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The New Parisienne: The Women & Ideas Shaping Paris

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In a follow-up to the popular The New Paris, Lindsey Tramuta explores the impact that the women of Paris have had on the rapidly evolving culture of their city   The New Parisienne focuses on one of the city’s most prominent features, its women. Lifting the veil on the mythologized Parisian woman—white, lithe, ever fashionable—Lindsey Tramuta demystifies this oversimplified In a follow-up to the popular The New Paris, Lindsey Tramuta explores the impact that the women of Paris have had on the rapidly evolving culture of their city   The New Parisienne focuses on one of the city’s most prominent features, its women. Lifting the veil on the mythologized Parisian woman—white, lithe, ever fashionable—Lindsey Tramuta demystifies this oversimplified archetype and recasts the women of Paris as they truly are, in all their complexity. Featuring 50 activists, creators, educators, visionaries, and disruptors—like Leïla Slimani, Lauren Bastide, and Mayor Anne Hidalgo—the book reveals Paris as a blossoming cultural center of feminine power. Both the featured women and Tramuta herself offer up favorite destinations and women-owned businesses, including beloved shops, artistic venues, bistros, and more. The New Parisienne showcases “Parisianness” in all its multiplicity, highlighting those who are bucking tradition, making names for themselves, and transforming the city.  


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In a follow-up to the popular The New Paris, Lindsey Tramuta explores the impact that the women of Paris have had on the rapidly evolving culture of their city   The New Parisienne focuses on one of the city’s most prominent features, its women. Lifting the veil on the mythologized Parisian woman—white, lithe, ever fashionable—Lindsey Tramuta demystifies this oversimplified In a follow-up to the popular The New Paris, Lindsey Tramuta explores the impact that the women of Paris have had on the rapidly evolving culture of their city   The New Parisienne focuses on one of the city’s most prominent features, its women. Lifting the veil on the mythologized Parisian woman—white, lithe, ever fashionable—Lindsey Tramuta demystifies this oversimplified archetype and recasts the women of Paris as they truly are, in all their complexity. Featuring 50 activists, creators, educators, visionaries, and disruptors—like Leïla Slimani, Lauren Bastide, and Mayor Anne Hidalgo—the book reveals Paris as a blossoming cultural center of feminine power. Both the featured women and Tramuta herself offer up favorite destinations and women-owned businesses, including beloved shops, artistic venues, bistros, and more. The New Parisienne showcases “Parisianness” in all its multiplicity, highlighting those who are bucking tradition, making names for themselves, and transforming the city.  

30 review for The New Parisienne: The Women & Ideas Shaping Paris

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    A thoughtful and informative examination of a diverse cross-section of women from virtually all racial, gender identity, and economic backgrounds—definitively debunking the sexist notions of what "all" Parisian women are like. (The photos and art direction are mesmerizing, too. You want this book on your coffee table—but unlike most coffee table books, you should read this one cover to cover.) A thoughtful and informative examination of a diverse cross-section of women from virtually all racial, gender identity, and economic backgrounds—definitively debunking the sexist notions of what "all" Parisian women are like. (The photos and art direction are mesmerizing, too. You want this book on your coffee table—but unlike most coffee table books, you should read this one cover to cover.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Janet Skeslien Charles

    I was drawn in by the beautiful line, "A lot happened in the nine months following the release of my first book, The New Paris. Writing a book can change a person, but so can the exchanges that emerge from its existence in the world." So true! The book is a primer about life in Paris and the challenges that many women face; an insider guidebook; and interviews with amazing women who are making the city better and more interesting, one action, one thought, one sentence at a time. I finished the bo I was drawn in by the beautiful line, "A lot happened in the nine months following the release of my first book, The New Paris. Writing a book can change a person, but so can the exchanges that emerge from its existence in the world." So true! The book is a primer about life in Paris and the challenges that many women face; an insider guidebook; and interviews with amazing women who are making the city better and more interesting, one action, one thought, one sentence at a time. I finished the book wishing I could meet the Parisiennes over coffee. The New Parisienne is a way to travel and enjoy Paris now, even if we can't travel.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shana

    Lindsey's second book "The New Parisienne" is beautifully crafted from the building blocks of her first book "The New Paris". With each profile, Lindsey reconstructs a more complete view of "La Parisienne" and touches on issues that many in France fail to recognize. Each profile is as engaging as the next and is complimented with captivating photos by Joann Pai, providing a portrait of a true Paris. It has been an absolute joy to read and dismantle the myth of "La Parisienne" who has for generat Lindsey's second book "The New Parisienne" is beautifully crafted from the building blocks of her first book "The New Paris". With each profile, Lindsey reconstructs a more complete view of "La Parisienne" and touches on issues that many in France fail to recognize. Each profile is as engaging as the next and is complimented with captivating photos by Joann Pai, providing a portrait of a true Paris. It has been an absolute joy to read and dismantle the myth of "La Parisienne" who has for generations been marketed to the public as a mystical being.

  4. 5 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

    As a woman of color, I feel like I've been waiting for a book like this that represents so many different, individual women. I loved the authors' previous book, so I knew I wanted to read this. The Paris that I know and love is a vibrant, diverse, multicultural city. It's discernible everywhere you go. I quickly learned, years ago, that Paris is a city that attracts and is loved by people of all walks of life and that there is truly something for everyone. It's one of the many reasons I feel at As a woman of color, I feel like I've been waiting for a book like this that represents so many different, individual women. I loved the authors' previous book, so I knew I wanted to read this. The Paris that I know and love is a vibrant, diverse, multicultural city. It's discernible everywhere you go. I quickly learned, years ago, that Paris is a city that attracts and is loved by people of all walks of life and that there is truly something for everyone. It's one of the many reasons I feel at home in Paris. I truly loved reading about each of the inspiring women included in this book, and there were many special moments that I particularly found powerful, true and thoughtfully said or written. I felt inspired and rejuvenated, seen and understood by this book, and that's the highest compliment I can give. Warmly recommended. "I see the Parisienne as any woman who considers Paris her home. And that’s one thing I love about the city—it can adopt you." — Heidi Evans

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

    Loved all of the stories in this book. Lindsey takes the archetype of the Parisian woman (thin, white, brunette, "effortless") and turns it upside down with pages of real women who show a completely different side of what it means to live & work in, and contribute to the city. I finished the book inspired by their stories and also looking forward to trying some of their recommendations when things reopen again. Loved all of the stories in this book. Lindsey takes the archetype of the Parisian woman (thin, white, brunette, "effortless") and turns it upside down with pages of real women who show a completely different side of what it means to live & work in, and contribute to the city. I finished the book inspired by their stories and also looking forward to trying some of their recommendations when things reopen again.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bethany R. Rains

    So glad I found The New Parisienne. Not gonna lie, my style (and approach to beauty) has been deeply shaped by Birkin, de la Falaise, and de Maigret... but as I’ve gotten more woke, I’ve come to realize that the French myth, the Parisienne, is oppressive. It is to embrace being both Odette and Odile, but to reject being one’s self. I’ve been reading interviews of Gabrielle Deydier (wish her book was out in English or Spanish so I could read it!), of Muslim women who are disdained for choosing to So glad I found The New Parisienne. Not gonna lie, my style (and approach to beauty) has been deeply shaped by Birkin, de la Falaise, and de Maigret... but as I’ve gotten more woke, I’ve come to realize that the French myth, the Parisienne, is oppressive. It is to embrace being both Odette and Odile, but to reject being one’s self. I’ve been reading interviews of Gabrielle Deydier (wish her book was out in English or Spanish so I could read it!), of Muslim women who are disdained for choosing to cover their hair, and of women like Nelly Buff who are challenging racism. This book is another step in my woke process, another step toward dismantling the white, patriarchal system that has laid siege to my psyche.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Comte de Saint-Germain

    TL,DR: "The New Parisienne" should be mandatory reading for Americans before being allowed to talk about Parisiennes... but also for Parisian teens of all genders before making career choices. --- A few months ago, I picked up Lindsey Tramuta's "The New Parisienne", a surprisingly sturdy and sharp-corned tome at The Red Wheelbarrow bookstore, opposite Jardin du Luxembourg in Paris. Then long Covid happened, as well as all kinds of weird transdimensional travel, so other books had to take priority. TL,DR: "The New Parisienne" should be mandatory reading for Americans before being allowed to talk about Parisiennes... but also for Parisian teens of all genders before making career choices. --- A few months ago, I picked up Lindsey Tramuta's "The New Parisienne", a surprisingly sturdy and sharp-corned tome at The Red Wheelbarrow bookstore, opposite Jardin du Luxembourg in Paris. Then long Covid happened, as well as all kinds of weird transdimensional travel, so other books had to take priority. A few days ago, I finally opened it, and was instantly absorbed by this series of portraits of women in today’s Paris, from high-profile personalities like polymath Rokhaya Diallo or mayor Anne Hidalgo, to relative unknowns with fascinating corporate careers like aeronautical engineer Delphine Dijoud. Tramuta does a great job at deconstructing Parisienne stereotypes, though fair warning, there are more entrepreneurs and small-business owners featured than say, cleaning persons, sex workers or union organizers. The chapters are sometimes descriptive, but mostly in interview format, with smart questions that go beyond biographical details, and make the interviewees take a stand on very current issues facing women and French society. Each profile ends with the person’s Parisian recommendations, from women-owned businesses to locations for week-end strolls. Again, it was nice to not only see hipster shops but also good ol’ walks on the river banks. I am so happy that this book will soon be translated into French. The opening chapter is a sort of primer on French hot topics, written from a very valid but also very American point of view, so will probably need some tweaking for a francophone audience. But the rest is directly applicable as is, so if you’re French and can read English go for it! Once translated, this book’s combination of honesty about challenges and positivity about outcomes can really inspire other young Parisiennes, empower them to take risks, grow to their full potential... and maybe get featured in the next edition!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Rubinsky

    An absolute MUST read for any person who loves Paris and is interested in understanding how their culture is evolving. This book is definitely more “coffee table” style; but is so worth it. I enjoyed reading a handful of essays every morning with my coffee, imagining I was there.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lulu

    An interesting collection of interviews with a diverse group of Parisiennes.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Niamh

    The central thesis of 'The New Parisienne' is simple. In our minds, we view a 'Parisienne' - a woman from Paris - as white, heterosexual, thin, able-bodied, middle-to-upper class and effortless. She is simultaneously a contradiction and something we should be aspiring to. Type 'Parisienne' into Pinterest and you'll endless pictures of the same woman. Lindsey Tramuta attempts to change the narrative with this book by interviewing a huge variety of women in every industry imaginable - from cuisine The central thesis of 'The New Parisienne' is simple. In our minds, we view a 'Parisienne' - a woman from Paris - as white, heterosexual, thin, able-bodied, middle-to-upper class and effortless. She is simultaneously a contradiction and something we should be aspiring to. Type 'Parisienne' into Pinterest and you'll endless pictures of the same woman. Lindsey Tramuta attempts to change the narrative with this book by interviewing a huge variety of women in every industry imaginable - from cuisine to film to engineering to politics. It's essentially a compilation of women who are changing Paris from the inside and changing how the world views women of Paris. Something I really did appreciate was Tramuta explicitly including women from all walks of life - women of colour, immigrant women, LGBTQIA+ women - they were all included in this examination of the new Parisienne. I did enjoy reading this book, but I struggle to work out why it's a book? I suspect that in its hard copy (I read this via audio) where there are photos and you can dip in and out and read different interviews it hits a bit differently, but there was just something missing from the book. But, it's not unenjoyable. I think it's one I'd like to have savoured, however, over a long period of time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Fay

    Another fascinating look under the hood of what makes Paris work. It is impossible to predict what the future Paris will look like, but it is a safe bet it will be better in many ways and the women portrayed here will play a big role in that. Again, the myth of Paris and Parisian women is far less interesting than the complicated and diverse reality. The wide array of viewpoints and the range of areas in which these women are working has me thinking differently about the future of NY and other c Another fascinating look under the hood of what makes Paris work. It is impossible to predict what the future Paris will look like, but it is a safe bet it will be better in many ways and the women portrayed here will play a big role in that. Again, the myth of Paris and Parisian women is far less interesting than the complicated and diverse reality. The wide array of viewpoints and the range of areas in which these women are working has me thinking differently about the future of NY and other cities as well.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joyce Adams

    A delightful examination of women from various, cultures, colors in today's Paris. The author's purpose as she identified it was to re-cast the image of Parisienne women and focus on the movers and shakers of today. This is skillfully done with personal interviews with over 20 women who reside in Paris community. I especially enjoyed the beautiful photography as well as the "Paris Guide" and recommendations from each of the women interviewed and their recommendations of women owned businesses to A delightful examination of women from various, cultures, colors in today's Paris. The author's purpose as she identified it was to re-cast the image of Parisienne women and focus on the movers and shakers of today. This is skillfully done with personal interviews with over 20 women who reside in Paris community. I especially enjoyed the beautiful photography as well as the "Paris Guide" and recommendations from each of the women interviewed and their recommendations of women owned businesses to support. Some new ideas of places to visit on my next trip to Paris! Je t'aime Paris!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Yurkewich Hoffmann

    I loved this book. The imagery is beautiful, and it is full of inspiring stories and thought-provoking ideas about life in Paris and French culture. The interviews have been carefully selected and opened my mind to new opportunities and perspectives, and the questions are very thoughtful. I like that each gives a glimpse into their Parisienne life, with tips on neighborhoods and things to do.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carly Simo

    Inspiring read of (just some of the many!) incredible women who make up the modern fabric of Paris. Luminous photography compliments glowing interviews. Excellent writing on intelligent, passionate women with beautiful imagery catching Paris at its finest. Engaging and motivating. Love the list of to-visit spots included from the interviewees too. Enjoy the read all over again for me!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy

    This is the second book I’ve read by this author and I loved it. I’ve read a lot of books about women lately - the women of New York, Gutsy Women, Culottes (adorable), and now this one. Same types of stories about great women doing great things, but also ‘regular’ women doing ‘regular’ things. It’s inspiring, well-researched and contemporaneous. The best part is the wide range of diverse women that the author profiles. Well done.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Henley

    This book is way more than it might look from first glance. While it might look like a book-version of some kind of “Humans of Paris- The Women Edition,” it is a very well cultivated set of interviews and stories that makes a very real and necessary point that Paris is so incredibly multicultural. And all cities are so much more than a kitschy stereotype. Traumata will do a better job weaving this story than I, and I’d recommend this for those who aren’t even particularly Paris-oriented. But, th This book is way more than it might look from first glance. While it might look like a book-version of some kind of “Humans of Paris- The Women Edition,” it is a very well cultivated set of interviews and stories that makes a very real and necessary point that Paris is so incredibly multicultural. And all cities are so much more than a kitschy stereotype. Traumata will do a better job weaving this story than I, and I’d recommend this for those who aren’t even particularly Paris-oriented. But, that being said, can we do a Prague version??

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erika Hope Spencer

    Lindsey Tramuta is a natural storyteller with an energetic and fluid writing style. Extremely enjoyable to read. Actually, I listened to this as an audiobook. Tramuta herself was the narrator and spoke with genuine enthusiasm and heart about each one of these impressive women. To start with Tramuta offers a succinct and illuminating cultural primer, that was helpful if you aren't French (she explains concepts like laïcité for example). She faults the media for perpetuating the (various) myths of Lindsey Tramuta is a natural storyteller with an energetic and fluid writing style. Extremely enjoyable to read. Actually, I listened to this as an audiobook. Tramuta herself was the narrator and spoke with genuine enthusiasm and heart about each one of these impressive women. To start with Tramuta offers a succinct and illuminating cultural primer, that was helpful if you aren't French (she explains concepts like laïcité for example). She faults the media for perpetuating the (various) myths of Paris, talks about stereotypes of the thin white Parisienne and about how often we conflate Paris and France. Her book challenges these archetypes and presents a more realistic and honest representation of what Parisiennes are really like today. She talks a little about societal shifts and how Paris is evolving but then she steps aside and listens, (and writes) about these 35 or 40 women in Paris and what their stories are. I found them all incredibly impressive and compelling. There were a few high profile women are known internationally, especially if you have any ties to France. Rokhaya Diallo the dynamic journalist, filmmaker and anti-racist activist; Lauren Bastide another well-known and provocative journalist who has a popular podcaste; and the first female mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo. I was really interested in learning a little more about them-in their own words. But, honestly, I found all the bios really compelling. I can't really imagine anyone reading this and not being riveted by the stories of all these women with such different experiences and all taking charge of their lives. It was inspiring and eye opening. I ended up buying the book because I was curious to see photos of all the places they talk about and the women themselves. The photography was beautiful incidentally (Joann Pai). I also liked how each interviewee mentioned which arrondissement was their favorite. It added to my understanding of how Paris is layed out-even though I'm pretty familiar with it. It was just a nice touch. Tramuta must have spent so much time researching each of these women and asking the kinds of questions that would draw out their passions and their stories. She seemed to be equally interested in each person she was talking to and painted a full picture of them in relatively few words. This book is a good reminder for us to listen to each other, and to do the emotional work to open up your own mind (even if that can be uncomfortable). Sensitive topics are addressed with kindness and candor. One in particular that I remember was her interview with the lawyer and disability-rights activist Elisa Rojas. I have always noticed a definite lack of access to buildings in France, but that was just the first layer of what she talked about. More frustrating to Rojas was how condescending people can be when talking about handicapped people..."despite their handicap" kind of writing that she found irritating and insulting. That was something that made a lot of sense but I hadn't really noticed before. Sarah Zouak was another really fascinating bio as she talks about the experiences of Muslim women and the feminist movement in France. The fact is, if we don't listen to different people's experiences in life we walk around in ignorance-like fools. This book was a look into all these different people's lives, really inspiring people who are sharing themselves in hopes that they are seen and heard. I don't want this review to sound sappy, but there is no other way to really explain it. One thing that was a tiny bit problematic for me was the decision to include the shout-outs to businesses. That is how I will phrase it. I guess it is travel advice (and on some level it is cool to know where everyone gets their food or reads) but it sat a little funny with me when reading about serious issues of racism or homophobia and about the culture of consumption and evils of capitalism but then each bio has essentially an advertisement. HOWEVER, people need to make money, the businesses that are mentioned are all female-owned and this is just how our economy functions. She wants to highlight these women and help them publicize what they are doing, whether it is making jewelry, running a family justice center, or just making a living in a conscientious way. Point is, we should support the people who live their lives in an ethical way whatever they happen to be doing. The only person who really talked about ethics and consumerism was Mihaela Iordache, a coffee roaster. And she only really alluded to it. I liked the way Moko Hirayama (a baker) was able to raise her kids while running her family business. I liked how she mixed her family and her livelihood. So, yeah, these are places I would like to support even if I do think as a global society we are too consumerist. I liked how a lot of the women interviewed had a favorite place that was a library or a park where they would walk or read. That is one thing I hope never changes about Parisiennes. Other interesting bios that stood out to me were Heidi Evans who created a Paris tour about famous women in Paris-just a cool idea; Sarah Sauquet who created an app that encourages reading. I was also inspired to read Leïla Slimani's novel Adèle (I was mesmerized). But honestly every single woman is pretty amazing, I just remember the ones whose focus happens to fall more in line with my world of reading or French history. But I think the takeaway from this is actually to get AWAY from that habit of living in your own world and listen to other people-many of whom are marginalized, discriminated against and just flat out misunderstood. So, it looks like a pretty coffee table book but is full of these really controversial and urgent topics sort of hidden in plain sight. It is a really well put together book and I'm very grateful that Tramuta put so much energy into pulling it off and that these women took time to share what they are about. I hope it inspires everyone or at least encourages them to look around at people with more interest, empathy and respect.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cédric Morel

    The New Parisienne revisits the traditional cliché of the Parisienne while getting the reader to meet inspiring women from very diverse backgrounds.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gilmore Book Club - Kristine Eckart

    A great way to learn about women shaping Paris and get ideas for places to go and things to do on your next trip to Paris!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ann Mah

    A celebration of women in Paris portrayed through the insightful lens of a long-time resident. A wonderful gift for the Francophile in your life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This beautifully designed book, makes clear that the popular, and somewhat stereotyped, view of a Parisian woman is but one of the many varied and nuanced stories unfolding today in the city of lights. From interesting origin stories and impactful contributions to daily routines and Paris favorites, the stories shared in this book are delightful and diverse.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leena

  23. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Jonik

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy Clarke

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

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