 1960s as opposed to now. I thought Rhea captured the very essence of this era and as this book is written in an informal manner, it seemed, at times, that I was listening to Rhea's account rather than reading about it. The Constable on the Hill is the book that inspired Heartbeat — which was to become essential Sunday night viewing on ITV and at its peak audience, drew in a staggering 13.82 million viewers. After reading Constable on the Hill, I can appreciate why it was made into a television series that lasted for two decades. Rhea had penned a fresh, vibrant account of what life was like during this time. An account which has stood the test of time and I am sure will continue to do so. I loved every single minute of it. I Highly Recommend. Review by Mary Anne Yarde. The Coffee Pot Book Club.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I have been a big fan of the television series called 'Heartbeat', which was inspired by the bestselling 'Constable' books released by Nicholas Rhea, for about 20 or so years. I still watch the repeats of 'Heartbeat' on ITV3 of an afternoon. I discovered the television series first and then decided that I would read the books that inspired the show. The books are slightly different to the television series but both are equally as enjoyable. I recently re-read 'Constable On The Hill' and I thorou I have been a big fan of the television series called 'Heartbeat', which was inspired by the bestselling 'Constable' books released by Nicholas Rhea, for about 20 or so years. I still watch the repeats of 'Heartbeat' on ITV3 of an afternoon. I discovered the television series first and then decided that I would read the books that inspired the show. The books are slightly different to the television series but both are equally as enjoyable. I recently re-read 'Constable On The Hill' and I thoroughly enjoyed every single minute of it but more about that in a bit. I absolutely love the cast of characters in this book. I have a bit of a soft spot for Sergeant Blaketon and Claude Jeremiah Greengrass. After having watched the show for so long, as I read the books I imagine the actors who played the respective characters in the show as I imagine the scene playing out in my head. Blaketon is a bit of a stickler for rules and regulations and he had a long standing rivalry or grudge fest against Greengrass, who was a loveable rogue. Each would try to outmanoeuvre the other in a sort of game of 'cat and mouse'. I found their shenanigans to be quite amusing at times and more than once I ended up chuckling away to myself. It didn't take me long at all to get into 'Constable On The Hill'. In fact as soon as I started reading that was it, I was transported back to 1960s North Yorkshire and I just couldn't stop reading. I couldn't turn the pages quick enough as I was waiting for the first appearances of my favourite characters. I was enjoying the book so much that I lost all track of time and I lost track of just how quickly I was getting through the story. I reached the end of the book far quicker than I had wanted to, which I had mixed feelings about. Don't get me wrong I was pleased to finish because it meant that I knew how this first 'Constable' book concluded but I was enjoying the author's writing style, the characters and the storylines so much that I just wish the book could have been longer. As with all of Nicholas's books, I was drawn into this one from the first word on the first word on the first page. Nicholas uses such vivid and realistic descriptions that I literally felt as though I had borrowed Dr. Who's Tardis and I was transported back in time to 1960s North Yorkshire with all the relevant sights, sounds, cars, characters and the pre-decimalisation currency. A true step back in time. I felt as though I was part of the story myself. The 'Constable' books especially appealed to me because my great grandfather was born in the same sort of area as the books are set. I never knew him as he died long before I was born but reading books such as these help me gain a better level of understanding of the environment in which he lived and the people he lived amongst. In short, I thoroughly enjoyed reading 'Constable On The Hill' and I would definitely recommend it to other readers. I will certainly be reading the rest of the 'Constable' series just as soon as I can. The score on the Ginger Book Geek board is a very well deserved 5* out of 5*.

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