hits counter Uzumaki: Spiral into Horror - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Uzumaki: Spiral into Horror

Availability: Ready to download

In Kurouzu geschieht Seltsames: Ein Einwohner nach dem anderen dreht durch. Schuld daran scheinen die Spiralen zu sein... Kirie glaubt anfangs nicht an die düsteren Theorien ihres Freundes Shuichi, doch logische Erklärungen gibt es nicht. Der Horror zieht seine Kreise!


Compare

In Kurouzu geschieht Seltsames: Ein Einwohner nach dem anderen dreht durch. Schuld daran scheinen die Spiralen zu sein... Kirie glaubt anfangs nicht an die düsteren Theorien ihres Freundes Shuichi, doch logische Erklärungen gibt es nicht. Der Horror zieht seine Kreise!

30 review for Uzumaki: Spiral into Horror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    well, that really spiraled out of control quickly

  2. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    Wow, what a macabre masterpiece. This was gory and grotesque and very disturbing and at the same time the story is amazing and I could hardly put it down. It was amazing and it had boundless imagination. The story kept getting more and more hopeless until the bitter end. I mean this really is a horror story, but man, it's so good at the same time. It's a nightmarish brilliant piece of art. I can't explain it better than that. Thank goodness the artwork is in black and white except for one chapte Wow, what a macabre masterpiece. This was gory and grotesque and very disturbing and at the same time the story is amazing and I could hardly put it down. It was amazing and it had boundless imagination. The story kept getting more and more hopeless until the bitter end. I mean this really is a horror story, but man, it's so good at the same time. It's a nightmarish brilliant piece of art. I can't explain it better than that. Thank goodness the artwork is in black and white except for one chapter. I don't think I could have taken these drawings in color. This story is twisted and at the same time, so brilliant. I am really blown away. I am so glad I read it and I'm so glad I'm done and it was astonishing. I mean, this was master storytelling. It was amazing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Isabella

    i'm traumatized but in a good way i'm traumatized but in a good way

  4. 5 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    “Spirals... this town is contaminated with spirals...” If all horror manga is as fucked-up and disturbing as Uzumaki, then my bank balance will have something else to worry about, in addition to my coffee addiction. Kurouzu-cho, a small fogbound town on the coast of Japan, is cursed. However, the town is not haunted by a person or a being, but a pattern - uzumaki, the spiral. That synopsis sounds a bit ridiculous, doesn’t it? Yet Ito manages to make such a concept absolutely terrifying! His imagina “Spirals... this town is contaminated with spirals...” If all horror manga is as fucked-up and disturbing as Uzumaki, then my bank balance will have something else to worry about, in addition to my coffee addiction. Kurouzu-cho, a small fogbound town on the coast of Japan, is cursed. However, the town is not haunted by a person or a being, but a pattern - uzumaki, the spiral. That synopsis sounds a bit ridiculous, doesn’t it? Yet Ito manages to make such a concept absolutely terrifying! His imagination reminds me of Clive Barkers in so many ways, I almost can’t fathom how they come up with such insane, disturbing ideas. The illustrations are INCREDIBLE, just mind-bending and horrifying. Some will live long in the memory! I loved how each chapter had its own self-contained story or theme, therefore it’s very easy to pick up and read a single chapter and still get a satisfying experience. Uzumaki really has it all: fucked-up body horror, Lovecraftian elements, boundless imagination, and an unnerving sense of dread that pervades throughout its entirety. Highly, HIGHLY recommend. I need ALL the Junji Ito now! 4.5 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Char

    This was crazy good. The artwork, the disturbing imagery, the originality of the stories, just...all of it. That's it. That's the review. *I bought this with my hard earned cash. If I hadn't I would buy it right now because I'll be re-reading this, perhaps many times.* This was crazy good. The artwork, the disturbing imagery, the originality of the stories, just...all of it. That's it. That's the review. *I bought this with my hard earned cash. If I hadn't I would buy it right now because I'll be re-reading this, perhaps many times.*

  6. 4 out of 5

    jade

    this three-in-one collection tells the story of a town completely unravelling through unsettling, disgusting, horrifying, and mind-bending body horror. and i am so here for it. the setting is kurouzu-cho, a sleepy town surrounded by mountains and hills on one side, and the sea on the other. our main protagonist is kirie goshima, a high school student, whose boyfriend shuichi saito has a bit of a depressive streak. the slow, uncanny creep of horror starts when shuichi’s father discovers a new hobby: this three-in-one collection tells the story of a town completely unravelling through unsettling, disgusting, horrifying, and mind-bending body horror. and i am so here for it. the setting is kurouzu-cho, a sleepy town surrounded by mountains and hills on one side, and the sea on the other. our main protagonist is kirie goshima, a high school student, whose boyfriend shuichi saito has a bit of a depressive streak. the slow, uncanny creep of horror starts when shuichi’s father discovers a new hobby: collecting examples of uzumaki, the spiral. what starts relatively innocent soon becomes a full-on obsession, and he devolves into a state where he doesn’t even go to work anymore. he just stares at spirals all day in his study, with devastating results. and that is when shuichi -- and kirie, by extension -- starts to notice how everything in kurouzu-cho seems to have some strange connection to the symbol of the spiral. yes, this book is the story of how something as abstract and seemingly harmless as a spiral overtakes an entire town and turns the lives of its inhabitants to ruin. this is illustrated (literally) in several ways: slow, creeping descents into madness, people turning into various creatures, outright murder, hair sucking the life out of the people it’s growing on, sentient hurricanes… … and eventually a full-on apocalyptic situation with hotel california vibes that ensure everyone that’s still alive is there for the big showdown. you gotta give ito points for originality, and i love the concept of it. the illustrations are no doubt the absolute best part of this, though. the art is stunning, and by that i mean stunningly horrifying. images just suck you in and you sit there, staring at them for a full minute in hair-raising dread. it’s perfectly designed, too, making excellent use of page layout to ensure the right impact of every individual image. ito can jangle your chain with outlandish, surrealist scary images as if they were jump scares, but he can also add to slow-creeping dread of the overall story. that said, there are plenty of criticisms to be had. its format contains a lot of same-structured chapters, where every chapter introduces a Horrific Event Of The Week arc. this is followed by another (and another, and another) until everything gets progressively worse. you also DEFINITELY need a healthy suspension of disbelief. shuichi is literally the only one who seems to understand that screaming ghosts in pottery seem a little weird. after every Horrific Event Of The Week, the citizens of kurouzu-cho just move along as if nothing happened. and it’s not like it could be ignored, because these are situations in which people actually DIE or are otherwise horrifically altered. (view spoiler)[or, you know, the teacher turns into a snail and still crawls to school, the pregnant women in the hospital suck the blood out of other patients with hand drills, a lighthouse is burning people alive… a regular day in town! (hide spoiler)] lots of people also felt the ending was anticlimactic. which i can understand, considering all the build-up and physical body horror, but to me it was a nice step away from what ito had been giving me up until that point. (view spoiler)[besides, i’ve always loved cosmic horror, and could anyone really believe all the shit in this book could be caused by something our mortal minds could comprehend? (hide spoiler)] but even if it gets too hilariously outlandish (without spoiling something, consider snails), i was still laughing in horror. like, the reality of it is still frightening, even when it becomes comedic. it’s mostly due to ito’s drawings being rendered in such vivid, excruciating detail. all in all, this is still my favorite of his works, and ito is the master of this type of visual horror for me. i reread this every halloween and i still have a good time. a hundred percent recommended if you’re fan of really creepy, uncanny stuff. see you next halloween, mr. ito. ✎ 4.5. stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Vacca

    Possibly one of the most inspired hunks of derangement I have ever had the pleasure to thumb through. Manga maker Junji Ito conjures up an epic phantasmagoria that obsessively plumbs the most modest of shapes, a spiral, for all the perversity and horror to be found within its endless contours. Set in a small town, the first segment of chapters presents various ways in which a spiral can configure into madness, mutation and murder. A slow-moving fatso turns into a lusty snail. A battle for popula Possibly one of the most inspired hunks of derangement I have ever had the pleasure to thumb through. Manga maker Junji Ito conjures up an epic phantasmagoria that obsessively plumbs the most modest of shapes, a spiral, for all the perversity and horror to be found within its endless contours. Set in a small town, the first segment of chapters presents various ways in which a spiral can configure into madness, mutation and murder. A slow-moving fatso turns into a lusty snail. A battle for popularity ensues between two high-school divas with increasingly treacherous coifs. The local incinerator for the dead starts pumping out winding trails of ash that wreak ecological havoc. A woman decides to rid her body of any spiral that may naturally form within her body. The eye of a tornado gets the hots for a particular girl and hilarity ensues. Bad things happen with a maternity ward and umbilical cords. And then things get even weirder. By the time the reader reaches the last two-hundred pages, chaos reigns as the town turns into a wasteland of freakish mutants and good old-fashioned human depravity. This is a horror yarn of grand scope that is filled with wild free-wheeling inventiveness, wicked black humor and grotesquely detailed drawings.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    the most horrifying book i’ve ever read

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    A man in a Japanese village becomes obsessed with spirals found in nature until he meets a horrific end. Things spiral further out of control with each chapter. The story focuses on a teenage couple as they watch this town become further and further unhinged with each chapter. Junji Ito sprinkles in some Lovecraft into the story. Later chapters were very reminiscent of House of Leaves. Like a lot of Japanese horror I've come across, it doesn't always make sense. It can be more about horrific ima A man in a Japanese village becomes obsessed with spirals found in nature until he meets a horrific end. Things spiral further out of control with each chapter. The story focuses on a teenage couple as they watch this town become further and further unhinged with each chapter. Junji Ito sprinkles in some Lovecraft into the story. Later chapters were very reminiscent of House of Leaves. Like a lot of Japanese horror I've come across, it doesn't always make sense. It can be more about horrific images that haunt your dreams. I like that Ito had his own art style. A lot of Manga I've seen has a certain sameness to the art. Ito maintains his own style throughout. The book is filled with body horror. Really creepy body horror, yet there is very little blood or gore.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Lawson

    Creepy. Awesome. Enough said.

  11. 5 out of 5

    NReads

    this sounds exactly what I need right now

  12. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    If you've been following my reviews for a while, you may remember that, a few months back, I accidentally got Volume 2 instead of Volume 1 from the library and decided to read it, anyways. I was less than impressed (and incredibly confused) and chalked it halfway up to not having read the beginning of the story (my mistake) and halfway up to this manga just not being my cup of tea. I decided recently that I wanted to give it another try by reading the entire story, since I know this is a very po If you've been following my reviews for a while, you may remember that, a few months back, I accidentally got Volume 2 instead of Volume 1 from the library and decided to read it, anyways. I was less than impressed (and incredibly confused) and chalked it halfway up to not having read the beginning of the story (my mistake) and halfway up to this manga just not being my cup of tea. I decided recently that I wanted to give it another try by reading the entire story, since I know this is a very popular horror manga, so I managed to get my hands on a copy of the deluxe edition version, which has all of the volumes in one hardback. Having learned the beginning of the story now, I'll say that Uzumaki is a very intriguing concept. The book takes place in a city that has been overtaken by spiral designs which are slowly causing the city's inhabitants to go entirely mad. It causes mutations and illnesses in people, and nobody who enters the city is able to leave. Random whirlwinds appear from time to time, destroying houses and sucking people up to never be seen again. The artwork in this book is probably capable of being pasted beside the dictionary definition of the word "grotesque". There is so much gross imagery (like people slowly turning into massive snails), and while gore doesn't bother me, this is just beyond my comfort level of "ick factor". If you enjoy stuff that makes you squirm and go "ewww", though, this is probably perfect for you. As far as the plot itself goes, it's bizarre but kind of like a train wreck: it's so god-awful you just can't stop looking. Would I ever read this manga again? Highly doubtful. Did I enjoy it, though? In a weird way... yes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emma☀️

    Absolutely terrifying and disturbing. I’m slightly traumatized, yet I could not look away because the illustrations were amazing! I wonder what goes on in Junji Ito’s mind because never in my life have I read anything like this before. That being said, I will now proceed to devour the rest of Ito’s works. Spoilery thoughts about the ending: (view spoiler)[I liked the ending. Nothing was explained but that’s what made it so much more impactful and horrifying. We, as human beings, need explanations Absolutely terrifying and disturbing. I’m slightly traumatized, yet I could not look away because the illustrations were amazing! I wonder what goes on in Junji Ito’s mind because never in my life have I read anything like this before. That being said, I will now proceed to devour the rest of Ito’s works. Spoilery thoughts about the ending: (view spoiler)[I liked the ending. Nothing was explained but that’s what made it so much more impactful and horrifying. We, as human beings, need explanations for almost everything. By keeping the origins of the spirals unexplained, this heightens our fear of the unknown resulting in a far more powerful horror story. It was so well done. (hide spoiler)]

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    Kurouzu-cho is a small, fogbound town on the coast of Japan, and it is haunted by an unusual curse. The curse of the spiral. A reclusive young man named Shuichi Saito is the first to take notice of the spiral patterns popping up everywhere and having strange effects on people, most of them not even noticing what’s happening to them until it’s too late. No one takes Shuichi’s warnings about the horrifying delusions the spirals cause to those who become entranced by their hypnotic spell seriously, Kurouzu-cho is a small, fogbound town on the coast of Japan, and it is haunted by an unusual curse. The curse of the spiral. A reclusive young man named Shuichi Saito is the first to take notice of the spiral patterns popping up everywhere and having strange effects on people, most of them not even noticing what’s happening to them until it’s too late. No one takes Shuichi’s warnings about the horrifying delusions the spirals cause to those who become entranced by their hypnotic spell seriously, do to his past paranoia-induced ramblings that have given him the reputation of a mentally unbalanced conspiracy theorist. Not even his girlfriend takes him seriously at first. Shuichi’s father is the first of many to fall under the dangerous spell of the spiral, becoming obsessed with the whirling patterns until his obsession drives him to the brink of madness. The story begins with Shuichi Saito trying to explain to his girlfriend that he thinks his father is being driven insane by his recently developed obsession with spirals. He collects hundreds of spiral shaped objects, hoarding them to the point of his house nearly overflowing with them. He refuses to take a bath unless he makes the water form a whirlpool before he jumps in, he even refuses to eat a bowl of soup unless his wife throws in a few spiral shaped fishcakes to please his bizzare fixation. Eventually, Shuichi’s father’s obsession with spirals becomes so extreme that he throws himself into the family pottery machine and sacrifices his life to become a human spiral. All of the bones in his body are crushed, his remains are contorted into a spiral of baggy flesh, leaving his wife and son to discover the horrifying sight of his grotesquely disfigured corpse balled up into a mess of limbs stretched beyond human capacity. The nightmare doesn’t end there. After Shuichi has his father cremated, even his ashes form a disfigured, humanoid spiral in the sky that looms over the terrified locals of Kurouzu-cho like the gaze of an all-powerful god. In that moment, everyone begins to realize that the curse of the spiral is very real. After the tragic incident with Shuichi’s father, the spirals begin to contaminate and consume more and more victims with their hypnotic sadism. They turn school students into snails, pregnant women into bloodsucking monsters, they transform villagers' bodies into tree branch-like limbs that get tangled together when they get too close to each other, they even turn a girl’s hair into a living hypnosis wheel that can drive you insane if you look at the spiraling strands of hair for too long. The curse of the spiral is vicious and it doesn’t stop spreading until the entire island is consumed by its vengeful spell. Before I started reading this manga, I asked myself “how can a cute and innocent thing like spirals possibly be scary?” Well, Uzumaki did a pretty great job of proving that they can be nightmarish little monstrosities. Uzumaki takes full advantage of its visual story-telling format, looking at the pages for long periods of time made me feel slightly dizzy at times, almost making me feel like I was becoming a victim of the spirals myself. It made the experience that much more surreal, being able to see the hypnotic effects the spirals have on the characters while also feeling some of their dizzying effects on my own vision. It’s a masochistic feast for the eyes, drawing you in with surreal body horror and mind-warping imagery. The paranoia, the delirious madness, the lovecraftian themes of normal, everyday people being driven insane by seemingly innocent obsessions. The scales keep getting higher, escalating from strange body disfigurement to full-on gory nightmare fuel. If you’re a horror fan or a fan of lovecraftian themes and imagery, and you’re not all that familiar with what manga has to offer in terms of horror, Uzumaki is the best place to start. It doesn’t have a brilliant plot or deep characters with major story arcs, it’s about average, perfectly ordinary people getting drawn into something otherworldly that the human mind can’t possibly fathom without self-destructing. The story is also told in an episodic format, each chapter having its own self-contained narrative that slowly builds upon the alluring mystery and origins of the spiral curse. The ending also has that poetic lovecraftian touch of humanity being small, helpless and completely irrelevant in the face of greater things that humans can never hope to comprehend.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Oriana

    Oh man, Jugs & Capes. This club sure knows how to expand my horizons. I haven't read much (any?) manga. And this one, which seems to be something of an international cult horror fave, was certainly an interesting place to start. It'd be tough to be terribly spoilery because any description I give you won't make much sense if you don't read the book. But let's just say that Uzumaki is about a town that gets overtaken by spirals. (I know, right?) This takeover assumes many forms, from spiral-shape Oh man, Jugs & Capes. This club sure knows how to expand my horizons. I haven't read much (any?) manga. And this one, which seems to be something of an international cult horror fave, was certainly an interesting place to start. It'd be tough to be terribly spoilery because any description I give you won't make much sense if you don't read the book. But let's just say that Uzumaki is about a town that gets overtaken by spirals. (I know, right?) This takeover assumes many forms, from spiral-shaped scars that eat your face to spiral-patterned plates that poison your food, from spiraling tornados that knock down your damn house to spiraling hair that chokes anyone who tries to cut it off. Oh look, the internet has made us a gif of what that last one looks like before it gets deadly: So yeah, with 300 pages of spirally craziness? Obviously the art is incredible. The book is really hypnotic, in fact, especially if you wait until two days before book club to buy it and have to burn through the whole thing in an evening. As an avowed anti-horror person, my #1 hope going in was that the book didn't give me malevolent lingering nightmares. And that, at least, was a win: despite being often horrifying, I didn't really actually find it scary. Which is so strange for me! I get scared by like a single well-crafted measure of ominous music, or a single sparsely spooky paragraph of text, or even a shadowy dark split-second shot in a movie—and yet this book, replete with face-eating spirals, vampire babies, and jack-in-the-box zombies, left me... well to be honest, it left me a little bit bored. Or, well, not bored really, but definitely not afraid. Partially I think this was due to the melodrama that is (I think?) inherent in manga. I mean there's so much AIEEE-ing and cartoonishly gaping mouths, so much scampering around and overplayed reaction shots, that it's tough to keep a patina of fear going. Also in fact so much of the "scary" stuff here is actually gross-out, like people turning into giant slimy snails, or a baby being surgically reinserted into its mom, or two people twisting together so tightly that their bodies become enmeshed. Like b-grade horror, which even I know isn't the same kind of scary as when there's a girl alone in a dark house who hears a whisper-soft tap tap tap at the window. Another Uzumaki gif? Okay: The last thing I'll say is that this book is really, really, really long. I mean, yes, this is a combination of three volumes, each of which is probably made up of dozens of issues, but it's supposed to be a whole, right? And a lot of the time what it felt like was a whole lot of repetitive vignettes where the same characters go through similar but slightly different horrors, while everyone in the town dies in a different horrible (spiral-related) ways. Some of the vignettes didn't even have spirals, and some didn't seem to fit into the storyline either temporally or character-wise. And then the ending... Several J&C ladies felt that the ending redeemed much of the journey, but I thought it was kind of a letdown. So. Even though I didn't really love this, I'm not at all sorry I read it. It was a great departure from the twee graphic novel memoirs we often read (though I adore those!), and the art was fantastic, and the story was super weird and in many ways awesome. Here's one more gif to close us out:

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    There are some images in this manga that have haunted me for days. Spirals are terrifying. Keiko lives in a town cursed by spirals. It starts with one man, her boyfriends father, and spirals (see what I did there?!) outwards from there. The curse effects everyone and everything differently. Pregnant women. Pottery. Children. Weird stalker kids from school. Hair. The spirals get everywhere, and the town gets worse and worse. Junji Ito has one weird mind. I genuinely don't know how he can think up There are some images in this manga that have haunted me for days. Spirals are terrifying. Keiko lives in a town cursed by spirals. It starts with one man, her boyfriends father, and spirals (see what I did there?!) outwards from there. The curse effects everyone and everything differently. Pregnant women. Pottery. Children. Weird stalker kids from school. Hair. The spirals get everywhere, and the town gets worse and worse. Junji Ito has one weird mind. I genuinely don't know how he can think up these things. I kept getting flashbacks of The Human Centipede at times, as it definitely has that kind of vibe in terms of body horror and squeamish imagery. Utterly creepy yet strangely compelling.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Janie C.

    Amazing artwork and a creepy story. What more can you ask for?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Boston

    3.5 stars

  19. 4 out of 5

    Roxana Chirilă

    It all starts with a man who becomes obsessed with spirals - he collects kimonos with spiral patterns, he looks endlessly at snails, he commissions a spiral bowl from the potter in town. And, well, there are quite a lot of spiral-y patterns in nature, just look at those leaves! But as time goes by, his obsession grows so much that his wife throws out his spiral collection, and he decides he can turn his body into spirals: he spins his eyes around, he rolls his tongue into a chameleon-like spiral It all starts with a man who becomes obsessed with spirals - he collects kimonos with spiral patterns, he looks endlessly at snails, he commissions a spiral bowl from the potter in town. And, well, there are quite a lot of spiral-y patterns in nature, just look at those leaves! But as time goes by, his obsession grows so much that his wife throws out his spiral collection, and he decides he can turn his body into spirals: he spins his eyes around, he rolls his tongue into a chameleon-like spiral and, eventually, dies after breaking his whole body to fit himself into a spiral shape. It's only the beginning of odd and increasingly terrifying occurrences, which slowly make the town descend from normal life into a terrified struggle for survival as the spiral affects the lives of their inhabitants, killing them in horrific ways, turning them into monstrous creatures, and wrecking their homes with whirlwinds. There's a lot of body horror here, with people twisted into spiraling shapes in each and every way. Eventually, as the town is driven mad, the darker side of the human psyche surfaces - is it bad to eat a human being if you're starving and they're not human anymore? What if they're really delicious? The art is really good, by which I mean that it'll probably haunt me for a while. And the story escalates really well, really knowing how to become more and more horrifying as it goes on. Kudos to Junji Ito, now I'll try to remove some of the images from my memories so I can sleep tonight.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    This had the potential of being really, really creepy but unfortuantely fell extremely flat for me. The art style was terrifying and the premise of a town being haunted by a spiral was definitely intriguing; however, story-wise this just wasn't interesting at all. No convincing build-up of suspense, no actual reasons for why what is happening is happening and also no compelling characters to care about throughout the story. Most chapters follow the pattern of a new character being introduced that This had the potential of being really, really creepy but unfortuantely fell extremely flat for me. The art style was terrifying and the premise of a town being haunted by a spiral was definitely intriguing; however, story-wise this just wasn't interesting at all. No convincing build-up of suspense, no actual reasons for why what is happening is happening and also no compelling characters to care about throughout the story. Most chapters follow the pattern of a new character being introduced that is then instantly killed while nothing much happens to the main cast until much later. Especially the first half of this volume bored me to tears at times. The most creepy to me were the two chapters on mosquitos, because it felt like there was actual suspense, despite the utter predictability of it all. Overall, I'm extremely disappointed in what was done with such a spectacular premise and such a phenomenal art style. In no way did it live up to its potential and if you need a little more than creepy pictures to actually freak you out then I recommend steering clear of this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Angel Noir

    It’s like a strange dream you’d have ...if you ate too much sugar right before bed, had a low grade fever, over indulged in NyQuil, or fell asleep too fast from exhaustion. As the story continued, it got even weirder —even to the end where I was like, “WTF... did I just read?!” It was worth every twist and turn, so to speak. Nope, I’ll own that one, pun intended. If you don’t mind shoving reason down a disposal, then this book is for you. Every time I wanted to tell Reality to take a hike, I pic It’s like a strange dream you’d have ...if you ate too much sugar right before bed, had a low grade fever, over indulged in NyQuil, or fell asleep too fast from exhaustion. As the story continued, it got even weirder —even to the end where I was like, “WTF... did I just read?!” It was worth every twist and turn, so to speak. Nope, I’ll own that one, pun intended. If you don’t mind shoving reason down a disposal, then this book is for you. Every time I wanted to tell Reality to take a hike, I picked up this read and enjoyed every bizarre moment of it. This book is twisted. Yep, I said it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    3.75-4/5stars Wow this one was a RIDE - I was always confused by what people meant about this being a book about a town obsessed with spirals but now I GET IT. This one started and ended SO STRONG but definitely lost me for about 200-250 pages in there (when the storms started happening and the twisters) which is why it dropped a bit in rating for me but I still HIGHLY recommend - super creepy and unsettling !

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brittney

    I meant to read this in one day, but it felt like it took me forever. (Maybe I'm turning into a snail person?) The good: - The art. - Some really creepy body horror moments, especially in the early chapters. The bad: - The characters don't act like people. There's no clear motivation for what they do, especially staying in town. (Yeah, it's sort of explained right at the end of the book, but that explanation feels too late and too insufficient.) They don't change or grow in convincing ways, and I s I meant to read this in one day, but it felt like it took me forever. (Maybe I'm turning into a snail person?) The good: - The art. - Some really creepy body horror moments, especially in the early chapters. The bad: - The characters don't act like people. There's no clear motivation for what they do, especially staying in town. (Yeah, it's sort of explained right at the end of the book, but that explanation feels too late and too insufficient.) They don't change or grow in convincing ways, and I spent almost all of the book wanting to shake most of them. - Junji Ito never satisfactorily explains why any of the spiraling creepiness is happening. Episodic chapters add up to a disjointed story of WTF-ery that never really coalesces into anything substantial. I had seen so many isolated, eerie panels around the Internet over the years that, when I realized we had it in my library system, I had to read it. I'm not upset that I did, but it wasn't that impressed, either. That said, I need a SFX makeup artist to do a look based on the spiral forehead chapter.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tristan

    SPIRAL INTO MADNESS “I saw it myself now. His eyes were spinning around and around…separately." Among storytellers of whatever stripe, conventional wisdom dictates that there are two genres which you have to work the hardest at to perfect: comedy and horror (the kind that evokes dread, not the one that assaults you with cheap jump-scares). Both are very specific responses to elicit from your audience, and enormously tough to pull off. It shouldn't come as a surprise then that horror comics rar SPIRAL INTO MADNESS “I saw it myself now. His eyes were spinning around and around…separately." Among storytellers of whatever stripe, conventional wisdom dictates that there are two genres which you have to work the hardest at to perfect: comedy and horror (the kind that evokes dread, not the one that assaults you with cheap jump-scares). Both are very specific responses to elicit from your audience, and enormously tough to pull off. It shouldn't come as a surprise then that horror comics rarely succeed in unsettling me to my core. Unlike some of its cinematic counterparts - which naturally greatly benefit from the use of sound and music- there always seems to be a frustrating disconnect, an invisible barrier erected between what’s pictured on the page and the mind that is targeted to be affected. This is not what happened while I, as in a trance, was thumbing through Junji Ito’s epic Uzumaki, in all likelihood the most genuinely disturbing, iconographically nightmarish piece of sequential art I have thus far come across (believe it or not, the pictures shown here are relatively tame compared to the fevered phantasmogaria this manga is brimming with). Formerly a placid Japanese coastal town, Kurôzu-cho has fallen prey to a series of strange, seemingly unexplainable occurrences, all somehow having to do with spiral patterns. They pop up in the unlikeliest of places, while infiltrating, taking over, contaminating, even mutating human bodies, and slowly but surely its inhabitants one by one succumb to its mysterious spell. Some turn obsessed and go mad (one woman after learning that a part of the inner ear, the cochlea, has a spiral shape hysterically stabs herself there with a pair of scissors), literally turn into snails or find their bodies twisting themselves into a coil. Other, highly inventive, yet disagreeable fates await the rest. This premise (secluded village, odd happenings, ensuing madness and hopelessness) does remind one vaguely of a certain early 20th century American horror writer, and the comparison isn't at all a trite one to make. To be sure, it has a distinct whiff of the Lovecraftian to it, especially as a hinting at a deeper horror - on the cosmic scale - is never far away. Yet even though Ito has taken some noticable cues from one of the acknowledged masters of the weird, he had the good sense - and artistic flair - to make it wholly his own, delivering a new horror to the modern world. Utilising an episodic structure for his storytelling, with our protagonist Kirie each time witnessing a strange event, he takes us through the various stages of the infection, slowly ramping up its severity, right until the inescapable bleakness of its conclusion. Some suspension of disbelief is required of course ( it's highly doubtful the villagers would have stuck around that long, if they hadn't committed mass-suicide under the direction of some Japanese Jim Jones first), but in this genre, that just comes with the territory. I for one applaud Junji Ito for this expertly crafted masterpiece, and consider it to be more than worthy of inclusion in the Hall of Fame of the weird. If the patently bizarre and transgressive holds even the tiniest shred of appeal for you, I very much urge giving this collection a look. Just remember to turn your attention away from the page once in a while, if you please. It tends to set its claws into you... Hmmm... Now what's with that spider in the corner back there? It's moving around so fast, going into spirals, spinning spirals, ever more spirals, unending SPIRALS...

  25. 4 out of 5

    verity

    Wow. This is one disturbing, chaotic, weird masterpiece. I couldn’t bring myself to look away from Ito’s incredible, grotesque imagery. And now I’ll be having nightmares for weeks. The premise is not one you’d expect—I’ve never read anything like this before. I mean, a town haunted by a spiral? By not a person or some kind of monster, but by a seemingly harmless pattern? But I’m always down for some bizarre insanity, and I was pleasantly surprised to find the unique concept is done so well and so Wow. This is one disturbing, chaotic, weird masterpiece. I couldn’t bring myself to look away from Ito’s incredible, grotesque imagery. And now I’ll be having nightmares for weeks. The premise is not one you’d expect—I’ve never read anything like this before. I mean, a town haunted by a spiral? By not a person or some kind of monster, but by a seemingly harmless pattern? But I’m always down for some bizarre insanity, and I was pleasantly surprised to find the unique concept is done so well and so cleverly. But that’s enough praise. We have to keep this on-brand. Truly, I’m more inclined to think of Uzumaki as a brilliantly crafted piece of art, rather than an actual book. I feel like storytelling isn’t Ito’s strong suit (even though, of course, the illustrations make up for it). The story is told through chapters that each detail Kurouzo-Cho’s Latest And Greatest Strange And Scary Occurrence. And yet, despite the fact that the victims of these Strange And Scary Occurrences end up dead or *cough* drastically different *cough*—the townspeople just ignore it and move on like nothing ever happened in the first place. (view spoiler)[Schoolchildren turn into snails, a lighthouse burns people alive, two girls’ hair nearly sucks the life out of them, pregnant women turn into vampires armed with hand drills—you know, the usual. (hide spoiler)] So one might require a certain, um, suspension of disbelief for that. The ending is my only other critique. I feel like, what with all of that buildup and suspense, there needed to be... Well, there needed to be more. It was disappointingly anticlimactic. But of course, I grudgingly understand why there was never an explanation for the hows and the whys and the what-happens-nexts of the whole situation, because how do you even begin to explain any of that? I don’t dislike cosmic horror, per se—in this case it just made the epic conclusion feel a bit lacking. But the illustrations, folks. Oh, God. I still can’t get them out of my head. How do I move on from this? How do I finish the grieving process that began once I finished this book?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    When Shuichi Saito's father turns himself into a human spiral killing himself getting cremated, his ashes are accidentally sent up into the atmosphere and land into dragonfly pond. This results in a horrifying curse that is spread onto the small coastal town of Kurôzu-cho, Japan. Can Kirie Goshima and the rest of the town survive the Spiral curse that is Uzumaki? Read on and find out for yourself. This was a pretty good and freaky horror anime. The artwork is great and it had a good storyline too When Shuichi Saito's father turns himself into a human spiral killing himself getting cremated, his ashes are accidentally sent up into the atmosphere and land into dragonfly pond. This results in a horrifying curse that is spread onto the small coastal town of Kurôzu-cho, Japan. Can Kirie Goshima and the rest of the town survive the Spiral curse that is Uzumaki? Read on and find out for yourself. This was a pretty good and freaky horror anime. The artwork is great and it had a good storyline too. If you are looking for something different to read in a manga then definitely look for this book at your local library and wherever books are sold.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Krista Regester

    Junji Ito gives me the absolute best nightmares.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    5 stars--amazing. This novel is a frenetic nightmare of imagery. The stories and art combine to create a truly chilling, fascinating tale. If you're a horror fan, it's a must-read. 5 stars--amazing. This novel is a frenetic nightmare of imagery. The stories and art combine to create a truly chilling, fascinating tale. If you're a horror fan, it's a must-read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chaunceton Bird

    Gripping, haunting, and super weird. What more could one want from a book? Junji Ito writes and draws Lovecraftian horror quite well. I was pleasantly surprise by how good this was.

  30. 5 out of 5

    breana / milkyboos ♡

    this was both the worst and greatest thing i have ever read, thank u for the nightmares junji ito

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.