hits counter The Nidderdale Murders - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Nidderdale Murders

Availability: Ready to download

In a Yorkshire Dales village everyone has a motive for murder—except the killer. A retired judge is shot dead outside the Dog and Gun inn in the remote Yorkshire village of Niddersgill. There’s a witness who saw everything, and the gunman’s on the run; the case should be open-and-shut for DCI Jim Oldroyd. But the murderer had no motive for wanting Sandy Fraser dead and, In a Yorkshire Dales village everyone has a motive for murder—except the killer. A retired judge is shot dead outside the Dog and Gun inn in the remote Yorkshire village of Niddersgill. There’s a witness who saw everything, and the gunman’s on the run; the case should be open-and-shut for DCI Jim Oldroyd. But the murderer had no motive for wanting Sandy Fraser dead and, what’s more, no trace of him can be found.As Oldroyd and his team cast the net wider, they discover that Fraser wasn’t without enemies in Niddersgill. As the wealthy owner of a grouse moor, he’d clashed with farmers, debtors, hunt saboteurs and blackmailers. But none of them were at the scene of the murder. And when a local shopkeeper is gunned down in a second senseless attack, it’s clear that these killings are anything but random.Surrounded by the dramatic beauty of the Yorkshire Dales, Oldroyd faces a race against time to connect the crimes and find who’s behind them. But with all the evidence sending him down dead ends, can he get one step ahead before someone else is killed?


Compare

In a Yorkshire Dales village everyone has a motive for murder—except the killer. A retired judge is shot dead outside the Dog and Gun inn in the remote Yorkshire village of Niddersgill. There’s a witness who saw everything, and the gunman’s on the run; the case should be open-and-shut for DCI Jim Oldroyd. But the murderer had no motive for wanting Sandy Fraser dead and, In a Yorkshire Dales village everyone has a motive for murder—except the killer. A retired judge is shot dead outside the Dog and Gun inn in the remote Yorkshire village of Niddersgill. There’s a witness who saw everything, and the gunman’s on the run; the case should be open-and-shut for DCI Jim Oldroyd. But the murderer had no motive for wanting Sandy Fraser dead and, what’s more, no trace of him can be found.As Oldroyd and his team cast the net wider, they discover that Fraser wasn’t without enemies in Niddersgill. As the wealthy owner of a grouse moor, he’d clashed with farmers, debtors, hunt saboteurs and blackmailers. But none of them were at the scene of the murder. And when a local shopkeeper is gunned down in a second senseless attack, it’s clear that these killings are anything but random.Surrounded by the dramatic beauty of the Yorkshire Dales, Oldroyd faces a race against time to connect the crimes and find who’s behind them. But with all the evidence sending him down dead ends, can he get one step ahead before someone else is killed?

30 review for The Nidderdale Murders

  1. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Once again, access to books has me reading a series out of order. I enjoyed the first in this series, The Body in the Dales. DCI Oldroyd is an astute, older detective, determined to teach his two detective sergeants the proper way to research a crime. In some ways, he reminds me of Armand Gamache, Louise Penny’s wise soul of a detective. This time, the crime should be an open and shut case. A retired judge is shot in front of the local pub and a witness sees who fired the shot. But the suspect c Once again, access to books has me reading a series out of order. I enjoyed the first in this series, The Body in the Dales. DCI Oldroyd is an astute, older detective, determined to teach his two detective sergeants the proper way to research a crime. In some ways, he reminds me of Armand Gamache, Louise Penny’s wise soul of a detective. This time, the crime should be an open and shut case. A retired judge is shot in front of the local pub and a witness sees who fired the shot. But the suspect can’t be found and there’s no clear motive for him. Oldroyd knows not to accept things on face value. Ellis uses an omniscient third person POV, so we are granted access to info denied the detectives. Everyone seems to know more than they’re telling. Ellis does a wonderful job of painting the landscape, which comes across as a character in its own right. But the book moves slowly and at times drags. The victim wasn’t liked by anyone but yet no one seems to have a serious enough motive to want him dead. I wanted a little more action than this one delivered, despite a second murder in the same manner. I found the ending to be entirely too far fetched and unbelievable. Still, points to Ellis for thinking up something so unique. I do enjoy the characters, so I still intend to go back and read the intervening books. I was sorry Allison didn’t play a larger role in this book as I enjoyed her in the first. My thanks to netgalley and Thomas & Mercer for an advance copy of this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was another strong instalment in J.R. Ellis's DCI Jim Oldroyd / Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series. It's autumn - grouse shooting season - in the Yorkshire Dales and DCI Jim Oldroyd and his team are called out to the village of Niddersgill, where unpopular retired judge and local grouse moor owner Alexander "Sandy" Fraser has been murdered under mysterious circumstances. Not only has the crime been witnessed by a barmaid observing from a window of the Dog & Gun Inn, but the perpetrator seems This was another strong instalment in J.R. Ellis's DCI Jim Oldroyd / Yorkshire Murder Mysteries series. It's autumn - grouse shooting season - in the Yorkshire Dales and DCI Jim Oldroyd and his team are called out to the village of Niddersgill, where unpopular retired judge and local grouse moor owner Alexander "Sandy" Fraser has been murdered under mysterious circumstances. Not only has the crime been witnessed by a barmaid observing from a window of the Dog & Gun Inn, but the perpetrator seems to have made no effort to conceal his identity from her. The search is on for local odd-job man / gardener Alan Green, but he remains elusive. As with previous books, the central trio of DCI Oldroyd, DS Johnson and DS Carter are supported by a cast of well-developed new and recurring characters. The unique landscape of the Yorkshire Dales makes for an evocative backdrop and, as always, the place names are fantastic! While the plot stretches credibility at times, it maintained my interest throughout and I found the conclusion quite ingenious - in the vein of Agatha Christie or Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. Oldroyd remains an intriguing central protagonist - his resemblance to P.D. James's sensitive and intuitive Commander Adam Dalgliesh continues to grow in The Nidderdale Murders, as Oldroyd takes up poetry as a foil to the immersive nature of his professional life. An enjoyable read. While part of a series, I feel that The Nidderdale Murders would also prove a satisfying standalone read for newcomers to J.R. Ellis's writing. My thanks to the author, Amazon Publishing UK and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review an ARC of this title. #TheNidderdaleMurders #NetGalley

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bam cooks the books ;-)

    Once again I've jumped into a mystery series with both feet because of the offer to read an advanced readers copy of the latest book via NetGalley! This mystery works fine as a stand alone--any references to previous cases are briefly explained. This is a police procedural set in the Nidderdale dales of Yorkshire, England. Detective Chief Inspector Oldroyd and his team are called from Harrogate to investigate the shotgun shooting of a wealthy landowner outside the local inn. The case seems prett Once again I've jumped into a mystery series with both feet because of the offer to read an advanced readers copy of the latest book via NetGalley! This mystery works fine as a stand alone--any references to previous cases are briefly explained. This is a police procedural set in the Nidderdale dales of Yorkshire, England. Detective Chief Inspector Oldroyd and his team are called from Harrogate to investigate the shotgun shooting of a wealthy landowner outside the local inn. The case seems pretty straight forward as the murder was observed by one of the employees of the inn. But the man she saw has vanished without a trace! And once they begin digging for a possible motive, the case becomes more complicated and darker than they first thought. This story had an old-fashioned feel to it. Perhaps it was the atmospheric setting of the Yorkshire dales. The beauty of the landscape really comes through in Ellis' descriptions. The characters are interesting, especially Oldroyd and his personal life, how he handles his young team, and how he comes to figure out the whodunit, channeling a bit of Shakespeare and Sherlock Holmes. I would definitely be interested in reading more in this series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    The Cats’ Mother

    The Nidderdale Murders is the fifth book in the excellent DCI Oldroyd series set in Yorkshire. Each of the mysteries stands alone, and doesn’t spoil the others, so you could easily read this first, although I have enjoyed the character progression and relationships from reading them in order. Oldroyd and his team are called to investigate a murder in the small picturesque village of Niddersgill, because the victim was a retired judge and his senior officers want their best man leading the case. D The Nidderdale Murders is the fifth book in the excellent DCI Oldroyd series set in Yorkshire. Each of the mysteries stands alone, and doesn’t spoil the others, so you could easily read this first, although I have enjoyed the character progression and relationships from reading them in order. Oldroyd and his team are called to investigate a murder in the small picturesque village of Niddersgill, because the victim was a retired judge and his senior officers want their best man leading the case. Disliked by almost everyone, even those calling themselves his friends, Sandy Fraser had bought the local manor house and was leading lucrative grouse shoots, but avoided paying his bills and lorded it over everyone else. A witness got a good view of the killer, who then disappeared - and was one of the few people not to have a good motive - so Oldroyd suspects something more complicated is going on... I’ve enjoyed all of these Agatha Christie inspired police procedurals - they have great characters and a wonderful sense of place. The author clearly loves Yorkshire and knows it well - if anything the descriptions risked overwhelming the plot this time. Oldroyd is in a good place with his new relationship and getting healthier, and some readers might find there was a bit too much about his personal life which slowed the pace down a bit; it didn’t bother me since I know and enjoy the characters. There’s a large number of potential suspects and minor characters, some of whom have quite similar names, so I was glad of the search function on my Kindle that allowed me to keep track of them. There was also quite a lot of anti-hunting commentary, although the author does a good job of presenting both sides of the argument. Personally I think anyone who shoots animals or birds for pleasure is a psychopath so was quite glad to see Fraser experience a shotgun from the grouse’s perspective. It’s not gruesome or violent though, one of the nice things about this series - it’s not too dark. I didn’t guess the identity of the perpetrator and was definitely curious as to what was going on, but then found the eventual reveal stretched credulity, but it was a satisfying ending nonetheless. My thanks to NetGalley and Amazon UK for the ARC which allowed me to give an honest review, and apologies that it’s a few days late. The Nidderdale Murders is available now.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Amazon Publishing UK for an advance copy of The Nidderdale Murders, the fifth novel to feature DCI Jim Oldroyd ofHarrogate Police. A retired judge is shot dead outside a pub in the fictional Yorkshire village of Niddersgill. Barmaid Kirsty witnesses it all and can identify the gunman but he promptly disappears. There is no shortage of people who are glad to see the back of Alexander “Sandy” Fraser but the questions remain, is their motive strong enough and what I would like to thank Netgalley and Amazon Publishing UK for an advance copy of The Nidderdale Murders, the fifth novel to feature DCI Jim Oldroyd ofHarrogate Police. A retired judge is shot dead outside a pub in the fictional Yorkshire village of Niddersgill. Barmaid Kirsty witnesses it all and can identify the gunman but he promptly disappears. There is no shortage of people who are glad to see the back of Alexander “Sandy” Fraser but the questions remain, is their motive strong enough and what is their link to the alleged gunman? A second murder provides the links. I found The Nidderdale Murders to be a bit of a mixed bag. As ever in this series the plot relies on misdirection and an ingenious solution which is lying hidden, waiting for Oldroyd to discover it. Whether it’s familiarity with the process or it’s not as well done in this case I found the majority of the novel quite boring as Oldroyd and his team flounder around looking for a motive and a missing suspect. It goes nowhere until the second murder at more than three fifths in when it takes off in a flurry of activity and discoveries. If the second murder had taken place earlier in the novel and the resulting developments more evenly spaced it would have made the novel more engaging. I understand that this is a work of fiction, not designed to be massively realistic but the author obviously realises that his solution is overly reliant on coincidence as he spends paragraphs explaining that coincidence does exist. Highly unlikely. Still the solution is ingenious and I defy any reader to guess it correctly. The Nidderdale Murders is a competent novel that will have readers puzzled.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Linda Strong

    Nidderdale is a remote Yorkshire village of Niddersgill .. not somewhere one would suspect a murder taking place. A retired judge is the victim. He wasn't well liked and almost everyone in the village had a motive. DCI Jim Oldroyd and his team are tasked with the investigation. There just happens to be an eyewitness to the crime and Oldroyd is already planning a quick end to solving the murder. But ... the gunman has disappeared .. and he was one of those who didn't have a grudge. So why was he m Nidderdale is a remote Yorkshire village of Niddersgill .. not somewhere one would suspect a murder taking place. A retired judge is the victim. He wasn't well liked and almost everyone in the village had a motive. DCI Jim Oldroyd and his team are tasked with the investigation. There just happens to be an eyewitness to the crime and Oldroyd is already planning a quick end to solving the murder. But ... the gunman has disappeared .. and he was one of those who didn't have a grudge. So why was he murdered? And then a second murder occurs. A local shopkeeper is gunned down ... again there is no clear motive .. so why was he killed? And who might be next? This is a rather slow paced mystery that only picks up here and there. The characters are intriguing, deftly drawn. Although 5th in the series, this can easily be read as a stand alone. Many thanks to the author / Amazon Publishing / Netgalley for the digital copy of this crime fiction/mystery. Read and reviewed voluntarily, opinions expressed here are unbiased and entirely my own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Judy Lesley

    Thank you to NetGalley and Amazon Publishing UK for an e-galley of this novel. This is the fifth book in the series featuring Detective Chief Inspector Jim Oldroyd and his two team members solving the difficult cases in the Yorkshire Dales of England. This is a modern police procedural but the technology bit is toned down quite a lot so the reader rides along with the officers as they work out why this specific victim of murder was chosen. The motive is the stumbling block for the murder because Thank you to NetGalley and Amazon Publishing UK for an e-galley of this novel. This is the fifth book in the series featuring Detective Chief Inspector Jim Oldroyd and his two team members solving the difficult cases in the Yorkshire Dales of England. This is a modern police procedural but the technology bit is toned down quite a lot so the reader rides along with the officers as they work out why this specific victim of murder was chosen. The motive is the stumbling block for the murder because there is an eye witness to what happened. That would seem to bode well for a quick resolution except that the murderer has disappeared and police wonder how accurate their witness really is. This was my first book in this series and I enjoyed it quite a lot. The Yorkshire landscape is marvelously described and it brought back the vivid memories I have of exploring that area when I was visiting Britain. Oldroyd and his team are well developed characters by this time and I liked watching as they worked their way through solving the crimes. There was a pretty big segment where no progress was being made regarding a motive for the first murder and that went on for longer than seemed strictly necessary. Still, I'm looking forward to reading the previous books in the series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vintagebooklvr

    Ellis gives the reader a baffling police case in atmospheric and beautiful rural Yorkshire. The characters are engaging and I love the interaction between the police officers. The author does a good job in depicting a modern English village that has changed from Agatha Christie's classic portrayals and brings in contemporary concerns such as the many different sides in the argument of grouse hunting. Surprise twists and a number of possible suspects will keep the reader guessing--it did me!--and Ellis gives the reader a baffling police case in atmospheric and beautiful rural Yorkshire. The characters are engaging and I love the interaction between the police officers. The author does a good job in depicting a modern English village that has changed from Agatha Christie's classic portrayals and brings in contemporary concerns such as the many different sides in the argument of grouse hunting. Surprise twists and a number of possible suspects will keep the reader guessing--it did me!--and satisfied with the conclusion. Sign me up for the rest of the series! Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for a copy of the ARC in exchange for a impartial review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This was a long, lonely slog through the heavily described Yorkshire dales area. There is a murder to be solved and it could have been done in half the number of pages if the author was an adept editor. Too many clichés, too much clutter, too much extraneous language and dialog. I was bored. I can’t remember the last time I fell asleep reading a book but The Nidderdale Murders put me to sleep each and every night I tried to finish it. Obviously not the book for me but apparently it hit the mark This was a long, lonely slog through the heavily described Yorkshire dales area. There is a murder to be solved and it could have been done in half the number of pages if the author was an adept editor. Too many clichés, too much clutter, too much extraneous language and dialog. I was bored. I can’t remember the last time I fell asleep reading a book but The Nidderdale Murders put me to sleep each and every night I tried to finish it. Obviously not the book for me but apparently it hit the mark for many others. Thank you NetGalley and Thomas & Mercer for a copy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Schuyler Wallace

    This is the fifth in a Yorkshire Murder Mystery series by noted British writer J.R. Ellis, all of which are largely stand-alone novels, all adept at portraying the gorgeous landscape features and weather anomalies, something the author has a great feel for. So, if you enjoy rolling heather covered hillocks, rumbling ocean shores, and glowering wet weather, get your Wemblies on and give it a go. A couple of seemingly senseless murders at which the assailant was seen and identified with unfailing d This is the fifth in a Yorkshire Murder Mystery series by noted British writer J.R. Ellis, all of which are largely stand-alone novels, all adept at portraying the gorgeous landscape features and weather anomalies, something the author has a great feel for. So, if you enjoy rolling heather covered hillocks, rumbling ocean shores, and glowering wet weather, get your Wemblies on and give it a go. A couple of seemingly senseless murders at which the assailant was seen and identified with unfailing description, has the countryside in turmoil. One victim was a judge, seemingly liked by all and the other was a selfish wealthy landowner who sponsored yearly grouse hunts that were extravagant self-serving events, not enjoyed by everyone but that were lucrative to the natives even though the lovely birds were missed as their numbers rapidly diminished under the greedy shotguns of the killing advocates. Reliable witnesses that viewed the murders, were able to provide clear descriptions of the murderer, different for each of the victims, but DCI Oldroyd wasn’t able to get a hook in the killer who disappeared after each killing. There were motives galore for nearly everyone in the village, but none fit the descriptions given by the witnesses. Some confusion was present in the story because of similar names and the large number of potential perpetrators so it would be a good idea to slow down the reading pace and get into the story that is really quite intriguing. There was also quite a bit of anti-hunting sentiment expressed that might also dull the enjoyment for some readers, but I confess to getting a good bit of enjoyment from the story. The ending is somewhat contrived and even a little hokey, but fiction writers can employ whatever technique he or she considers appropriate to their invention. Don’t let that keep you from reading a good, enjoyable who-dunnit.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kate Baxter

    What a charming and refreshing police procedural mystery this was. I was captivated by the Yorkshire Dales setting, the relaxed country vibe, the quirky characters and the small town feel. Our main protagonist, DCI James Oldroyd has completely won me over. He's highly respected and admired by his colleagues for his amazing ability to resolve the most difficult of cases. He is thoroughly committed to his job and can never seem to turn off his analytic brian when it comes to solving a mystery. Tha What a charming and refreshing police procedural mystery this was. I was captivated by the Yorkshire Dales setting, the relaxed country vibe, the quirky characters and the small town feel. Our main protagonist, DCI James Oldroyd has completely won me over. He's highly respected and admired by his colleagues for his amazing ability to resolve the most difficult of cases. He is thoroughly committed to his job and can never seem to turn off his analytic brian when it comes to solving a mystery. That's great for the police department but a bit rough on his loved ones. There's a tremendous depth to his character. On one side, he's incredibly good at his police work without any display of arrogance. He is a leader by example. Yet, there is also a touch of humility and introspection to his character. He enjoys stories of Sherlock Holmes as well as the wealth of Shakespearean literature and finds inspiration for resolving mysteries by opening his mind to disciplines outside of police work. There is also a touch of philosophic pondering, which I found absolutely delightful. The writing in the earlier pages of the book is fairly straight forward police procedural language - not too desciptive. "Just the facts, ma'am." As the solving of the mystery becomes less cut and dry, the language becomes more descriptive, more painterly and rather philosophic. The cast of characters is tremendous and well developed. The pace is steady up until the last quarter of the book at which point the urgency accelerates and one's heartbeat rises, with the story resolving into a satisfactory conclusion when all is said and done. Although this fifth book of the Yorkshire Murder Mystery series was my first foray into this much admired series, I did not find myself at a loss for having missed the previous four books.There was enough background information provided on each of the long-standing characters to set the tone and provide firm-footing. However, as enjoyable as this one was, I'll definitely be going back to catch the earlier books. I am grateful to publisher Thomas & Mercer for having provided a complimentary electronic copy of this book through NetGalley. Their generosity, however, has not influenced this review - the words of which are mine alone.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    299 pages 4 stars One evening, following a shooting party, a retired judge and promoter of grouse shooting parties, Alexander “Sandy” Fraser is shot dead outside the Dog and Gun Inn in Nidderdale. DCI Jim Oldroyd and his team are called to the scene since the dead man was of some importance. They begin to interview the occupants and employees of the inn, including one woman who says she witnessed the shooting and can name the killer. Sadly, the person identified has disappeared. They soon discover 299 pages 4 stars One evening, following a shooting party, a retired judge and promoter of grouse shooting parties, Alexander “Sandy” Fraser is shot dead outside the Dog and Gun Inn in Nidderdale. DCI Jim Oldroyd and his team are called to the scene since the dead man was of some importance. They begin to interview the occupants and employees of the inn, including one woman who says she witnessed the shooting and can name the killer. Sadly, the person identified has disappeared. They soon discover that Fraser was a difficult man whom no one really liked. There are a wide variety of reasons. He was also known to be arguing with one of his shooting party members during dinner at the inn earlier that evening. Further interviews don't reveal anyone with a clear motive. Even the main suspect looks blameless. The people who have been sabotaging the grouse shoots on Fraser's land don't seem to be combative enough. It's a real puzzle for Oldroyd and team. When another seemingly motiveless killing takes place, with another witness, the tension in the story increases. Ellis' writing reminds me so much of an episode of “Midsomer Murders.” The reader gets to drop in now and then on the principles to witness what they are thinking and saying to one another. It is during these private moments away from the police that we learn there were motives aplenty for murder. It was nice visiting once more with “old friends.” Oldroyd's sister, Alison is always a delight, as is his team from work. I remain suspicious of Julie and what exactly she wants, however. I want to thank NetGalley and Amazon Publishing UK for forwarding to me a copy of this very entertaining book for me to read, enjoy and review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Excellent mystery with an ending worthy of Conan Doyle--a perfect twist! The sleepy village in the Yorkshire Dales was the perfect antidote to city life but for those who protested game shooting just for sport. Then came the first murder. It was witnessed by a reliable person and the named suspect was not only a very nice man (unlike the victim) but he disappeared without a trace! the assignment goes to DCI Jim Oldroyd of the Harrogate Police together with Sergeants Johnson and Carter and local Excellent mystery with an ending worthy of Conan Doyle--a perfect twist! The sleepy village in the Yorkshire Dales was the perfect antidote to city life but for those who protested game shooting just for sport. Then came the first murder. It was witnessed by a reliable person and the named suspect was not only a very nice man (unlike the victim) but he disappeared without a trace! the assignment goes to DCI Jim Oldroyd of the Harrogate Police together with Sergeants Johnson and Carter and local Inspector Gibbs who really have their hands full with this one. Lots of misdirection and red herrings seem to thwart their due diligence even before the second murder. Along the way we readers get to know all of the police characters as well as the civilian ones. I found it riveting and hope for more with Oldroyd and his team in Yorkshire. I requested and received a free ebook copy from Amazon Publishing UK via NetGalley. Thank you!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bonnye Reed

    I received a free electronic copy of this excellent British police procedural on August 13, 2020, from Netgalley, J. R. Ellis and Thomas & Mercer, publisher. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read this novel of my own volition and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. If you have an interest in Yorkshire or British police procedurals, this is a good one. J. R. Ellis takes you there, visiting all the sites that make Yorkshire special which are, coincidentally I received a free electronic copy of this excellent British police procedural on August 13, 2020, from Netgalley, J. R. Ellis and Thomas & Mercer, publisher. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read this novel of my own volition and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. If you have an interest in Yorkshire or British police procedurals, this is a good one. J. R. Ellis takes you there, visiting all the sites that make Yorkshire special which are, coincidentally, part of the chapter headings. His story is intricate and intriguing, his protagonists personable and his prose crisp. Nidderdale is very small, with a newsagent/grocery store, one hotel with a renowned restaurant, and the area's only pub, attached to the hotel. They don't even have a cop shop. Hard to imagine an intricately presented murder, much less two of them, that would outfox the experienced police personnel in Nidderdale's outlying communities. Even harder to imagine more than one person about the dales and fells who needs killing. J. R. Ellis could and did imagine that, and spoons information out delicately. You are gonna like this one. I sure did. pub date August 20, 2020 received August 13, 2020 Thomas & Mercer publisher Reviewed on Goodreads, and Netgalley on August 16, 2020. Reviewed on August 22, 2020, on AmazonSmile, Barnes&Noble, and Bookbub. Not available for review on Kobo or GooglePlay.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Les Wilson

    A good book with an unusual angle. Anything else would spoil the book for you.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sadie Yorke

    Note: Thanks to Netgalley for providing this book for a fair and honest review. I'll be perfectly frank - what first drew me to The Nidderdale Murder in was the premise. A retired judge shot at his country estate, with a promise of intrigue and mystery. Though the fifth in a series, this was the first book I'd read by J. R. Ellis, and I am afraid to say, also the last. Reading through the reviews both here and Netgalley convey to me a strange feeling akin to stepping out of reality and into the tw Note: Thanks to Netgalley for providing this book for a fair and honest review. I'll be perfectly frank - what first drew me to The Nidderdale Murder in was the premise. A retired judge shot at his country estate, with a promise of intrigue and mystery. Though the fifth in a series, this was the first book I'd read by J. R. Ellis, and I am afraid to say, also the last. Reading through the reviews both here and Netgalley convey to me a strange feeling akin to stepping out of reality and into the twilight zone. The novel was poorly written - too often clumsily reliant telling me how characters feel rather than allowing their words speak for themselves - but nonetheless, I persevered. This was after all a murder mystery at its heart. But The Nidderdale Murders failed too in this account. The premise though initially intriguing quickly fell through the territory of serviceable, and then unforgivably boring. Simply put, nothing of any value happened. There were no clues to be found by the reader, no great reflection on the human condition or at the least, any conflict or entertainment to be found within its odd 90, 000 words. The second murder arrives too late. The denouement is laughable. The characters are barely there. And if this is meant to be an ode to countryside, then the Niddledale Murders fails thricefold.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Janine

    I have to give the author props in that I wasn't quite expecting the outcome. However, despite not being a very long book, it felt like it dragged at times. There were bits that felt long winded and almost rambling. The amount of references back to prior books was almost distracting. I get it. Another book dealt with caves. I also found it difficult to follow the story at times because there were so many characters. I couldn't keep them straight. All in all, it wasn't a bad story though. I have to give the author props in that I wasn't quite expecting the outcome. However, despite not being a very long book, it felt like it dragged at times. There were bits that felt long winded and almost rambling. The amount of references back to prior books was almost distracting. I get it. Another book dealt with caves. I also found it difficult to follow the story at times because there were so many characters. I couldn't keep them straight. All in all, it wasn't a bad story though.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. The Nidderdale Murders is the 5th book in the Yorshire Mysteries by J.R. Ellis. Released 20th Aug 2020 on Amazon's Thomas & Mercer imprint, it's 301 pages and available in paperback, audio, and ebook formats. It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive formats lately. For Kindle Unlimited subscribers, this book and the rest Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. The Nidderdale Murders is the 5th book in the Yorshire Mysteries by J.R. Ellis. Released 20th Aug 2020 on Amazon's Thomas & Mercer imprint, it's 301 pages and available in paperback, audio, and ebook formats. It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive formats lately. For Kindle Unlimited subscribers, this book and the rest of the series are currently included in the KU subscription library to borrow and read for free. These books are well written engaging procedurals which are tightly plotted, set against the Yorkshire countryside: hills, moors, and fells. Although it's part of a series, it works quite well as a standalone. There are references to occurrences from previous books in the series, but they don't play a central role in the action and readers new to the series won't have any troubles keeping up. DCI Oldroyd is an experienced and practical investigator in charge of a team of intelligent and hardworking detectives. The unexpected shotgun murder of a local retired judge has the team looking for motives from the past and present. I enjoyed the writing and I really liked Oldroyd's relationship with his family and colleagues. He's an honest and compassionate officer and the development of the plot and denouement were satisfying and well written. Looking forward to more in this series which compares quite favourably with P.D. James' wonderful Adam Dalgleish books. Four stars. Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    DCI Jim Oldroyd and his team are called in to investigate a murder in the small village of Niddersgill in the Yorkshire dales. A retired judge and owner of a grouse moor is murdered and a witness claims the shooter was a local handyman and gardener. Oldroyd and his team keep searching since Green has no motive. What at first looked like an open and closed case gets complicated and more facts and more suspects are uncovered and it’s up to Oldroyd’s team to solve it. This is the fifth book in this DCI Jim Oldroyd and his team are called in to investigate a murder in the small village of Niddersgill in the Yorkshire dales. A retired judge and owner of a grouse moor is murdered and a witness claims the shooter was a local handyman and gardener. Oldroyd and his team keep searching since Green has no motive. What at first looked like an open and closed case gets complicated and more facts and more suspects are uncovered and it’s up to Oldroyd’s team to solve it. This is the fifth book in this series and even though I haven’t read any of the prior books, I had no trouble getting to know the characters. Oldroyd is an interesting main character. He is a great detective, inspiring leader to his two detectives, and has been going through changes in his personal life. There are a few times when his detectives Stephanie Johnson and Andy Carter each question witnesses on their own which allows the reader to learn more about those characters. The book starts out strong and I was very intrigued by the investigation. Then it slows down as the detectives seem to be going in circles. Things do pick up as there is a new development in the case, although the solution is ultimately very complicated and slows the momentum that had built up the last part of the book. I like the main characters and the Yorkshire setting. I really enjoyed the clever poem that is included that uses names of places in the Yorkshire Dales area. Some of the dialogue, especially between Stephanie and Andy who work closely together and are dating, is very stilted. Oldroyd’s interactions seem more natural and realistic. Overall, this is an interesting procedural that I would rate 3.5 stars. I would be interested to read further cases featuring Oldroyd and his team. I received this ebook from NetGalley through the courtesy of Thomas & Mercer. An advance copy was provided to me at no cost, but my review is voluntary and unbiased.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    The Nidderdale Murders begins with what appears to be an open-and-shut case of murder. A persnickety and unlikeable judge retired and bought a manor house with a hunting moor where he hosted grouse-shooting parties to the dismay of animal rights activists. But such was his tight-fisted parsimony, he managed to make everyone else dislike him. Even his oldest friend had cause to wish him ill. So, being shot would have generated a long list of suspects except the shooting was witnessed. Unfortunate The Nidderdale Murders begins with what appears to be an open-and-shut case of murder. A persnickety and unlikeable judge retired and bought a manor house with a hunting moor where he hosted grouse-shooting parties to the dismay of animal rights activists. But such was his tight-fisted parsimony, he managed to make everyone else dislike him. Even his oldest friend had cause to wish him ill. So, being shot would have generated a long list of suspects except the shooting was witnessed. Unfortunately, the suspect is nowhere to be found. DCI Oldroyd and his team come to help the local investigation and they find far too many reasons to kill the judge and no trace anywhere of the suspect. Something just feels wrong and that becomes even more clear with a second murder with a second witness seeing a second killer. Something strange is afoot. I thoroughly enjoyed The Nidderdale Murders and look forward to reading more in this series. This was the fifth in the Yorkshire Murders series and I never once felt lost. There were brief references to past murder investigations, but just as a way of noting similarities or differences and not once necessary to follow the investigation. The book is fair and all the clues are there so we reach the same conclusions as or just before our detectives. It was a clever, methodical procedural with a creative solution. I received an e-galley of The Nidderdale Murders from the publisher through NetGalley The Nidderdale Murders at Thomas & Mercer | Amazon Publishing J.R. Ellis at Facebook

  21. 5 out of 5

    Judith

    “The Nidderdale Murders” is a mildly entertaining murder mystery set in a small village in Yorkshire, England. The first murder occurs shortly after a retired judge, Sandy Fraser, organizes a grouse shoot on his land. Fraser is an unpleasant man with many enemies, so when he is shot at point blank range with a shotgun outside the village inn, there should have been many suspects. However, a witness who resided at the inn saw Fraser’s apparent murderer, who quickly disappeared. Local police as we “The Nidderdale Murders” is a mildly entertaining murder mystery set in a small village in Yorkshire, England. The first murder occurs shortly after a retired judge, Sandy Fraser, organizes a grouse shoot on his land. Fraser is an unpleasant man with many enemies, so when he is shot at point blank range with a shotgun outside the village inn, there should have been many suspects. However, a witness who resided at the inn saw Fraser’s apparent murderer, who quickly disappeared. Local police as well as a team from Harrogate led by Detective Chief Inspector Oldroyd investigates the murder. The investigation is complicated when a second victim is shot in the same manner by a different murderer, who is also observed by a witness. Although the descriptions of the Yorkshire countryside are poetic, the dialog and interactions among the characters feel stilted and awkward. The only exceptions to this were the passages involving Oldroyd and his daughter when he and his sister Allison, and Oldroyd ex-wife attend the daughter’s graduation from Oxford. The awkward prose described earlier kept this book from receiving a 4 or 5 star rating. If the reader is only interested in an entertaining read and the prose style is not an issue, others might enjoy the book more than I did. (Incidentally, the author essentially admits that he copied the plot from an old Sherlock Holmes movie from the forties. This “borrowed” plot further diminished my appreciation for the book.)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    3.5 Stars In a Yorkshire Dales village everyone has a motive for murder—except the killer. A retired judge is shot dead outside the Dog and Gun inn in the remote Yorkshire village of Niddersgill. There’s a witness who saw everything, and the gunman’s on the run; the case should be open-and-shut for DCI Jim Oldroyd. But the murderer had no motive for wanting Sandy Fraser dead and, what’s more, no trace of him can be found. As Oldroyd and his team cast the net wider, they discover that Fraser wasn’t 3.5 Stars In a Yorkshire Dales village everyone has a motive for murder—except the killer. A retired judge is shot dead outside the Dog and Gun inn in the remote Yorkshire village of Niddersgill. There’s a witness who saw everything, and the gunman’s on the run; the case should be open-and-shut for DCI Jim Oldroyd. But the murderer had no motive for wanting Sandy Fraser dead and, what’s more, no trace of him can be found. As Oldroyd and his team cast the net wider, they discover that Fraser wasn’t without enemies in Niddersgill. As the wealthy owner of a grouse moor, he’d clashed with farmers, debtors, hunt saboteurs and blackmailers. When a local shopkeeper is gunned down in a second senseless attack, it’s clear that these killings are anything but random. Oldroyd faces a race against time to connect the crimes and find who’s behind them. This is the fifth book in the series & is very easily read on its own. A well written book that had plenty of twists and turns but I did find the pace very slow to begin with so much so that I was skimming through pages & it was only after the second murder that the pace increased & I was glued. I didn’t work out who the murderer was, which is always a bonus. I just wish it had been more evenly paced. Not my favourite of the series but still an enjoyable read My honest review is for a special copy I voluntarily read

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mystica

    A Yorkshire Murder Mystery - that is the description and certainly more than the murder or the mystery or the detective work, the Yorkshire dales are so beautifully described in this book that anyone will want to go right now see what it is all about. The names of the villages themselves are enchanting and add to the mystery of this story. Add a detective that loves poetry and the dales, a mix of very realistic village folk, cautious with "in comers" and everyone who loves a pint the story is ver A Yorkshire Murder Mystery - that is the description and certainly more than the murder or the mystery or the detective work, the Yorkshire dales are so beautifully described in this book that anyone will want to go right now see what it is all about. The names of the villages themselves are enchanting and add to the mystery of this story. Add a detective that loves poetry and the dales, a mix of very realistic village folk, cautious with "in comers" and everyone who loves a pint the story is very good reading. One murder at point blank range, the murderer almost wanting to be recognized as so and so and then the murderer disappears. No one knows where he lived, though he worked for many as an odd job man and gardener - the victim was obnoxious and disliked but tolerated because he spent quite a bit around the village (though never paid his bills on time). When a second murder happens in the same manner, where the murderer faces a witness so that he will be identified Detective Oldroyd knows that there is something much more than meets the eye. Good detective work, plodding book work connects the dots and how revenge is really served cold in this case.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ruthie Taylor

    ~~I received a free copy of this book to read and review for Wicked Reads ~~ 3.5*s This is the fifth book in the series, although I must admit it is my first. I shall be adding the others to my tbr list though, as I found this to be a good read. The highlight, which was completely unexpected, was the revelation of what the headings to each chapter turned out to be - genius, and beautifully written. Set in the wild and beautiful countryside of Yorkshire, bringing a vision of a rural community who ~~I received a free copy of this book to read and review for Wicked Reads ~~ 3.5*s This is the fifth book in the series, although I must admit it is my first. I shall be adding the others to my tbr list though, as I found this to be a good read. The highlight, which was completely unexpected, was the revelation of what the headings to each chapter turned out to be - genius, and beautifully written. Set in the wild and beautiful countryside of Yorkshire, bringing a vision of a rural community who have outsiders visiting for shooting grouse. There is the usual haves and have-nots split, exemplified by their behaviour in the local pub. An unhappy calm, shattered by the murder of the local landed gentry, which starts unravelling the status quo. The author does a good job of highlighting the social dynamics of country and town, and uses the visiting police to emphasise the disconnects. I will have to go back and catch more of the ongoing plot lines - like Steph and Andy, and Jim and his ex-wife, and new partner - but it did not affect this story at all. Find yourself a quiet corner and enjoy this entertaining read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    I grew up reading Agatha Christie so I like a good British police procedural novel. I enjoyed this one. My favorite aspect was the setting. Ellis has done a good job of taking readers into the many Yorkshire locations, from moor to gorge. I liked learning a bit about land used for hunting, in this case a grouse hunting moor. The plot was very interesting, with the murderers clearly wanting to be seen in the act. I like how Ellis slowly and deliberately takes us on the journey of solving the case I grew up reading Agatha Christie so I like a good British police procedural novel. I enjoyed this one. My favorite aspect was the setting. Ellis has done a good job of taking readers into the many Yorkshire locations, from moor to gorge. I liked learning a bit about land used for hunting, in this case a grouse hunting moor. The plot was very interesting, with the murderers clearly wanting to be seen in the act. I like how Ellis slowly and deliberately takes us on the journey of solving the case, revealing background information bit by bit. The novel is about Detective Chief Inspector Oldroyd and we learn a great deal about his life and family. Ellis does maintain a good balance of character development, mystery plot and setting. This is a good novel for readers who like a slow and methodical investigation into puzzling murders. I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Edi McNinch

    I am never disappointed with this author's police procedurals set in some remote quaint village outside of Detective Oldroyd's home base of Harrogate. It is part of a series but is very easily read as a stand alone as are all of the series. Only the main characters are.the same in the series. Det. Oldroyd seems to be a mix of Sherlock Holmes, Morse, and maybe a little Colombo which makes for an interesting main character. The stories are unique and characters are well developed. He describes the I am never disappointed with this author's police procedurals set in some remote quaint village outside of Detective Oldroyd's home base of Harrogate. It is part of a series but is very easily read as a stand alone as are all of the series. Only the main characters are.the same in the series. Det. Oldroyd seems to be a mix of Sherlock Holmes, Morse, and maybe a little Colombo which makes for an interesting main character. The stories are unique and characters are well developed. He describes the settings in such a way that you can easily picture the hills, forests or barren lands. The story itself is quite detailed but not boring. It may take a little while to get involved and it is not a quick read but it is enjoyable and not one you can guess "who dunnit" until the end! Jacket cover gives a good synopsis of the story so I will not write a book report. Read and enjoy!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    Having just read the latest Kelly Porter story, I thought I'd like to stay in the North of England. Nidderdale in the Yorkshire Dales is the setting for this enjoyable mystery. After a grouse shoot & celebration dinner the owner of the grouse moor & retired judge is shot outside the hotel. The shooting is witnessed by an employee at the hotel, she saw the shooter clearly & can identify him. This should make things easy for DCI Jim Oldroyd & his two other officers but things do not seem to be as Having just read the latest Kelly Porter story, I thought I'd like to stay in the North of England. Nidderdale in the Yorkshire Dales is the setting for this enjoyable mystery. After a grouse shoot & celebration dinner the owner of the grouse moor & retired judge is shot outside the hotel. The shooting is witnessed by an employee at the hotel, she saw the shooter clearly & can identify him. This should make things easy for DCI Jim Oldroyd & his two other officers but things do not seem to be as clear cut as they seem. This is part of a series but it is not one I'm familiar with, nor did it spoil my enjoyment of the story. The setting of the story was almost an extra character & I really liked Oldroyd. There were enough twists to make things interesting but not make it too confusing. Thanks to Netgalley & the publisher for letting me read & review this book. It was a satisfying read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Lee

    This was an eagerly awaited next-in-series by another of my highly rated authors. I lived in Yorkshire for almost 30 years and characters and locations conjured up by the author felt so real. Even the name of the DCI has a Yorkshire ring about it; Oldroyd. The author continues his theme of 'impossible' murder situations but in this case it should all be so straight forward . Surely with an eyewitness positively identifying the killer, what could possibly go wrong? A well crafted story with a very This was an eagerly awaited next-in-series by another of my highly rated authors. I lived in Yorkshire for almost 30 years and characters and locations conjured up by the author felt so real. Even the name of the DCI has a Yorkshire ring about it; Oldroyd. The author continues his theme of 'impossible' murder situations but in this case it should all be so straight forward . Surely with an eyewitness positively identifying the killer, what could possibly go wrong? A well crafted story with a very clever plot. I think that I saw through a bit of it but I still missed most of the twists and turns. Its nice to read of a good natured police team who respect their boss and not have too much of their personnal lives thrown in to pad out the story. Of course I also appreciated the memories of Yorkshire it evoked. A good 4*.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I was looking into a new mystery, and found this to be fairly good. I definitely liked reading about the moors or Yorkshire, especially since my own family comes from that area of England. Since this was obviously a book written farther along in the series, I think I need to go back and read the earlier books mainly for more information about the characters. The plot was very convoluted...two women see two different men killed, at different times, but both of the murders were done by people in to I was looking into a new mystery, and found this to be fairly good. I definitely liked reading about the moors or Yorkshire, especially since my own family comes from that area of England. Since this was obviously a book written farther along in the series, I think I need to go back and read the earlier books mainly for more information about the characters. The plot was very convoluted...two women see two different men killed, at different times, but both of the murders were done by people in town. And then neither of the two men who supposedly killed cannot be found. Fun story...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katie Kat

    In this fifth installment in the series, an unpopular retired judge is killed almost everyone in the village is a suspect. Where to start,.. when a second murder occurs the team, led by the quite likeable Jim Oldroyd, set about finding the clues and unravelling the links to solve the mystery. The characters in the book are easy to relate to and imagine and the descriptions of the beautiful Yorkshire countryside brings the book to life. A good read for any fans of cosy mysteries. Thanks to NetGal In this fifth installment in the series, an unpopular retired judge is killed almost everyone in the village is a suspect. Where to start,.. when a second murder occurs the team, led by the quite likeable Jim Oldroyd, set about finding the clues and unravelling the links to solve the mystery. The characters in the book are easy to relate to and imagine and the descriptions of the beautiful Yorkshire countryside brings the book to life. A good read for any fans of cosy mysteries. Thanks to NetGalley, Amazon publishing and the author for an ARC of this book.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.