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Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution!

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"Someday girls like us will be able to wear whatever we want. People will call us by the names we choose. They'll respect that we are women. The cops will leave us alone and no one will go hungry." Sylvia and Marsha are closer than sisters. They are kind and brave and not afraid to speak their truth, even when it makes other people angry. This illustrated book introduces chi "Someday girls like us will be able to wear whatever we want. People will call us by the names we choose. They'll respect that we are women. The cops will leave us alone and no one will go hungry." Sylvia and Marsha are closer than sisters. They are kind and brave and not afraid to speak their truth, even when it makes other people angry. This illustrated book introduces children to the story of Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson, the two transgender women of colour who helped kickstart the Stonewall Riots and dedicated their lives to fighting for LGBTQ+ equality. It introduces children to issues surrounding gender identity and diversity, accompanied by a reading guide and teaching materials to further the conversation.


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"Someday girls like us will be able to wear whatever we want. People will call us by the names we choose. They'll respect that we are women. The cops will leave us alone and no one will go hungry." Sylvia and Marsha are closer than sisters. They are kind and brave and not afraid to speak their truth, even when it makes other people angry. This illustrated book introduces chi "Someday girls like us will be able to wear whatever we want. People will call us by the names we choose. They'll respect that we are women. The cops will leave us alone and no one will go hungry." Sylvia and Marsha are closer than sisters. They are kind and brave and not afraid to speak their truth, even when it makes other people angry. This illustrated book introduces children to the story of Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson, the two transgender women of colour who helped kickstart the Stonewall Riots and dedicated their lives to fighting for LGBTQ+ equality. It introduces children to issues surrounding gender identity and diversity, accompanied by a reading guide and teaching materials to further the conversation.

30 review for Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution!

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

    This book is historically inaccurate. The Stonewall Riots did not start on Marsha's birthday (her birthday was in August). Sylvia Rivera was not present. I could find no evidence of Marsha liberating a police truck full of arrested individuals or dancing in the street that night in my (admittedly brief and limited) research into the subject. I felt the author was glib about Marsha and Sylvia's extreme poverty and homelessness even while trying to show their giving natures. The glossary and activ This book is historically inaccurate. The Stonewall Riots did not start on Marsha's birthday (her birthday was in August). Sylvia Rivera was not present. I could find no evidence of Marsha liberating a police truck full of arrested individuals or dancing in the street that night in my (admittedly brief and limited) research into the subject. I felt the author was glib about Marsha and Sylvia's extreme poverty and homelessness even while trying to show their giving natures. The glossary and activities in the back of the book are too numerous and stray off topic. Protest signs are not mentioned in the book - why is there a "make a sign" activity? Even though Marsha is famously depicted as wearing a flower crown it doesn't seem necessary to have a crown craft in the book. The glossary felt unnecessary - beyond transgender, the other terms did not appear in the rest of the book, making them superfluous. I wanted to love this book. I have been wanting a biography of Marsha P. Johnson for kids, but this can't be it. This review is based on digitial review copy provided by NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers. The review is cross-posted to Goodreads and Instagram.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Danni Green

    My friend Joy is the author of this book, and it has been an honor and a delight to witness it go from an idea to a Kickstarter to a whole real book that I'm holding in my hands. Both author and illustrator worked together to create a literary and historical treasure, portraying the story of the powerful friendship of these two courageous trans women of color and how from the foundation of their friendship they were able to mobilize and take action to protect the most vulnerable members of their My friend Joy is the author of this book, and it has been an honor and a delight to witness it go from an idea to a Kickstarter to a whole real book that I'm holding in my hands. Both author and illustrator worked together to create a literary and historical treasure, portraying the story of the powerful friendship of these two courageous trans women of color and how from the foundation of their friendship they were able to mobilize and take action to protect the most vulnerable members of their community. The hopeful, uplifting tone of this book shines through the text and the illustrations. I would like a copy on the bookshelf of everyone I love!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Professional Judy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is pushing an historical inaccuracy of our LGB Civil Rights history, Marsha/Malcolm self described himself in a video mere days before his death as a gay man, and simply a crossdresser. He said that he crossdressed because he could earn more money as a drag queen and as a sex worker, this video is on YouTube. He would also get very upset being misgendered when not in character. He was not the catalyst for the Stonewall riots, that was a butch black lesbian called Stormé DeLarverie. Mar This book is pushing an historical inaccuracy of our LGB Civil Rights history, Marsha/Malcolm self described himself in a video mere days before his death as a gay man, and simply a crossdresser. He said that he crossdressed because he could earn more money as a drag queen and as a sex worker, this video is on YouTube. He would also get very upset being misgendered when not in character. He was not the catalyst for the Stonewall riots, that was a butch black lesbian called Stormé DeLarverie. Marsha/Malcolm himself in an interview that is available online stated that he got to the bar late and that it was already on fire by that time and that Silvia, a very troubled individual, was in park taking “cocktails” (slang at the time for a combination of drugs) with his punters. This book is offensive to LGB people and their civil rights history, this drive by trans activists to insert themselves into our civil rights struggle to claim the credit for the rights WE won by OURSELVES is seriously unacceptable and disrespectful. We owe the right we won to ourselves and I strongly object to this book being used to transwash our civil rights history. I think it's problematic how the words of a dead black man are ignored and him being called a woman because he failed to live up to white expectations of black masculinity. He was also seriously unwell believing that his father was Neptune to the point where he would routinely throw his clothes into the river in tribute to his 'father'. If the writer had any integrity they would remove this book and apologise. This needs to stop.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul Decker

    *I received this book as an eARC from Jessica Kingsley Publishers via NetGalley. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.* This picture book showcases two amazing trans women of color! It's the Stonewall Riots in children's book format. Plus a glimpse into these two women's lives. This book addresses homelessness. Police are seen as the antagonist, but in a way that is children appropriate. After the story, there's plenty of additional *I received this book as an eARC from Jessica Kingsley Publishers via NetGalley. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.* This picture book showcases two amazing trans women of color! It's the Stonewall Riots in children's book format. Plus a glimpse into these two women's lives. This book addresses homelessness. Police are seen as the antagonist, but in a way that is children appropriate. After the story, there's plenty of additional resources. There are details and information so that adults can give some context to children who have additional questions. And so the adults have that information for themselves as well. There are even external resources. And some activities. The events shown in this book are made appropriate for children so not all the details are there. I give this book a 5/5. I love seeing books like this for children. Especially showcasing trans women of color from history.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Manon the Malicious

    I was provided an ARC by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This was cute and such a fast read. It's also educational. My main problem with it was how everything was over simplified. I understand that this is for kids but still, it felt over the top. Especially since the actual drawn story is so short and then there are pages and pages of text explaining it. I feel like everything could have been more in depth in the actual drawn story and more accurate too. Anyway, stil I was provided an ARC by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This was cute and such a fast read. It's also educational. My main problem with it was how everything was over simplified. I understand that this is for kids but still, it felt over the top. Especially since the actual drawn story is so short and then there are pages and pages of text explaining it. I feel like everything could have been more in depth in the actual drawn story and more accurate too. Anyway, still a good introduction to explain gender identities and Stonewall.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ally

    a lot of the information in this book is incorrect and this retelling of history is insulting

  7. 4 out of 5

    Isaiah

    To see more reviews check out MI Book Reviews. I got an ARC of this book. I am not a fan of the art. It just didn’t click with me for some reason. I don’t know why. So that really made it hard to enjoy a picture book. The story itself was really simplistic, which was both good and bad. The story was watered down for kids, but not sure the whole sex workers being assaulted by police would have been appropriate for a four year old. The issue is it took a lot of the power from the story. It made it ma To see more reviews check out MI Book Reviews. I got an ARC of this book. I am not a fan of the art. It just didn’t click with me for some reason. I don’t know why. So that really made it hard to enjoy a picture book. The story itself was really simplistic, which was both good and bad. The story was watered down for kids, but not sure the whole sex workers being assaulted by police would have been appropriate for a four year old. The issue is it took a lot of the power from the story. It made it make no sense why the police, who are supposed to be the good guy and are the good guy in kids media, would suddenly be arresting women. It took so much of the context away. I was really happy that Sylvia Rivera and Marsha Johnson were the stars of the picture book though! It is wonderful to see they are being honored and that more people will know their names and their bravery. So I am really torn on this book. I wanted it to exist, but it is just so hard to get it just right. It is really hard to talk about police brutality and other more intense subjects in a picture book. I did like that there were reading guides and an activity guide for parents in the back. It opened up for more education. It allowed the true story to be a true story. It gave more context that was lacking in the text itself.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution! is a non-fiction picture book about 2 transgendered women living in NYC in the late 1960s. At that point in time, transgender women could be arrested simply for dressing in women's clothing. Sylvia and Marsha were best friends and felt bad about the treatment of transgender women. They regularly gave homeless transgender people money and helped support them in other ways. One evening, Sylvia and Marsha helped start a revolution as part of the Stonewall Rebel Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution! is a non-fiction picture book about 2 transgendered women living in NYC in the late 1960s. At that point in time, transgender women could be arrested simply for dressing in women's clothing. Sylvia and Marsha were best friends and felt bad about the treatment of transgender women. They regularly gave homeless transgender people money and helped support them in other ways. One evening, Sylvia and Marsha helped start a revolution as part of the Stonewall Rebellion. They freed transgender women who had been put in a van by the police...simply for dressing in women's clothing. This picture book is good for older elementary aged kids and is a good way to teach about equal rights and LGBTQ+ history. This book could inspire kids to be more understanding of others. Thank you to the publisher for the advanced copy!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carmen (TheReadingTrashQueen)

    A huge thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for providing me with a free eARC in exchange for an honest review! 4,5/5 I really wish I could give this 5 full stars, but sadly I wasn't in love with the art, and I felt like the story could have been fleshed out a bit more in illustrations, instead of having it tacked on as text afterwards. Don't get me wrong, the text at the end is very important. It explains the transgender terms, expands more on Sylvia and Marsha's stories and lives (and the choic A huge thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for providing me with a free eARC in exchange for an honest review! 4,5/5 I really wish I could give this 5 full stars, but sadly I wasn't in love with the art, and I felt like the story could have been fleshed out a bit more in illustrations, instead of having it tacked on as text afterwards. Don't get me wrong, the text at the end is very important. It explains the transgender terms, expands more on Sylvia and Marsha's stories and lives (and the choices they made for this particular 'retelling'), gives questions to talk and think about with children, and some fun activities, like making a sign for a protest, and making a flower crown. It's a brilliant way to get kids engaged in this kind of history that is generally completely ignored in schools. There also is some further reading, both for adults and kids, if you want to explore this more with (your) kids/students. I think that all in all this is a very important little book, that makes these revolutionary women of color a lot more 'accessible', more real, to the people (and especially the children) of today. Not to mention the message of it being okay to be who you are; that that really is the only way you can and should be. It also shows how far we've come, and how far we've yet to go. Would definitely recommend! Teachers, get on this!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Thank you to the publisher for providing me an ARC via netgalley. You know a book is fantastic when the minute you have read it, you go straight on over to waterstones and preorder yourself a copy. This is the book that should be on the school curriculum. It manages to talk about transgender issues (I as a 30 year old woman learnt a lot of things I didn't know!) It has discussion points, and after the story and graphics it has a lot more information about the historical events. I think everyone s Thank you to the publisher for providing me an ARC via netgalley. You know a book is fantastic when the minute you have read it, you go straight on over to waterstones and preorder yourself a copy. This is the book that should be on the school curriculum. It manages to talk about transgender issues (I as a 30 year old woman learnt a lot of things I didn't know!) It has discussion points, and after the story and graphics it has a lot more information about the historical events. I think everyone should read this as a base knowledge of the transgender revoluion, and then expand on knowledge!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    By now, the world knows about Stonewall, so I'm so happy to see that the two transgender women who helped kick off the riots are being featured in their own picture book. And though I thought I knew the whole story, I did not know of the other work that they did in their lifetime. It is a bit like only knowing that Rosa Parks refused to get off the bus, when she did so much work before and after that moment in time. Sylvia and Marsha also helped other transgender youth, because they knew what they By now, the world knows about Stonewall, so I'm so happy to see that the two transgender women who helped kick off the riots are being featured in their own picture book. And though I thought I knew the whole story, I did not know of the other work that they did in their lifetime. It is a bit like only knowing that Rosa Parks refused to get off the bus, when she did so much work before and after that moment in time. Sylvia and Marsha also helped other transgender youth, because they knew what they themselves had gone through. Highly recommended. Very simple and easy to read, kids can get the history in very bite sized, easy to understand bits.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I helped crowdfund this, and I think maybe the backer reward copy I got was essentially a pre-ARC?  Since mine is softcover, doesn't have an ISBN, and also doesn't have the "glossary and activities" some other reviews mention. The book opens with Sylvia and Marsha as friends, Marsha being generous to a homeless girl, and Sylvia saying, "We've got to do something for girls like us." This theme -- of their friendship and desire to help girls like them -- runs through the whole book. The narrative st I helped crowdfund this, and I think maybe the backer reward copy I got was essentially a pre-ARC?  Since mine is softcover, doesn't have an ISBN, and also doesn't have the "glossary and activities" some other reviews mention. The book opens with Sylvia and Marsha as friends, Marsha being generous to a homeless girl, and Sylvia saying, "We've got to do something for girls like us." This theme -- of their friendship and desire to help girls like them -- runs through the whole book. The narrative straightforwardly refers to Sylvia and Marsha as transgender women -- which feels to me like a reasonable way to make them comprehensible to children of today. I liked the repetition of the phrase "girls like us," since I assume it was an intentional echo of #GirlsLikeUs. Unlike March With Marsha , which literally opens with, "June 28, 1969: Marsha P. Johnson is 25 years old, and today she celebrates her birthday. Happy birthday, Marsha!" this narrative has somewhat more plausible deniability -- with Marsha being greeted upon entering the Stonewall Inn with, "Happy birthday, Marsha!" and telling a policeman who asked for her ID, "Not on my birthday."  Like, I could believe that's a playful way of speaking embedded in that particular queer culture. However, this book repeats that book's ahistorical narrative device of placing them both at Stonewall the first night of the uprising -- and adds in a line about them freeing a bunch of their friends from a police van, which I think no one claims. It also quickly pivots from the first night of the Stonewall uprising -- as if it lasted for only one night (even though one could easily gloss that time period without actually dwelling on it in the text) -- to the development of them providing housing for trans youth. I was bummed that they didn't actually name STAR (House). ( March With Marsha splits the difference in a different way -- saying, "Marsha and Sylvia start a new organization to help young people like themselves. They march and organize and stand up for queer people's rights," and showing them holding a banner that says, "Street Transvestites [sic] Action Revolutionaries.") The coda at the end of the book includes:There are many different versions of what happened the night of the 1969 Stonewall Rebellion. This book is a retelling of one version of the events. Some people say that Marsha was the first to protest that night. We know for certain she was not alone. You can find in this book pictures of Stormé DeLarverie and Miss Major Griffin-Gracie, two other Black women who were also in the Rebellion. You can be like Sylvia and Marsha by sharing what you have and by demanding justice for everyone. You and your friends can start a revolution, too.Although this book, like March With Marsha , stays in the past, I feel like it gives readers a lot more to go on to encourage them to work for change in their own time -- or at least helps them understand better what the problems were of this particular part of the past (which better enables them to recognize those problems recurring in their present).

  13. 5 out of 5

    iam

    Easy to follow picture book that tells children the story of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera and the Stonewall Riots in a simplified version. The illustrations were simple and effective, the text short, each page able to stand on its own, enabling even small children to understand what is happening. I liked the extra resources at the end. There's a glossary, short extra biographies and event descriptions, as well as activities to do with children, from discussion prompts to building a protest Easy to follow picture book that tells children the story of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera and the Stonewall Riots in a simplified version. The illustrations were simple and effective, the text short, each page able to stand on its own, enabling even small children to understand what is happening. I liked the extra resources at the end. There's a glossary, short extra biographies and event descriptions, as well as activities to do with children, from discussion prompts to building a protest sign or making a flower crown. While they seem to be more aimed towards guardians reading the book with children, it's written simply enough for children to follow on their own too. The book also directly tells the reader that it's more of a retelling than a biography or historically accurate, being upfront about being only one retelling of the events. I also thought it was good that the book encourages guardians to talk to children about gender and queerness without having to be experts about it, instead teaching them to be open to anyone. What I found a bit curious was the choice of calling it Stonewall rebellion rather than Stonewall riots. I for one are much more familiar with them being called the latter. While I appreciate the simplicity of the text and pictures, I also found them a bit disconnected. This might have been a deliberate choice to make this accessible to very young children, but to me it also felt like it traded away some of its overall coherence for that. There were also some inconsistent choices, like stating the date of the beginning of the Stonewall Riots in the text without previously setting the story in a specific time or place at all. I received an ARC and reviewed honestly and voluntarily.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Yasmine Baker

    🌟🌟🌟🌟 Sylvia & Marsha Start a Revolution is an illustrated book about how Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson defied police intimidation and started the Stonewall Rebellion. Their inspirational story is delightfully illustrated in this gorgeous children’s book about sisterhood, community, and bravery. This book was such a pace breaker for me. I don’t often read children’s books like this, but when I do it is so that I can find books for students at my school that are new to English, or for the tin 🌟🌟🌟🌟 Sylvia & Marsha Start a Revolution is an illustrated book about how Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson defied police intimidation and started the Stonewall Rebellion. Their inspirational story is delightfully illustrated in this gorgeous children’s book about sisterhood, community, and bravery. This book was such a pace breaker for me. I don’t often read children’s books like this, but when I do it is so that I can find books for students at my school that are new to English, or for the tiny children that are in my life! This book tells an important story that is often ignored in education, as there is a lack of LGBTQ+ history on the curriculum. The language is simple and accessible without diminishing the important message of tolerance and acceptance, which will help parents and teachers alike explain Marsha & Sylvia’s story in a simple and clear way. It also explains what it means to be transgender, which is a concept that isn’t openly and consistently explained in schools at the moment, and teaches children an important lesson on tolerance and acceptance. The illustrations are full of diverse and interesting characters, with vibrant colours and beautiful clothes that will encourage young children to read and engage with this book. Marsha and Sylvia literally glow, which is one of my favourite parts of Silver’s illustration style. There is a section at the end for educators and parents which includes follow up questions and activities which is a lovely touch. It allows parents the opportunity to further educate themselves while they engage and inspire their children. A delightful children’s book that I will be buying for the little people in my life!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bee

    ’Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution’ is a brilliant introduction for children both to the events at the Stonewall Inn that would begin the change in both the US and across the world over LGBTQAI+ rights and to the lives of Sylvia Riviera and Marsha P. Johnson. The illustrations are bright and full of character enabling younger readers to follow the story and I loved them. I can easily imagine showing it to a younger child and explaining to them the events of Stonewall and why it was indeed a Re ’Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution’ is a brilliant introduction for children both to the events at the Stonewall Inn that would begin the change in both the US and across the world over LGBTQAI+ rights and to the lives of Sylvia Riviera and Marsha P. Johnson. The illustrations are bright and full of character enabling younger readers to follow the story and I loved them. I can easily imagine showing it to a younger child and explaining to them the events of Stonewall and why it was indeed a Revolution. Although there isn't a lot of text, there is enough to guide the tale along and I liked how ’Here comes Alice in the Blue Dress’ was used as the Police were called by several names including ’Alice Blue Gown’. The author has in this simple concept shown how careful Homosexual men and Transgender women had to be to avoid arrest. My only criticism I have about the story itself is it paints an unrealistic history. The Stonewall Rebellion or Riots lasted for six days, and the book implies heavily that it was one and then everything on Christopher Street, Greenwich was back to normal the next day. This is far from accurate but I do understand that the full story is a difficult one. At the end of the book is a glossary of terms which will help anyone who isn't certain of what certain terminology means, not just children. I can see how the whole book will open the eyes to children and their families and will open up a conversation that may never happen otherwise. With activity suggestions like a protest sign or a crown like Marsha? This book is a must in any school or home to teach children about a globally historic moment.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Harri

    This book is the story of Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P Johnson, the trans women of colour who were an integral part of the Stonewall Uprising and the ensuing fight for LGBTQ+ rights. This book has beautiful, vibrant artwork and is written in simple and engaging language. It is perfect for young readers. The book covers the facts in a way that is suitable for young children. It shows two strong trans women standing up against transphobia, which is empowering for young trans kids to see, especially y This book is the story of Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P Johnson, the trans women of colour who were an integral part of the Stonewall Uprising and the ensuing fight for LGBTQ+ rights. This book has beautiful, vibrant artwork and is written in simple and engaging language. It is perfect for young readers. The book covers the facts in a way that is suitable for young children. It shows two strong trans women standing up against transphobia, which is empowering for young trans kids to see, especially young trans girls of colour. It's also important for every child to see trans people, especially trans women of colour, in a positive light. After the story, the book includes some facts about Marsha and Sylvia, some discussion questions that parents can use with their children, and some activities for children to do to get started as activists. There is also an explanation about what it means to be trans, with some simple, accurate definitions. I was pleased to see that the book is inclusive of nonbinary people. This book encourages kids to stand up for social justice. It sends the message that it is good to be yourself, and that it is important to stand up for marginalised people. It also includes the message that found family is important, which will be comforting for young trans people to see, as they are often at high risk of being rejected by their biological families. This is a really positive, inclusive book that will help kids to understand trans people and learn about trans women of colour who are central to the LGBTQ+ community but often ignored.

  17. 4 out of 5

    April Gray

    There are a lot of things I liked about this book, with Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera being women who should be celebrated and respected as the main reason. However.... while the author acknowledges that this story is a version of what may have happened the first night of the Stonewall uprising, this version includes some of the less accepted possibilities of events. An afterword explaining other reported versions, including Marsha's, which contradicts some of this version, would be in ord There are a lot of things I liked about this book, with Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera being women who should be celebrated and respected as the main reason. However.... while the author acknowledges that this story is a version of what may have happened the first night of the Stonewall uprising, this version includes some of the less accepted possibilities of events. An afterword explaining other reported versions, including Marsha's, which contradicts some of this version, would be in order. I understand downplaying the two doing sex work and using drugs, as that isn't age appropriate, but their poverty, homelessness, and struggle feels glossed over. I get that this book centers on Marsha and Sylvia's friendship and their founding of STAR, but Stormé DeLarverie should have been mentioned more than just being included in an illustration. The glossary at the back doesn't relate very much to the story, but I did find its inclusion helpful. The activities at the back are unnecessary, but the resources listed are wonderful. I feel like the author's heart is in the right place, but missed the chance to make a great book for kids about Marsha, Sylvia, and the Stonewall Uprising, and made an okay book instead. #SylviaandMarshaStartaRevolution #NetGalley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    This book is a short read, it's aimed at young children to introduce them to these well-known people in the transgender community, The illustrations are full of character and are charming. There isn't a lot of text which is great for young readers. But there is a couple of pages of text for older readers, explaining in a few more details the story behind this piece of history. There is also a glossary of the terms used that people may not be familiar with. I really like that there are discussions This book is a short read, it's aimed at young children to introduce them to these well-known people in the transgender community, The illustrations are full of character and are charming. There isn't a lot of text which is great for young readers. But there is a couple of pages of text for older readers, explaining in a few more details the story behind this piece of history. There is also a glossary of the terms used that people may not be familiar with. I really like that there are discussions questions for adults to discuss with the child. It will really help them to understand what the book is about. There are also further resources that you can look at with your child and also more books for you to read. At the end, there are two activities, one to make a protest sign with your child, and another to make a flower crown like Marsha. I think these are really great additions to the book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amie

    Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution! is a watered down introduction to the Stonewall Rebellion within the LGBTQI+ community. It contains a quick picture book followed by talking point resources at the back. It would make a good starting point in learning about this important time in US history, but a proper discussion would need much more of a resource. I am rating this a 2.5 because I feel like the book could have been so much MORE. It felt like fluff to me glossing over so many issues and prej Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution! is a watered down introduction to the Stonewall Rebellion within the LGBTQI+ community. It contains a quick picture book followed by talking point resources at the back. It would make a good starting point in learning about this important time in US history, but a proper discussion would need much more of a resource. I am rating this a 2.5 because I feel like the book could have been so much MORE. It felt like fluff to me glossing over so many issues and prejudices that Sylvia and Marsha (and the LGBTQI+ community had to endure / still are fighting against). Don't underestimate the ability for children to understand and empathize. They may not have the maturity to understand the more complex concepts, but can identify and understand perspectives. I think students would get more out of the back resources of the book, rather than the picture book. Advanced copy provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Paddy Pikala

    I will never cease to be amazed by how straightforwardly beautiful and real Children's books are nowadays. Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution! is the story of two transgender women of color who started the Stonewall Riots. As any book for children, it simplifies the story, and even though it doesn't show the violence those women had to face, it hints at the threat the police posed at the time. The illustrations are sweet and the style is very clear. This book isn't only a story for children, i I will never cease to be amazed by how straightforwardly beautiful and real Children's books are nowadays. Sylvia and Marsha Start a Revolution! is the story of two transgender women of color who started the Stonewall Riots. As any book for children, it simplifies the story, and even though it doesn't show the violence those women had to face, it hints at the threat the police posed at the time. The illustrations are sweet and the style is very clear. This book isn't only a story for children, it's also a resource for parents and educators that includes explanations and activity suggestions. The text for older readers makes it easier for adults to explain what the book is about without doing any additional research. There are also discussion questions for groups. A fair warning, this book might help you raise a politically conscious child.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Donna Maguire

    Review to be added to Amazon UK and US on 19th November 2020 - publication day! I loved this book!! I thought that this book was great and it is a brilliant introduction to Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson - brilliant people who started a revolution - the book is a great way to encourage children to want to know more about these fabulous and inspirational characters! They were leading characters in the transgender community and the book is a great way to explain more about this to younger childr Review to be added to Amazon UK and US on 19th November 2020 - publication day! I loved this book!! I thought that this book was great and it is a brilliant introduction to Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson - brilliant people who started a revolution - the book is a great way to encourage children to want to know more about these fabulous and inspirational characters! They were leading characters in the transgender community and the book is a great way to explain more about this to younger children. The images in the book really sited the story and brought it to lie for me - It is 5 stars from me for this one, very highly recommended!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    *I received this book from NetGalley in return for a honest review* This is a fun, colourful, and important book to help introduce kids to the Stonewall Riots in an age appropriate way and to the great people of Sylvia and Marsha. The text of this book is simple and while some of the harshness of the real Stonewall Riots is glossed over since the book is a picture book that isn't a bad thing. The most important parts are there. I think this book really shines in the additional information at the ba *I received this book from NetGalley in return for a honest review* This is a fun, colourful, and important book to help introduce kids to the Stonewall Riots in an age appropriate way and to the great people of Sylvia and Marsha. The text of this book is simple and while some of the harshness of the real Stonewall Riots is glossed over since the book is a picture book that isn't a bad thing. The most important parts are there. I think this book really shines in the additional information at the back where there is more information on the Stonewall Riots, how LGBTQ+ rights have changed and grown because of Sylvia and Marsha, as well as discussion questions, activities, and more.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    This is an excellent book for younger children! It's a great way to introduce children to trans people, LGBT+ history and making the world a better place. It would be great for trans children, and for other children whether they know a trans person or not. There were lots of useful resources at the end of the book: discussion questions for parents and teachers, websites for further reading, clear definitions of key words and even craft activities. I highly recommend this book to families and teach This is an excellent book for younger children! It's a great way to introduce children to trans people, LGBT+ history and making the world a better place. It would be great for trans children, and for other children whether they know a trans person or not. There were lots of useful resources at the end of the book: discussion questions for parents and teachers, websites for further reading, clear definitions of key words and even craft activities. I highly recommend this book to families and teachers of primary school aged children. [Free ARC from NetGalley]

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennie Seaman

    I loved this! Such a fun little introduction for little ones about the Stonewall Protests. It was nice to have an introduction to them in a way that spoke to how important they were but didn't include all the violence. It's so important to introduce little ones to the important bits from the past. Especially since so much of it is skipped in history books. *eARC provided in exchange for an honest review* I loved this! Such a fun little introduction for little ones about the Stonewall Protests. It was nice to have an introduction to them in a way that spoke to how important they were but didn't include all the violence. It's so important to introduce little ones to the important bits from the past. Especially since so much of it is skipped in history books. *eARC provided in exchange for an honest review*

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andi

    Easy-level book. Mini biography of to of the foundational women of the LGBTQ civil rights movement: Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera. As well as a story about their role in the Stonewall Riots in 1969. **I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jeimy

    Whether or not Sylvia Rivera was actually at the Stonewall Inn that night is almost irrelevant when one thinks of how Marsha P. Johnson and her founded STAR to give a voice and a home to trans youth. Their legacy and advocacy is honored in this fantastic picture book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    sierra

    This book is amazing. I love that it's as kid friendly as possible without dumbing anything down. I learned new things while reading this. I love that the author included fun activities as well as other resources. This book is amazing. I love that it's as kid friendly as possible without dumbing anything down. I learned new things while reading this. I love that the author included fun activities as well as other resources.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    Beautiful illustrations and visual representations of Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson. I wish that there were books like this when I was a child, but I am so grateful that books like these exist for the current children of the world and also forevermore for future generations to come.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Hardy

    I love it! Its a cute picture book with a really positive, but not whitewashed, message about our history and the start of the queer rights movement. It's definitely written in an accessable way, kid friendly, but not dumbed down. I love it! Its a cute picture book with a really positive, but not whitewashed, message about our history and the start of the queer rights movement. It's definitely written in an accessable way, kid friendly, but not dumbed down.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

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