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The End of the Christian Life: How Embracing Our Mortality Frees Us to Truly Live

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We're all going to die. Yet in our medically advanced, technological age, many of us see death as a distant reality--something that happens only at the end of a long life or to other people. In The End of the Christian Life, Todd Billings urges Christians to resist that view. Instead, he calls us to embrace our mortality in our daily life and faith. This is the journey of g We're all going to die. Yet in our medically advanced, technological age, many of us see death as a distant reality--something that happens only at the end of a long life or to other people. In The End of the Christian Life, Todd Billings urges Christians to resist that view. Instead, he calls us to embrace our mortality in our daily life and faith. This is the journey of genuine discipleship, Billings says: following the crucified and resurrected Lord in a world of distraction and false hopes. Drawing on his experience as a professor and father living with incurable cancer, Billings offers a personal yet deeply theological account of the gospel's expansive hope for small, mortal creatures. Artfully weaving rich theology with powerful narrative, Billings writes for church leaders and laypeople alike. Whether we are young or old, reeling from loss or clinging to our own prosperity, this book challenges us to walk a strange but wondrous path: in the midst of joy and lament, to receive mortal limits as a gift, an opportunity to give ourselves over to the Lord of life.


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We're all going to die. Yet in our medically advanced, technological age, many of us see death as a distant reality--something that happens only at the end of a long life or to other people. In The End of the Christian Life, Todd Billings urges Christians to resist that view. Instead, he calls us to embrace our mortality in our daily life and faith. This is the journey of g We're all going to die. Yet in our medically advanced, technological age, many of us see death as a distant reality--something that happens only at the end of a long life or to other people. In The End of the Christian Life, Todd Billings urges Christians to resist that view. Instead, he calls us to embrace our mortality in our daily life and faith. This is the journey of genuine discipleship, Billings says: following the crucified and resurrected Lord in a world of distraction and false hopes. Drawing on his experience as a professor and father living with incurable cancer, Billings offers a personal yet deeply theological account of the gospel's expansive hope for small, mortal creatures. Artfully weaving rich theology with powerful narrative, Billings writes for church leaders and laypeople alike. Whether we are young or old, reeling from loss or clinging to our own prosperity, this book challenges us to walk a strange but wondrous path: in the midst of joy and lament, to receive mortal limits as a gift, an opportunity to give ourselves over to the Lord of life.

30 review for The End of the Christian Life: How Embracing Our Mortality Frees Us to Truly Live

  1. 4 out of 5

    Todd Miles

    A thought provoking book about the finitude of life and what the Bible has to say about death (in the most personal sense). Perhaps if we understood how brief and small our lives actually are, we would be free to rejoice in the small things, to be faithful in the small things, and to think less of ourselves. I suspect the world would be a better place is such took place.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael Philliber

    Today, it came at me again. I was teaching a small group of people at our State Capitol and we were hunkered down examining James 4:13-17. James was correcting the brazen outlook that thinks we have control of our lives and our outcomes, while not having God anywhere in the equation (4:13). And part of James’s remedy was to point out that in light of our brevity (4:14) what we should say is, “If the Lord wills, we will live and do this or that” (4:15). If the Lord – the Lord Jesus Christ (1:1 an Today, it came at me again. I was teaching a small group of people at our State Capitol and we were hunkered down examining James 4:13-17. James was correcting the brazen outlook that thinks we have control of our lives and our outcomes, while not having God anywhere in the equation (4:13). And part of James’s remedy was to point out that in light of our brevity (4:14) what we should say is, “If the Lord wills, we will live and do this or that” (4:15). If the Lord – the Lord Jesus Christ (1:1 and 2:1) wills, we will live…and then engage in our activities. And that thought is what “The End of the Christian Life: How Embracing Our Mortality Frees Us to Truly Live” occupies itself with in 240 softback pages. The author, J. Todd Billings, Gordon H. Girod Research Professor of Reformed Theology at Western Theological Seminary in Holland, Michigan, an ordained minister in the Reformed Church in America, and author of numerous studies, has some skin in this game as he faces his own incurable cancer. It’s not a book for the light-of-heart, but for the live-at-heart! This volume is a must-read for anyone who claims to believe in the Christ of Good Friday and Easter Morning. As Billings states it, the “strange thesis of this book is that whether you are nineteen or ninety-nine, whether you are healthy or sick, or whether the future looks bright or bleak, true hope does not involve closing over the wound of death. Instead, even the wound can remind us who we are: beloved, yet small and mortal children of God, bearing witness to the Lord of creation who will set things right on the final day.” The author takes readers through an extended meditation on our mortality beginning with our plunge into Sheol, that dark pit that can encircle us even while living. He moves on to two views of death among ancient Christians that, with Irenaeus, sees death as a relief, and with Augustine, perceives death as the enemy. Further, Billings addresses how we mere mortals delude ourselves with dreams of invincibility and immortality, especially in the face of modern medicine. Next, he graciously takes on the prosperity gospel and its anemic cousins, showing how Christians appear to be three times as likely to grasp at extreme medical measures that will only marginally extend their lives. Finally, the author wraps up his material with a glance over the cloudy ridge into the canyon vistas beyond. In these two chapters, he comes at Near Death Experiences (NDE) from a sagacious and pastoral posture, and looks at the differences between what happens when we die, and the glorious day of Christ’s return when he raises all of his people from the dead. We are forced to contemplate what we expect to meet in the end; “The difference is between expecting oblivion and expecting God. Christian hope expects God to be the unrivaled King in the end, so that sin, the devil, and even death will be destroyed.” Much of the material is challenging, sobering, and enlightening! There were times Billings had me in tears (especially when retelling the stories of “Jack” and “Claude”), and other times he had me walking around the house and yard thinking hard. The author doesn’t shy away from the important topics, like the Day of Judgment and why it is such good news; that NDEs are not revelatory and therefore not a guide; how the Scriptures repeatedly emphasize that Christians actually should expect a life of unexplained suffering; and that the Christian hope is not in life extension or healing, but eternal life with the Father, and the Son and the Holy Spirit, boundlessly! In the end, Billings helps us to recognize that “our mortal limits can lighten our load and deepen our joy. We are small, and the world is not on our shoulders.” “The End of the Christian Life” is THE book to get this year, especially as the Lord of heaven and earth has given us a good reason to pause, reset, and reboot (2020 and COVID19). This would be a healthy gift for your loved ones, and for you to read yourself. Church leaders and laity should snatch up a copy as it comes out and make this manuscript a priority. Seminaries must require their students to delve deep into its pages and ponder its gravities. I highly recommend this volume, and plan to make numerous copies available to my congregation. My gratitude goes out to the author and publisher who invited me to be part of the book’s “launch team” and supplied me with a pre-published electronic copy of the volume. They made not stipulations on me, offered me no bribes, nor promised me riches and wealth untold. Therefore, I can say unashamedly that this analysis is all mine, freely made and freely given.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anna Erickson

    I found myself deeply encouraged, challenged, and drawn near to Jesus through Dr. Billings's work. Part of what makes his books so unique is that Dr. Billings lives and writes with the heart and faithfulness of a pastor and the theological precision of a world-class scholar. Reading through these chapters helped me recognize my own death-denying tendencies that limit me from living in both true Christian assurance and lament. I think that now more than ever, we need a robust and distinctly-Christ I found myself deeply encouraged, challenged, and drawn near to Jesus through Dr. Billings's work. Part of what makes his books so unique is that Dr. Billings lives and writes with the heart and faithfulness of a pastor and the theological precision of a world-class scholar. Reading through these chapters helped me recognize my own death-denying tendencies that limit me from living in both true Christian assurance and lament. I think that now more than ever, we need a robust and distinctly-Christian theological account of death and dying, for the sake of Christ's church-- The End of the Christian Life is just that.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    J. Todd Billings is one of my favourite theological authors. He writes with real warmth and rich theology; his dual experience of living with terminal cancer and being a theologian mean that we has both authority and wisdom. Reading a book about death probably shouldn't be enjoying - but this one was! J. Todd Billings is one of my favourite theological authors. He writes with real warmth and rich theology; his dual experience of living with terminal cancer and being a theologian mean that we has both authority and wisdom. Reading a book about death probably shouldn't be enjoying - but this one was!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Thomas James

    The warmth with which J. Todd Billings writes always sets his books apart from others in his field. This book is one of the best resources I have found on the topic of death, mortality, and what it means to be human. Truly a must-read for anyone.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Richard Myerscough

    Todd Billings writes with such care and insight, with a wisdom that is gentle and godly. A wonderful book, I'd give it 6 stars if I could. Todd Billings writes with such care and insight, with a wisdom that is gentle and godly. A wonderful book, I'd give it 6 stars if I could.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    In The End of the Christian Life, Billings invites us all to contemplate our own mortality. Weaving together real-life narratives with poignant theological insight, Billings offers sober, christ-centered hope for mortal creatures like us.  The End of The Christian Life moves from death to life in Christ. Billings begins with an exploration of the biblical language of Sheol. He notes that it is not just the abode of the dead, but is a place where even the living can cry out to God and long for God In The End of the Christian Life, Billings invites us all to contemplate our own mortality. Weaving together real-life narratives with poignant theological insight, Billings offers sober, christ-centered hope for mortal creatures like us.  The End of The Christian Life moves from death to life in Christ. Billings begins with an exploration of the biblical language of Sheol. He notes that it is not just the abode of the dead, but is a place where even the living can cry out to God and long for God’s presence at the temple. Life in Sheol is life cut off from the land of the living. It is life swallowed up by death. Yet, even before our final breath, we can be swallowed up by Sheol.  After an intimate look at just what it feels like to live in the pit of Sheol, Billings confronts us with the nature of death. Is it an enemy or a friend? The answer, surprisingly, is both. We rightly see death as an enemy and a consequence of the fall. There is something wrong about dying. Yet, there is also something fitting about dying. We are creatures, not God. We were made with limits, and there can be times where death can even be considered good. When Christians celebrate life and proclaim hope of eternal life in Christ in the face of death, this is right. When Christians lament and weep and question and cry out to God in the face of death, this too is right. For most of us, Billings points out, our deaths will be a mixture of the two.  Ultimately, Billings seeks to help us live as those who will die. This powerlessness in the face of death and the recognition of our mortal limits can cast us back upon the LORD to guard and hold us even in death. Yet, ours is a culture that denies death. What pretends to be the pursuit of life can easily be motivated by the fear and denial of death. Billings sees this firsthand as he navigates the steady barrage of cancer treatment and the hope that the next treatment, the next remedy will finally do the trick and bring the cure. Even (perhaps especially) Christians can be tempted to denying our mortality when we view blessing primarily in terms of health and healing.  Billings ends by circling back to the language of Sheol and longing for the temple. He centers the Christian hope in the presence of the crucified and risen Christ. Jesus Christ has tasted death for us and, in union with him, we will one day be raised to life in him. The hope of the presence of God in the temple finds its fulfillment in Jesus Christ. We are not the center of the story, even the story of our death. Christ is. We are graciously invited to join the chorus. The End of the Christian Life is not just for those facing death or the death of a loved one. It is for all of us who walk this mortal road. This book will change the way you pray and read the Scriptures. Perhaps the greatest gift it offers is a spiritual geography of death and life in Christ. The biblical language of Sheol, temple, barrenness, and fullness is rich and needed for the Christian life. Billings’ treatment of these words expands and deepens our reading of the Psalms, Job, the Prophets, the Gospels, and Revelation. Our contemporary world has given us faulty maps to navigate our life and death. Billings gives us deep, biblical language to orient us well as we pray, read, and wrestle with life as mortals.  In his characteristic balanced, gentle, but convicted style, Billings also exposes the false, but ever so appealing, pathways of our death-denying culture. He avoids false dichotomies and easy answers, all the while holding forth the astounding hope found in the resurrected Christ. He critiques the way prosperity teaching has infected our understanding of faith, death, and healing. Yet, he also reveals why this teaching is so appealing, even to the most orthodox. He is gentle, but firm even as he points out the errors of longing for life after death without judgment.  The End of the Christian Life will change how you live. Each of us will die. None of us knows when. Death is not something that only happens to other people. It will happen to us. Our best works and most supreme achievements will crumble. Yet, the promise of God in Christ remains secure. We will one day be brought into the promised land where Christ is and join our voices in the chorus of praise.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    Another wonderful book by one of my favorite @westerntheologicalseminary faculty Dr. J Todd Billings. I had the privilege of reading an advance copy this summer. As always, his writing is a gift and a reminder of hope - embracing life in the midst of our morality, to center ourselves in Christ amidst the great catastrophes of our day and feelings of powerlessness in the midst of it all. A short quote from the book, The End of the Christian Life: How Embracing our Morality Frees us to Truly Live: “ Another wonderful book by one of my favorite @westerntheologicalseminary faculty Dr. J Todd Billings. I had the privilege of reading an advance copy this summer. As always, his writing is a gift and a reminder of hope - embracing life in the midst of our morality, to center ourselves in Christ amidst the great catastrophes of our day and feelings of powerlessness in the midst of it all. A short quote from the book, The End of the Christian Life: How Embracing our Morality Frees us to Truly Live: “You are small, so do small things. Bring a loaf of bread or scones. Bring yourself. Bring hope in Christ that is durable enough to lament and ache and rejoice and laugh. You can meet others in Sheol, and you can reflect the light of the Deliverer. But you cannot empty out the Pit. You are not the ruler of the universe. Feel the freedom of that as you act in the world.” I commend this book to all who wonder about life and death, our place in the world, and who need a reminder of who God is in the midst of it all. #theendofthechristianlife #dosmallthings #psalm39

  9. 4 out of 5

    Derek Emerson

    There is an ancient Christian tradition known as memento mori, “remember your death,” which means we live our lives with our death in front of us. It is a way to refocus our energy on living a full life while we have it. It predates but connects with ars moriendi, the “art of dying” which begins with 15th-century texts that examine Christian death and the afterlife in an effort to allow us to “die well.” Todd Billings most recent book, The End of the Christian Life: How Embracing our Mortality Fr There is an ancient Christian tradition known as memento mori, “remember your death,” which means we live our lives with our death in front of us. It is a way to refocus our energy on living a full life while we have it. It predates but connects with ars moriendi, the “art of dying” which begins with 15th-century texts that examine Christian death and the afterlife in an effort to allow us to “die well.” Todd Billings most recent book, The End of the Christian Life: How Embracing our Mortality Frees Us to Truly Live, builds on this tradition in a work that will appeal to the layperson as well as the theologian. For Billings, dying well is not an abstract exercise. He is dying from multiple myeloma, an incurable cancer. Diagnosed at the age of 39, Billings lives with the knowledge that he is unlikely to see his two children graduate from high school. The constant pain of his cancer reminds him of his mortality even as he continues to be a father, husband, neighbor, church member, and friend. A highly regarded theologian, Billings first wrote movingly about his diagnosis and life with cancer in Rejoicing in Lament: Wrestling With Incurable Cancer And Life In Christ in 2015. Now we see a person who has lived with this diagnosis for five years and “In my own journey of treatment and getting to know others in the cancer community, I’ve realized that the process of embracing my mortality is a God-given means for discipleship and witness in the world. As strange as it seems, coming to terms with our limits as dying creatures is a life-giving path” (p. 4). Billings takes us through the different ways Christians either struggle or embrace the concept of death. He examines the afterlife, how medicine impacts our view of death, how we avoid the concept of death, and an especially intriguing chapter on how “prosperity gospel” theology impacts our view of evil our ideas about death. It is our views on death that Billings focuses on since death is a fact; how we come to grips with our death is another story. As a solid Protestant theologian, Billings’ thinking is always grounded in scripture. He does not shy away from the fact that the Judeo-Christian view of death and the afterlife have evolved and changed over the centuries. His exploration of “Sheol” in the Old Testament challenges the popular understanding of it as a shadowy afterlife. In Psalm 107 he shows us that “then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,/and he saved them from their distress;/he sent out his word and healed them,/and delivered them from destruction [Sheol].” Billings cites several examples that show Sheol is for the living and the dead. It is for those who are cut off from God and they cry out to be rescued. In doing so, Billings shows that scripture does not separate biological life and death as much being in God’s presence or absent from God’s presence. Sheol becomes a fluid “place” where those who suffer, in life or death, find God absent from their lives. Billings acknowledges that his more privileged background has allowed him to escape much of this suffering. Still, “Each person’s suffering has its own character…and a brush with death can transport any of us to Sheol in short order” (p.18). We have been preceded in this suffering by Christ, who calls out from the cross, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me.” Christ felt this abandonment, but then “The life-giving presence of God descended to the deep pit of Sheol” (p. 19). God reaches across the chasm to those who feel lost and abandoned. Billings also examines how our society handles death. Funerals, like weddings, have become separated from worship services and turned into personalized events. “The older pattern was to bring the coffin, and thus the body of the deceased, to a congregational worship service centered on the death and resurrection” (p. 82) Now, many people have “celebrations of life” with no body present, lest it dampens people’s spirits. “Stated differently, all too often the church swaps a Christ-centered funeral liturgy for a sugarcoated ‘personal memorial service’ to accommodate a death-denying culture” (p. 82). Billings sees this as dangerous for Christians as it allows us to avoid our need of God for deliverance. Billings is willing to challenge us and our culture in how we approach death. He refuses to slip into false platitudes and points out that the “heavenly family reunion” we often talk about when someone dies has no biblical basis. We simply don’t know what life after death is going to be like (and he has great review of near-death experience literature in here), but what we do know does not imply that our departed loved ones are waiting for us the moment we die. Billings is not trying to be unsympathetic, but as a theologian, he recognizes the limits of our human understanding. What Billings provides us with in this book is a call for Christians to rethink how they approach their death. The first part of that is stop denying death and then to consider how we live our lives with the acknowledgment of our death. Any of us may die today without expecting it. Billings could as well, but unlike many of us he knows his death will come sooner than he desires. We can be thankful that he has the faith and the courage to share with us how that knowledge of death can shape our lives. Disclaimer: This is from an advance review copy so the page numbers may change. In addition, I know Todd Billings and in the book, he refers to my youngest son, Oliver, who died from cancer. Nevertheless, this is an honest review of another great book by Billings. If I didn’t like it, I just wouldn’t say anything!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Robert D. Cornwall

    We will all die. The age at which we die varies, but we are mortal beings. Some among us have been stricken with diseases, including cancer, that make life difficult. I've been fortunate to be relatively healthy, but I've known too many who have suffered and died. I've been their friend, their family member, and their pastor. The question that those of us tasked with ministry is helping others make sense of their realities. So, could "embracing our mortality free us to truly live?" That is the p We will all die. The age at which we die varies, but we are mortal beings. Some among us have been stricken with diseases, including cancer, that make life difficult. I've been fortunate to be relatively healthy, but I've known too many who have suffered and died. I've been their friend, their family member, and their pastor. The question that those of us tasked with ministry is helping others make sense of their realities. So, could "embracing our mortality free us to truly live?" That is the premise of a new book by Todd Billings. Todd Billings is a research professor of Reformed Theology at Western Theological Seminary in Holland, Michigan. Billings has joined several other theologians in connecting their experiences with terminal cancer with their theologies. In these works, these theologians have shared how their experiences have illuminated their understandings of God and their own mortality. Billings writes from a Reformed theological perspective. The thesis of the book is that whatever our condition in life, "true hope does not involve closing over the wound of death. Instead, even the wound can remind us of who we are: beloved yet small and mortal children of God" (p. 11). It is that reference to smallness that Billings returns to at the end of the book. He writes the book in essence as a response to a world that seeks to deny and cover over the realities of our mortality. Having terminal cancer while in his 40s, with a wife and young children, Billings can't afford to deny his own mortality. He can only live with it. While an earlier book, Rejoicing in Lament: Wrestling with Incurable Cancer and Life in Christ, provided more of a memoir of his experience of cancer, this book is a theological exploration of mortality, though with reference to his cancer. In thinking about where to place this book, I think it rightly fits in the category of eschatology, as it calls on us to ponder ultimate realities. Billings begins the book with a reflection on living in the "pit." Titled "Welcome to Sheol," he uses this biblical concept to consider the possibility that as a cancer patient he has discovered that "the shadow of death covers the faces of the living" (p. 21). Dealing with pain, difficult treatments, and the reality that his tenure in this life is limited, he lives in Sheol. He notes that "Sheol is the Pit, the place of the living and the dead who are silenced and cut off, crying out to the Lord for deliverance" (p. 23). This opening chapter serves as a reminder to those of us who have not entered Sheol that we are dying from the day of our birth. It is a fact that cannot be mended. With this premise laid out, Billings moves on to "two views of mortality." Those views are that either death is an enemy or a friend. From his own experience, he has come to understand that death can be both enemy and friend. Following Augustine, he concludes that surrendering to the premise that we cannot master death can be liberating. But, he believes that a mediator, Christ, is necessary to the journey. Thus, we can see death as a fitting conclusion to life and also as unnatural. Perhaps different situations call for different perspectives. While we may not be able to master death, we often live in denial of death. This is the subject of chapter 3. He notes that from his own experience, our bodies have a survival instinct. We want to live. That's part of who we are. Yet, death will come. So, how do we overcome the fear of death so as to live fully the lives we have before us? Our culture has done its best to push death to the margins, to recognize our mortality again is freeing. Billings speaks of the "beauty of living small," of recognizing that in the big scheme of things, we're playing a rather small role. That allows us to place things in the hands of God. As he continues, he addresses the role of modern medicine, which has benefited from chemo and other treatments. But that treatment has its own drawbacks. There are, he reminds us, tradeoffs from medicine. There are benefits and side-effects. Thus, choices must be made, for if we're not careful medicine can become an idol that denies our mortality. This is a helpful chapter that speaks to the role of medicine in our lives, helping us think through our choices. It also speaks to the process of dying, and the way we observe the end of life, including funerals. There is an intriguing chapter that addresses the growing prominence of prosperity thinking. He notes that cancer patients are generally a religious bunch. They overwhelmingly view prayer as important to their lives. The challenge here, because of this growing embrace of prosperity thinking, is that those who tend to be more religious also tend to be those who pursue heroic measures. In fact, he notes that religious people are three times more likely to do so (p. 127). Perhaps, Billings suggests there is a different kind of prosperity, one that accepts our mortality, but welcomes the presence of God. One of the key eschatological questions has to do with the possibility of life after death. Billings fully embraces the promise of resurrection but notes the growing belief in the witness of near-death experiences. He doesn't deny their reality but does invite us to ask questions about the meaning of death and the concept of life after death. What is the biblical picture? He addresses as well the hope of reunion after death with loved ones. Why is this? These are good questions that invite conversation, something he does here. The final chapter is titled "Hoping for the End as Mortals." He notes that while he recognizes that he is mortal, but when it comes to the question of whether he lives as such, he admits that he doesn't most of the time. However, his cancer, which includes various forms of pain including tingling and sharp pain in his feet, are bodily reminders that we are but dust and to dust, we'll return. These reminders speak to the truth that we are "small yet beloved creature[s] belonging to the Creator. I cannot save the world. I cannot do all I have ever imagined or desired to do. Like the hundreds of generations of mortals who have come before me, my body aches, I am small, and I am dying" (p. 180). This reality includes the promise of an afterlife, but it also, suggests, involves judgment, something that our culture, including Christian culture, finds problematic. He asks us to consider the premise that "a God without wrath is a God who whitewashes evil and is deaf to the cries of the powerless" (p. 203). That is also part of the conversation about mortality. The question is, what is our hope if we accept our creatureliness? It's not easy accepting our mortality. I like life (most of the time). Then again, I'm in relatively good health and don't have to worry about daily survival. I do minister among the sick and the dying. I am tasked with leading people in saying farewell to loved ones. So, I know the reality of death. As I write this, our world is reeling from a pandemic that has taken the lives of hundreds of thousands and shows no signs of abating. So, how do we address our mortality? While my theology differs at points from that of Todd Billings, I found the book to be a most useful meditation on our mortality.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Larry

    In a time when our culture is intent on leading us to believe that we are immortal, when we are bombarded with advertisements that claim to slow or stop the aging process; when some scientists, futurists and philosophers theorize about the immortality of the human body, some suggesting that human immortality may be achievable in the first few decades of the current century, Dr. Billings in his new book, “The End of the Christian Life,” helps us to come face to face with the reality and the fear In a time when our culture is intent on leading us to believe that we are immortal, when we are bombarded with advertisements that claim to slow or stop the aging process; when some scientists, futurists and philosophers theorize about the immortality of the human body, some suggesting that human immortality may be achievable in the first few decades of the current century, Dr. Billings in his new book, “The End of the Christian Life,” helps us to come face to face with the reality and the fear of our personal mortality, reminding us, “Our bodies...are fragile “clay jars.” But also reminding us that as followers of Jesus, “We are not our own,” “that we belong—body and soul, in life and in death—to our faithful savior Jesus Christ.”

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ranoordam

    We read this with a bookgroup, discussion on zoom but it didn’t go to bad. More difficult to read a person on the computer but still a book you can discuss this way. It did bring you to discuss important things you don’t do very often, helpful book and not to difficult to read

  13. 4 out of 5

    James Calvin

    Loved some of it. Few meditations like this made me reflect as much on territory of my own life. Any study that generates that much reflection is doing it’s job.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Радостин Марчев

    Много добра.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Excellent.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Olga

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marc Swan

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Christopher

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Boga

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  23. 4 out of 5

    Justin Ariel

  24. 4 out of 5

    G Lewis

  25. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Binkley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Barham

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kylene

  28. 5 out of 5

    Callie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeb

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robert

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