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Why Jesus? Perhaps you have had the funny feeling that God wants to get your attention. Or maybe you're intrigued with what you've heard about Jesus. Or maybe you're simply looking for meaning and direction in your life. John Stott has spent a lifetime wrestling with questions about Jesus both personally and in dialogue with skeptics and seekers around the globe. Now in Wh Why Jesus? Perhaps you have had the funny feeling that God wants to get your attention. Or maybe you're intrigued with what you've heard about Jesus. Or maybe you're simply looking for meaning and direction in your life. John Stott has spent a lifetime wrestling with questions about Jesus both personally and in dialogue with skeptics and seekers around the globe. Now in Why I Am a Christian he provides a compelling, persuasive case for considering the Christian faith. If you take an honest look at Jesus, you will discover that following him gives you the purpose, identity and freedom you've been searching for--and far more than you have ever imagined.


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Why Jesus? Perhaps you have had the funny feeling that God wants to get your attention. Or maybe you're intrigued with what you've heard about Jesus. Or maybe you're simply looking for meaning and direction in your life. John Stott has spent a lifetime wrestling with questions about Jesus both personally and in dialogue with skeptics and seekers around the globe. Now in Wh Why Jesus? Perhaps you have had the funny feeling that God wants to get your attention. Or maybe you're intrigued with what you've heard about Jesus. Or maybe you're simply looking for meaning and direction in your life. John Stott has spent a lifetime wrestling with questions about Jesus both personally and in dialogue with skeptics and seekers around the globe. Now in Why I Am a Christian he provides a compelling, persuasive case for considering the Christian faith. If you take an honest look at Jesus, you will discover that following him gives you the purpose, identity and freedom you've been searching for--and far more than you have ever imagined.

30 review for Why I Am a Christian

  1. 4 out of 5

    BJ

    Good little apologetic book by one of the most prominent evangelicals at the turn of the twentieth century, John Stott. In 1927, the atheist Bertrand Russell, gave speeches that become his book "Why I am Not a Christian", while Stott's "Why I Am a Christian" makes the case for Christianity. One thing I always appreciate about Stott, as a biblical commentator and Christian voice, is that he consistently writes with such clarity. This book is no different. In it he gives seven reasons for why he i Good little apologetic book by one of the most prominent evangelicals at the turn of the twentieth century, John Stott. In 1927, the atheist Bertrand Russell, gave speeches that become his book "Why I am Not a Christian", while Stott's "Why I Am a Christian" makes the case for Christianity. One thing I always appreciate about Stott, as a biblical commentator and Christian voice, is that he consistently writes with such clarity. This book is no different. In it he gives seven reasons for why he is a Christian, and his aim is to convince you to become one. For any with questions about Christianity this is a great place to start.

  2. 5 out of 5

    W. Whalin

    A Great Audiobook for Every Christian Theologian and Biblical scholar John R. W. Stott gives a remarkable apologetic defense of the faith) in WHY I AM A CHRISTIAN audiobook. The detailed stories are combined with a series of Scriptures to help every Christian know and celebrate their faith. I enjoyed this audiobook and listened to it cover to cover. I highly recommend it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robert Cox

    Stott makes some strong arguments does a wonderful job referencing Scripture but lack some of the simple elegance and accessibility of C.S. Lewis' "Mere Christianity". Lewis is hard to top.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joe Haack

    THIS BOOK CUTS THROUGH THE FOG. I waddled off to seminary and got drunk on interesting peripheral issues, giving too much attention to the cultivation of ways to communicate them in the pastorate. That's an overstatement; but closer to the truth than I'd like to admit. Now as a pastor I am growing in my appreciation (and need) of clearly communicated first principles. Stott, rest in peace, wrote an amazing little booklet that meets this need and appreciation. While not as witty as Lewis' Mere Ch THIS BOOK CUTS THROUGH THE FOG. I waddled off to seminary and got drunk on interesting peripheral issues, giving too much attention to the cultivation of ways to communicate them in the pastorate. That's an overstatement; but closer to the truth than I'd like to admit. Now as a pastor I am growing in my appreciation (and need) of clearly communicated first principles. Stott, rest in peace, wrote an amazing little booklet that meets this need and appreciation. While not as witty as Lewis' Mere Christianity, or nuanced as Wright's Simply Christian, or subversive as Wilson's Notes from the Tilt-a-Whirl - it rises to the top owing to its simplicity, brevity, and clarity. So good. So good.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    This book, whose title forms an answer of sorts to Bertrand Russell's essay "Why I Am Not A Christian," is a solid book of personal apologetics.  For one reason or another, I read a lot of this kind of book [1], and this book manages to strike a different tone than most works in this genre.  Rather than writing critically about the readers' presumed worldview, he instead looks at a constellation of personal reasons that account for why he is a Christian that likely ring true for many other reade This book, whose title forms an answer of sorts to Bertrand Russell's essay "Why I Am Not A Christian," is a solid book of personal apologetics.  For one reason or another, I read a lot of this kind of book [1], and this book manages to strike a different tone than most works in this genre.  Rather than writing critically about the readers' presumed worldview, he instead looks at a constellation of personal reasons that account for why he is a Christian that likely ring true for many other readers as well.  Some readers may find this book to be a bit too gentle, but it amounts to a soft-sell of the gospel message rather than the hard sell approach many writers take, and as a short book that can be profitably read during one's lunch break, as was the case for me, and it certainly is a book that provides a thoughtful and well-spoken defense of the legitimacy of the Christian faith and why it should be taken seriously by skeptics.  As an introduction to the writer's works, it forms an effective way to build interest for the author's other writings that I hope to be able to read eventually. At slightly over 100 small pages, this is not a particularly demanding book in terms of its material.  The author begins by talking about the hound of heaven, and how God is the one pursuing us rather than we being the ones searching for God, giving the examples of Paul, Augustine, and C.S. Lewis, among others.  After that the author talks about the claims of Jesus, and notes that while Jesus is nearly uniformly respected and viewed as a humble man, his claims were immensely audacious and anything but humble.  The author then turns, of necessity, to the cross and to its powerful importance for humanity.  The author then turns to the paradox of humanity as being created in the image and likeness of God but also being deeply marred by sin and its effects, and then turns to the paradox of freedom in being an escape from our sinful human nature rather than being free of the laws and restraints that keep us from sinning to the extent that is possible for us.  The last two chapters of the short book finish on a discussion of eternal life as part of God's kingdom being a fulfillment of our aspirations--an argument from desire--and discusses the call to believe as the greatest of all invitations. Throughout the book the author manages to combine a great deal of humor along with a strong sense of humility and some notable insight.  To be sure, there is a great deal about the Bible and about Christianity that the author does not discuss at any length.  There are no discussions here about the nature of God or the role of God's law in the lives of believers or anything that could be viewed as contentious matters that are argued over by those who profess to follow Christ.  This book, in stark contrast, looks at those essentials that are not really in dispute by anyone who has any plausible claim as a Christian, namely that human beings are in a hopeless place as a result of thousands of years of sin, but that God reaches out to us to pull us out of the despair that we find ourselves in, at the cost of confronting us with what we are and what we were created to be.  This is the sort of book that is a pleasure to read, in that it provides genuinely good news as an introduction to those who are unfamiliar with God's word, an invitation to get to know God and God's ways better.  If I do not consider the author trustworthy in all biblical matters, he certainly does a good job in this introductory text. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris Huff

    This is a short book, but I encourage you to not read it in one sitting. In fact, I don't think it would be right to read even a whole chapter at a time. I read just a couple pages per day, and even that was a lot to take in. There's a lot to chew on in each section of each chapter. As I read the book, I felt as if I were being let in on the humble reasoning of a true believer. I'm finding that to be more and more rare today. While Stott's arguments aren't simplistic, they are simple. They share h This is a short book, but I encourage you to not read it in one sitting. In fact, I don't think it would be right to read even a whole chapter at a time. I read just a couple pages per day, and even that was a lot to take in. There's a lot to chew on in each section of each chapter. As I read the book, I felt as if I were being let in on the humble reasoning of a true believer. I'm finding that to be more and more rare today. While Stott's arguments aren't simplistic, they are simple. They share his experience, without sharing the irrelevant details of his experiences. He keeps the focus on Jesus. In short, Jesus fills every longing. That's why he's a Christian. I've read many books that seek to convince people about Jesus using external evidence. They are good for what they are, and I certainly recommend them to Christians as a means of strengthening their faith. But Stott takes a completely different approach. He appeals to what we all long for in life, and shows that Jesus is the answer. This is a book that I'll recommend.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Pitman

    I can't believe I had not read this before. Stott's words are rich and bring unparalleled clarity to the biggest questions we have about life. "Nothing can convince us of our personal significance like the cross of Christ"

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chipita Sibale

    n this book John Stott tells his spiritual story, and gives the reasons for his first life- changing step of faith on the path he has followed since that day. It was not so much that he found Christ, as that Christ found him. Not because the Christian faith is attractive, but because it is true. Not because he deserved to be saved, but because Christ took his sins, and ours, on himself. It is because the answer to the paradox at the heart of our humanness, because the key to true freedom and ful n this book John Stott tells his spiritual story, and gives the reasons for his first life- changing step of faith on the path he has followed since that day. It was not so much that he found Christ, as that Christ found him. Not because the Christian faith is attractive, but because it is true. Not because he deserved to be saved, but because Christ took his sins, and ours, on himself. It is because the answer to the paradox at the heart of our humanness, because the key to true freedom and fulfillment, are to be found in Jesus Christ alone. And he who extends the greatest of all invitations to each one of us waits patiently for our response.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jack Hansen

    What an inspirational book that also deepens one's understanding of the Old and New Testament. The common denominator in that scripture being Jesus of Nazareth. John R.W. Stott eloquently writes about his accepting Jesus as Christ, the Messiah. He uses scripture from both Old and New Testaments to reinforce his belief and also quotes great minds such as Augustine, C.S. Lewis, Mother Teresa, Bertrand Russell, and Bornhoeffer. One appreciates the academic mind and logical rationale of Stott's inte What an inspirational book that also deepens one's understanding of the Old and New Testament. The common denominator in that scripture being Jesus of Nazareth. John R.W. Stott eloquently writes about his accepting Jesus as Christ, the Messiah. He uses scripture from both Old and New Testaments to reinforce his belief and also quotes great minds such as Augustine, C.S. Lewis, Mother Teresa, Bertrand Russell, and Bornhoeffer. One appreciates the academic mind and logical rationale of Stott's interpretation throughout this book. He summarizes and further explains each component of the claims about Jesus Christ that confirm his abiding belief in Christianity. For example, the crucifixion's purpose is atonement of sins, revelation of God, and conquest over evil. These three points expand in that chapter's elaborations. Why I Am a Christian is a short book but a powerful message of profound importance. It would behoove any reader to acquaint themselves with this work for the ability to discern truth in a world filled with lies and deception.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mwansa

    John Stott was a preacher! Sometimes you can sense that a man is a preacher in the way he writes and John Stott without a doubt was a brilliant preacher. If you are looking for a book to give to a new convert for a first book then I would highly recommend this book but it also works for someone who has been a Christian for several years because it is nice refresher of the truths we know and hold dear. Why I am a Christian is a book that explains the grace of the God on our lives from the call tha John Stott was a preacher! Sometimes you can sense that a man is a preacher in the way he writes and John Stott without a doubt was a brilliant preacher. If you are looking for a book to give to a new convert for a first book then I would highly recommend this book but it also works for someone who has been a Christian for several years because it is nice refresher of the truths we know and hold dear. Why I am a Christian is a book that explains the grace of the God on our lives from the call that leads us to salvation to the purpose we find for life now that we are saved. Reading it gets you to the point where you have to ask yourself if what is being described is something that you have come to know. And it ends with a prayer for salvation. I have not been one for repeated sinners prayers but I absolutely loved the prayer at the end because it said all that I felt was the necessary end to such a great book. Basically it says, Dear God if you have not saved me yet, save me now.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hayley Brentmar

    I got this as a free audiobook download. So I figured "why not". It was short, only a few hours. There were a few interesting and enlightening things that I hadn't thought about before. But there was also a lot of circular reasoning (How do we know Jesus was really divine? Because he said so. How do we know he wasn't lying? Because he was divine... and we're back to "But, how do we know he was really divine?"). If you're already a Christian this book might strengthen your faith. But it's not goi I got this as a free audiobook download. So I figured "why not". It was short, only a few hours. There were a few interesting and enlightening things that I hadn't thought about before. But there was also a lot of circular reasoning (How do we know Jesus was really divine? Because he said so. How do we know he wasn't lying? Because he was divine... and we're back to "But, how do we know he was really divine?"). If you're already a Christian this book might strengthen your faith. But it's not going to convince non-believers. Overall I give it a "meh".

  12. 4 out of 5

    Phinehas Osei

    I enjoyed reading this book. John Stott made such good arguments for why he placed his faith in Jesus. In rather down to earth terms, he shows the desperate need of humanity for a saviour, and ends the book by breaking down the essentials in Jesus' invitation to humanity. I put off reading this book for so long. I wish I had read it sooner. It's definitely one of those books I'd keep going back to, in the years to come.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Incredible, Christocentric book! Note: If the author did believe in annihilation-ism (which Wiki says he at least deemed a possibility), he was obviously in error and that belief is unscriptural. But I don't recall the topic of annihilation-ish brought up in this book, and "Why I am a Christian" was over-all very good and enjoyable!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Happy Snow

    I started reading this book under the recommendation of a Christian friend after I quitted the first and the only church I attended a few months ago, with tears and a broken heart. It was such a dark time; I doubted everything in my life: the meaning of being a Christian, the teachings from that church, and the purpose of being where I was. I opened this book in seek of answers to all of these questions. To me, there's no doubt that I am a Christian: I was attracted to the joy and freedom that t I started reading this book under the recommendation of a Christian friend after I quitted the first and the only church I attended a few months ago, with tears and a broken heart. It was such a dark time; I doubted everything in my life: the meaning of being a Christian, the teachings from that church, and the purpose of being where I was. I opened this book in seek of answers to all of these questions. To me, there's no doubt that I am a Christian: I was attracted to the joy and freedom that the people in the church and the experiences afterward are real; the change in my personality and life attitude is real. But I never actually hear the reasons for being a Christian from other people's perspectives. I echoed this book with the very first chapter, which talks about how Jesus is relentlessly pursuing him. It is, for sure, not a choice after logical thinking to become a Christian. It is because I was put at a particular time and space in a particular condition, and I met this particular group of people. I somehow willingly followed an intuition to take a step into something unknown, which is not reasonable at all when I look back. Even when I thought I was about to give up believing, I was, again, put into another community that gave a message, which is exactly what's written in this book, "Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with him, and he with me (Revelation 3:20)". So I was persuaded that it is true that there's a power beyond us, watching us, persuing us, who will not give us up. This book also solved some questions that have been bothering me for a while: In the church I went to, people always practice "deny yourself", by denying the negative feelings and thoughts. I cannot agree because I was confused by the conflicts between "self-care" and "deny myself". I couldn't get it why I need to deny myself. The point mentioned in this book enlightened me that to "deny myself" is to care and love others. If we constantly live in our desires and struggles, we will have no room in our hearts to care and love others. Also, I was a little resistant towards the verse "Take my yoke upon you (Matthew 11:29)" because the previous church was full of outward activities and works, which eventually made everyone worn out. I immediately relate "take my yoke" to "work for the church," but in this book, it says the way we "put on his yoke" is to "learn from him," to accept his teaching authority, which perfectly fit our humanity. This book is the first Christian book I read in English other than the church materials from my first church. I will continue this journey of reading, and hopefully, these books will give me some answers in the upcoming years.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Lee

    As with his other titles, Stott writes clearly and does not dive into complicated theological jargon or discussion. He writes in a calm, gentle manner (unlike the strong argumentation of Ravi Zachariah’s). He cites the notable people. thinkers and theologians as he gives the reasons why he is a Christian. Most of the time, he utilises the bible as the primary source of reference for his substantive. John Scott is one of my favourite theological authors; The Cross is Christ is one of the few books As with his other titles, Stott writes clearly and does not dive into complicated theological jargon or discussion. He writes in a calm, gentle manner (unlike the strong argumentation of Ravi Zachariah’s). He cites the notable people. thinkers and theologians as he gives the reasons why he is a Christian. Most of the time, he utilises the bible as the primary source of reference for his substantive. John Scott is one of my favourite theological authors; The Cross is Christ is one of the few books that I felt deserving of an exceptional 6 stars. However, as a 30 year old I could not engage with the content of this book. I am aware that my peers generally hold post modern world views, and felt that his book would better serve a modern audience (like the readers of 2003, when it was first published). Alternatively, this title could also be useful to readers whose English is a second language or for people who hail from traditional and non-postmodern backgrounds. For engaging critical or intelligent thinkers, this book would however not be useful in bringing up logical positions or debates in apologetics. A better title to aid evangelism of postmodern people would perhaps be Timothy Keller’s Reason for God or C S Lewis’ Mere Christianity.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gabe Zepeda

    This short work is intellectually honest, convincing, charitable to skeptics, and pastorally warm. It is not exhaustive in dealing with every objection to Christianity. However, it lovingly confronts anyone seeking the truth to seriously consider the claims and person of Jesus. The last chapter has a powerful appeal to respond to The gospel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Gem after gem in this one. What a gift! John Stott taking on Bertrand Russell’s thesis of why Christianity is bunk is a small portion of what is stellar about this apologetical work. Go read it, please and thank you.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eli Johnson

    A short and concise apologetics book that lays out Scripture, the person of Jesus, logic, and thoughts from various thinkers (Christian and not) in order to illuminate the truth of the Gospel in intelligent yet approachable language

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mateus Land

    Wonderful book, every believer should surely read it. I wish I had read it as soon as I was converted. Basic points from the Scriptures that just open your mind for the real truth in its fullness. Praise God for this piece of work.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Really enjoyed his writing and points regarding his story with Christ

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mark Nenadov

    Generally pretty good and an easy to digest book. John Stott writes with clarity and conviction here. The title is a bit of a jab at Bertrand Russell's "Why I Am Not A Christian".

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marguerite Harrell

    I just finished reading “Why I am a Christian by John Stott.” Great book to read and no need to have Ph.D to read this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Aftab

    Great book

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jessie Mize

    Good

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pr. Kenton

    Short little book on basic apologetics. By no means an exhaustive book on the topic, and sticks to more personal and empathetic reasons for being a Christian, rather than hard logic (as you would expect from a more philosophical book). However it gets its message across and does a good job of explaining some of the emotional and base logical reasonings for being a Christian.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris Wray

    This is a fine little apologetic, in which John Stott explores six interconnected answers to the question of why he is a Christian: - Because God pursued him - Because of the claims of Jesus to be the fulfilment of the Old Testament, to a unique and intimate relationship with God as his Son, and to the authority to be a saviour and judge of all humankind. - Because of the cross, where Jesus suffers and dies to atone for our sins, to reveal the character of God and to conquer the powers of evil. - Be This is a fine little apologetic, in which John Stott explores six interconnected answers to the question of why he is a Christian: - Because God pursued him - Because of the claims of Jesus to be the fulfilment of the Old Testament, to a unique and intimate relationship with God as his Son, and to the authority to be a saviour and judge of all humankind. - Because of the cross, where Jesus suffers and dies to atone for our sins, to reveal the character of God and to conquer the powers of evil. - Because it unravels the paradox of our humanity, in both its glory and its shame, its dignity and its depravity. We are able to think, choose, create, love and worship; but we are also able to hate, covet, fight and kill. We are made in God's image, but we are also tragically fallen. - Because it provides the key to freedom. First, freedom from guilt and from the judgement of God and second freedom to be our true selves, as God made us and meant us to be in love and service to God and others. - Because it provides the fulfilment of our aspirations, for transcendence, significance and community. He closes by extending the greatest of all invitations, to come follow Jesus, by unpacking two affirmations (God is revealed only by Jesus, and God is revealed only to the child-like) and two invitations (come to Jesus for rest, and to take his yoke upon us) from Matthew 11:25-30. Like all of Stott's writing this exudes a calm, warm firmness that I imagine was also true of the man himself. Here is a good example: "Jesus describes evil as both issuing from our heart and causing our defilement. It is clear therefore from this that we have a double need: on the one hand cleansing from defilement, and on the other a new heart with new desires and aspirations. And to me it is truly wonderful that both these are offered to us in the gospel. For Christ dies to make us clean, and by the inward working of his Holy Spirit he can make us new." The whole book is written in a similar vein, and acts as a timely reminder for Christians of the reasons for the hope we have. It would also be a great book to give to others who may be considering Christianity.

  27. 5 out of 5

    L.a.

    I enjoyed this book very much. It was a quick read, yet held good information and explanation. Stott wrote something here very accessible to the average person. You don’t have to be a Bible scholar to understand it or extract from it. His arguments for why he is a Christian are laid out one at a time in six chapters with the seventh and final chapter being his conclusion. I have listed the chapter titles and written my summary below each. 1. The Hound of Heaven Explaining that Christ pursued him n I enjoyed this book very much. It was a quick read, yet held good information and explanation. Stott wrote something here very accessible to the average person. You don’t have to be a Bible scholar to understand it or extract from it. His arguments for why he is a Christian are laid out one at a time in six chapters with the seventh and final chapter being his conclusion. I have listed the chapter titles and written my summary below each. 1. The Hound of Heaven Explaining that Christ pursued him not the other way around 2. The Claims of Jesus Without making excuses for the church you have to come to some conclusions about the person of Jesus. Stott Says: Let’s be clear, to begin with, that the claims of Christianity are in essence the claims of Christ. I have no particular wish to defend “Christianity” as a system or “the church” as an institution. The history of the church has been a bittersweet story, combining deeds of heroism with deeds of shame. But we are not ashamed of Jesus Christ, who is the center and core of Christianity. 3. The Cross of Christ An interesting look at the prominence of Jesus’s death. In comparison with other spiritual leaders an extraordinary emphasis is focused on his death rather than his life. 4. The Paradox of our Humanness Christianity gives a compelling and thorough explanation of both the glory and shame we find in our experience as human beings. 5. The Key to Freedom Christianity offers an exciting proposition to one of our basic human desires. In this chapter he also gives an explanation of the Gospel. 6. The Fulfillment of our Aspirations Broken into three main points he addresses our quest for transcendence, our quest for significance, and our quest for community. 7. The Greatest of all Invitations An invitation to Jesus. I would recommend this book as a good starting point to why Christianity can be considered rationally and philosophically. It is not written to be exhaustive or overly academic.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy

    The title of the book mimics atheist Bertrand Russell’s (in)famous essay, “Why I am not a Christian” which was also the title for Russell’s book that was a compilation of Russell’s other essays on religion and Christianity. Here in this book the author John Stott presents his reasons of why he is a Christian. This book is an adaptation of a four part series of lectures Stott has delivered concerning why he believes in Christianity which here is expanded into seven chapters. I enjoyed this book es The title of the book mimics atheist Bertrand Russell’s (in)famous essay, “Why I am not a Christian” which was also the title for Russell’s book that was a compilation of Russell’s other essays on religion and Christianity. Here in this book the author John Stott presents his reasons of why he is a Christian. This book is an adaptation of a four part series of lectures Stott has delivered concerning why he believes in Christianity which here is expanded into seven chapters. I enjoyed this book especially when Stott is talking about Christ. Since Christianity is centered on the person and work of Christ of course it is reasonable for Stott to concentrate on Christ. This book is very Christ-centered and it reminded me of how amazing Christ was during His earthly ministry. The book was similar to Stott’s other work titled Basic Christianity which I also enjoyed especially for the book’s discussion of the character of Christ. I think there is something with Christ’s character that is self-evidencing of Himself as the Messiah. I wished Stott was more epistemologically conscious in his book. To be fair there was at least one reference in the book to our current climate of postmodernity in the West. But I didn't think he was necessarily writing this book with the epistemological challenges in mind. I also wished he explored the self-evidencing nature of Scripture as God’s revelation and the Scripture’s significance as the presuppositions for all of human life’s experience and rationality. I think this book is probably more useful not necessarily with a nonbeliever but a Christian who might need the reminder of why one follows Christ.

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Campton

    I thought I had reviewed this when I first read it but apparently not, so here goes. Stott was a massive influence on me as a younger Christian and when I first became a minister, not only because of his commentaries but because he was not shy of dealing with difficult issues in a rational manner, not resorting to polarising polemics. Indeed this tendency in a divisive world where many evangelicals are separatist and broadly anti-intellectual (or seem to operate off a radically alternative intel I thought I had reviewed this when I first read it but apparently not, so here goes. Stott was a massive influence on me as a younger Christian and when I first became a minister, not only because of his commentaries but because he was not shy of dealing with difficult issues in a rational manner, not resorting to polarising polemics. Indeed this tendency in a divisive world where many evangelicals are separatist and broadly anti-intellectual (or seem to operate off a radically alternative intellectual framework) Stott was refreshingly engaged and engaging. I had hoped in this book to get an idea of not only why Stott is a Christian but why he is the sort of Christian he is. However, it is nowhere near as auto-biographical as I might have hoped, and was actually a relatively dry, de-personalised apologetic, which, as I look back on his other writings, is fairly typical of him, and why I sadly, rarely refer to his books any more. That said there is still much in this book worth noting, not least a perspective on the unfashionable idea of "the wrath of God" that debunks many of the contemporary concerns regarding this term and which chimes with my Wesleyan background... but then, Stott and Wesley were both at heart conservative Anglicans with a humanitarian heart.

  30. 4 out of 5

    MG

    A classic testimony and apologetic for the faith, but strangely not very compelling, despite how much I respect John Stott and am indebted to his books and teachings. His precise thinking and sound teaching strikes me as surprisingly unchanged since I first read him decades ago--but in a way that seems like he stopped growing and developing. I admit my judgment sounds presumptuous, and I know from my personal acquaintance with John Stott that he was formal and strategic in terms of how much he d A classic testimony and apologetic for the faith, but strangely not very compelling, despite how much I respect John Stott and am indebted to his books and teachings. His precise thinking and sound teaching strikes me as surprisingly unchanged since I first read him decades ago--but in a way that seems like he stopped growing and developing. I admit my judgment sounds presumptuous, and I know from my personal acquaintance with John Stott that he was formal and strategic in terms of how much he disclosed, but I can't help feeling a little sad after reading this. Amendment: I now feel I was too negative above. Stott remains amazingly wise, balanced, broad, and generous, and his handling of biblical texts is exemplary. What really frustrated me was the lack of incarnation. He has been a Christian since his school days and this well-oiled balance of principles were ones he landed on decades ago. Why not say something of the sixty-plus years he walked with Christ, how God showed up repeatedly in his life? Yet there is almost no biography here. I believe Christianity must show how it is lived in order for it to be believed. This is the true source of my frustration with the book.

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