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Koguty okłamujące kury? Łanie pogrążone w żałobie? Zawstydzone konie? To przejawy fantazji ekologów czy naukowo udowodnione fakty z życia zwierząt? Czy bogate życie uczuciowe nie jest zastrzeżone jedynie dla ludzi? Peter Wohlleben, leśnik i miłośnik przyrody, korzystając z najnowszych badań i własnych obserwacji, udowadnia, że zwierzęta i ludzie w sferze uczuć i doznań są d Koguty okłamujące kury? Łanie pogrążone w żałobie? Zawstydzone konie? To przejawy fantazji ekologów czy naukowo udowodnione fakty z życia zwierząt? Czy bogate życie uczuciowe nie jest zastrzeżone jedynie dla ludzi? Peter Wohlleben, leśnik i miłośnik przyrody, korzystając z najnowszych badań i własnych obserwacji, udowadnia, że zwierzęta i ludzie w sferze uczuć i doznań są do siebie podobni. Odkrywa przed nami niesamowite historie zwierząt, w których możemy zaobserwować ich mądrość, współczucie, troskę czy przyjaźń. Podobnie jak w bestsellerowym Sekretnym życiu drzew Wohlleben przedstawia w fascynujący sposób świat przyrody, którego nie znamy. Kochasz zwierzęta? Dzięki tej książce przekonasz się, że są ci bliższe, niż ci się zdawało. Kochasz zwierzęta? Dzięki tej książce przekonasz się, że są Ci bliższe, niż Ci się zdawało.


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Koguty okłamujące kury? Łanie pogrążone w żałobie? Zawstydzone konie? To przejawy fantazji ekologów czy naukowo udowodnione fakty z życia zwierząt? Czy bogate życie uczuciowe nie jest zastrzeżone jedynie dla ludzi? Peter Wohlleben, leśnik i miłośnik przyrody, korzystając z najnowszych badań i własnych obserwacji, udowadnia, że zwierzęta i ludzie w sferze uczuć i doznań są d Koguty okłamujące kury? Łanie pogrążone w żałobie? Zawstydzone konie? To przejawy fantazji ekologów czy naukowo udowodnione fakty z życia zwierząt? Czy bogate życie uczuciowe nie jest zastrzeżone jedynie dla ludzi? Peter Wohlleben, leśnik i miłośnik przyrody, korzystając z najnowszych badań i własnych obserwacji, udowadnia, że zwierzęta i ludzie w sferze uczuć i doznań są do siebie podobni. Odkrywa przed nami niesamowite historie zwierząt, w których możemy zaobserwować ich mądrość, współczucie, troskę czy przyjaźń. Podobnie jak w bestsellerowym Sekretnym życiu drzew Wohlleben przedstawia w fascynujący sposób świat przyrody, którego nie znamy. Kochasz zwierzęta? Dzięki tej książce przekonasz się, że są ci bliższe, niż ci się zdawało. Kochasz zwierzęta? Dzięki tej książce przekonasz się, że są Ci bliższe, niż Ci się zdawało.

30 review for Duchowe życie zwierząt

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tanja Berg

    Since this book didn't bring any knew knowledge for me, it would really have been a 3/3,5* book. However, since the theme is incredibly important it definitely gets 4*. It's also easily read, well told and Wohlleben's own farm runs as a red thread through the chapters. It's incredibly daft that people think animals - even mammals - can feel neither pain nor emotions. As mammals we have a similar evolutionary path behind us and a need for social bonding. If you're social, you need emotions or it Since this book didn't bring any knew knowledge for me, it would really have been a 3/3,5* book. However, since the theme is incredibly important it definitely gets 4*. It's also easily read, well told and Wohlleben's own farm runs as a red thread through the chapters. It's incredibly daft that people think animals - even mammals - can feel neither pain nor emotions. As mammals we have a similar evolutionary path behind us and a need for social bonding. If you're social, you need emotions or it just isn't going to work. Not just fear! Love, hate, shame, regret and empathy as well. That animals can have fun and spend energy on something that is not a means to an end everyone who has a pet knows. My youngest dog has a ”play bark” and plays with imaginary friends and foes (since my older dog won't accommodate). This is not a cutting edge book. It mixes anecdotes with empirical and scientific evidence. It's well worth reading anyway. Hopefully this book will increase our level of empathy with the fellow creatures we share this planet with, and that we on a grand scale, treat so ill.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    This was more about observation than it was about scientific inquiry. As the title suggests, he sure stuck to it too. So do not expect any trials or proofs here. But those who love stories about peoples' viewing and habits of animals they have experienced! They will like this much more than I did. The stories are primarily one time owned or friend kept animals. But birds of several varieties, domestic and wild pigs, and many domesticated other species (lots of goats) are also included- but beyon This was more about observation than it was about scientific inquiry. As the title suggests, he sure stuck to it too. So do not expect any trials or proofs here. But those who love stories about peoples' viewing and habits of animals they have experienced! They will like this much more than I did. The stories are primarily one time owned or friend kept animals. But birds of several varieties, domestic and wild pigs, and many domesticated other species (lots of goats) are also included- but beyond that too are some chapters on various insect and slime fungi "observations". To be really truthful, the Introduction turned me off so much that I almost didn't continue. But I found the rest not as preachy and would just skim read the parts where he got way too precious and or teary upon a worm or some other aspect of hunting or fishing. This is all opinion upon observation. It does, at times, say more about the author himself, his wife and their offspring than it does about the critters. I did laugh out loud at his supposition that if humans had never hunted than "what our relationship would be like with them now!" I can't conceptualize a homo form which did not hunt or scavenge to live. They would never have made it without doing so.

  3. 4 out of 5

    ༺Kiki༻

    You might also enjoy: ✱ Winter World: The Ingenuity of Animal Survival ✱ Summer World: A Season of Bounty ✱ Mind of the Raven ✱ Ravens in Winter ✱ One Wild Bird at a Time: Portraits of Individual Lives ✱ Pilgrim at Tinker Creek ✱ The River of Consciousness ✱ The Thing with Feathers You might also enjoy: ✱ Winter World: The Ingenuity of Animal Survival ✱ Summer World: A Season of Bounty ✱ Mind of the Raven ✱ Ravens in Winter ✱ One Wild Bird at a Time: Portraits of Individual Lives ✱ Pilgrim at Tinker Creek ✱ The River of Consciousness ✱ The Thing with Feathers

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    "He is writing not as a scientist but as an observant animal lover." - Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, introduction to Inner Life of Animals Peter Wohlleben, who brought us the The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World is back with the Inner Life of Animals. My same critiques of his last book are still here. I think Peter tends towards a heavy anthropomorphism when dealing with both trees and animals. I get it still. It is hard to view other speci "He is writing not as a scientist but as an observant animal lover." - Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, introduction to Inner Life of Animals Peter Wohlleben, who brought us the The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World is back with the Inner Life of Animals. My same critiques of his last book are still here. I think Peter tends towards a heavy anthropomorphism when dealing with both trees and animals. I get it still. It is hard to view other species outside of our own viewpoint. In his enthusiasm FOR trees and animals, he wants to give us a reason to love them. We naturally love ourselves, so why not talk about how animals share common traits with man? But I think that can be a dangerous precedent. That said, Wohlleben is a natural observer. And his enthusiasm is a delight. This book was just not nearly as smooth or as surprising and delightful as the Hidden Life of Trees. Still good, just not great. Oh, and this is just Part II of Wohlleben's 'The Mysteries of Nature trilogy'. The other books are: 1. The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World - my review 3. The Secret Wisdom of Nature: Trees, Animals, and the Extraordinary Balance of All Living Things ― Stories from Science and Observation - my review

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    I was thrilled when I saw Peter Wohlleben had written this book about animals. His Secret Life of Trees was one of the best books I read last year. The way he wrote, and the abundance of facts gave me such an intense appreciation for trees that I had previously lacked. In The Inner Life of Animals Wohlleben writes with the same love, respect, and appreciation of animals as he wrote about trees. It is more anecdotal than scientific, much of what he wrote is his own observations of animals, both w I was thrilled when I saw Peter Wohlleben had written this book about animals. His Secret Life of Trees was one of the best books I read last year. The way he wrote, and the abundance of facts gave me such an intense appreciation for trees that I had previously lacked. In The Inner Life of Animals Wohlleben writes with the same love, respect, and appreciation of animals as he wrote about trees. It is more anecdotal than scientific, much of what he wrote is his own observations of animals, both wild and domestic. He strives to open our minds to the inner complexities of non-human animals, showing how they feel many emotions we humans feel and how they are much more intelligent than humans often give them credit for. Anyone who has lived with animals already knows this; we can see that our companion cats and dogs and birds possess an inner life full of thoughts and feelings similar to our own. I didn't learn much in this book, thus 4 stars instead of 5. It was still an enjoyable and interesting read, despite the lack of new knowledge for me. I think it's an important book, just as is The Secret Life of Trees, and we humans need to start appreciating the depth of feeling and thought most (perhaps all?) animals possess. How can we treat them humanely if we do not recognise their uniqueness and ability to suffer? I think that is exactly why we have looked so long upon them as automatons; if we do not admit their ability to suffer, we can do to them what we wish, including keeping them in ghastly conditions in factory farms. There are heart-warming stories and touching observations in this book, of many different animals. Wohlleben writes often of his dogs and goats, but also about bees, pigs, wolves, hedgehogs, foxes, and many other animals. Not just of their feeling pain, but also joy and gratitude, fear and courage. The Inner Life of Animals is a must-read for animal lovers, or anyone merely wondering if animals have the ability to feel. (Photo credit: Blond Hovawart with Lamb, Hovawarts USA, 2017)

  6. 5 out of 5

    J.

    Delightful reading, full of interesting observations in both senses of the word! This book isn't a comprehensive review of all the current science on animals, and it never claims to be. It's an educated, informed, gentle and very open-minded take on whether some of our baseline assumptions might just be wrong. Questions lead to more questions most of the time here. The chapters are short, small bites to digest as you wish. There are many keen, moving, funny and just generally fascinating descriptio Delightful reading, full of interesting observations in both senses of the word! This book isn't a comprehensive review of all the current science on animals, and it never claims to be. It's an educated, informed, gentle and very open-minded take on whether some of our baseline assumptions might just be wrong. Questions lead to more questions most of the time here. The chapters are short, small bites to digest as you wish. There are many keen, moving, funny and just generally fascinating descriptions of wild & domestic animal behaviour, with possible interpretations of it. The author's enthusiasm and inquisitiveness is disarming and makes it a joy to read, and worth the possible odd glances from laughing out loud. Having seen the author speak in person, I can say his gentle and curious-about-everything passion was well-translated into this book. The only "moralizing" (far too strong a term) he makes is that absence of proof isn't proof of absence (of feelings, thoughts etc), so why not err on the side of decency & caution and treat nature a little better, and consume less. This seems such a basic level of reasonableness that I cannot understand the claim that he's "preachy". I'm not a vegetarian & he's not scolding except for some justified skepticism about the vested interests of industrial-scale animal farming having an inordinate effect on policy. I do find the author's comments that hunting is no longer necessary to be only applicable to Europe, not say the Americas. This is my only complaint, & it may be just a function of the book's (original) intended audience. I highly recommend reading this in a park if you can manage it, the pages come even further alive :) Note--I read this in a paperback form, published by The Bodley Head (a division of Vintage Publishing, London) in 2017. It was special-ordered for me as a gift so I don't know if there are variances from a N. American paperback version. The cover & title is the same as the one shown here so I used it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cicada

    Ugh. Where to start with this book? Okay, so let’s start at the beginning, firstly, this book is in the science sections of most bookstores. Which doesn’t really make any sense to me at all as it’s more of a blog (certainly reads like one) of a man who lives/works in a farm and therefore has some farm animals and comes across ‘science’ articles that he’s read to put in his book. THIS IS NOT A SCIENCE BOOK and it is a great insult to put that in this category. My next problem is the fact that he’s Ugh. Where to start with this book? Okay, so let’s start at the beginning, firstly, this book is in the science sections of most bookstores. Which doesn’t really make any sense to me at all as it’s more of a blog (certainly reads like one) of a man who lives/works in a farm and therefore has some farm animals and comes across ‘science’ articles that he’s read to put in his book. THIS IS NOT A SCIENCE BOOK and it is a great insult to put that in this category. My next problem is the fact that he’s coming with a very biased, matter-of-fact mindset already. He is only writing about articles he’s read and therefore, believes it as the Holy Grail/absolute truth. Let’s say this is truthiness 101. Many of the articles he’s mentioned are not accurate (or are still debated in the science community, for example about what dogs feel/think when you yell at them—they don’t have concept of guilt, they’re just doing puppy eyes because they know it’ll get you to stop yelling at them!) I literally wanted to throw this book across the room from time to time. There were many examples of pseudo-science articles too (plants/trees cannot feel emotions. Just stop now.) and lastly, what annoyed me most was the conclusion. He makes the argument that it’s okay to anthropomorphism because humans are animals too, then goes on about how we should think twice how we treat other animals (cruelty, fashion, vegetarianism), but my argument would be; well if you see yourself as animal than what we do to other animals is just as fine then. (Did you forget animals eat other animals? Animals use other animals? Animals can be cruel to other animals? Like, you spent the whole fucking book writing about this shit and now it’s all gone...) I would say that you’d get a small amount of interesting looking into certain animals (I rather liked the part about corvids, but I think I’d rather find a book on them by actual scientists), and I mean A SMALL amount. There was nothing to gain from this book, I feel like a lot of the stuff in there, I forgot (just some general things, really). Really disappointed in this book, sadly can’t get my money back.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Even though Peter Wohlleben's Das Seelenleben der Tiere (which I ended up ordering from Amazon Germany last year) has been both interesting and enlightening (and certainly to and for me much less fantastical and strangely new agey than his book on trees), I still have found his Das Seelenleben der Tiere (which I think is called The Hidden Lives of Animals in its English translation) rather disappointing as a whole and also a trifle frustrating. For albeit Wohlleben's observations on animals and Even though Peter Wohlleben's Das Seelenleben der Tiere (which I ended up ordering from Amazon Germany last year) has been both interesting and enlightening (and certainly to and for me much less fantastical and strangely new agey than his book on trees), I still have found his Das Seelenleben der Tiere (which I think is called The Hidden Lives of Animals in its English translation) rather disappointing as a whole and also a trifle frustrating. For albeit Wohlleben's observations on animals and his assertions that they also show emotions and have feelings certainly do make sense and indeed, I also must admit that in fact he is of course even preaching to the proverbial choir here (as I have always known for a fact that our dogs, our cats and our horses not only had souls but also had similar feelings as I, as my family did), I guess I was expecting not just the author's personal observations but also scientific proofs, quoted tests and such. And yes, the almost complete lack thereof, while it certainly has not prevented me from enjoying my reading time with Das Seelenleben der Tiere, it definitely has somewhat lowered my reading pleasure, as from the title, I was in fact kind of expecting a bit more scientific rigour, a bit more data and actual hard core proofs and not just what the author had personally observed and felt amongst both domestic and wild animals (in particular since the English translation of Das Seelenleben der Tiere is usually located in the hard science section of local bookstores). Therefore, although I do think that Das Seelenleben der Tiere is a worthwhile effort and indeed very easily and immensely readable (I plowed through it in less than four hours late last night), that Peter Wohlleben has basically eschewed science in favour of simply presenting unproven and yes also tinged with his own emotions animal observations does make me hesitate to recommend this book (either in German or in English) without in my opinion some necessary and required caveats and warnings.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Animals of all kinds have played a part in the human story from way back; they have been companions, used for work, providing and actually being the food in a lot of cases too. Whilst some have been cherished, lots have been treated as pure commodities and we have often been quite cruel usually because people thought that they were not capable of communicating or had emotions. The latest scientific research and observations though is uncovering a very different story. Lots are known about dolphi Animals of all kinds have played a part in the human story from way back; they have been companions, used for work, providing and actually being the food in a lot of cases too. Whilst some have been cherished, lots have been treated as pure commodities and we have often been quite cruel usually because people thought that they were not capable of communicating or had emotions. The latest scientific research and observations though is uncovering a very different story. Lots are known about dolphins and whales though we and not very far down the road of understanding what is being said, and it turns out there are a lot of other animals that communicate in one way or another but there is another world that is slowly being revealed. They have discovered instances of animals feeling shame, sadness, regret and as well as the way they can consciously select partners. I really enjoyed Peter Wohlleben's first book, The Hidden Life Of Trees, a subject he knows a lot about having been a forester for around three decades, and the intimacy of his knowledge there shines like a blade of sunlight through the glade. With this, he is out of his comfort zone somewhat and even though he is drawing on personal experience and scientific research to highlight just how animals behave. Whilst it may have a grounding in science, this is primarily anecdotal evidence and also shows how we as humans project our not fully understood emotions and habits onto all sorts of different species. Still worth reading as some of the stories in here are quite entertaining.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caro the Helmet Lady

    My only problem with this book was that it was too short.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    2.5 Stars I enjoyed this book for the anecdotes and stories about animal observations. I did not really enjoy the layout - each short chapter is labelled with a human emotion and then the author sets about explaining how animals exhibit these emotions. Some of these are pretty obvious and unnecessary. I would have preferred a more general discussion with more stories and less explanation. Anyone with an interest in animals is going to have observed animal emotions in some form, no need to spell it o 2.5 Stars I enjoyed this book for the anecdotes and stories about animal observations. I did not really enjoy the layout - each short chapter is labelled with a human emotion and then the author sets about explaining how animals exhibit these emotions. Some of these are pretty obvious and unnecessary. I would have preferred a more general discussion with more stories and less explanation. Anyone with an interest in animals is going to have observed animal emotions in some form, no need to spell it out.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Richard Reese

    In his bestselling book, The Hidden Life of Trees, Peter Wohlleben revealed the fascinating magic and mystery of trees. He spent his childhood close to nature, where he was fascinated by the family of life. In his adult years, he has been a forest manager in Germany, continually striving to nurture the health of the land, and minimize harms. He has spent much of his life outdoors. Consequently, he has developed a perception of reality that is quite different from the herd. In his new book, The In In his bestselling book, The Hidden Life of Trees, Peter Wohlleben revealed the fascinating magic and mystery of trees. He spent his childhood close to nature, where he was fascinated by the family of life. In his adult years, he has been a forest manager in Germany, continually striving to nurture the health of the land, and minimize harms. He has spent much of his life outdoors. Consequently, he has developed a perception of reality that is quite different from the herd. In his new book, The Inner Life of Animals, he directs his attention to animal life, which is also little understood by mainstream society — the folks who spend most of their lives in climate controlled compartments. For them, the natural world is often just a meaningless blur of scenery along the freeway, and wildlife sightings are mostly on glowing screens. The new book is a pleasant voyage into a kinder and gentler mindset. Readers are served a banquet of interesting ideas, mostly. Wohlleben is a caring man who wishes that humans would cause far less damage and suffering in the world. That’s his message. At his home in the woods, he keeps goats, horses, rabbits, dogs, and chickens. He apparently treats them with kindness until they drop dead from old age, or become terminally ill. He confesses to drinking goat milk and making cheese, but says not a peep about meat (a touchy subject these days). He detests factory farms, hunters, and industrial forest miners. He has a deep appreciation for the coherence of wild ecosystems, and the remarkable relationships that coevolution has produced. A primary focus of his book is to confront the cult of human supremacy. Like patriarchy, and get-rich-quick fever, human supremacist beliefs intensify the madness of modern society. The cult asserts that anything non-human is below us. It’s perfectly OK to cram 20,000 chickens, shoulder to shoulder, inside a metal shed, without guilt or shame. They are mindless machines that can feel no pain, organisms incapable of thoughts or feelings. Supremacism has left a boot print on the English language. Throughout the book, there are two categories of critters, “humans” and “animals,” implying that humans are not animals. Of course, that’s not true. Take off your clothes and look in a mirror, and you will see an animal that looks a lot like a chimp or bonobo, our closest living relatives. In the mirror you will see a furless tropical primate that evolved an upright bipedal stance fine-tuned for long distance running. This enabled us to survive via persistence hunting — chasing animals across the savannah for hours, until they collapsed from exhaustion. Louis Liebenberg wrote about this. Our ancestors have been hunters for several million years, long before we became Homo sapiens. As every gardener knows, our bodies are poorly designed for gathering seeds, nuts, melons, and berries — too much bending and backaches. Wohlleben hates hunting, which in its current form is “no longer appropriate.” During the season, the woods are crowded with hunters, hiding close to bait piles, with high-powered rifles. Bullets are whizzing all over the place, and up to 650,000 wild boars die every year. Some animals are merely wounded, and suffer agonizing deaths. He doesn’t describe what “appropriate” hunting would be. Society has vigorously exterminated wild carnivores, whilst growing staggering amounts of boar food. Is boar overpopulation appropriate? Wohlleben owns a number of domesticated animals, and they spend their days in locations enclosed by electric fences. They cannot go where they please, and the fences discourage the indigenous wild lynx from dining on his exotic invasive critters. This disturbs him a bit. “Nature didn’t intend for goats and horses to spend their whole lives as prisoners behind a fence. Let’s not pretend: these animals would hightail it in a heartbeat if they could.” (Did nature intend the existence of domesticated animals?) The best he can do is treat them respectfully. He lives in the twenty-first century, when many people own domesticated animals, a source of wealth and status. For these folks, wild predators are evil. Chickens are fox food, and foxes are demonic anti-capitalist anarchists. Many also plant large fields of boar food, and get quite upset when boars come to enjoy their generous offering. Some farmers surround their corn fields with electric fences to keep them out. In the good old days, before domestication, nobody owned the large game and edible plants. Nobody got upset when wild predators consumed wild herbivores, because nobody’s status was diminished. In egalitarian societies, all people were equal, and status consciousness was totally inappropriate. In The Others, Paul Shepard brilliantly described how important it is for all humans to spend their entire lives in healthy wild ecosystems, surrounded by many species of wild animals. He also explained the many ugly consequences of capturing, confining, and domesticating “goofies” and “hooved locusts.” Civilized primates are seriously deformed and traumatized by spending their lives in isolation from their wild relatives. It’s easy to gobble a Big Mac when you have been taught that animals are like rutabagas, dumb organisms. Now, we’re learning how sensitive and intelligent animals are. To complicate matters, in his tree book, Wohlleben revealed that plants are also not dumb machines. How can we feed ourselves in a morally acceptable manner? Chimps and bonobos happily beat small animals to death, eat them raw, with no guilt at all. A robin eating a worm is not evil. We all feed one another. Wohlleben is a fountain of stories. Foxes lie down, tongues out, and play dead to attract hungry crows. Goats move away from the herd when it’s time for them to die, because their corpse will attract predators. Hives of bees with insufficient honey for the winter will attack weaker hives, kill defenders, and swipe their stash. Swifts rarely stand on the ground, they sleep while soaring. The book is loaded with hundreds of anecdotes like these. I shall let you discover them on your own. According to the human supremacist myths, animals do not have consciousness, self-awareness, or emotions. They cannot feel pain, communicate, remember events, grieve, express gratitude, or recognize individual humans. Today, the core of the controversy over animal intelligence is whether or not they are capable of thinking. Humans, of course, can think like crazy. In our brains, the neocortex is the engine of self-awareness, consciousness, and thinking — and humans have the greatest neocortex of all. Oddly, while most of the book is dedicated to challenging human supremacy, Wohlleben refers to our neocortex as the “crowning achievement of creation.” Indeed, no other species is capable of experiencing so much cognitive dissonance. Folks who understand environmental history and ecological sustainability, and have learned how to engage in critical thinking, can readily detect enormous flaws in the core myths of our culture. The view from their mountaintop, far above the thick smog of dodgy beliefs, perceives that thinking is at least as much of a curse as a blessing. We can live without glowing screens, but we can’t live in a toxic wasteland, with a hostile climate. Supremacist myths trump common sense. You can lead the herd to the pool of knowledge, but you can’t make them think. “Mommy?” “Yes, dear?” “What is intelligence?” “Sweetheart, intelligence is turning old growth forests into money, destabilizing the climate, acidifying the oceans, driving many species to extinction — and not caring. Intelligence is speeding across the land in motorized wheelchairs, dumping trash on the moon, creating vast coastal dead zones, and developing miracle cures for the infectious and degenerative diseases that emerged with the birth of civilization.” “Mommy?” “Yes, dear?” “I don’t want to be intelligent. Can I be wild, free, and happy?”

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    Do animals have emotions? Do fish feel pain? How intelligent are pigs? Can animals lie? And more. Nothing deeply scientific, more of an entertaining pop science primer, interspersed with humourous anecdotes. Each emotion gets an entry with several examples of different animals and how they could feel and what researchers have to say about it. The books culminates in the question if animals can think and solve abstract problems. And if animals have a soul. And if they do, can there be a life afte Do animals have emotions? Do fish feel pain? How intelligent are pigs? Can animals lie? And more. Nothing deeply scientific, more of an entertaining pop science primer, interspersed with humourous anecdotes. Each emotion gets an entry with several examples of different animals and how they could feel and what researchers have to say about it. The books culminates in the question if animals can think and solve abstract problems. And if animals have a soul. And if they do, can there be a life after death for them? Seriously? It was mildly interesting in parts, but pretty shallow, a bit monotonous and with a very repetitive structure. Ultimately I was underwhelmed, I expected more.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    This is a surprising and fascinating book that I’d recommend to anyone, even (especially) those who might not know much to begin with about animals. From magnificent megafauna to the most humble creatures most of us pay no mind to at all, Wohlleben studies a huge variety of creatures and comes away with amazing, amusing, and thought-provoking facts and theories. In any discussion of animal intelligence and sentience, there’s that proverbial elephant in the room—the fact that the human being does This is a surprising and fascinating book that I’d recommend to anyone, even (especially) those who might not know much to begin with about animals. From magnificent megafauna to the most humble creatures most of us pay no mind to at all, Wohlleben studies a huge variety of creatures and comes away with amazing, amusing, and thought-provoking facts and theories. In any discussion of animal intelligence and sentience, there’s that proverbial elephant in the room—the fact that the human being doesn’t have a very friendly track record with most of the species roaming earth. Wohlleben doesn’t fly the banner of the animal cause, lecture his audience or tell them what to think, which no doubt helps get this book into the hands of mainstream audiences who could most use the information. At the same time, he doesn’t shy away from discussing the intelligence, sensitivity, and natural instincts still retained by farm animals such as pigs and chickens—and asks us to simply consider the effects the factory farming system has upon these minds and bodies. Right now, my part of the country is in the midst of hunting season, and I can’t visit the grocery store or the gym without overhearing guys shout-questioning each other as to whether they “got” any deer. Even those who may feel discomfort with the idea of sport hunting often act as though they must grin and go along with it. Yet behind this macho façade stands some stark facts about the capacity of these “game” animals for thought and emotion. Wohlleben sheds some light on emotions such as fear and even grief in deer and other hunted animals. This book also brought up a thought regarding hunting I haven’t had before. Hunters typically argue that they are simply taking the place of natural predators (who were also once hunted out of existence, funny how that works). But predatory animals usually hunt huge swaths of land, are highly territorial, and aren’t everywhere at once like humans on opening day. Prey animals go from having to worry about that puma or that grizzly to having to face the possibility of death from up every tree and behind every blind. There are never thousands of wolves or lions in the forest at once. It’s no wonder the stress hormone levels of “game” species go through the roof when hunting commences. Facts sometimes put a damper on fun, tradition, and convenience, but that’s simply indication that we need to find new, less damaging ways of enjoying our fun, traditions, and conveniences.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Camelia Rose

    As Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson summarized in the introduction of The Inner Life of Animals, Peter Wohlleben is "writing not as a scientist but as an observant animal lover.". Fun, easy, thoughtful, a delight indeed. As Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson summarized in the introduction of The Inner Life of Animals, Peter Wohlleben is "writing not as a scientist but as an observant animal lover.". Fun, easy, thoughtful, a delight indeed.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jayme Holmes

    I received this book as a gift, which pushed me to read much further than I would have preferred. When I came upon the section where he talks about ticks, and feelings.....huge flag. Continued on, and the author then was including "while researchers disagree with this", or "researchers have found otherwise" I had to stop. This book is a farce. This author, in my opinion, is exploiting people who love animals and want to know more about them. But he has no research, he just has his "thoughts" on th I received this book as a gift, which pushed me to read much further than I would have preferred. When I came upon the section where he talks about ticks, and feelings.....huge flag. Continued on, and the author then was including "while researchers disagree with this", or "researchers have found otherwise" I had to stop. This book is a farce. This author, in my opinion, is exploiting people who love animals and want to know more about them. But he has no research, he just has his "thoughts" on their feelings. Save your money, save your time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob)

    Hidden Life of Trees was perhaps a bit better than this one, however, I still enjoyed this one. As others have mentioned, there are quite a few anecdotes mentioned throughout, but, also some scientific studies are referenced. At the end there's a pretty decent list of other information you can cross reference if you so choose. My favorite by the end of the book was still the slime molds portion around page 35. I've read so much in the last few years on animal cognition that I was surprised to fi Hidden Life of Trees was perhaps a bit better than this one, however, I still enjoyed this one. As others have mentioned, there are quite a few anecdotes mentioned throughout, but, also some scientific studies are referenced. At the end there's a pretty decent list of other information you can cross reference if you so choose. My favorite by the end of the book was still the slime molds portion around page 35. I've read so much in the last few years on animal cognition that I was surprised to find too much I hadn't read about already, but there were still a few fun surprises in this book. I enjoyed the thoughts on anthropomorphizing animals. I've been fairly critical of people for doing just that, but, I find myself reexamining that. As we discover evidence for animals having many similar thought processes and emotions, how can we keep acting as though comparisons to human emotions is an error in judgement? If anything, we're getting closer to realizing that we aren't anywhere near as different as we thought. That was something I wholeheartedly believed as a child and then crushed into oblivion as an adult. Perhaps I can revive some of those childhood beliefs as perhaps I wasn't so far off after all. Really likable writing style, conversational and probably more accessible for those who don't usually enjoy nonfiction. I can see myself at reading anything Peter Wohlleben writes in future.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cynda

    I enjoyed this book. It was not as eye-opening for me as Wohlleben's The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World. I have difficulty communicating with trees where I an fairly easy around animals. Besides my "own" cat, I have housesat where I was responsible for reptiles, rodents, cats, dogs, and a pig, so I have watched and dealt with many animals emoting--stress, loneliness, love, affection, hunger, playfulness, and humor. I did enjoy learning I enjoyed this book. It was not as eye-opening for me as Wohlleben's The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World. I have difficulty communicating with trees where I an fairly easy around animals. Besides my "own" cat, I have housesat where I was responsible for reptiles, rodents, cats, dogs, and a pig, so I have watched and dealt with many animals emoting--stress, loneliness, love, affection, hunger, playfulness, and humor. I did enjoy learning about animals I have never or rarely considered. I learned a bit about swifts, crows, martens, foxes, and moths. I learned in general, gained a starting place. This starting place seems more appropriate for those who have never really considered the emotional life of animals in general. Now I want to read books about crows.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mark Hartzer

    Even though science can tell us so much by dispelling myth and superstition, some things are truly unprovable. We will never really know what happens after death. It is scientifically unknowable. But I would certainly like to think I'll one day see my little furry friends again. And I would like to think they'll be happy to see me too. Wohlleben says: "Isn't it a beautiful vision that up in heaven there will be a throng of animals of different species living among countless people?" I would add t Even though science can tell us so much by dispelling myth and superstition, some things are truly unprovable. We will never really know what happens after death. It is scientifically unknowable. But I would certainly like to think I'll one day see my little furry friends again. And I would like to think they'll be happy to see me too. Wohlleben says: "Isn't it a beautiful vision that up in heaven there will be a throng of animals of different species living among countless people?" I would add that wouldn't it be wonderful if we could treat them all with a little bit more love and respect right now?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I didn't realize this was in translation when I picked it up, and not only is it in translation, but the narrator is British, so there's so much in terms of language going on here that it was hard not to enjoy. This is really a book about love for animals, empathy for them, and a desire to understand why they act as they do. It talks about how smart ravens and pigs are, how dumb squirrels are, and makes acute observations about our own relationships with animals of all kinds. There's no science I didn't realize this was in translation when I picked it up, and not only is it in translation, but the narrator is British, so there's so much in terms of language going on here that it was hard not to enjoy. This is really a book about love for animals, empathy for them, and a desire to understand why they act as they do. It talks about how smart ravens and pigs are, how dumb squirrels are, and makes acute observations about our own relationships with animals of all kinds. There's no science here, so don't go in expecting that. It's more of a read for animal lovers. A couple of points near the end of the book I took away and will be thinking about for a while: 1. why is it that we, as people, have tried to train animals to speak our language when we could use our capacities to speak theirs and learn that way? and 2. I love the discussion of whether animals have souls in the dictionary definition of the word (which is compared with the religious definition of the word). I'm atheist, but I strongly believe in the idea that all of us are part of an interconnected web of beings, and thus, animals have feelings and needs and desires and souls like we as humans do. They're just different. I appreciated how Wohllenben's book really hinges on these ideas. Maybe not worth a purchase, but definitely worth reading from the library. I snagged it under $10 on audio, which was worth my 7 hours of enjoyment.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eren

    Took a long time to finish this, but there was no rush. Chapters are short, and mostly filled with eye-openers. Also that last bit about souls is really interesting.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    Peter Wohlleben, a German forest ranger, wrote a surprise international bestseller with The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World. This is his follow-up title. I haven't read his book on trees, though I look forward to doing so, and at first, I wasn't terribly taken with this book, initially organized into chapters on plausibly recognizable emotions experienced by animals in scientific studies or in the woods near Wohlleben's home. Some of h Peter Wohlleben, a German forest ranger, wrote a surprise international bestseller with The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate – Discoveries from a Secret World. This is his follow-up title. I haven't read his book on trees, though I look forward to doing so, and at first, I wasn't terribly taken with this book, initially organized into chapters on plausibly recognizable emotions experienced by animals in scientific studies or in the woods near Wohlleben's home. Some of his examples feel strained and analogous. In graduate school, one of my professors told me that squirrels clearly appreciate beauty because they scramble to the top of the trees at sunset, and if they were warming themselves, they would turn their hindquarters to the sun. This syllogism did not compute for me, and sometimes Wohlleben falls into the same "if this observable effect, then clearly this interior life." That being said, Wohlleben makes a for me convincing case that humans' absolute panic about anthropomorphizing, recognizing or acknowledging emotional or affective experiences in animals, says more about the inheritance of the Great Chain of Being and the needs of capitalist production than it does about the world around us. Wohlleben makes the practical point that while clearly it is impossible for us to know what animal senses and subjectivity feels like (indeed, we have to make tremendous assumptions about how other people perceive the world, stuck in our own individual experiences), it is not so preposterous to enact some guesswork based on our own perceptions and their behaviors. For me, the biggest risk of anthropomorphism is not that we will endow animals with more capacities, sensations, or emotions than their due, but rather than they will reduce them to a pale shadow of ourselves, without recognizing the complexity of other species and their ways of feeling the world. I think Wohlleben would agree. The other pleasure of this book is Wohlleben's blunt Germanic perspective. Try reading some of this narration in the voice of Werner Hertzog. It works perfectly. The book gets better the more idiosyncratic it is; the first few chapters felt like Wohlleben making a case through analogy and anecdote that he knew scientists might take issue with. By the last half, it was more filled with his biographical experiences encouraging wild animals and living with domestic ones, and I preferred that texture and the unrepentent voice he achieves by then.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    *3.75 stars* For people who already love animals there, is, perhaps, not a great deal of new information here. Although few of us encounter as many varied species as Peter Wohlleben does so we will still learn something about goats. Wohlleben writes this book from a place of long observation instead of science. Science backs up some of his revelations but has yet to consider many others. Does this make him an amateur in an age of much derided expertise? No. He never opposes science, but instead in *3.75 stars* For people who already love animals there, is, perhaps, not a great deal of new information here. Although few of us encounter as many varied species as Peter Wohlleben does so we will still learn something about goats. Wohlleben writes this book from a place of long observation instead of science. Science backs up some of his revelations but has yet to consider many others. Does this make him an amateur in an age of much derided expertise? No. He never opposes science, but instead in the best traditions of the keen observer asks questions the experts haven't focused on yet. In time, given his common sense, I imagine science will one day agree with him that animals have a full range of emotions. And that rabbits can sometimes be cruel.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    An interesting book that is what it says on the cover. The writer is a German forest ranger with keen powers of observation. Interesting and informative, especially if you like squirrels or goats. Highly recommended.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anita

    I highly recommend it. It changes your perspective when it comes to thinking about animals (they are not that different than us). It also has lots of fun facts about forests that surround you.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gemma Golley

    This felt like a waste of time. It was just one dude who was simply observing how nature is and speculating whether they had higher cognitive functions but not really giving much scientific basis (there were a few but hardly anything substantial at least). He told stories about animals that were on his farm (and birds) and how he thinks they experienced the world... What bothered me the most is how he was trying to be comical about his stories. In particular, he described something upsetting an This felt like a waste of time. It was just one dude who was simply observing how nature is and speculating whether they had higher cognitive functions but not really giving much scientific basis (there were a few but hardly anything substantial at least). He told stories about animals that were on his farm (and birds) and how he thinks they experienced the world... What bothered me the most is how he was trying to be comical about his stories. In particular, he described something upsetting an animal experienced and tried to make it a joke. I thought this book was about trying to show the humility that animals possess, yet he ended up being distateful. Again, waste of my time.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Wagner

    A light, quick read packed with adorable and poignant stories about animals and the scientists studying their feelings and thoughts. Not an in-depth account, but heart-warming!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Priyanka Dutta

    The book highlights animal behaviour. But there are some unique points which highlights ethology....it is worth reading from biological perspective.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    Preaching to the converted; I don't need much convincing that animals can feel joy, fear, pain and so on. At times a little too whimsical (said the writer of talking-animal stories), and it seems unfair to call snails 'sado-masochistic' for the way they mate, but there were plenty of interesting research snippets as well as cute personal anecdotes, and one absolutely brilliant fact about martens I am definitely going to use in a story, Preaching to the converted; I don't need much convincing that animals can feel joy, fear, pain and so on. At times a little too whimsical (said the writer of talking-animal stories), and it seems unfair to call snails 'sado-masochistic' for the way they mate, but there were plenty of interesting research snippets as well as cute personal anecdotes, and one absolutely brilliant fact about martens I am definitely going to use in a story,

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashok Krishna

    Yet another lovable work by Peter Wohlleben. Deserves a proper review.❤

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