hits counter Dark Harvest - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Dark Harvest

Availability: Ready to download

A Warhammer Horror novel A disgraced warrior-priest who prowls the Greywater Fastness is forced to confront his past when a message from an old friend sends him on a perilous quest. In an isolated village full of untrusting souls, his darkest secrets threaten to come to light. READ IT BECAUSE Explore a corner of the Mortal Realms full of dangerous characters and dark secrets A Warhammer Horror novel A disgraced warrior-priest who prowls the Greywater Fastness is forced to confront his past when a message from an old friend sends him on a perilous quest. In an isolated village full of untrusting souls, his darkest secrets threaten to come to light. READ IT BECAUSE Explore a corner of the Mortal Realms full of dangerous characters and dark secrets in a novel by Josh Reynolds, master of the sinister. THE STORY Harran Blackwood was a Warrior-Priest of ruthless virtue. Now he's a man with a scorched reputation, prowling the back alleys of Greywater Fastness, content to fight the petty wars of racketeers for survival. But when a desperate message arrives from an old friend, Blackwood is forced to confront a past he thought long buried. Summoned to the isolated village of Wald, Blackwood sets off on a perilous trek to ensure the sins of his former life remain forgotten. He soon discovers that Wald is a hostile, secretive place with sins of its own. Deep in the murky marshes, where the cruel chants of village folk echo and the stink of death hovers low, Blackwood must channel his bitterness and rage to defy the ancient darkness that now hunts him before he is devoured, body and soul.


Compare

A Warhammer Horror novel A disgraced warrior-priest who prowls the Greywater Fastness is forced to confront his past when a message from an old friend sends him on a perilous quest. In an isolated village full of untrusting souls, his darkest secrets threaten to come to light. READ IT BECAUSE Explore a corner of the Mortal Realms full of dangerous characters and dark secrets A Warhammer Horror novel A disgraced warrior-priest who prowls the Greywater Fastness is forced to confront his past when a message from an old friend sends him on a perilous quest. In an isolated village full of untrusting souls, his darkest secrets threaten to come to light. READ IT BECAUSE Explore a corner of the Mortal Realms full of dangerous characters and dark secrets in a novel by Josh Reynolds, master of the sinister. THE STORY Harran Blackwood was a Warrior-Priest of ruthless virtue. Now he's a man with a scorched reputation, prowling the back alleys of Greywater Fastness, content to fight the petty wars of racketeers for survival. But when a desperate message arrives from an old friend, Blackwood is forced to confront a past he thought long buried. Summoned to the isolated village of Wald, Blackwood sets off on a perilous trek to ensure the sins of his former life remain forgotten. He soon discovers that Wald is a hostile, secretive place with sins of its own. Deep in the murky marshes, where the cruel chants of village folk echo and the stink of death hovers low, Blackwood must channel his bitterness and rage to defy the ancient darkness that now hunts him before he is devoured, body and soul.

30 review for Dark Harvest

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael Dodd

    A sinister, atmospheric tale of old gods and lost faith in the grey swamps of Ghyran. Once a warrior priest of Sigmar, now reduced to scraping a living as hired muscle, Harran Blackwood finds his quiet life in Greywater Fastness rocked when he receives a message which stirs up painful memories from his past. Setting out with violence in his heart, Blackwood travels to the squalid town of Wald to seek the message’s sender, but finds a deeper and older darkness lurking in the wilds. It's maybe not A sinister, atmospheric tale of old gods and lost faith in the grey swamps of Ghyran. Once a warrior priest of Sigmar, now reduced to scraping a living as hired muscle, Harran Blackwood finds his quiet life in Greywater Fastness rocked when he receives a message which stirs up painful memories from his past. Setting out with violence in his heart, Blackwood travels to the squalid town of Wald to seek the message’s sender, but finds a deeper and older darkness lurking in the wilds. It's maybe not as out-and-out horror as you might expect, but there’s a lot to enjoy in a rare Warhammer story which doesn’t involve Chaos, and in which the antagonists are as much wild forces of nature as anything else. It could have done with digging a bit deeper into Blackwood’s past, which is intriguing but a little nebulous, and a little more in the way of consequences for the fact he’s able to see the (properly creepy) little gheists haunting the swamps of Ghyran, but there’s nevertheless an evocative sense of darkness to the setting, the cast and the overarching narrative. If you like your Warhammer stories to feel old-school, atmospheric and properly grim, this should be right up your street. Read the full review at https://www.trackofwords.com/2019/11/...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Munch

    I was sent an arc copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for a honest review. I was pleasantly surprised, I wasn't expecting to enjoy this as much as I did! I was instantly into the story and connected to the main character. I haven't read any other Warhammer books (I'll probably have to look up more now) but I didn't find myself getting too confused, there are a lot of unfamiliar places and creatures but the author does a really good job of slowly filling in your knowledge of the world with I was sent an arc copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for a honest review. I was pleasantly surprised, I wasn't expecting to enjoy this as much as I did! I was instantly into the story and connected to the main character. I haven't read any other Warhammer books (I'll probably have to look up more now) but I didn't find myself getting too confused, there are a lot of unfamiliar places and creatures but the author does a really good job of slowly filling in your knowledge of the world without it being too much. The main character Harran is a easy character to root for, he's one of those men that act like they don't care and are out for themselves but you see that this is just a façade and he has a very intriguing back story which is slowly revealed as the story goes on but I still found myself wanting to know more. The atmosphere was creepy and dark, the plot of a isolated village in a swamp and hostile locals with dark secrets really drew me in. The side characters were interesting and complex as well, I especially liked Gint, he brought some banter and I enjoyed watching his and Harran's interactions as they slowly got to trust each other. Overall a good little creepy read for winter time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Candyce

    Although atmospheric the story itself is slow and the climax does not really pay off. The protagonist is an anti hero but not one that is captivating. He is arrogant and somehow knows everything before it happens each step of the way. He does not encounter any trial that actually feels as though it might be of mortal danger to him. As for horror I feel that this had potential but was over all flat.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo

    [Received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review] Summary: This story had all the classic elements of horror. The decaying, decrepit town was of course present, as were the hostile, unhelpful inhabitants and the secret cult. So were the troubling dreams had by our main character, the dread visions caught at the corner of the eyes. But these elements, unsurprising and almost token in their predictability, were woven very effectively into a compelling narrative that kept me faithful [Received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review] Summary: This story had all the classic elements of horror. The decaying, decrepit town was of course present, as were the hostile, unhelpful inhabitants and the secret cult. So were the troubling dreams had by our main character, the dread visions caught at the corner of the eyes. But these elements, unsurprising and almost token in their predictability, were woven very effectively into a compelling narrative that kept me faithfully turning the pages. They provided a journey that is likely to be of great interest to people who crave this kind of horror in a non-urban setting. Prose: Perhaps one of my favorite elements in the book was the prose itself. The author manages to capture and paint a vivid picture of the story events and the dreariness of Wald in a way that really made the place pop in my mind. It sure made for an enjoyable read. The word green was utterly ubiquitous, but I suppose could not be helped. 4/5 Plot: As mentioned above, the particular elements of the plot fall on the table almost as a matter of course. This by itself is not necessarily a bad thing, though at times it did feel a bit too by-the-book other than the fact it was taking place in a fantasy setting. There was a points that soured my enjoyment of the story, however. (view spoiler)[ Namely, the Old Stag not devouring Harran at the end by virtue of the latter already belonging to Sigmar. It makes sense, but it also makes all the suspense the book had been slowly building feel like a sham. The second, also concerning the Old Stag, is that his speech felt a little too refined whenever he spoke to the character. Also, Gilt's death felt utterly cheap and telegraphed from the moment he mentioned the foretelling. (hide spoiler)] 3/5 Pacing: The story felt a little plodding near the beginning. Though Harran is a very interesting character and viewpoint for most of the story, the very start of it felt a little too studded with banal introspection. 3/5 Characterization: The characters were without a doubt the most enjoyable aspect of this story, alongside the prose and the world-building. Harran, specially, and I can't help but wonder if we'll see him again in another book. 4/5 World-building: Though this was the first book I've read set in the Warhammer Fantasy universe, I feel like the author did a particularly excellent job in providing flourishes of memory of Harran's previous life to embellish his present situation and his character as a whole. The same goes with the information he provides regarding the different creatures and the setting. 4/5 Final Score: 3.6/5 rounded to 4/5.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    I bought this book because it had green page edges. Unfortunately, that was the only thing interesting or unique about it. The story was cliché-ridden, and the protagonist is a shallow, unlikable antihero, all of which could have still made for a passable novel, if the whole thing wasn't so badly written. I bought this book because it had green page edges. Unfortunately, that was the only thing interesting or unique about it. The story was cliché-ridden, and the protagonist is a shallow, unlikable antihero, all of which could have still made for a passable novel, if the whole thing wasn't so badly written.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adam Nicol

    An absolute descent into gothic horror framed by the Age of Sigmar mythos.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Xuechen Yu

    It is that kind of story set in a high fantasy world, but with the minimum amount of magic. There is no chaos monsters filled with elemental power, no superheroes in golden armour waving lightning hammer, just a down-to-ground sinister story, dirty, old fashioned but also providing you a comfortable reading experience. Ironically I will rate this book almost above all other AOS novels I‘ve read so far, even surpassed Mr. Reynolds’ previous well-written works. Telling story from a “relatively” comm It is that kind of story set in a high fantasy world, but with the minimum amount of magic. There is no chaos monsters filled with elemental power, no superheroes in golden armour waving lightning hammer, just a down-to-ground sinister story, dirty, old fashioned but also providing you a comfortable reading experience. Ironically I will rate this book almost above all other AOS novels I‘ve read so far, even surpassed Mr. Reynolds’ previous well-written works. Telling story from a “relatively” common fool’s view point greatly help the whole setting to make sense, and also provided in-depth insight of how mortal lives functioned in such a world. The plot and the characters are both simple and traditional, but that’s enough, combined with Josh’s vivid and darksome tone, it is already an amiable good story. No more I can ask for. Hopefully there be a sequel, the protagonist is really a character I can get along with.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Arthur

    Fairly standard fantasy affair with an all-too-predictable story and a tendency to get lost in Harran Blackwood's background. Engaging atmosphere yet the writing tends to paint too vague a picture sometimes. A lot of the cast was unmemorable outside of a handful. Did not like how long it took for the mystery develop--Blackwood doesn't get his first clue until the halfway point, and considering how obvious the story is, the book feels like it's dragging its feet. Could've used more twist and turn Fairly standard fantasy affair with an all-too-predictable story and a tendency to get lost in Harran Blackwood's background. Engaging atmosphere yet the writing tends to paint too vague a picture sometimes. A lot of the cast was unmemorable outside of a handful. Did not like how long it took for the mystery develop--Blackwood doesn't get his first clue until the halfway point, and considering how obvious the story is, the book feels like it's dragging its feet. Could've used more twist and turns and some editing down, and excising the long forays into Harran's backstory with more left to the imagination.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Rankin

    As someone with an interest in the Warhammer universe, I finally decided to investigate the many offers of Black Library. When I browsed the site and saw that there was a 'Warhammer Horror' section I was very interested. At random, I decided to give Dark Harvest a go. Initially it's a promising read. I found that the opening chapters conveyed a good sense of atmosphere and escalation, as well as the perils of life and travel in the Age of Sigmar world. While I didn't find much interest in the main As someone with an interest in the Warhammer universe, I finally decided to investigate the many offers of Black Library. When I browsed the site and saw that there was a 'Warhammer Horror' section I was very interested. At random, I decided to give Dark Harvest a go. Initially it's a promising read. I found that the opening chapters conveyed a good sense of atmosphere and escalation, as well as the perils of life and travel in the Age of Sigmar world. While I didn't find much interest in the main character (as he came off as very one-note gruff guy with a troubled past) I was willing to see where it developed. However much of this promise was cut short once the main story begins in earnest. All the attempts at a compelling hook into the mystery of the town just seemed to fall short for me. What also doesn't help is that my hope of the main character developing some depth doesn't eventuate. This can also be said for any of the other supporting characters, who are just there to spout ominous sounding dialogue at the main character in attempt to make up for the atmosphere draining once the main plot begins. What also doesn't help much is that whenever our main character finds himself in a tricky situation, he without fail, is able to brute force himself out of the situation. I understand he is an ex-Warrior Priest, but it really undercuts the attempts at horror when he can smash his way through any problem that appears. He is also not a very likeable chap. I can understand that many books present unlikeable characters, but having to spend some 300 pages without a break or different perspective inside his gruff and one-note mind begins to wear thin. I did find his interaction with a character later introduced (Sepesh) to be interesting. Their dynamic for a brief moment showed some snappy back and forth, a welcome reprieve from other characters being a doom dispenser. If you've read any kind of mystery novel you'll pretty quickly suss out the goings on of the town, but now with a Warhammer coat of paint. Ultimately, while it has a veneer of horror, I wouldn't really call it a horror novel. So that is a bit of a mark against this 'Warhammer Horror' line.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nightshade

    This is the first Warhammer Horror book and the first non-40k book that I've read, so I wasn't quite sure what to expect going into it. I really enjoyed it. Reynolds did a very good job in building up the creepy atmosphere in Wald and I loved the middle-of-the-swamp setting. The world-building was great and I liked Reynolds writing. Right from the start as they are travelling it is made clear that it is not safe to leave the road and I loved all the creatures hiding in the woods and waters, parti This is the first Warhammer Horror book and the first non-40k book that I've read, so I wasn't quite sure what to expect going into it. I really enjoyed it. Reynolds did a very good job in building up the creepy atmosphere in Wald and I loved the middle-of-the-swamp setting. The world-building was great and I liked Reynolds writing. Right from the start as they are travelling it is made clear that it is not safe to leave the road and I loved all the creatures hiding in the woods and waters, particularly the treekin. There are a lot of mysteries that build up throughout the book, but everything is resolved nicely by the end, with basically all the questions answered. (view spoiler)[ I actually quite liked the fact that Harren survived his experience in Wald, as it was unexpected. I found myself routing for him, despite being sure he was going to be killed, so it was fun to see him survive. (hide spoiler)] There were a lot of interesting and fun characters introduced. I liked Harran's no-nonsense way of getting things done and his interactions with the people of Wald were fun. I liked watched his friendship grudgingly develop with Gint, leading to some fun scenes. (view spoiler)[ With The Stag's foretelling at the end of the story, that there are worse things awaiting Harren, I would like to see what happens to Harren next. Another book that covers these predicted future events would be great. (hide spoiler)] Overall I really enjoyed this book and am looking forward to jumping into another Warhammer Horror story soon.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sigmund

    This is the first Age of Sigmar book I've read that's come anywhere close to holding a candle to old Warhammer classics such as Drachenfels or Beasts in Velvet. It's well written, at times exiting even though it takes a while to get going. I'm not sure I'd call it "horror", although it does have elements of that, especially towards the end. The book is well written, some of the characters are pretty interesting, and it does a very good job of showing how the Mortal Realms can be depicted as infin This is the first Age of Sigmar book I've read that's come anywhere close to holding a candle to old Warhammer classics such as Drachenfels or Beasts in Velvet. It's well written, at times exiting even though it takes a while to get going. I'm not sure I'd call it "horror", although it does have elements of that, especially towards the end. The book is well written, some of the characters are pretty interesting, and it does a very good job of showing how the Mortal Realms can be depicted as infinitely more interesting than the drivel Games Workshop put out at the launch of AoS, and are still putting into their army books... sorry, battletomes. If you're not a Warhammer fan (in any of its incarnations), Dark Harvest is still very readable - no prior knowledge needed here. Indeed, you might find it even better than I did if you have no prior knowledge of the setting, as its more common high fantasy depiction won't be running in the back of your head trying to prevent you from entering the dark version of the world that Joshua Reynolds has painted. All in all, I'm now hoping for more Age of Sigmar books from Warhammer Horror, and from Joshua Reynolds in particular. If they keep making things like this, they might yet make converts of Oldhammer nerds like myself.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marco Baier

    Ahh, there is something about stories featuring swamps that I simply enjoy. Maybe it is the scenery itself, those misty & muddy places far, far away from proper civilization. Maybe it is the decay made manifest, the way nature claims and conquers, devouring towns and unlucky souls alike – just as in this novel. Maybe it is just enjoying the suffering of the characters while oneself is snug as a bug in a rug while they will inevitable become wet and woefully miserable? Maybe it is the way unseen Ahh, there is something about stories featuring swamps that I simply enjoy. Maybe it is the scenery itself, those misty & muddy places far, far away from proper civilization. Maybe it is the decay made manifest, the way nature claims and conquers, devouring towns and unlucky souls alike – just as in this novel. Maybe it is just enjoying the suffering of the characters while oneself is snug as a bug in a rug while they will inevitable become wet and woefully miserable? Maybe it is the way unseen things are lurking in the shadows. Stalking. Watching. Waiting… for you to turn the next page. This book has it all, which is why I recommend it for the proper connoisseur or Grimdark Fantasy. It felt more like one of the good old Warhammer Fantasy novels rather than what I’ve read from Age of Sigmar so far – which admittedly is not that much. It is darker and grittier than most, less heroic in action, but not in scope. It is a good book and I enjoyed reading it, but I probably won’t be reading it twice.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This was an excellent, gripping read. Definitely in the "horror" category, without actually being scary. It is very atmospheric, I could hear the swamp and feel the creeping horror lurking in the shadows. The tension of the leopard eels. It's a slow-burn, but I didn't feel that any time or space was wasted. The main characters are well-sketched, and clearly differentiated. It's one of the few looks into a more "domestic" Age of Sigmar setting, and I would like more. [SPOILER AHEAD] [SPOILER ALERT] Th This was an excellent, gripping read. Definitely in the "horror" category, without actually being scary. It is very atmospheric, I could hear the swamp and feel the creeping horror lurking in the shadows. The tension of the leopard eels. It's a slow-burn, but I didn't feel that any time or space was wasted. The main characters are well-sketched, and clearly differentiated. It's one of the few looks into a more "domestic" Age of Sigmar setting, and I would like more. [SPOILER AHEAD] [SPOILER ALERT] The only thing stopping me from giving it 5 Stars is that I was disappointed in the ending. I understand, narratively, why Blackwood wasn't going to be killed by the Huntsman, because his soul was already damned and a greater horror awaited him at the hands of Sigmar, but it felt like the author pulled the punch. After all the build-up and creeping tension of the Sylvaneth and the Huntsman, I didn't feel any of the horror that Sigmar was waiting for him, saving him for His own punishment, and it seemed like Blackwood just kinda got away with it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ally

    I loved this book! I have very little knowledge of Warhammer. I have plaid a bit of a video game and wanted to learn more so I chose this as my first starting point. I like medieval fantasy a lot, and this fit my preference perfectly! It gave me a bit of Witcher vibes but more gritty and brutal. The descriptions of the events and creatures did scare me at a few points, which I appreciated for a horror novel. I read this book rather quickly because I just wanted to find out what happened next. The I loved this book! I have very little knowledge of Warhammer. I have plaid a bit of a video game and wanted to learn more so I chose this as my first starting point. I like medieval fantasy a lot, and this fit my preference perfectly! It gave me a bit of Witcher vibes but more gritty and brutal. The descriptions of the events and creatures did scare me at a few points, which I appreciated for a horror novel. I read this book rather quickly because I just wanted to find out what happened next. The pacing was fantastic. The ending felt a teeny bit rushed, and the conclusion was a bit I expected and a cliff hanger, but I’m satisfied. I highly recommend this to people who enjoy medieval fantasy and horror, regardless of their knowledge or affinity to warhammer. It could definitely be a stand alone book and hold its own. I wish there were more books like it, but so far I haven’t found any.

  15. 4 out of 5

    James Big Cat

    I finished it so I won't give it one star but Dark Harvest is a boring story. The main character, Blackwood, is an ex war preist turned leg breaker with a mysterious past goes to collect a debt as well as look into a mysterious coin he receives from his past. He makes his way to a swamp village where everyone is super into sickles, knives, creepy masks, and hunting. There's some stuff about the areas past that is pretty grim and some interesting scenes with the inhabitants of the swamp but as a I finished it so I won't give it one star but Dark Harvest is a boring story. The main character, Blackwood, is an ex war preist turned leg breaker with a mysterious past goes to collect a debt as well as look into a mysterious coin he receives from his past. He makes his way to a swamp village where everyone is super into sickles, knives, creepy masks, and hunting. There's some stuff about the areas past that is pretty grim and some interesting scenes with the inhabitants of the swamp but as a horror story but I never really felt that Blackwood was ever in mortal danger or really scared. Most of the characters are pretty forgettable except maybe Blackwoods would-be sidekick with a mysterious past.. If it didn't have Warhammer or Horror on the cover I probably wouldn't have picked this up to begin with.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    Atmospheric! I loved the setting and I loved the characters. The plot was slow, but that's okay for me because I know it's a horror/mystery and I like the slow build up that leads to a final payout at the end. The big problem I have with this book is the payout simply didn't deliver to redeem the pace. I really want to like this book more, don't get me wrong the writing is really good, but right after I finished I had already thought up several endings I thought would have been way better than the Atmospheric! I loved the setting and I loved the characters. The plot was slow, but that's okay for me because I know it's a horror/mystery and I like the slow build up that leads to a final payout at the end. The big problem I have with this book is the payout simply didn't deliver to redeem the pace. I really want to like this book more, don't get me wrong the writing is really good, but right after I finished I had already thought up several endings I thought would have been way better than the way it ended. If you're reading this review, pick it up the book and check it out for yourself. It's a quick fun read and maybe the ending will satisfy you more than it did me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Graeme

    Sinister and atmospheric, the horror elements of the book come through strongly. I haven't read a great deal of Age of Sigmar material, but to me this seems to lean far more firmly into a creepy, unpleasant aspect of the universe than the normal stories of heavenly warriors and godlike heroes. The protagonist is fairly unlikable and maybe a little too good at or aware of most things (a common problem I find with 1st-person books) and occasionally the story can be a bit clichéd. That said, by the Sinister and atmospheric, the horror elements of the book come through strongly. I haven't read a great deal of Age of Sigmar material, but to me this seems to lean far more firmly into a creepy, unpleasant aspect of the universe than the normal stories of heavenly warriors and godlike heroes. The protagonist is fairly unlikable and maybe a little too good at or aware of most things (a common problem I find with 1st-person books) and occasionally the story can be a bit clichéd. That said, by the end I was fully on board and am looking forward to the next offering from Reynolds in the Warhammer Horror series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Earl Bingham

    I listened to the audio book version. The narrator does an amazing job of English accents and providing a sense of fear through out the beginning of the book. I loved the initial setting of a swampland fantasy world. What really upset me was the ending... I suppose pre-season 8 Game of Thrones books have made me really enjoy seeing a main character get killed, and I felt that a lot of what took place should've ended up having the main character die. I've read too many books where protagonist gets I listened to the audio book version. The narrator does an amazing job of English accents and providing a sense of fear through out the beginning of the book. I loved the initial setting of a swampland fantasy world. What really upset me was the ending... I suppose pre-season 8 Game of Thrones books have made me really enjoy seeing a main character get killed, and I felt that a lot of what took place should've ended up having the main character die. I've read too many books where protagonist gets knocked out repeatedly and keeps on going...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Graeme Shelton

    This book is fun! Like all Warhammer books, it is recommended largely to people who are already interested in Warhammer. I wouldn't necessarily call this a horror novel, but rather a pretty solid dark fantasy. The protagonist is a fairly run of the mill "fallen gritty antihero". The real reason to read this book is the environment. The dank, haunted, dripping swamp infested with flesh eating eels and monstrous tree spirits is right on the money. As a sucker for immersive world building, I was pr This book is fun! Like all Warhammer books, it is recommended largely to people who are already interested in Warhammer. I wouldn't necessarily call this a horror novel, but rather a pretty solid dark fantasy. The protagonist is a fairly run of the mill "fallen gritty antihero". The real reason to read this book is the environment. The dank, haunted, dripping swamp infested with flesh eating eels and monstrous tree spirits is right on the money. As a sucker for immersive world building, I was pretty happy with this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adam Hurst

    It would seem that the Wendigo has really become an inspiration for so many writers this decade. Algernon Blackwood's The Wendigo was my first experience with this mythological creature, unless Pet Cemetery can be included despite no actual mention of the supposed child of Loki. So although the story is not all that unique, it's still an enjoyable read. Don't expect much Warhammer 40k lore here despite it being labeled as a Warhammer novel. One could easily forget it was a Warhammer book altoget It would seem that the Wendigo has really become an inspiration for so many writers this decade. Algernon Blackwood's The Wendigo was my first experience with this mythological creature, unless Pet Cemetery can be included despite no actual mention of the supposed child of Loki. So although the story is not all that unique, it's still an enjoyable read. Don't expect much Warhammer 40k lore here despite it being labeled as a Warhammer novel. One could easily forget it was a Warhammer book altogether.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lex

    One of the better horror stories for WH. Very creepy atmosphere with the typical "stranger in a weird, distant village" theme, reminiscent of The Shadow over Innsmouth. Was not really surprised at the twist during the last act (it's been done before), but overall a good, logical turn following the plot and some reveals about Blackwood's (the protagonist's) background. This slow reveal was a welcome, and very interesting addition. Good story, all in all. One of the better horror stories for WH. Very creepy atmosphere with the typical "stranger in a weird, distant village" theme, reminiscent of The Shadow over Innsmouth. Was not really surprised at the twist during the last act (it's been done before), but overall a good, logical turn following the plot and some reveals about Blackwood's (the protagonist's) background. This slow reveal was a welcome, and very interesting addition. Good story, all in all.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Roel Yento

    Age of Sigmar Really enjoyed the story and how Josh Reynolds brought this world to life. Fleshing out the region this book took place was well done and hope to read more about the region and groups within. Blackwood was an interesting character and I hope we see other tales from his time in the mortal realms.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joe Collins

    The atmosphere was the best part of the story - creepy and definitely fits the horror theme the author was going for. I just found the story didn't grip me. Extremely low magic and didn't find the Gods aspect that gripping. However, the author seemed very competent so will try another of his books in the Warhammer universe The atmosphere was the best part of the story - creepy and definitely fits the horror theme the author was going for. I just found the story didn't grip me. Extremely low magic and didn't find the Gods aspect that gripping. However, the author seemed very competent so will try another of his books in the Warhammer universe

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Jamieson

    My first foray into Black Library's horror imprint - and I was not disappointed! This was my first Josh Reynolds' book too and it won't be my last. A truly gripping, high fantasy noir adventure that delves into the swampy underbelly of Age of Sigmar. My first foray into Black Library's horror imprint - and I was not disappointed! This was my first Josh Reynolds' book too and it won't be my last. A truly gripping, high fantasy noir adventure that delves into the swampy underbelly of Age of Sigmar.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Paul

    DNF. Love me some warhammer, but LORD this was slow. I swear, if I had to hear about how wet, damp, hot, or dark that damn forest was, I would gave torn out part of my beautiful beard in frustration.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mikael

    Felt like a return to Warhammers old world and its dark and grimy roots.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eric Smith

    I am thrilled that there is now a Warhammer Horror imprint if books like this are the result. Absolutely loved this book and hope it’s just the harbinger of more to come of this quality.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    A great read! I love the low fantasy, gritty feel to the novel. It reminded me heavily of bloodborne, in setting and tone.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Swords & Spectres

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. When I saw the beautifully dark cover for Dark Harvest and Josh Reynolds listed as the author, I knew I had to get my hands on this. Josh is one of those authors that seems incapable of providing anything less than a four or five star read for me. Just has such a deep, gritty way with telling stories in the Warhammer universe. Dark Harvest is part of Black Library’s ‘Warhammer Horror’ genre. I’m not sure if the fact that I kind of fe I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. When I saw the beautifully dark cover for Dark Harvest and Josh Reynolds listed as the author, I knew I had to get my hands on this. Josh is one of those authors that seems incapable of providing anything less than a four or five star read for me. Just has such a deep, gritty way with telling stories in the Warhammer universe. Dark Harvest is part of Black Library’s ‘Warhammer Horror’ genre. I’m not sure if the fact that I kind of feel it isn’t any different to the dark stories that they used to publish or that maybe I just have a thick skin in this delicate era we live in, but I didn’t find it very horrory. That being said, I have been reading the dark fiction put out by the Black Library since I was about eleven. So it takes a lot to make me shiver. The basic story is one of an ex-warrior priest (Harran Blackwood) turned bitter drunk. Instead of swinging his hammer in the name of Sigmar, he now thrusts his knife in the name of any man willing to pay coin enough for his service. He’s a leg-breaker, a debt-collector and all-around odd job man for those of less honest backgrounds. He receives a letter from a friend begging for help and, due to a past that Blackwood would prefer to keep buried, he decides this friend needs to be removed. After all, his continued existence relies on people not knowing where he is, let alone who he is. And this old friend knows both. He travels off to the depths of the swamplands in search of said friend and gets embroiled in troubles not his own along the way. The story is told in first person narrative and in Harran’s own gritty, un-polished way. It made me think of the Raven’s Mark series by Ed McDonald. Harran Blackwood is very similar in mannerism and speech/thought as Ryhalt Galharrow. So, if you are a fan of that series, you just may appreciate the bleak and grim style of Dark Harvest. Much like Galharrow, Blackwood has that ‘Not too fussed if I die, so I’ll just do what I want’ mentality. If I was to have one complaint about the novel as a whole it would be that I felt it was perhaps a little too long. Some of it could have been done at a little quicker pace and it left me wondering if they were going for higher word count rather than a better reading flow. If I was to have a second it would simply be that some of the things that happen near the end made me a tad annoyed. More so because I just didn’t want them to happen than for any negative story reason. So that was entirely a bitter personal choice. There are certainly some things you don’t see coming in this book which keep the reader on their toes. I do hate it when a novel is too linear and you could practically write the plot yourself. Thankfully, at no point does Dark Harvest suffer from that fate. Josh does a good job of setting the scene and bringing the surroundings to life. After a while of reading, the damp, soggy confines of the boggy swamp permeate your mind and you often feel that murkiness as though it’s in the room with you. All in all it’s very well-written and certainly worth a read if you like your grim fantasy. I just think it could have benefitted from less padding.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    This was a super atmospheric novel about a fallen Sigmarite priest taking up the invitation of an estranged former friend. There is a lot of allusion of things dwelling in the twilight of the swamp just beyond the bounds of the close knit community that passes off as civilization. The ending is a bit of a head scratcher and I hope more is done with the priest, Haran Blackwood, in the future. After all, he has a Dark Destiny to fulfill.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.