hits counter The Threat Below - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Threat Below

Availability: Ready to download

Three hundred years ago, something terrifying arose and pushed humanity to the brink of extinction. Now, a small remnant – the descendants of the few survivors who were able to escape the massacre below – lives above the clouds, on the top of a Mountain. When they discover that their water supply is being poisoned Down Below, an expedition, including seventeen year-old gi Three hundred years ago, something terrifying arose and pushed humanity to the brink of extinction. Now, a small remnant – the descendants of the few survivors who were able to escape the massacre below – lives above the clouds, on the top of a Mountain. When they discover that their water supply is being poisoned Down Below, an expedition, including seventeen year-old girl Icelyn Brathius, must descend and face the monsters, the Threat Below, that wiped out civilization centuries ago. Icelyn quickly learns that all is not what it seems as she uncovers secrets hundreds of years old and struggles to stay alive in a world where no human is fit to survive.


Compare

Three hundred years ago, something terrifying arose and pushed humanity to the brink of extinction. Now, a small remnant – the descendants of the few survivors who were able to escape the massacre below – lives above the clouds, on the top of a Mountain. When they discover that their water supply is being poisoned Down Below, an expedition, including seventeen year-old gi Three hundred years ago, something terrifying arose and pushed humanity to the brink of extinction. Now, a small remnant – the descendants of the few survivors who were able to escape the massacre below – lives above the clouds, on the top of a Mountain. When they discover that their water supply is being poisoned Down Below, an expedition, including seventeen year-old girl Icelyn Brathius, must descend and face the monsters, the Threat Below, that wiped out civilization centuries ago. Icelyn quickly learns that all is not what it seems as she uncovers secrets hundreds of years old and struggles to stay alive in a world where no human is fit to survive.

30 review for The Threat Below

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melissa (Mel’s Bookshelf)

    What a fantastic surprise! What an ABSOLUTELY AWESOME book! When I first saw The Threat Below, I was apprehensive. There are SO many YA dystopian books out there. I wasn't sure that this one was going to be much different than the rest. But with a whole lot of positive reviews, and thankfully a bit of time on my hands, I decided to give it a go. And I'm SO GLAD that I did! I had already decided on my top 5 books of the year, a list compiled in my head - awaiting December for me to put it togethe What a fantastic surprise! What an ABSOLUTELY AWESOME book! When I first saw The Threat Below, I was apprehensive. There are SO many YA dystopian books out there. I wasn't sure that this one was going to be much different than the rest. But with a whole lot of positive reviews, and thankfully a bit of time on my hands, I decided to give it a go. And I'm SO GLAD that I did! I had already decided on my top 5 books of the year, a list compiled in my head - awaiting December for me to put it together and blog it, not expecting the next month and a half to bring me anything worthy... Now its going to have to be changed! Yes, this book was THAT GOOD!! Set in the distant future, Icelyn is the heir to Mountaintop, a place where the remaining existence of humanity lives high up on a mountain, separated from the world below. They are separated by a wall, and further below is a thick cloud covering that makes visualising the world below impossible. They have lived this way for hundreds of years. But now their water supply has been tainted, and people are dying. Someone has to go down below to save them all... This wasn't your typical YA dystopian book. It was EPIC. But so easy to read! Think The Silo Series by Hugh Howey, meets A Game of Thrones with a touch of The Hunger Games, Lord of the Rings, Planet of the Apes and a sprinkle of The Sparrow rolled into a fantastic YA read. But I don't think this is just a YA Book! Even though the central characters are young, I am sure this book will be enjoyed by just about anyone! This book captured me from the first chapter! What a fantastic premise! It has EVERYTHING! Excitement, action, adventure, un-worldly creatures, romance, power, betrayal, love, hate, violence, BEARS!! IT HAS BEARS!!! I could keep going! The characters are FANTASTIC! Every one of them, from the dickheads up on Mountaintop, attempting to out play and our power each other... To the young ones stuck below cloudline. Each character brings a unique energy to the book. Usually quite a lot of characters in a book annoys me, mostly because I can't keep up because I read so fast! I get confused with names and who is who when there is an abundance of characters. The only thing I got confused about at the beginning of this one was the difference between Torrain, Tranton and the Tarlinius, (All the T's) but after it got going it didn't take long at all to become engaged with EVERY SINGLE CHARACTER! The book doesn't go any way you expect it to and I love that. You have no idea what is waiting around the corner, all you know is that HAVE to see what's waiting there! The only thing I almost don't like about this book, is the strange little almost love triangle thing that Icelyn has got between Ad and Torrain. I get that love triangles are often pivotal in most YA books... I understand why they appeal to younger audiences, what is more young adult than the perils of love?... And in this book it wasn't too bad. Its just love triangles in general piss me off but I didn't hate it enough to deduct stars from it, so that's saying something. Another thing that I feel doesn't quite do the book justice is the cover. It just doesn't really grab your attention. Honestly if it was based on the cover alone I wouldn't have read it. I would hate to think that others are missing out on such a fantastic book because of it. Don't get me wrong, its not a "bad" cover... It just lacks something for me. I know that when I first look at a book I only really take a quick glance at the cover. My initial feeling about this cover was "Meh...". Also because the authors name is so big down the bottom (in plain font that again, doesn't do the book justice) I didn't even really look at what was behind it. I didn't realise that there was a monster down there. It wasn't until I read reviews and considered reading the book that I looked closer and realised that there was a monster down there and that were thick clouds below the mountain, not water or some kind of red sea. The cover can make or break a book, and this one doesn't do it for me. However I loved the small illustrations at the start of each chapter that made it clear where the chapter was set. Nevertheless, once you start the book you CANNOT stop. Or at least, I couldn't. Thought it was absolutely fantastic! Loved the complex story and the relationships between all the characters and creatures. I thought it was truly original and undeniably worthy the whole 5 stars! Would I recommend it? ABSOLUTELY! Read it and tell me what you think of it! I'm DYING to discuss it with someone! "Life is exactly what it is, and nothing more." Many thanks to author Jason Latshaw via WordSlinger for a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. For more reviews visit my blog www.booksbabiesbeing.com Follow me on twitter www.twitter.com/BBB_Mel

  2. 5 out of 5

    Doris Marcantel

    Good book! I enjoyed this book very much and look forward to reading g more books from this author!!! Great job to the author!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Book

    “The Threat Below”, a debut novel written by Jason Seth Latshaw is first installment in author’s “Brathius History” series - Latshaw brought a dystopian theme so popular these days, though he told the story in a way that made his book special in the genre. The story begins 300 years after “The Great Death”, an unexplained catastrophe that wiped out almost all the human race. Those hundred that remained alive, managed to find safe haven in a place named Mountaintop, up at the top of a high mounta “The Threat Below”, a debut novel written by Jason Seth Latshaw is first installment in author’s “Brathius History” series - Latshaw brought a dystopian theme so popular these days, though he told the story in a way that made his book special in the genre. The story begins 300 years after “The Great Death”, an unexplained catastrophe that wiped out almost all the human race. Those hundred that remained alive, managed to find safe haven in a place named Mountaintop, up at the top of a high mountain that together with wall and dense clouds protects them from something called “Threat Below”. The main character is called Icelyn Brathius, a 17 years old daughter of colony leader and direct descendent of the person who led people 300 years ago up the mountain to find protection. The problem will arise when water supply becomes poisoned and both our main hero and her two friends are going to descend from their safe house in the sky, trying to find out what happened meantime below… Though his fiction debut, Jason Seth Latshaw managed with the very first work to bring some fresh air into the genre and present the well-developed and intelligently crafted dystopian future. Especially interesting is the way how Latshaw through his story succeeds to speak about human nature and while we slowly learn what happened with our society 300 years ago we are also becoming aware of all the bad consequences that greed and lust for power are producing in real world. In that way the author cleverly achieved that his novel is not only another one in a series of dystopian works present all around these days. The only aspect of novel that sometimes can be confusing (but still doesn’t influence the overall experience) are shifts of narrator – though Latshaw decided to mix both first and third person perspective, it is bit unclear why he decided to introduce omniscient narrator in chapters told from Icelyn’s perspective. Still, “The Threat Below” can be fully recommended read not only for the readers that enjoy YA dystopian reads, but also all those willing to consider some fundamental questions about human existence and the beliefs that Jason Seth Latshaw with his novel raised. I was given a copy of this book by the author for the purpose of unbiased review, while all the presented information is based on my impressions.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Grady

    ‘Together we’ll face whatever this new age holds’ California author Jason Latshaw challenges young adult readers with this epic tome written in 2015, his official debut publication. The writing is imaginative and rich in fantasy and in a concept of a dystopian future, blended so well to offer a stage of discovery for the questions about life that begin to gel in the teenage years. The book is lengthy, yet the writing is of the quality that holds the reader’s interest throughout. After completing ‘Together we’ll face whatever this new age holds’ California author Jason Latshaw challenges young adult readers with this epic tome written in 2015, his official debut publication. The writing is imaginative and rich in fantasy and in a concept of a dystopian future, blended so well to offer a stage of discovery for the questions about life that begin to gel in the teenage years. The book is lengthy, yet the writing is of the quality that holds the reader’s interest throughout. After completing this novel, we are in suspense as to where Book 2 of the series, yet to be written, will advance. Perhaps, having attained his MFA in Screenwriting from UCLA and his history of writing television and film scripts, the next step in this adventure will be cinematic… In addition to THE THREAT BELOW, Jason’s other books are A SON LIKE HIS FATHER and THE GIRL WHO ENDED THE DROUGHT. He lives in Los Angeles. ‘The Threat Below’ is the label assigned to the Great Death, that event that (nearly) wipes out the human race, and the post-apocalyptic future of those humans who survive that event becomes a dwelling place on Mountaintop – a peak that is protected by clouds and allows the survivors to look down the mountain at the forbidden area. There are two classes of people - Cognates (the elite intellectuals) and Veritas (worker class) – and the lead character is a Cognate, one Icelyn, who embodies the strengths and virtues that propel this tale of struggle of good versus evil. In a tale of this magnitude it is wise to study the synopsis the author offers, a fine preparation for the events that follow: ‘Three hundred years ago, a lethal and mysterious threat arose and pushed humanity to the brink of extinction. Now, a small remnant - the descendants of the few survivors who escaped the massacre below - lives above the clouds, atop a mountain. When they discover their water supply is being poisoned, an expedition, including seventeen year-old Icelyn Brathius, must descend and face the horror that wiped out civilization centuries ago. As Icelyn faces dangers in a world humans are not meant to survive, she learns that not everything is as it seems, uncovers an ancient revelation, and faces a choice that will change the fate of everyone above and below the clouds. Will Icelyn be strong enough to survive - and bear a terrible secret?’ Jason’s writing skills are so polished that the various characters he creates become tangible and credible, young adults facing the concepts of morality, the meaning of life, facing the fearful aspects of the future, and conquering. Not only is the story quite solid, but also issues Jason creates for his fine characters are significant and challenging. This is a very fine novel for the YA (and beyond!) audience. Highly recommended.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bill Ward

    Although this is a YA book and I'm in my sixties, I really loved the book and never felt I was reading something unsuitable for my age! I think this is mostly because of the fantastic, dystopian world, the author creates. The age of the characters was irrelevant, as the author's imagination immersed me in a futuristic, fantasy world, where the survivors of humanity have been living up a mountain for hundreds of years, never daring to venture below. When a threat to their water supply forces them Although this is a YA book and I'm in my sixties, I really loved the book and never felt I was reading something unsuitable for my age! I think this is mostly because of the fantastic, dystopian world, the author creates. The age of the characters was irrelevant, as the author's imagination immersed me in a futuristic, fantasy world, where the survivors of humanity have been living up a mountain for hundreds of years, never daring to venture below. When a threat to their water supply forces them to leave the mountain top, the action really hots up. The characters continually develop during the story and there are a few surprises in store for the reader. This is quite a long book but it always held my attention. I'm really looking forward to reading the next book in the series!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Maas

    5 Stars for this Innovative Tale that Brings You to Another World Got done with this one awhile ago - getting to the review just now! Great tale, a lot of fun - just takes you out of your own world and brings you to another one. Probably only thing I could say how it could be improved is that we need another one! Jason Latshaw - looking forward to Brathius History #2 5 Stars for this Innovative Tale that Brings You to Another World Got done with this one awhile ago - getting to the review just now! Great tale, a lot of fun - just takes you out of your own world and brings you to another one. Probably only thing I could say how it could be improved is that we need another one! Jason Latshaw - looking forward to Brathius History #2

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julie Powell

    I found this book by chance and thought it to be a well-written, fabulous fantasy. Icelyn is the main focus of the story and her part is seen through her eyes, although, there are many other characters seen through third person narrative as well. There are two 'worlds', that of Mountaintop and the other of the Threatbelow. How this evolved is gradually revealed to make a compelling and amazing read. I cannot say too much so as not to give spoilers, but will say that the plot, descriptions, characte I found this book by chance and thought it to be a well-written, fabulous fantasy. Icelyn is the main focus of the story and her part is seen through her eyes, although, there are many other characters seen through third person narrative as well. There are two 'worlds', that of Mountaintop and the other of the Threatbelow. How this evolved is gradually revealed to make a compelling and amazing read. I cannot say too much so as not to give spoilers, but will say that the plot, descriptions, characters and concepts are brilliant. It is a long story but worth every word and I am looking forward to the next in the series - hope it's not too long coming. Highly recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Madeleine Holly-Rosing

    In a post-apocalyptic future, the remnants of humanity have been driven to a place they call Mountaintop by a menace so devastating they simply refer to it as “The Threat Below.” Their rigid class structure of the elite intellectual Cognates and the worker class of the Veritas has produced a fragile society with dwindling resources. But like all human societies, politics and power replaces good sense and resentment from the lower class challenges the status quo. Especially, when they discover th In a post-apocalyptic future, the remnants of humanity have been driven to a place they call Mountaintop by a menace so devastating they simply refer to it as “The Threat Below.” Their rigid class structure of the elite intellectual Cognates and the worker class of the Veritas has produced a fragile society with dwindling resources. But like all human societies, politics and power replaces good sense and resentment from the lower class challenges the status quo. Especially, when they discover that their water source is being contaminated by those they thought were simply beasts. The main thrust of the story is told through the eyes of seventeen year old, Icelyn Brathius, a Cognate and the future leader of this small community. But Icelyn has a bit of the adventurer in her and is easily coerced into breaking the rules by her best friend (and secret crush), Adorane, a Veritas. It is an odd match as Cognates are atheists and consider Veritas to be their intellectual inferior who still believe in God. However, Adorane’s innate intelligence and striking good looks draw Icelyn to him. When the leaders of Mountaintop discover their water is being poisoned, it causes political strife which results in a group of Veritas men, including Adorane, being sent below what is known as the Cloudline to fix the water problem. (POTENTIAL SPOILERS AHEAD) Icelyn follows thinking she can save Adorane, but becomes the perceived savior of those humanity fears the most—The Threat Below. Written in both the first and third person, this would normally put my teeth on edge, but it works well in this case. The story is a richly drawn world with the humans on Mountaintop considered to be living in Shangri La by those below. It reminds me a little of the Star Trek episode “The Cloud Minders” where those who lived on the surface of the planet served those who lived in the clouds and eventually revolted. Mountaintop itself is a microcosm of that dynamic while the larger world mirrors it. Little do those who live below know that most of the humans live a culturally barren existence. This is a very enjoyable and strong first novel with a nice twist to the usual “Hunger Games” and “Insurgent” knockoffs. My main nitpick would be with the character of Icelyn. She comes across as whiny, privileged and uncompromising in her beliefs until it suits her needs. Then she is willing to toss it away in order to maintain the privileged position she lost on Mountaintop. However, since this is the first book in the series, I suspect the writer is setting us up for a slow character arc and Icelyn will gradually learn that being a God comes with consequences she may not have anticipated Since my time is very limited, I usually read before I go to bed and this was the first book in a while where I looked forward to getting to it when the house got quiet. I very much want to learn what happens in this beautiful, yet tortured world that Mr. Latshaw has created. Kuddos to him for doing such a fine job. This review was originally posted on Fanboy Comics.

  9. 5 out of 5

    SheReads

    Wow - there's so much I want to say about this book. When I flipped the final page on my kindle, I immediately came to goodreads to see if the second book is out yet. Alas, I will have to wait. First of all, let me say that I don't do weird. The mutts in the Hunger Games took Mockingjay down a notch for me and I would never touch a book like The Fifth Wave if Rick Yancey's commentary on humanity didn't hit me right in the feels. Well, parts of this book got weird and I was surprised that I found Wow - there's so much I want to say about this book. When I flipped the final page on my kindle, I immediately came to goodreads to see if the second book is out yet. Alas, I will have to wait. First of all, let me say that I don't do weird. The mutts in the Hunger Games took Mockingjay down a notch for me and I would never touch a book like The Fifth Wave if Rick Yancey's commentary on humanity didn't hit me right in the feels. Well, parts of this book got weird and I was surprised that I found myself loving it. That's a testament to the quality of the writing that it can take a genre skeptic like myself and turn them into a believer. Now, onto the book. Humanity is on it's last legs. Hundreds of years ago, they retreated high up into the mountains to escape the end of their way of living that was happening below. The current residents have stories and legends about the creatures that lurk below but no one that has ventured down has ever returned so that's all they are - myths. When their water supply is poisoned from far below cloudline, an expedition into the unknown must be taken. Icelyn is a teenage girl destined to be the next leader of her people because of the name she bares. But, when she doubts her father's methods of ruling, she has a decision to make. What she finds as a result of that decision is more than she could have ever imagined. I loved every single character in this story and the world that has been created is outstanding. I could see it all so clearly and I was oddly fascinated and terrified at the same time. Sure, there were a few things I didn't particularly like (the ending comes to mind), but when I can't stop reading and finish desperate for more, that book deserves as many stars as I'm allowed to give.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle the 小書蟲

    I went in not knowing what to expect. I found that it's truly deeper than what meets the eye. The exposition of The Threat Below is incredibly long, and, well, odd. Actually, the whole book was a bit odd, but not necessarily in bad ways all the time. The first thing that jumped out at me was the strangely longwinded and almost cringe-worthy dialogue, which extended to our main character, Icelyn Brathius's stream of consciousness when the story is told from her POV. It took a little while to inter I went in not knowing what to expect. I found that it's truly deeper than what meets the eye. The exposition of The Threat Below is incredibly long, and, well, odd. Actually, the whole book was a bit odd, but not necessarily in bad ways all the time. The first thing that jumped out at me was the strangely longwinded and almost cringe-worthy dialogue, which extended to our main character, Icelyn Brathius's stream of consciousness when the story is told from her POV. It took a little while to internalize that this was just the stilted, stiff customs of the humans' world on their little perch on the mountain. Their society operates in ways that are completely foreign to my mind; I've never read of a society like this before. Honestly, I was initially very put off by the names of our protagonists and their fellow townspeople. I admit my pickiness on names might have a little too much control over my impressions on how a book is going to go, but after The Threat Below, I think I've been unfair. I just really wasn't feeling "Icelyn," "Adorane" (pronounced 'ah-DOOR-ah-nay', as the author was oddly quick to point out) and "Aclornis," okay? But OH, the character development. Mr. Latshaw, your characters won me over by the time I was 1/4 of the way through this story. In the beginning, for a very long time (it's an extremely long book, for YA), our 3 main protagonists are defineable by simplistic traits (one might even say overly simplistic). But they all begin to have their individual, active arcs, and I can't help but come to like them. I've learned to be patient with getting to know characters I might be doubtful of from reading this book. There are basically two "worlds," and both are shrouded in so much haziness that you won't get clear answers as to the history of either the Mountaintop or the Down Below for a very long time. It goes hand-in-hand with the themes, which, my goodness, are absolutely the best part about The Threat Below. The themes make this book so unique for a post-apocalyptic, dystopian YA. There's just so much about the loss of children's innocence as they grow up and realize cold truths hidden behind the lies they've grown up with, and the dangers, as well as the tragedies that paternalism cause for both individuals and a collective society. The Threat Below brings to light the struggle all people who grow up must face: finding out for themselves what the "truth" is, and what to believe despite what "has always been" and how their communities and parents raised them. This is a story of young people questioning and venturing out of what they'd always thought their reality was. Among the other themes are the stubborness of bigotry and arrogance in the nature of humans, countered by love and openmindedness. This isn't a fluffy "love conquers all" deal, but it's a truther about how our world has always been—the good and the bad. I really think teenagers and adults (young, new, and adult-adults all included) should pick this book up. It's extremely eye-opening in the most surprising, and sometimes subtle, ways. The plot's pace was not consistent—extremely slow for the first half, and extremely fast in the last eighth or so. I only get hooked about 60% to 65% into it, but putting it down after that was very difficult. I felt like I was really there learning and discovering things as our 3 young ones were. I loved seeing their wonder about a world they'd only heard about in old stories and legends (our world, today). There were many scenes that read more like a fantasy than dystopian, but that is just one of the quirks of this unique book. I will say that the ending was unexpectedly abrupt, which definitely calls for the sequel. When it comes out, I hope to read it. The Threat Below is a YA dystopian/post-apocalypse that is so different from anything else I've ever read, and I was pleasantly surprised by how attached I grew to it. It's truly opened the floodgates for me to start reading more non-mainstream books. Thank you, Mr. Jason Latshaw, for opening my mind up to ideas and possibilities that I never knew I never knew!

  11. 4 out of 5

    L.J. Higgins

    I LOVED this book, and despite its length, I didn’t once lose interest and could not put it down. It was an epic adventure unlike any I have read before. Icelynn Brathius, lives in a post-apocalyptic world on the top of a mountain, which is always surrounded in cloud, making it impossible to view the world below. The small community are the only humans that survived when the threat below began to slaughter the rest of their kind. Who and what are the threat below? No-one knows, and no-one dares I LOVED this book, and despite its length, I didn’t once lose interest and could not put it down. It was an epic adventure unlike any I have read before. Icelynn Brathius, lives in a post-apocalyptic world on the top of a mountain, which is always surrounded in cloud, making it impossible to view the world below. The small community are the only humans that survived when the threat below began to slaughter the rest of their kind. Who and what are the threat below? No-one knows, and no-one dares to find out for themselves. That is until a situation arises where the communities lives depend on a small group who are chosen to save them all. (Sorry my description is so vague, don’t want to give anything away!) This book had me hooked from the beginning. The characters were real, they had their strengths and flaws, and each of them were products of their different upbringings. To be honest I found it hard to pick a favourite, each of them made me hate and love them at different points throughout the story, but where this would normally turn me off, it was done in a way that made me love them more. I could never have predicted where this story would go and gave up trying to work out what was going to happen next. Instead I let it take me on a journey through the world Jason Latshaw created. I can’t wait to read the next installment in this series, and have a weird desire to see a threat below! I highly recommend this book!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Bickerstaff

    Thoroughly enjoyable read This is essentially an epic YA dystopian sci-fi fantasy but it will appeal to readers of any age. It centres on two human societies - those on top of the mountain and those who live below the cloud line who threaten the survival of those on the mountain top. Central character, Icelyn Brathius and a group must bravely descend below the cloud line and into the unknown to deal with the threat. I like Icelyn, she is a well-drawn and fascinating with surprising and unusual fa Thoroughly enjoyable read This is essentially an epic YA dystopian sci-fi fantasy but it will appeal to readers of any age. It centres on two human societies - those on top of the mountain and those who live below the cloud line who threaten the survival of those on the mountain top. Central character, Icelyn Brathius and a group must bravely descend below the cloud line and into the unknown to deal with the threat. I like Icelyn, she is a well-drawn and fascinating with surprising and unusual facets to her character. The fascinating world in which the story takes place is very well imagined and easy to follow. I enjoyed the story, which does have some slow flat spots and is a little too long for my personal taste but it is well written and balanced with good action/adventure and interesting characters that kept me turning the pages. Highly recommended.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Cunningham

    Jason Latshaw’s THE THREAT BELOW is a gripping YA post-apocalyptic adventure story set three centuries after an unexplained event (called “The Great Death”) destroyed most human life on Earth. The few remaining humans (100 in total) are living in a place called “Mountaintop,” at the top of a great mountain, protected from the enigmatic “Threat Below” by a huge Wall and a thick ring of dense clouds called the “Cloudline.” The society’s “Code” prohibits any resident of Mountaintop from venturing b Jason Latshaw’s THE THREAT BELOW is a gripping YA post-apocalyptic adventure story set three centuries after an unexplained event (called “The Great Death”) destroyed most human life on Earth. The few remaining humans (100 in total) are living in a place called “Mountaintop,” at the top of a great mountain, protected from the enigmatic “Threat Below” by a huge Wall and a thick ring of dense clouds called the “Cloudline.” The society’s “Code” prohibits any resident of Mountaintop from venturing beyond the Wall and the Cloudline for fear of the Threat Below. The central protagonist is 17-year-old Icelyn Brathius, daughter of the colony’s leader and descendent of the man who led the survivors up the mountain in the first place. When the colony’s water supply is mysteriously poisoned, Icelyn and two of her friends end up risking everything to descend from Mountaintop and discover what’s really going on in the world Below. The first part of this novel focuses on Icelyn’s society on Mountaintop – how it works, how it’s ruled, and what life is like for Icelyn and her two potential boyfriends, Adorane (“Ah-dor-ah-nay”) and Torrain. The colony is made up of two distinct classes, the physically strong Veritas and the intellectually strong Cognate. The Cognate are the ruling class, while the Veritas are the society’s labor force. This is a claustrophobic society with limited space, even more limited resources, and few freedoms. Marriages are arranged (Torrain is Icelyn’s “Intended,” even though she feels more drawn to Adorane), and all decisions are made by the Chief Cognate, who isn’t a particularly strong leader. Because of that, things in Mountaintop begin to fall apart after the water is poisoned, especially when the Chief’s power-hungry advisor embarks on a dangerous plan to claim leadership for himself. But Icelyn’s story is the heart of the novel. Her journey down the mountain is both dangerous and exciting, and the farther she gets from the only world she has ever known, the more she learns about what really happened centuries ago . . . and why. The mystery is a compelling one, and it’s definitely what kept me reading. I wanted to know the answers – and there are answers. What Icelyn discovers is both horrifying and totally believable. Knowing this is the first of a planned series of books, I was concerned that Latshaw would leave us waiting before revealing the truth. But he doesn’t. While there is definitely plenty of room for sequels, THE THREAT BELOW has a real resolution and a satisfying conclusion in its own right. I still look forward to the second book, but not because of a frustrating cliff-hanger! The most interesting aspects of this novel are definitely its focus on philosophy and religion. There is no approved religion in Mountaintop, but that hasn’t kept the Veritas from secretly practicing ancient religious beliefs. And the creatures Icelyn and her friends encounter Below have their own form of religion, one that involves Icelyn and the Brathius family. Latshaw raises questions about whether religion (and belief in God and Heaven) is a help or a hindrance. Icelyn suspects that such magical thinking (as she sees it) is a false way of looking at the world, but Adorane (who’s a Veritas, and was raised to believe) finds it comforting. This debate is further complicated by Icelyn’s decision to play a god-like role herself with the creatures she meets Below. Is she helping them or hurting them? Additionally, the novel explores human attitudes and behavior by shining a very harsh light on how and why the world as we know it was destroyed. While Icelyn is Below discovering the truth about her own history, her little colony on Mountaintop is learning what human greed, anger, and thirst for power can produce. We’re used to stories in which humans battle monsters; this is a story about how monstrous we humans can become. I do have a few minor criticisms of this novel. First, the POV shifts can be confusing. Some chapters are narrated by Icelyn, but other chapters (and even parts of Icelyn’s chapters) are told in third person by an omniscient narrator. This can get confusing, especially when it happens within one chapter. One minute Icelyn is telling us what’s happening, and the next minute a third-person narrator is picking up her story. There are also a few consistency problems that had me scratching my head. For example, Icelyn speaks of attending school, taking essay tests, and participating in an elocution class, all of which seem ridiculous for a girl raised on an isolated mountaintop hundreds of years after the fall of humanity! With a society this small (there are only 100 citizens in Mountaintop, and only 36 of them are Cognates, most of those being adults), the whole concept of traditional school (with public speaking classes and essay tests) makes little sense. Additionally, it’s unlikely that flashlight batteries and oxygen tanks would still function after three centuries! Finally, what happens in the last few chapters happens so fast, with so little development and so little time to process, that I was left wondering why. This is such a well-crafted and thoughtful novel, but the final conflict felt oddly anticlimactic. But those are minor quibbles in what is definitely an exciting, thought-provoking, and engaging adventure story. Ultimately, THE THREAT BELOW reminds me a lot of Justin Cronin’s THE PASSAGE trilogy (there’s a similarity in plot and message), as well as the rebooted “Planet of the Apes” films (humanity’s role in the decimation of the planet is a major theme). But Latshaw’s novel is definitely his own. I highly recommend THE THREAT BELOW for both teen and adult readers. And I will definitely keep my eye out for the sequel!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ronesa Aveela

    The setting for this dystopian novel is atop a mountain to escape from the Threat Below, creatures their ancestors fled from 300 years earlier. Some doubt their existence, along with so many other things written about the civilization their ancestors lived in: tall buildings for one, since they cannot seem to build them on the mountain. The thinking going that if it can't exist here, then how could it possibly exist elsewhere. Along those same lines, there's a bit of a religious undertone to the The setting for this dystopian novel is atop a mountain to escape from the Threat Below, creatures their ancestors fled from 300 years earlier. Some doubt their existence, along with so many other things written about the civilization their ancestors lived in: tall buildings for one, since they cannot seem to build them on the mountain. The thinking going that if it can't exist here, then how could it possibly exist elsewhere. Along those same lines, there's a bit of a religious undertone to the story, but one that provides both sides to the question of God and life after death. I think that's one of the things that kept my interest: a deeper look at life and death. The novel is quite long, but I enjoyed the build up to the journey down the mountain, where the pace picks up and becomes more exciting. It's a unique story and had some twists I wasn't expecting. I think I especially love Eveshone, with her childlike innocence, but killer nature.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This is a post-apocalyptic tale featuring teen leads and set in a throw-back world that offers new challenges and new adventures to the people who inhabit it. As the teens do what teens do, rebelling against authority, following their curiosity into new situations—the dangers be damned—the tale opens up accordingly into forbidden realms of ever-increasing peril. Unlike many such tales, this one has a pleasant feel of adventure to it, which strikes an upbeat note against all the darkness.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stephen R.

    This Young Adult novel is Jason Latshaw's debut book, and he's set the bar high. Though clearly of the YA genre, this dystopian story will appeal to readers of any age who enjoy fantasy, adventure, and love triangles. It's also a book, quite unusual for a YA novel, that will appeal equally to both males and females. The story itself is original and intriguing, with heaps of excitement and fast-paced action. The characters are intricately developed, and it's impossible not to find yourself invest This Young Adult novel is Jason Latshaw's debut book, and he's set the bar high. Though clearly of the YA genre, this dystopian story will appeal to readers of any age who enjoy fantasy, adventure, and love triangles. It's also a book, quite unusual for a YA novel, that will appeal equally to both males and females. The story itself is original and intriguing, with heaps of excitement and fast-paced action. The characters are intricately developed, and it's impossible not to find yourself invested in how events unfold for them. The scene descriptions are so enchanting that all senses are set alight. Latshaw has proven himself to be an imaginative and intelligent writer, with a skill for maintaining pace and interest while not neglecting character and plot development. This is a highly recommended read of an epic tale that serves as truly indulgent and enjoyable escapism.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Valery

    The Threat Below (Brathius History, #1) by Jason Latshaw is a post-apocalyptic book for the YA audience that packs a punch and is beautifully written. The “threat below” could be anything that is disruptive or different in your life, an event that proves to be life-changing. That appears to be the overarching undercurrent message here, wrapped in a science fiction package. Icelyn is a well described character, one who carries the expansive story well. She rises to the many challenges she faces w The Threat Below (Brathius History, #1) by Jason Latshaw is a post-apocalyptic book for the YA audience that packs a punch and is beautifully written. The “threat below” could be anything that is disruptive or different in your life, an event that proves to be life-changing. That appears to be the overarching undercurrent message here, wrapped in a science fiction package. Icelyn is a well described character, one who carries the expansive story well. She rises to the many challenges she faces with courage and intelligence. Fine writing makes this a must read that will entertain older folks as well, not just the YA age group. Well done, and looking forward to book two in this promising futuristic series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pegboard

    The Threat Below by Jason Latshaw begins with a civilization that lives up on the mountain top, above the clouds. Their society is small with three main social groups that comprise of leaders, laborers, and scholars. With their limited resources they can only allow a hundred people. Nicolas Brathius leads with group, but the people wait the time when his daughter, Icelyn is crowned. But Nicolas is manipulated and his daughter is banished. When her friend takes her place she must try to stop him, The Threat Below by Jason Latshaw begins with a civilization that lives up on the mountain top, above the clouds. Their society is small with three main social groups that comprise of leaders, laborers, and scholars. With their limited resources they can only allow a hundred people. Nicolas Brathius leads with group, but the people wait the time when his daughter, Icelyn is crowned. But Nicolas is manipulated and his daughter is banished. When her friend takes her place she must try to stop him, no matter the monsters on the other side of the wall. I could not give accurately convey the suspense and anticipation that Jason Latshaw weaves within the pages of The Threat Below. At first the plot seems simple enough, but it unfolds into a more thrilling and complex story. The pace quickens as danger creeps closer to the characters. I love how Icelyn adapts quickly as she is forced into difficult situations. Her loyalty makes her a great leader that her community recognized from her youth. She learns from her mistakes and faces the truth about the lies pasted down for generations. This novel gives us a glimpse into the factitious world of the author and realms in which he lives when he steps out of reality.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Monica Reents

    I received an ebook copy of this book for review. Thank you. I love post apocalyptic novels and it has been awhile since I have read one that I enjoyed this much! The main character is 17 years old and is facing changes in his life that show him that what he thought he knew of his world, is not always true. I began reading this book and soon found myself unable to put it down! I love the pacing, action, adventure, dystopian worlds, and the creative world building is astounding. The character grow I received an ebook copy of this book for review. Thank you. I love post apocalyptic novels and it has been awhile since I have read one that I enjoyed this much! The main character is 17 years old and is facing changes in his life that show him that what he thought he knew of his world, is not always true. I began reading this book and soon found myself unable to put it down! I love the pacing, action, adventure, dystopian worlds, and the creative world building is astounding. The character growth was well written and I thought the plot of the story was written in a way that kept the story moving forward. Although this is a young adult fantasy novel, I would recommend this to anyone who loves fantasy, dystopian based stories. Very impressive debut!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Island Rose

    A great read! I really did enjoy The Threat Below, a real fast-paced page-turner that I could not put down. Latshaw touches on some very important social topics too, which for me made the book all the more interesting. The characters have really quirky names and attitudes, Icelyn the main character was of course my favourite. I think other readers will find that this is a book that will not disappoint and I highly recommend.

  21. 5 out of 5

    ReadingInTheBurrow

    Thank you to the author Jason Latshaw for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review. This book was such a pleasant surprise! At just over 500 pages, I thought this would take me a little while to get through but I was wrong! I was hooked from the beginning, and it was so hard to put down! Set 300 years after a threat nearly destroyed all of humanity, the remaining humans (called the Kith) are living on Mountaintop, a small village at the top of the highest mountain. The only place they a Thank you to the author Jason Latshaw for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review. This book was such a pleasant surprise! At just over 500 pages, I thought this would take me a little while to get through but I was wrong! I was hooked from the beginning, and it was so hard to put down! Set 300 years after a threat nearly destroyed all of humanity, the remaining humans (called the Kith) are living on Mountaintop, a small village at the top of the highest mountain. The only place they are safe from the 'Threat Below'. Latshaw introduces a really intriguing society, with the population being split into 'Cognates' and 'Veritas', each with different advantages and opportunities. It was so interesting to read about how this civilisation has survived and Latshaw feeds the information to us well so it's not too heavy. As we follow our main character Icelyn through her life in the Kith, we learn about their various laws, and understand how this society works, along with the history of the 'Ascension', back when the first humans climbed to safety. In addition to the fantastic world-building, the suspense created was excellent. There were so many instances where Latshaw would finish a chapter with such a cliff-hanger (honestly, the stress in this book!!), and in the next chapter we would switch focus onto another character. You just have to continue reading! The journey to solve the main mystery (what was the Threat Below?) was handled so well! The reader learns small things about the Threat Below at the same time as Icelyn does, sharing in her confusion and surprise. And every time, a new question arises, urging the reader forward. Latshaw manages to make you really feel for the characters. I loved the character growth as our main characters learn more about The Threat Below and seeing how they dealt with the information. One character in particular, at the beginning, I found them so annoying, but by the end they were one of my favourites. Oh, and there's also some romance ;) Another thing I liked which I want to point out was the interesting fact that though this society is 'backward' in the sense that they don't have electricity and other modern appliances, they are also 'modern' in the way that they don't follow a religion or a book, which was written many years ago. There are some interesting conversations between two of the main characters about religion, and I especially liked when Icelyn held her ground even when the other character could be a bit overbearing with their thoughts. This was not the only instance when Icelyn admirably stayed true to herself and did what she thought was right, even when her own best friend said otherwise. Overall, I really loved this book. It was so emotional, and I felt such love towards some of the characters. If you're looking for a fast-paced dystopian read with a rich cast of characters, then I highly recommend this book!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Angel White (Certified_Book_Nerd)

    Humanity was once a thriving population until a terrible threat almost ended them. Remaining survivors made their way high up into the mountains, where the Threat Below (as they became known) could not go. Three hundred years later, humanity is surviving, broken into groups with their lives and jobs set out for them. Rigid rules are followed in order to keep the population thriving, as well as manageable. It is soon discovered that the only supply of water for the entire Mountaintop has become poi Humanity was once a thriving population until a terrible threat almost ended them. Remaining survivors made their way high up into the mountains, where the Threat Below (as they became known) could not go. Three hundred years later, humanity is surviving, broken into groups with their lives and jobs set out for them. Rigid rules are followed in order to keep the population thriving, as well as manageable. It is soon discovered that the only supply of water for the entire Mountaintop has become poisoned. A decision is made and, despite no one setting foot outside The Wall in 300 years, a small regiment is sent Down Below to see what is causing the water poisoning and fix it. Meanwhile, behind the regiment, follws Icelyn Brathius (next in line to rule the Mountaintop). She wants to be a part of the expedition and see what is Down Below. Little does she know that the secrets she uncovers will change everything. For fans of YA Dystopian type reads, this is definitely for you. Great characters, world building and setting. It was easy to really picture the places and creatures described. I loved the way human life, before the Threat Below, is explained. It's very creative! Icelyn is a young yet strong female lead. She did irritate me a tad but that's to be expected as she changes, adapts and grows. Adoradne is what I expected, a hard-headed, yet intelligent, boy who wants to test the limits placed and break the rules. It's great lol. The comraderie between Icelyn and Adoradne is light, sarcastic and well... enjoyable. We all have that friend who can bring out the best..and the worst but is always steadfast in their friendship. Overall a really unique, and fun read. I sincerely appreciate the author gifting me a copy of this E-Book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed herein, are mine and mine alone.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melina Lobo

    ‘The greatest pain is the love you leave behind.’ 🦄🦄🦄 After living for 300 years on the Mountaintop, those who survived the threat below find that the little water supply they have is being poisoned. Sent on an expedition to find out why, Icelyn finds herself on this journey unexpectedly, but everything happens for a reason. Along with unlikely companions, Icelyn uncovers the secret of her ancestors and the threat below. 🦄🦄🦄 The Threat Below is a fantasy, dystopian, adventure novel by J.S. Latshaw and ‘The greatest pain is the love you leave behind.’ 🦄🦄🦄 After living for 300 years on the Mountaintop, those who survived the threat below find that the little water supply they have is being poisoned. Sent on an expedition to find out why, Icelyn finds herself on this journey unexpectedly, but everything happens for a reason. Along with unlikely companions, Icelyn uncovers the secret of her ancestors and the threat below. 🦄🦄🦄 The Threat Below is a fantasy, dystopian, adventure novel by J.S. Latshaw and the first in the series. One of the major things I love about this book is the worldbuilding because this whole story is an adventure so the more we venture into the book, the more the world expands. My favourite part of the story, (the one that had me impressed) was a certain flashback that made me wonder will this be our future if an 'event' like this is currently taking place or will take place withoutour knowledge? (using 'event' as a VERY generic term since I can't think of another term, whatever you're trying to guess it means, it doesn't 😂.) I was also surprised that for a fantasy novel, the focus on religion as one of the sub-genres was interesting and unexpected. Coming to the main character, Icelyn, honestly she's not my favourite. I was more annoyed with her throughout the book than I thought I would be. She was written well as a characterto suit the story, but I just didn't like her because her personality irks me. My biggest annoyance was having to read through multiple POVs because each chapter is a different POV, and I understand the need for different POVs in this instance, but some of them being so short and some talking about irrelevant instances in the book only lengthens the story without need (Or they could have been merged into one chapter). The POVs also shift between first and third person so that was not fun. The overall story was not amazing, but still over average for me because of certain unique elements but if written and compiled better I would have enjoyed it more. Overall, the book is lengthy, but if fantasy or dystopian is something you are interested in, it won't take long to finish. 🦄🦄🦄 Rated 7.5/10 Melina L.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on our blog by clicking here. There was this trend in young adult books where everyone and their mothers could only write, talk and look at dystopias. Don’t act all surprised. I’m pretty sure you can name a couple hundred of series right off the top of your head. Today, we’ve got a whole new trend that focuses more on retellings. Oh, the famous modern retellings written in order to reach and please the fans and those who are oblivious to the source material. Wouldn’t it be You can find my review on our blog by clicking here. There was this trend in young adult books where everyone and their mothers could only write, talk and look at dystopias. Don’t act all surprised. I’m pretty sure you can name a couple hundred of series right off the top of your head. Today, we’ve got a whole new trend that focuses more on retellings. Oh, the famous modern retellings written in order to reach and please the fans and those who are oblivious to the source material. Wouldn’t it be nice to spice up our lives again with another dystopia featuring a female lead and a post-apocalyptic setting? Cue darkness. Cue spotlight. Here’s The Threat Below. Following the Great Death that nearly eliminated humanity from the face of the Earth, the descendants of the now remaining hundred individuals live at the top of a mountain. They call this village Mountaintop and it is protected by giant wall to keep away the very creatures that pushed humanity to the brink of extinction. A thick and opaque cloud line also surrounds the mountain, right after the wall. Impossible to see what’s beyond, citizens of Mountaintop live in isolation and desire nothing more than harmony in their well-structured, yet primitive, society. Until their water source is poisoned. In search for answers, a chain of events is unleashed and 17 year-old Icelyn is off on an adventure that will unearth the buried secrets of the past and awaken a force that shouldn’t be reckoned with. The Threat Below could make up for an interesting TV show with all the wonderful ideas that are spread throughout the book. In all honestly, Jason Latshaw had a mass of ideas to make sure this novel felt post-apocalyptic. The novel was so rich in theses ideas, I could basically smell the dystopia all over it. In fact, the whole novel is built upon solid and well-documented premises for a dystopia. Because the chapters were extremely short, but numerous, it was nearly impossible to avoid pointing out all the ideas one by one. From a restricted and controlled allocation of resources for survival to the division of the people in different factions (this book preferred to split the humans in Veritas and Cognates), you’re bound to feel the heavy density of the high altitudes. Although Jason Latshaw didn’t hide his various attempts in building the perfect world for his story, the themes discussed are intriguing. The best part of this novel lies in the world-building. Humanity is restrained to live their lives on the tip of a mountain, and if that wasn’t obvious enough, the privileges they have are stripped down to a need-to-survive basis. While the Cognates are seen as intellectually superior, their faction has evolved without pleasures as we know them (music, art, freedom to love whom we wish, etc.). The Veritas, obeying the orders of the Cognates in order to maintain the harmony in the society, have a much more similar culture and beliefs as their common ancestors before The Great Death happened. While the two factions live their lives with the sole intention to survive and perpetuate the existence of humans, the story leads readers to discover all the thing they take for granted in our current age and time; yes, of course, I’m talking about our age and time, my friend. As Icelyn and friends discover the secrets of the past, they also question some fundamental existential questions (sometimes weakly approached) and make this novel a fascinating read (and sometimes a poor one). My biggest downsides to Jason Latshaw’s debut novel is the ensemble of characters and the narration. As much as I enjoyed the succulent ideas implemented in the novel, I fear the characters (especially our dear protagonist) ruined it all for me. Icelyn’s thought processes and decision-making is dumbfounding; especially when she’s the main narrator for most of the novel. Her character simply annoyed me too much. From the moment she was introduced, I knew there was no way she was going to evolve into someone more likable or realistic. Her tone, her reactions, her attitude, there’s nothing satisfying in her presence. To top it off, her adventure unveils some really big twists, but her adaptation to these events was really outlandish, impossible to understand and beyond reason. It also didn’t help that there was a ridiculous love triangle in the mix. I understand that Icelyn (a Cognate) hasn’t known physical contact or learned the depths of love in her life, but the love triangle that was implemented in The Threat Below was just awkward and unnecessary. At least Icelyn’s sidekicks had some more interesting aspects to their personas; although the whole cast were a burden to carry around the adventure. I really think that if it weren’t for the world-building and the various themes that were tackled upon, this book would’ve flopped. With weak characters that tried too hard to be something, a porous narration was all that was needed to drag this down. And that’s what we get. With the innumerable transitions, there was no way I was going to get hooked to the characters. As much as having 1st class seats into the mind of the protagonist should give great insight, this narration did nothing more than showcase flaws, after flaws, after flaws. Although the ending was easily predictable, The Threat Below is filled with potential. It explores themes from love, religion to creativity, and never seizes to find an interesting angle to explore. The characters and the narration might have dragged the experience to something borderline enjoyable, I still thought this novel is quite an adventure and could deliver a strong sequel. There might have been some major plot holes and some rushing through events, here and then, but the overall experience leads me conclude that The Threat Below is worth a short. Compared to various other dystopian tales, this young adult novel has an interesting vision and Jason Latshaw doesn’t shy from diving into some controversial themes thanks to his unique world-building. In fact, there are a thing or two we can learn from this. Hopefully, the next installment will deliver on all fronts. Yours truly, Lashaan Lashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book Reviewers Official blog: http://bookidote.wordpress.com _____________________________ There's some really interesting ideas scattered around the story. I enjoyed how it flipped the way we see the world thanks to the world-building. In fact, by making the main character's world look primitive helped enormously in making all her discoveries more fascinating (even if this is a post--apocalyptic future). However, the characters are very annoying. They're filled with flaws and are utterly incoherent. The protagonist showcases this the most. The narration is also one to add headaches. The constant flipping between point of views and the annoying voice of Icelyn (the main character) made the adventure something I wanted to end as soon as possible. Sadly, the obvious ending didn't help in making this novel a better debut novel. P.S. A full review to come very soon. Yours truly, Lashaan Lashaan & Trang | Bloggers and Book Reviewers Official blog: http://bookidote.wordpress.com

  25. 5 out of 5

    Thais • tata.lifepages •

    Rating: 3.5 stars The Threat Below starts off intriguing: the descendants on the Mountaintop discover that their water supply is being poisoned from Down Below. The main character, Icelyn, has to go Down Below, and that's when the real fun starts: there's a threat around every corner, and Icelyn discovers secret after secret. This book had me on the edge of my seat when the third part started and Icelyn went Down Below. I wanted to know what happened next, and couldn't stop reading! The world-buil Rating: 3.5 stars The Threat Below starts off intriguing: the descendants on the Mountaintop discover that their water supply is being poisoned from Down Below. The main character, Icelyn, has to go Down Below, and that's when the real fun starts: there's a threat around every corner, and Icelyn discovers secret after secret. This book had me on the edge of my seat when the third part started and Icelyn went Down Below. I wanted to know what happened next, and couldn't stop reading! The world-building was exquisite, and I found myself even forgetting the world around me. The only thing that was lacking for me a bit was the character development, however the chemistry between the main character and side characters was great, and I lived for the conversations and banter between them. Super excited for the sequel!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chiara | _ckarys

    I was gifted an ebook copy by the author to review. Rating: 3.5 stars The Threat Below is the first book in a YA post-apocalyptic fantasy series in which humanity has migrated on top of a mountain village to escape extinction by the hands of humanoid monsters from “Down Below”. Given the author’s screenwriting background, it comes as no surprise that this book was as engaging and heart-stopping as a fantasy or dystopian movie! There was action and mystery around every corner, which is especially en I was gifted an ebook copy by the author to review. Rating: 3.5 stars The Threat Below is the first book in a YA post-apocalyptic fantasy series in which humanity has migrated on top of a mountain village to escape extinction by the hands of humanoid monsters from “Down Below”. Given the author’s screenwriting background, it comes as no surprise that this book was as engaging and heart-stopping as a fantasy or dystopian movie! There was action and mystery around every corner, which is especially enjoyable given the size of this chunky book. Every chapter seemed to end in a cliffhanger, which kept me hooked. The writing style was easy to follow and entertaining, though it took some getting used to the shifts in perspectives (Icelyn’s chapters are told in first person, while the others are in third person). The aspect that fascinated me most of all was the world-building. The narration moves between the world of Mountaintop (the human village on the mountain) and that of Down Below, home of the Threat Belows who have caused the near-extinction of humanity. Every aspect of both of these worlds is fleshed out in minute detail. The references to the world as we know it, with technologies that are a thing of the past in this world, was a treat, as it was fascinating to see how humanity’s mindset seemed to have taken a step back in terms of mentalities, traditions and beliefs. At the same time, I loved learning more of the Threat Belows—how they came to be, the origins of their history of violence and their motivations moving forward. I liked to call them my Post-Apocalyptic Gollums, and just like the famous character in The Lord of the Rings franchise, I alternated between feeling sorry for the pain they went through, feeling affection for their child-like naiveté and being terrified of their violent outbursts. The one aspect I would have liked more of were the characters, toward whom I have conflicting feelings. On the one hand, the immaturity of the main characters, Icelyn, Adorane and Torrain, was justifiable by their age, which actually is a merit to the author for the realistic representation. However, I struggled to believe in the volatility of their emotions toward one another and I had difficulty understanding Icelyn’s god complex in relation to the Threat Belows. I also would have liked a more prominent, mature adult presence in the book to balance things out. Overall, I recommend this book to lovers of fantasy and dystopian novels rich with intrigue and action, along the lines of The Lord of the Rings and The Hunger Games.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hayden (bookish.hayden)

    I really enjoyed this book! I don't find myself reading a lot of dystopian novels, but maybe I should be? I think the premise of this is a fresh take on the genre, and done very well. I think the last dystopian series I read would've been my re-read of Hunger Games this year, and before that the Red Queen series. This is a debut novel, but it didn't feel like one, and we love that. With humanity on the brink of extinction, the remaining human population is located atop a mountain, isolated from I really enjoyed this book! I don't find myself reading a lot of dystopian novels, but maybe I should be? I think the premise of this is a fresh take on the genre, and done very well. I think the last dystopian series I read would've been my re-read of Hunger Games this year, and before that the Red Queen series. This is a debut novel, but it didn't feel like one, and we love that. With humanity on the brink of extinction, the remaining human population is located atop a mountain, isolated from the terrifying threat below. When their water supply is discovered to be poisoned, a group of people, including 17 year-old Icelyn Brathius, must brave the monsters below to solve their problem. What they find down below flips Icelyn's entire life upside down, can they solve the problem? Initially I found Icelyn a tough character to like. She is very opinionated, and thinks very highly of herself. But like I've mentioned with previous reviews, I find that when a character is tough to like in the way that Icelyn is, it's often due to very smart writing, which I think is the case here. We see her go through so much, and see her character shift and grow in places. Adorane and Torrain were interesting companions, I like that we got to read from them. Actually I generally just loved every perspective we got. The plot of this book was nice. Every action made sense, and was driven by another action or person. The twist in this book, that Icelyn finds down below, was so interesting. The chapter where the involvement of the Brathius' is revealed was so juicy and fun, I could not put the book down after it! And oh man was the end of this book ever a wild ride. Overall I really enjoyed this. I found the writing of this to be very nice. I think the way that Latshaw slipped between perspectives was great, it made this debut novel pop for me. I'm glad I have the sequel, because I'm SO curious as to what happens next!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Richel (letsreadshallwe)

    Thank you to the author for providing me with a copy of The Threat Below in exchange for an honest review. I DNF’d this book at 40% though I tried not to, it’s just not working for me. The narrative was off-putting as it jumps from first person to third person all throughout the chapters that I’ve finished. I like multiple POVs, however, this was poorly executed. The POV keeps on changing that makes it so confusing. In most chapters, POV changed multiple times within a single chapter. The character Thank you to the author for providing me with a copy of The Threat Below in exchange for an honest review. I DNF’d this book at 40% though I tried not to, it’s just not working for me. The narrative was off-putting as it jumps from first person to third person all throughout the chapters that I’ve finished. I like multiple POVs, however, this was poorly executed. The POV keeps on changing that makes it so confusing. In most chapters, POV changed multiple times within a single chapter. The characters are not likeable enough. I don’t like stupid characters and this book has a few of them. I don’t recall the characters being described properly hence I can’t even picture them in my head. Did I miss that part? Timeline and pacing is also off, while other scenes take weeks, the next scene could be as quick as few minutes. Also, there’s a lot of parentheses, I understand that an explanation is needed but I wished it was executed better. The idea is interesting although I’ve seen similarity with the film Smallfoot by Warner Bros. Who came up with the idea first? I have no answer to that but what I know is this book is not for me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maria Elena | _mkarys

    Actual Rating: 3.5 stars The Threat Below is the first book in the Brathius History series. It is set in a post-apocalyptic version of our world three hundred years in the future. What I enjoyed most of this book was the incredible world-building. The survivors of the human race live on top of the Mountain, where a rigid social structure is set in place. There is the elite intellectual class of the Cognates, and the worker class known as Veritas. The author did a wonderful job at showing the diff Actual Rating: 3.5 stars The Threat Below is the first book in the Brathius History series. It is set in a post-apocalyptic version of our world three hundred years in the future. What I enjoyed most of this book was the incredible world-building. The survivors of the human race live on top of the Mountain, where a rigid social structure is set in place. There is the elite intellectual class of the Cognates, and the worker class known as Veritas. The author did a wonderful job at showing the differences between the classes, and the deep-rooted prejudices and bigotry of the Cognates toward the Veritas, who they deem to be lesser. This rigidness atop the Mountain is brutal, for anyone who doesn’t fit the established canons deemed worthy by the Cognates is exiled to live the rest of their lives Below, where living—or better yet, surviving is difficult because of the monsters that plague the land, the Threat Below. There was a lot of information to process in the first part of the book. The story got a lot more interesting the moment the civilization on the Mountain discover the water supply is being poisoned. An expedition is formed and the protagonist, Icelyn, sneaks down with them despite her father’s wishes to remain home, where it’s safe. The moment Icelyn travels down the mountain, we discover more about these monsters terrorizing the humans and the history of the world. Among the characters, I preferred Adorane most of all. Adorane is a Veritas, but despite this he is Icelyn’s best friend. Between him and Torrain, Icelyn’s intended, he is the one who questions the girl most often, trying to make her see reason even when her good intentions could lead to a potential disaster. Torrain, on the other hand, often succumbs to Icelyn’s whims, as if he can’t truly make up his mind on his own. As for Icelyn, she wasn’t always easy to like for she often appeared to be very self-absorbed. I did have an issue with the writing style. There were moments the narrative is in third person, others were it was in first person. This sudden switch threw me off and was difficult to follow sometimes. While I adore books with multiple perspectives, this is the first time I’ve seen an author adopt this writing style. I recommend this book to lovers of fantasies such as Lord of the Rings and dystopians like The Hunger Games.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    So everyone seems to love this book... and while the story is good there I had some serious issues with this book including how its written, the characters and plot holes/discrepancies. The characters live by a strict and oddly inconsistent "Code" - which once the backstory of the founder of their community is revealed, becomes even more confusing because nothing is really provided to explain what the Code was designed to actually accomplish or why the rules are laid out as they are. The narratio So everyone seems to love this book... and while the story is good there I had some serious issues with this book including how its written, the characters and plot holes/discrepancies. The characters live by a strict and oddly inconsistent "Code" - which once the backstory of the founder of their community is revealed, becomes even more confusing because nothing is really provided to explain what the Code was designed to actually accomplish or why the rules are laid out as they are. The narration/point of view is a bit of a mess, changing mid-chapter, or even after a paragraph, with no rhyme or reason or cue to the reader. Technology is an interesting problem, where 300+ year old items seem to magically appear/be found in mostly working order and characters who would have no idea what said objects are (or do they? the descriptions of the education the characters receive varies wildly) can instantly identify, repair, and use them. The passage of time is unclear - parts that happen in a day result in the character aging up, even in appearance, and then in other points of view, the passage of a day is treated like a month. Additionally the main character's thoughts, beliefs, and behavior don't match yet the only cognitive dissonance she seems to suffer is related to her personal relationships. I think this story could actually make a really good TV show - but in order for it to be successful as a novel, it needs some work and a good editorial team.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.