hits counter War of Shadows: Codebreakers, Spies, and the Secret Struggle to Drive the Nazis from the Middle East - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

War of Shadows: Codebreakers, Spies, and the Secret Struggle to Drive the Nazis from the Middle East

Availability: Ready to download

An award-winning journalist and historian tells the story of the Nazis' brutal march into Egypt, which seemed bound for Israel--until the Allies discovered the one American man who unwittingly made it all happen. When the Nazis broke the Black Code, used by American diplomatic missions around the world, they were able to get detailed portrayals of British positions and wea An award-winning journalist and historian tells the story of the Nazis' brutal march into Egypt, which seemed bound for Israel--until the Allies discovered the one American man who unwittingly made it all happen. When the Nazis broke the Black Code, used by American diplomatic missions around the world, they were able to get detailed portrayals of British positions and weaknesses in North Africa, sometimes just a few hours after they were written. Using this information, under Rommel's command, they marched swiftly and terrifyingly toward Alexandria, with the ultimate goal of reaching the Middle East. But Allied forces had broken the Nazis' code, Enigma, as well. They soon discovered they were leaking information, and set off on a fevered and high-stakes search for the source. War of Shadows is the cinematic story of the race for information in North African theater of World War II, and the battle of cryptographers on both sides of it. Years in the making, this book is a feat of historical research and storytelling, and a rethinking of the popular narrative of the war. It portrays the war not as an inevitable clash of heroes and villains but a spiraling series of failures and accidents-one that spread into Africa and nearly beyond.


Compare

An award-winning journalist and historian tells the story of the Nazis' brutal march into Egypt, which seemed bound for Israel--until the Allies discovered the one American man who unwittingly made it all happen. When the Nazis broke the Black Code, used by American diplomatic missions around the world, they were able to get detailed portrayals of British positions and wea An award-winning journalist and historian tells the story of the Nazis' brutal march into Egypt, which seemed bound for Israel--until the Allies discovered the one American man who unwittingly made it all happen. When the Nazis broke the Black Code, used by American diplomatic missions around the world, they were able to get detailed portrayals of British positions and weaknesses in North Africa, sometimes just a few hours after they were written. Using this information, under Rommel's command, they marched swiftly and terrifyingly toward Alexandria, with the ultimate goal of reaching the Middle East. But Allied forces had broken the Nazis' code, Enigma, as well. They soon discovered they were leaking information, and set off on a fevered and high-stakes search for the source. War of Shadows is the cinematic story of the race for information in North African theater of World War II, and the battle of cryptographers on both sides of it. Years in the making, this book is a feat of historical research and storytelling, and a rethinking of the popular narrative of the war. It portrays the war not as an inevitable clash of heroes and villains but a spiraling series of failures and accidents-one that spread into Africa and nearly beyond.

46 review for War of Shadows: Codebreakers, Spies, and the Secret Struggle to Drive the Nazis from the Middle East

  1. 4 out of 5

    AC

    If you're interested in WWII, and specifically, the North African Theater battles between the Desert Fox himself and British forces, this is a book for you., Gorenberg helpfully provides a listing of all the players at the front of the book, so if you're not intimately familiar with everything that was going on in the chaos of North Africa, you'll find that handy, The story, at its heart. is about people: their victories, but also their great failures. Both are abundant here - it is a war, after If you're interested in WWII, and specifically, the North African Theater battles between the Desert Fox himself and British forces, this is a book for you., Gorenberg helpfully provides a listing of all the players at the front of the book, so if you're not intimately familiar with everything that was going on in the chaos of North Africa, you'll find that handy, The story, at its heart. is about people: their victories, but also their great failures. Both are abundant here - it is a war, after all. It's a dense book, and requires attention. Here and there, it strays a little outside the lines (and it is clear the author is both very familiar with and very passionate about the period examined during these periods). However, it is a worthy read, an these occasional ramblings are worth it in the overall scheme of things. Four and a half stars out of five, for the rambles, rounded up to five for a well-written and entertaining (as entertaining as war can be) book. Thanks to Perseus Books/Public Affairs and NetGalley for the review copy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ManOfLaBook.com

    For more reviews and bookish posts visit: https://www.ManOfLaBook.com War of Shadows: Codebreakers, Spies, and the Secret Struggle to Drive the Nazis from the Middle East by Gershom Gorenberg is a history book recounting the Nazi army’s march through Africa and Egypt. Mr. Gorenberg is a historian and journalist specializing in Middle East affairs This is a World War II book recounting the battles between Erwin Rommel, the Dessert Fox, and the British, ending at the battle of El Alamein. The author For more reviews and bookish posts visit: https://www.ManOfLaBook.com War of Shadows: Codebreakers, Spies, and the Secret Struggle to Drive the Nazis from the Middle East by Gershom Gorenberg is a history book recounting the Nazi army’s march through Africa and Egypt. Mr. Gorenberg is a historian and journalist specializing in Middle East affairs This is a World War II book recounting the battles between Erwin Rommel, the Dessert Fox, and the British, ending at the battle of El Alamein. The author tells the story through the eyes of the participants, without much conjecture, but with fascinating analysis. This is a history book about people and how their successes and failures changed history. The battle for North Africa, at the time, had far reaching consequences. The might of the Nazi Army was on display, Mussolini’s Italian Empire was on the line, and of course control of the oil fields for the war in Europe. The Egyptians were promised to rule themselves if the Axis won, and that promise, worthless or not, had also its affects. The book is dense, but mesmerizing. It requires attention from the reader but the author helpfully supplies a list of personnel in the front of the book if needed. If you are familiar with history of the Middle East after the battlefield moved to Europe you’d recognize how getting ready for a Nazi occupation shaped people and nations. For example, the Jews in Palestine took it upon themselves to train, as semi-professional army, or join the British forces, for defense against Rommel’s forces when they win Egypt and roll into Palestine. The Jews knew they were going to be massacred and wanted to put up a fight, the outcome would probably have been the same though. In 1948, however, the Jews had a disciplined, trained, and experienced soldiers and commanders. The rest is history. The author mainly talks about events in Cairo and Bletchley Park, England focusing on failed spies and cryptographers. I enjoyed the center stage the cryptographers received (finally), and how their work, thankless and obscure for decades, had changed the outcome of the war. The author tells of the brilliance of humans, as well as the notion that no matter what, they are still the weakest link in the security chain and their mistakes cost dearly. The book does a great job to taking a complex, and messy, narrative and shaping it for the reader to understand. It was amusing to read how an obscure, but genius, cryptographer working in a dank room had far reaching consequences on the other side of the world without anyone knowing about it. This is the history that I love to read, human stories with real consequences, unsung heroes who made a difference. War of Shadows: Codebreakers, Spies, and the Secret Struggle to Drive the Nazis from the Middle East by Gershom Gorenberg is a fascinating read about a part of the war which doesn’t get as much attention. As a bonus, encryption, human intelligence, and signal intelligence have far reaching lessons which we should take to heart in today’s world of connected networks, which unfortunately it seem we haven’t learned much (in the humint category) since the late 1930s.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC. War of Shadows is about the Middle East Theatre of World War II and the espionage/intelligence efforts that shaped it. The book primarily toggles between Cairo and Bletchley Park in England, the location of the English cryptographers, and features an enormous cast of historical figures (thank heavens for the list of dramatis personae at the front of the book). While there are some big names that take center stage, like the Desert Fox himself, t Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC. War of Shadows is about the Middle East Theatre of World War II and the espionage/intelligence efforts that shaped it. The book primarily toggles between Cairo and Bletchley Park in England, the location of the English cryptographers, and features an enormous cast of historical figures (thank heavens for the list of dramatis personae at the front of the book). While there are some big names that take center stage, like the Desert Fox himself, the book is also full of failed spies, brilliant cryptanalysts, Egyptian politicians, a disputed count (yes, Almasy, the basis for The English Patient, makes an appearance), and more. What I like most about the work is that it attacks the notion of a clear victory between right and wrong to show instead, as the book copy says, "a spiraling series of failures, accidents, and desperate triumphs." History traditionally tends to focus on moments of brilliance and "great men". This book is different. Enigma was certainly solved with some genius-level inspiration from the Polish mathematicians Rejewski, Zygalski, and Rozycki and Turing, but the secrets pried from those encoded messages were also the product of meticulous work on the part of the codebreakers and profoundly human mistakes from the Germans. The contrast between human intelligence and signals intelligence is fascinating. On the subject of mistakes, the running theme of Americans being unwilling to change their codes after being warned about them being cracked was certainly eye-opening. The book gets bogged down a little, perhaps in part because of the effort to express the complexity and messiness, but a sincere tip-of-the-hat to the author for shaping a coherent story while retaining that messiness. I found myself having to consult the list of historical figures at the front of the book to remind myself who I was reading about. Still, an absolutely fascinating read about an important period of the war that gets rather less attention (at least in the American-geared media I generally consume). I highly recommend reading the epilogue and the acknowledgements section-- they wrap the book up nicely.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zeb Kantrowitz

    In England even before the second world war began, had created a group of crytographers whose job was to break the German and Italian codes used by diplomats and the military. This book concentrates on how the broken codes effected the war in North Africa. But we are not only privy to the broken Axis codes but to how the Germans and Italians used broken codes of the English and Americans. Not all codes could be broke completely and therefore the information that was gained by the broken codes dif In England even before the second world war began, had created a group of crytographers whose job was to break the German and Italian codes used by diplomats and the military. This book concentrates on how the broken codes effected the war in North Africa. But we are not only privy to the broken Axis codes but to how the Germans and Italians used broken codes of the English and Americans. Not all codes could be broke completely and therefore the information that was gained by the broken codes differed at times and would give on side or the other the advantage. The British know when Rommel is low on fuel and he knows where the British plan to ambush him. In the end it is the intercept of information that Rommel is making a dash for Cairo but is planning to use the captured British supplies after he destroys the British tank corps. The most interesting to me of all the codebreakers was the Italians. They insinuated their people into all of the Allied Embassies, and then broke into them and stole the codebooks when the Embassy was empty at night and copied the codes and then put them back with no one the wiser. The British also had a bad habit of sending cables in the clear or under easily broken codes that compromised everything they did or proposed to do.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Nesbitt

    Great history If you like history and are interested in world war 2 . this book is a must read clear concise reads like a novel

  6. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Stenquist

    Great historical real to life synopsis of all the challenges involved in WWII codebreaking. Very worth reading and learning and enjoying.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paula Charleston

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  9. 4 out of 5

    Neil Wigan

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jodie

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ronalde Scott

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robert H

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Bryant

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Powell

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Dattoli

  17. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Plunkett

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lori

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lori

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

  21. 5 out of 5

    A.L. Sowards

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nissa

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Meeker

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ciara

  28. 4 out of 5

    DW

  29. 4 out of 5

    Reading

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  31. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  32. 4 out of 5

    Elisa (Reisender Bücherwurm)

  33. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  34. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Bisaccia

  35. 4 out of 5

    Krzysiek (Chris)

  36. 4 out of 5

    R. Gabriel Esteves

  37. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  38. 5 out of 5

    Kimberley

  39. 4 out of 5

    Michael Griswold

  40. 4 out of 5

    Shim

  41. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Demsky

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  43. 4 out of 5

    Bettye Short

  44. 5 out of 5

    Brittf

  45. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  46. 4 out of 5

    Gail Barasch

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.