hits counter I'll Be Seeing You: A Memoir - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

I'll Be Seeing You: A Memoir

Availability: Ready to download

The beloved New York Times bestselling author tells the moving love story of caring for her parents in their final years in this beautifully written memoir. Elizabeth Berg's father was an Army veteran who was a tough man in every way but one: He showed a great deal of love and tenderness to his wife. Berg describes her parents' marriage as a romance that lasted for nearly s The beloved New York Times bestselling author tells the moving love story of caring for her parents in their final years in this beautifully written memoir. Elizabeth Berg's father was an Army veteran who was a tough man in every way but one: He showed a great deal of love and tenderness to his wife. Berg describes her parents' marriage as a romance that lasted for nearly seventy years; she grew up watching her father kiss her mother upon leaving home, and kiss her again the instant he came back. His idea of when he should spend time away from her was never. But then her father developed Alzheimer's disease, and her parents were forced to leave the home they loved and move into a facility that could offer them help. It was time for their children to offer practical advice, emotional support, and direction, to the best of their ability--to, in effect, parent the people who had for so long parented them. It was a hard transition, mitigated at least by flashes of humor and joy. But the mix of emotions on everyone's part could make every day feel like walking through a minefield. Then came redemption. I'll Be Seeing You charts the passage from the anguish of loss to the understanding that even in the most fractious times, love can heal, transform, and lead to graceful--and grateful--acceptance.


Compare

The beloved New York Times bestselling author tells the moving love story of caring for her parents in their final years in this beautifully written memoir. Elizabeth Berg's father was an Army veteran who was a tough man in every way but one: He showed a great deal of love and tenderness to his wife. Berg describes her parents' marriage as a romance that lasted for nearly s The beloved New York Times bestselling author tells the moving love story of caring for her parents in their final years in this beautifully written memoir. Elizabeth Berg's father was an Army veteran who was a tough man in every way but one: He showed a great deal of love and tenderness to his wife. Berg describes her parents' marriage as a romance that lasted for nearly seventy years; she grew up watching her father kiss her mother upon leaving home, and kiss her again the instant he came back. His idea of when he should spend time away from her was never. But then her father developed Alzheimer's disease, and her parents were forced to leave the home they loved and move into a facility that could offer them help. It was time for their children to offer practical advice, emotional support, and direction, to the best of their ability--to, in effect, parent the people who had for so long parented them. It was a hard transition, mitigated at least by flashes of humor and joy. But the mix of emotions on everyone's part could make every day feel like walking through a minefield. Then came redemption. I'll Be Seeing You charts the passage from the anguish of loss to the understanding that even in the most fractious times, love can heal, transform, and lead to graceful--and grateful--acceptance.

30 review for I'll Be Seeing You: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cheri

    4.5 Stars In the Prologue, the author - Elizabeth Berg - begins by saying that she is seventy years old, and is as astonished by this truth, as astonished as if she had just written ’I am a peacock.’ It made me laugh, and made me think not only of my own added up years, but how thoroughly true that has felt every year as my birthday rolled around - the difference being when we’re very young that we anxiously await being old enough to think we will be able to make our own decisions without critici 4.5 Stars In the Prologue, the author - Elizabeth Berg - begins by saying that she is seventy years old, and is as astonished by this truth, as astonished as if she had just written ’I am a peacock.’ It made me laugh, and made me think not only of my own added up years, but how thoroughly true that has felt every year as my birthday rolled around - the difference being when we’re very young that we anxiously await being old enough to think we will be able to make our own decisions without criticism from parents or teachers or even just ‘others.’ Then she adds a memory of passing a pair of two old ladies and heard one say ”I still feel like a girl inside.” This memoir shares her frustrations, fears, doubts and experiences as her parents declined, the anger that occasionally flared from parent to child, from parent to parent, and grown child to child-like parent. The emotions that follow watching parents decline, the slow acceptance of the new “normal” which will only be replaced too soon with more decline. And more, you see with a new appreciation those moments when they share moments you never knew about before, feelings you were never privy to before, and as your appreciation and understanding grow, so does your desire to continue to know more, to bear witness to it, along with an acceptance of what is to come. While the way there is occasionally humorous, there is plenty of anger, sorrow and frustration along the way. I appreciated all of her story, their story, it felt so honest and was shared with so much love. Published: 27 Oct 2020 Many thanks for the ARC provided by Random House Publishing Group / Random House

  2. 4 out of 5

    ☮Karen

    4.5 stars There's a line in here about how your parents took care of you when you were a baby so eventually it becomes your turn to take care of them. Only it's not the same because babys' butts are cute. This book is a diary of Elizabeth's parents' decline. During the months covered, her mom is 88 and her dad 90. They live in Minnesota near E.B.'s sister; E.B. lives in Chicago. They are to the point where they no longer can manage on their own so they'll be moved to an apartment building for seni 4.5 stars There's a line in here about how your parents took care of you when you were a baby so eventually it becomes your turn to take care of them. Only it's not the same because babys' butts are cute. This book is a diary of Elizabeth's parents' decline. During the months covered, her mom is 88 and her dad 90. They live in Minnesota near E.B.'s sister; E.B. lives in Chicago. They are to the point where they no longer can manage on their own so they'll be moved to an apartment building for seniors. The dad will be diagnosed with dementia and then Alzheimer's; the mom will become bitter over having to leave her home of 40 years and not fully understanding what the future holds for her. The mom's attitude was so similar to how my mother-in-law was with her husband's diagnosis, it felt like reliving those times again. E.B.'s interactions with her family will teach her many valuable lessons of love and understanding, but before it gets to that point, she experiences her own guilt, anger, confusion, and bitterness. These are times most of us will endure as our parents age, and again as we ourselves age. In the end it's about family and love, something everyone should be able to identify with. I love how expressively Elizabeth Berg writes, and here she lays out her own feelings and thoughts. It's not all pretty but she wants us to learn from her experiences, from her mistakes. Very touching. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Karen R

    This book hit close to home as I have experienced my parents’ descent into Alzheimers and ultimate death (3 years apart). Berg’s insightful comments touched my heart, reminded me of bittersweet memories. A heartbreaking memoir, beautiful and relatable.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    This is Elizabeth Berg’s first memoir. It is a love story to her parents as she bears witness to their final years. (So there’s a 100% guarantee of heartbreak.) Yet, she spins language so gracefully. You sink in to her words, nodding along to passages, with such knowing. This must have been incredibly difficult to write. But I’m betting there’s a legion of folks who are happy she did.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

    A touching story about the author as a caregiver to her aging parents. She presented a very healthy and loving perspective. I appreciated her love and understanding of the situation. Thank you NetGalley for the ARC.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Pole

    I'll Be Seeing You by Elizabeth Berg is a memoir chronicling the author's continued love and devotion to her parents as they age. When her father is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, Elizabeth sees the strain that this new reality places on her eighty-eight year old mother, and the difficult decision to sell the house that her parents have shared for over forty-five years is made. During the transition, there are frustrations and tears, but also happy memories, and a renewed and fierce love th I'll Be Seeing You by Elizabeth Berg is a memoir chronicling the author's continued love and devotion to her parents as they age. When her father is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, Elizabeth sees the strain that this new reality places on her eighty-eight year old mother, and the difficult decision to sell the house that her parents have shared for over forty-five years is made. During the transition, there are frustrations and tears, but also happy memories, and a renewed and fierce love that will always be an anchor to one's parents. Throughout the process, Ms Berg also reflects on her own future as she ages. This is a heartfelt, honest, and deeply personal tribute that honours a relationship that is paramount in life, that of a child and parent. Many of the author's musings and observations will resonate quite deeply. Many thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group - Random House for this ARC.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Darla

    The creator of memorable characters like Arthur Truluv shares a time of struggle from her own life with us. Her parents have been married for nearly 70 years. For the past 45 years they have been in the same house. Now that her father is showing signs of dementia and both parents are nearing 90, it is time to move them into a place that will have some amenities; where they have access to transportation and can socialize with others their age. Berg documents the bittersweet struggle of making tha The creator of memorable characters like Arthur Truluv shares a time of struggle from her own life with us. Her parents have been married for nearly 70 years. For the past 45 years they have been in the same house. Now that her father is showing signs of dementia and both parents are nearing 90, it is time to move them into a place that will have some amenities; where they have access to transportation and can socialize with others their age. Berg documents the bittersweet struggle of making that final decision, making the move, deciding to sell the house, and all the other details that have to be taken care of. Along the way, there it tension and everyone gets frustrated. What Berg realizes is that expectations, realistic or not, are not being met for any of them. With some help and patience, things will get better. Berg's parents have much to teach all of us about what it takes to remain faithful and committed to that person who you vowed to love "for better or worse." I hope that in understanding more about my parents, even though--or perhaps because--they're gone, I'll learn lessons about faith and endurance and trust and forgiveness. About putting I aside for the sake of we. About how love circles back on itself over and over to create deeper definitions of itself. And I hope I'll learn the value of that hardest thing of all: seeing it through. Thank you to Random House and Edelweiss+ for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Toni

    Elizabeth Berg writes with unique wisdom and beauty. As she recounts her parents' lives during their last years, she ends each chapter with a sentence or two with a thought or adage I found so mindful of what her parents had experienced in their long lives, combined with where they were now, at 90 and 88 years old. I'm struggling to explain this profound, yet simple and beautiful book. I may need to come back and edit this first pass. Just know it's great! Elizabeth’s writing here reminds of Anne Elizabeth Berg writes with unique wisdom and beauty. As she recounts her parents' lives during their last years, she ends each chapter with a sentence or two with a thought or adage I found so mindful of what her parents had experienced in their long lives, combined with where they were now, at 90 and 88 years old. I'm struggling to explain this profound, yet simple and beautiful book. I may need to come back and edit this first pass. Just know it's great! Elizabeth’s writing here reminds of Anne Tyler, that simple but wondrous beauty.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Vickie

    If you are looking for a book to give you happy feelings, this one isn’t it. But it did leave me reflecting on my life, the legacy I will leave and what will happen to me as I get older. This is a memoir of Elizabeth Berg and her parents as they get too old to stay in a home by themselves and have to move to an adult living apartment that will give them activities to do and friends to make. Since Berg’s father was suffering from Alzheimer’s, he was barely aware of his environment, so the interac If you are looking for a book to give you happy feelings, this one isn’t it. But it did leave me reflecting on my life, the legacy I will leave and what will happen to me as I get older. This is a memoir of Elizabeth Berg and her parents as they get too old to stay in a home by themselves and have to move to an adult living apartment that will give them activities to do and friends to make. Since Berg’s father was suffering from Alzheimer’s, he was barely aware of his environment, so the interactions with him were bittersweet and sad. Berg’s mom, on the other hand, was angry about having to move because she was still mobile and able to take care of herself, but she has to leave their home in order to help take care of her husband. Berg explicitly describes how the changes in her parents’ lives affect everyone in the family. I can’t say that this was a book that I enjoyed reading since I am getting older myself. But it is one that the children of elderly parents should read in order to get ideas for how to deal with the attitudes, the angst and the changes that are coming. Disclaimer Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255, “Guides Concerning the Use of Testimonials and Endorsements in Advertising.”

  10. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    This memoir is about the author's aging parents and how her family copes with the changes that nearly all families must deal with: the realization that you can no longer cope with living alone, unassisted; the understanding of how a neurological condition can change a person and that they aren't doing something on purpose; and how children deal with their parents' failing. This deeply affected me. Three years ago, my mother died from Parkinson's Disease. And just 3 weeks ago my father died of a m This memoir is about the author's aging parents and how her family copes with the changes that nearly all families must deal with: the realization that you can no longer cope with living alone, unassisted; the understanding of how a neurological condition can change a person and that they aren't doing something on purpose; and how children deal with their parents' failing. This deeply affected me. Three years ago, my mother died from Parkinson's Disease. And just 3 weeks ago my father died of a myriad of diseases that overcame his 90-year old body. The book is beautifully written, but that's what I expect from Elizabeth Berg. It is brutally honest. I'm sure she needed time and perspective to write it as honestly as she did. And she took it, as most of these events happened nearly 10 years ago. One thing that really struck me was how we all get "stuck" in our own thinking. An example of this is that Berg's mother was annoyed with her husband's shuffling and would walk in front of him, much more quickly than he could and be exasperated with him for not keeping up. And Berg wanted her father to give her mother some space because she could see that her mother needed time to recharge a bit from being the caretaker. What Berg could not understand is her mother's attitude about the walking. At one point a medical professional tells Berg's mother that her husband simply cannot walk faster or without shuffling. Berg feels vindicated. But then Berg mentions the request to have her father not follow her mother around all the time, and she is kind of shocked when the medical professional tells Berg the same thing. "He can't." With my own parents I saw this dynamic play out. My father tried to care for my mother until it simply became too much. Later, he tried to live alone until there was an episode one night that proved to him that he could not. It's hard to face reality. I wonder if I will do the same when it is my turn. Berg understands the emotional struggle of giving up the home her parents lived in for 45 years. I am feeling that myself as the home I grew up in will be sold and I will have no physical tie to the town I grew up in, and dearly love. "You can't go home again" is becoming more and more real to me. This is a book that I will keep because I think it has lessons for me in it that I will more fully understand as time goes on.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Elizabeth Berg is one of my favorite authors and this touching and personal memoir helps to firmly cement her place as one. "I'll Be Seeing You" is a touching story of love, loss, and change. The author's writing is so honest and she holds nothing back, even when her frustrations with her elderly parents make her look less than ideal. Memories of her childhood and of the romantic nature of her parents' long marriage are intertwined with the present troubles of dealing with her father's continuin Elizabeth Berg is one of my favorite authors and this touching and personal memoir helps to firmly cement her place as one. "I'll Be Seeing You" is a touching story of love, loss, and change. The author's writing is so honest and she holds nothing back, even when her frustrations with her elderly parents make her look less than ideal. Memories of her childhood and of the romantic nature of her parents' long marriage are intertwined with the present troubles of dealing with her father's continuing mental decline and her mother's unhappiness, making this a truly rich reading experience. This book will hit close to home for anyone who is dealing with elderly parents or grandparents. It shows how difficult getting older can be, but also how we don't have to stop loving and caring for each other during those difficulties. Many thanks to NetGalley, the publisher, and the author for the privilege of reading an advanced digital copy of this beautiful book in exchange for my honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Barb Martin

    I overly identified with Elizabeth Berg's memoir, "I'll Be Seeing You," which chronicles her father's decline into dementia and her mother's descent into crabbiness as they prepared to leave their home of 45-plus years and to move into an assisted-living facility. My parents died earlier this year. Mom in March. Dad in May. Before they died, my parents mirrored Berg's to a certain extent. My father was essentially immobile and dealing with dementia. Mom still thought it was her job to take care of I overly identified with Elizabeth Berg's memoir, "I'll Be Seeing You," which chronicles her father's decline into dementia and her mother's descent into crabbiness as they prepared to leave their home of 45-plus years and to move into an assisted-living facility. My parents died earlier this year. Mom in March. Dad in May. Before they died, my parents mirrored Berg's to a certain extent. My father was essentially immobile and dealing with dementia. Mom still thought it was her job to take care of him despite her own frail health. By all accounts, she was pretty crabby, too. I live hours away, so their care was left to my many siblings. Disputes over what was best for my parents led to irreparable factions among the siblings. The family isn't going to heal. So, anyway, I identified with Berg entirely too much as she chronicled the decisions, arguments and visits that led to moving her parents into a facility. I'm not one for memoirs, but this one obviously spoke to me.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Leeann

    Wow. Kudos, Elizabeth Berg, on a really fine book. Sometimes a book just comes along at the right time and it resonates so deeply. That happened with me while reading "I'll Be Seeing You." Elizabeth and her sister's experiences with her parents parallel in many, many ways what is happening with my family circle right now. It was incredibly helpful to read about the feelings that she and her sister were having, her take on each of her parents' emotions, trials and responses. I will absolutely be Wow. Kudos, Elizabeth Berg, on a really fine book. Sometimes a book just comes along at the right time and it resonates so deeply. That happened with me while reading "I'll Be Seeing You." Elizabeth and her sister's experiences with her parents parallel in many, many ways what is happening with my family circle right now. It was incredibly helpful to read about the feelings that she and her sister were having, her take on each of her parents' emotions, trials and responses. I will absolutely be sending a copy of this book to my sisters-in-law. I think the men might be too close to see it/read about it but it will help us to help them talk it through and navigate it.. and sooner or later we will be doing the same. My deepest thanks to Ms Berg for writing this book. It is indeed helpful to others. This has been the most impactful book I have read in 2020 and I will be actively recommending it! Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is a poignant memoir about the changing relationships between the author and her parents as they all grow older and move into new phases and stages of life.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Quite a few years ago I picked up a copy of Open House by Elizabeth Berg. It just so happened it came out at almost exactly the same time I was in a similar situation as Sam, the main character. Her voice was like reading my own story right in front of me, and I was smitten from those first few pages; her story was mine. From that time I have read nearly every word Elizabeth Berg has written, including her current Facebook posts. She speaks to me, through me in her writings. In this latest story, Quite a few years ago I picked up a copy of Open House by Elizabeth Berg. It just so happened it came out at almost exactly the same time I was in a similar situation as Sam, the main character. Her voice was like reading my own story right in front of me, and I was smitten from those first few pages; her story was mine. From that time I have read nearly every word Elizabeth Berg has written, including her current Facebook posts. She speaks to me, through me in her writings. In this latest story, a memoir, she tells a different story, but her words create the same kind of mood and emotions that always strike me as my own. This story, I'll Be Seeing You, is the story of Elizabeth and her sibling's journey through role reversal with their aging parents. Father is a retired WWII and Korean veteran. He was always stern and rigid until one day Elizabeth was able to reconcile with his demeanor, and he to soften his militant ways. He has always adored their mother. his wife, and put her first in every manner. Mom was the classic suburban housewife of the 50s and following decades; always putting her family first before her own needs, but also always knowing her husband adored her. Mom and dad are now elderly; dad has memory issues and mom is tired and to the breaking point. Suddenly, or maybe gradually, the task of having her adoring husband following her every step has become too much. This is the story of siblings moving their parents from their home of 45 years into smaller assisted living quarters, and the battles which ensued. I think of my mothers, both gone now before these type of decisions needed to be made. It makes me consider my own father; still youthful, yet aging. It makes me think of what it will be like for me, myself, when that time comes - who will help me settle in as Elizabeth and her siblings did their parents? I find myself looking around my own home - I have lived here on this property for 38 years now. The time will come, yet it is hard to imagine, much like as a child it is hard to comprehend getting to teen aged years. It is unfathomable, as it is to a teen, how to arrive at that place where no one tells you where to go, how to act, what to do. This story is about the phases of life each of us go through, and that there is no perfect one solution to any situation. In the end acknowledgements; to those readers who said "this will help so many people." That is so true. Thank you, Random House, for the opportunity to read it. Thank you, Elizabeth Berg, for writing it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laurel-Rain

    Elizabeth Berg’s father was an Army veteran who was a tough man in every way but one: He showed a great deal of love and tenderness to his wife. Berg describes her parents’ marriage as a romance that lasted for nearly seventy years; she grew up watching her father kiss her mother upon leaving home, and kiss her again the instant he came back. His idea of when he should spend time away from her was never. But then Berg’s father developed Alzheimer’s disease, and her parents were forced to leave th Elizabeth Berg’s father was an Army veteran who was a tough man in every way but one: He showed a great deal of love and tenderness to his wife. Berg describes her parents’ marriage as a romance that lasted for nearly seventy years; she grew up watching her father kiss her mother upon leaving home, and kiss her again the instant he came back. His idea of when he should spend time away from her was never. But then Berg’s father developed Alzheimer’s disease, and her parents were forced to leave the home they loved and move into a facility that could offer them help. It was time for the couple’s children to offer, to the best of their abilities, practical advice, emotional support, and direction—to, in effect, parent the people who had for so long parented them. It was a hard transition, mitigated at least by flashes of humor and joy. The mix of emotions on everyone’s part could make every day feel like walking through a minefield. Then came redemption. I’ll Be Seeing You charts the passage from the anguish of loss to the understanding that even in the most fractious times, love can heal, transform, and lead to graceful—and grateful—acceptance. My Thoughts: I’ll Be Seeing You was a tender tale of a family journey. From youth to the end of life and all of the wonderful and sometimes painful moments in between, I felt connected to the very real characters in the story. I could relate to some of my own travels along the way, from the excitement and joy of first love to the losses of aging that seem to be endless, as one leaves behind one way of life via a series of mini-losses that feel deeply sad and lonely. But also offer the kinds of new beginnings that take adjustment but can feel like more opportunities for growth. The beautifully written memoir kept me engaged completely as I could almost feel myself going along for the ride. A poignant story with very real lessons to be learned about what lies ahead. 5 stars.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gloria ~ mzglorybe

    I've been looking forward to this memoir. I'm not big on memoirs but I know for a fact that if Berg has written it I probably won't be disappointed. I'm a staunch fan and have read almost all of her novels. I marvel at how she writes like women think. Each novel is so different from the others, and beginning one is much like opening a quality box of chocolates, you don't exactly know what you will get in the first bite, but you know it will be good. One reason I enjoyed this so much is that my li I've been looking forward to this memoir. I'm not big on memoirs but I know for a fact that if Berg has written it I probably won't be disappointed. I'm a staunch fan and have read almost all of her novels. I marvel at how she writes like women think. Each novel is so different from the others, and beginning one is much like opening a quality box of chocolates, you don't exactly know what you will get in the first bite, but you know it will be good. One reason I enjoyed this so much is that my life has paralleled hers quite a bit insofar as how our parents affected our lives and how much they loved each other, marrying as young sweethearts, until death did they part. They were an inspiration for their offspring and beyond, even the great-grands. Dementia and Alzheimer's challenge many life-long relationships, and it's not just the person or persons afflicted with it, as it is a family as a whole that must educate oneself on the disease, learn how to cope with it without making the afflicted feel as if it's his fault he can't remember or asks questions over and over. It's a teaching experience for all. I knew the subject matter would be heartbreaking, having been through it myself with my Dad, but knowing how Ms Berg writes, in her inimitable and realistic style, I knew she wouldn't make this a depressive read. Her touches of humor and her loving nature shines through, making this reading a rewarding experience for me. I won't tell you anymore about it. Read it for yourself. My thanks to #NetGalley #RandomHousePublishing and #ElizabethBerg for the ARC. I am pleased to recommend this to any and all readers. A strong 4+ rating. At your favorite retailer this month. Release date 10/27/2020

  18. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Author Elizabeth Berg has written a bittersweet, often painful yet keenly observant accounting of her parents’ last years together. Her father became debilitated by dementia and her mother was his primary caretaker, while they moved from their home into a care facility. It was all very reminiscent of what my own family experienced so there is much to learn here. It is a brave book. I received my copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Many thanks to Random House Publishing Group for allowing me to read the ARC in exchange for an unbiased review. I was honored to be allowed to read Ms. Berg's latest book - I've read most of her novels and love her work. This is such a beautiful memoir. Ms. Berg shares candidly about her experience with her parents as they grapple with no longer being able to live independently. She discusses vulnerable thoughts and feelings this creates for her. She also is able to empathize with her parents a Many thanks to Random House Publishing Group for allowing me to read the ARC in exchange for an unbiased review. I was honored to be allowed to read Ms. Berg's latest book - I've read most of her novels and love her work. This is such a beautiful memoir. Ms. Berg shares candidly about her experience with her parents as they grapple with no longer being able to live independently. She discusses vulnerable thoughts and feelings this creates for her. She also is able to empathize with her parents and try to understand how they feel. In the book she voices that she struggled with whether this was too personal to publish, especially in light of respecting her parents and siblings stories as their own to share. Her hope is to help others through similar situations. I am so grateful that she did share her and her family's experience; I think it will benefit many.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Bosse

    What a love story. What a sad and happy story. This book is so insightful, especially as we have a huge aging population. Many of us will be both taking care of our children and our parents at the same time and possibly even grandparents. Elizabeth's thoughts and feelings are written beautifully and leave much to be thought about.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Faust

    A very hard book to read, but still...Elizabeth Berg...She’s my age (maybe a little older) dealing with her parents. It is clear that they are very old and are not going to make it forever. She has a lot of very real feelings and tries to talk herself out of being bitchy. It works sometimes and sometimes it doesn’t.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anita

    Elizabeth Berg shares a beautiful and honest memoir of her aging parents and the transition from independent living to acknowledging the need for help. Still reluctant as many older people are, her parents move and it is fraught with emotions. Having lived this with my own parents this book gave me comfort in that my family was not alone and also compassion as she writes about this difficult time so beautifully. I recommend this book to anyone entering this phase or just in preparation and to al Elizabeth Berg shares a beautiful and honest memoir of her aging parents and the transition from independent living to acknowledging the need for help. Still reluctant as many older people are, her parents move and it is fraught with emotions. Having lived this with my own parents this book gave me comfort in that my family was not alone and also compassion as she writes about this difficult time so beautifully. I recommend this book to anyone entering this phase or just in preparation and to all who love a love story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bonnye Reed

    This exceptional memoir from Elizabeth Berg came to me at the most needed time. over the last few years, my family has lost three members to age, two stricken for years with Alzheimer's before their deaths. I had no idea this internal rage and sense of unfairness was a basically normal response to the death of a dear one. 'Still Alice' helped a lot with understanding the personality changes and angst involved in the lives of Edie and Ann. Mom's death should not have caught me so off-guard - she This exceptional memoir from Elizabeth Berg came to me at the most needed time. over the last few years, my family has lost three members to age, two stricken for years with Alzheimer's before their deaths. I had no idea this internal rage and sense of unfairness was a basically normal response to the death of a dear one. 'Still Alice' helped a lot with understanding the personality changes and angst involved in the lives of Edie and Ann. Mom's death should not have caught me so off-guard - she was 88 with a history of heart problems - but the habit of caring for her and her home, scurrying across the mountains to take her to doctor appointments and lab works, was such an ingrained part of my life that I still feel totally lost a year and a half out. This book helped me so much to put into perspective the letting go necessary to make life once again whole for me. Thank you, Ms. Berg, for your frankness and for sharing with us your troubles, so we can see our own in a better light. I received a free electronic ARC of this memoir on September 29, 2020, from Netgalley, Elizabeth Berg, and Random House Publishing. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read this work of my own volition, and this review reflects my honest opinion of "I'll Be Seeing You". Elizabeth Berg writes from the heart to the heart. Her novels "Talk Before Sleep" and "Range of Motion" are one's I revisit every couple of years. "I'll Be Seeing You" will be added to that short shelf of must-read-again books. Pub date Oct 27, 2020 received Sept 29, 2020 Random House Reviewed on Goodreads and Netgalley on October 7, 2020. Reviewed on October 28, 2020, on AmazonSmile, Barnes&Noble, BookBub, Kobo, and GooglePlay.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carol Turner

    I, too, am 70 years old and feel as shocked as if I'd just written "I am a peacock." I, too, have gone down this path with grandparents, a great aunt, in-laws, and my parents. Elizabeth describes it perfectly. While the details may be different, the "flow is the same and I cried - and laughed - along with her. Thank you for such a gift, Elizabeth.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Janet Fiorentino

    If you have admired Elizabeth Berg’s heart-warming tales of what makes us human, then you will love her memoir, “I’ll be Seeing You.” Here, Ms. Berg writes the account of caring for her parents in their declining years. The author’s dad is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and as happens to many adult children, Ms. Berg finds herself in the role of care-giver to not just her dad, but her mom as she moves into this new life stage. Like many of us who have aging parents, the author grapples with f If you have admired Elizabeth Berg’s heart-warming tales of what makes us human, then you will love her memoir, “I’ll be Seeing You.” Here, Ms. Berg writes the account of caring for her parents in their declining years. The author’s dad is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and as happens to many adult children, Ms. Berg finds herself in the role of care-giver to not just her dad, but her mom as she moves into this new life stage. Like many of us who have aging parents, the author grapples with finding the necessary care for her parents, questioning medical professionals and making difficult decisions such as whether to sell the family home. At the same time, she wrestles with not just feelings of depression and frustration, but also anger and grief. Ms. Berg holds nothing back as she her struggles to make choices that her parents won’t necessarily agree with and at the same time, looks ahead at her own mortality. You need at least one box of Kleenex tissues to get through this book. Don’t worry, that sadness will be balanced with plenty of humor in true Berg style. Thank you to the author, publisher, and Net Galley for an opportunity to read this novel.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bookreporter.com Biography & Memoir

    “The failing of an aging parent is one of those old stories that feels abrasively new to the person experiencing it.” And so begins award-winning novelist Elizabeth Berg’s latest book, a memoir about her father’s journey with Alzheimer’s disease and moving her parents into a facility that could accommodate their new reality. I’LL BE SEEING YOU is filled with the longings and sadness that come with that time in your life, should you live so long and should your parents live long enough, when you b “The failing of an aging parent is one of those old stories that feels abrasively new to the person experiencing it.” And so begins award-winning novelist Elizabeth Berg’s latest book, a memoir about her father’s journey with Alzheimer’s disease and moving her parents into a facility that could accommodate their new reality. I’LL BE SEEING YOU is filled with the longings and sadness that come with that time in your life, should you live so long and should your parents live long enough, when you become the guardian of those who were your guardians for most of your life. It is a bridge from one reality to another, one that tests the love and patience and fears that aging brings to both the child and the parent. Berg has lived through this experience in a full and open way, and now shares advice and anecdotes that many readers will understand and others will take as a manual for the day when that world unfortunately opens up for them. Berg’s family situation was pretty Norman Rockwell --- parents who lived together happily in love for the better part of 70 years. But when this dreaded disease made that lifestyle inefficient and difficult, Berg made sure that she was educated and the mainstay of help throughout. She grew up as an Army brat, and her father was an Army man of deep and abiding values and morals. However, “spare the rod, spoil the child” seemed to be his greatest fear, and he took to parenting with an iron fist --- a literal fist sometimes --- leaving welts on his child’s body that left a permanent scar on her heart. As a novelist, Berg dealt with some of the residual fear, anger and sadness of these times in her work. Her father was surprised that he could have acted so badly as to be the model for some of the more punishing of punishments. Berg often wondered and discussed with fellow writers if these intimate stories should be used as fodder for fiction. She knew what was demanded of her if she wanted to be a serious writer. And so the stories became public. Other intimacies become touchstones of the difficulty of this transition from child to parenting your own parent --- buying Depends for your elderly elders, watching your mother lose the identity she formed by having the beautiful house that she now has to relinquish for something more appropriate. It is quite moving and difficult to read in parts (thanks to the fact that my immediate family is dealing with a similar situation at this time). “Wars come in all shapes and sizes. Battle gear, too. Sometimes it’s a khaki uniform and an AK-47. Sometimes it’s a cloth coat worn over an aching heart.” For her military family, a uniform is a protection against the worst that could come to you --- and Alzheimer’s, with all its myriad of issues, becomes the impetus to taking a look at her family’s health and the anger and sadness that rise to the surface. How do you get a good look at the reality of what has been part of your life as you watch your parents try to make sense of sudden change and the realization that their “best years” may have already happened? Berg handles it with a lot of emotional honesty. As time goes on, things get resolved and her parents continue on, stalwart in their progression toward the end, but also finding solace, happiness and some actual downright joy as they move forward. Berg says, “Someone once told me she thought of life as being stuck inside an airless little cabin... But every now and then a rush of fresh air came under the door and kept her alive. And I told her it seemed clear to me that everyone’s job was to get on the floor and lie right by that crack.” Her writing skills sharper than her emotions, Berg finds the right words and hits all the right notes when it comes to the complicated issue of aging parents and changing lifestyles. With that rush of fresh air, she gulps and keeps going. Those of us who are in this place now can be grateful to her for spilling her guts so elegantly and reminding us that everyone must deal with this passage of life. We are not alone, and in that we can find joy and happiness with our aging parents as the tables turn and we become the caregivers. I’LL BE SEEING YOU is a beautifully emotional story about reality, which is lacking from today’s bestsellers. It will serve as a handbook for everyone as they encounter perhaps the trickiest of transitions in a lifetime filled with them. Reviewed by Jana Siciliano

  27. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Date reviewed: October 4, 2020 When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are continuing to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the second wave is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in excha Date reviewed: October 4, 2020 When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are continuing to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the second wave is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. The beloved New York Times bestselling author tells the poignant love story of caring for her parents in their final years in this beautifully written memoir. “I’ll Be Seeing You moved me and broadened my understanding of the human condition.”—Wally Lamb, author of I Know This Much Is True Elizabeth Berg’s father was an Army veteran who was a tough man in every way but one: He showed a great deal of love and tenderness to his wife. Berg describes her parents’ marriage as a romance that lasted for nearly seventy years; she grew up watching her father kiss her mother upon leaving home and kiss her again the instant he came back. His idea of when he should spend time away from her was never. But then Berg’s father developed Alzheimer’s disease, and her parents were forced to leave the home they loved and move into a facility that could offer them help. It was time for the couple’s children to offer, to the best of their abilities, practical advice, emotional support, and direction—to, in effect, parent the people who had for so long parented them. It was a hard transition, mitigated at least by flashes of humour and joy. The mix of emotions on everyone’s part could make every day feel like walking through a minefield. Then came redemption. I’ll Be Seeing You charts the passage from the anguish of loss to the understanding that even in the most fractious times, love can heal, transform, and lead to graceful—and grateful—acceptance. This is a book that hit so close to home as my dad slips farther and farther into Alzheimer's disease - they have at least downsized to an apartment unlike Berg's parents had not. (trust me, this is a huge step!!) It was a joy to read and I laughed and I cried as she described life then and now. She handles the acceptance part of the disease excellently and this was just a STUNNING book to read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Dear Fellow Reader, I don’t know if you know this, but I am a fan of Elizabeth Berg. Yes, I like her books. I also enjoy her Facebook posts. If you have not read her Facebook posts, I urge you to follow her. Her written voice is so friendly and down to earth that I think we could be friends. I know this sounds weird, but I do. No, I do not stalk her. No, she has no idea who I am. (We have met twice at book signing but she meets lots of women that way and I know she has no idea who I am.) At one of Dear Fellow Reader, I don’t know if you know this, but I am a fan of Elizabeth Berg. Yes, I like her books. I also enjoy her Facebook posts. If you have not read her Facebook posts, I urge you to follow her. Her written voice is so friendly and down to earth that I think we could be friends. I know this sounds weird, but I do. No, I do not stalk her. No, she has no idea who I am. (We have met twice at book signing but she meets lots of women that way and I know she has no idea who I am.) At one of the book signings, there was a woman who had been to like 20 of her book signings. She has a big fan base. And for good reason. She generally writes fiction. Her latest series (the Mason Books) are wonderful. She has 30 books that are published by traditional publishing houses and then three books of her Facebook posts. I am not kidding about her Facebook posts. You need to read them. She writes about just day to day things and sometimes asks for advice. There was one book of hers that I did not like as much as the others. She wrote a Biographical Fiction book, The Dream Lover. It was the story about George Sand, the author whose real name was Aurore Dudevant. It was fine but it didn’t give me the warm fuzzies that her fiction pieces give me. So, it was with a little trepidation that I started I’ll Be Seeing You. This is yet another departure for her, this book is a memoir about her parents. I was hoping that I would like it. Guess what? I did. I really liked it. The book centers on a particular time in her parent’s life. It is her parent’s last years. As the book opens, her father has dementia and the disease is progressing. Her parents need to leave the house they have called home for many years and move to a place where they can have more assistance. This is a terrible time in one’s life both as the parent and the child. I think part of my trepidation with the book is from my own background. My parents also had to leave the place they had called home for many years and move to a lovely place where they could get more help. They moved to the town where I lived and I had the fortune and mis-fortune to be their primary contact. One of the things that I really liked was that Elizabeth didn’t gloss over her feeling and reactions. She wasn’t harsh but she expresses the frustration that she was feeling. You can see why she feels that way and how she tries to work with her parents to make things as pleasant as possible. She allows glimpses of her view of the life her parents have led. (And how lovely to have a husband that adores you the way her father adored her mother.) She lets you see that she lost her temper and felt sad and sorry. The reader also learns about the changes in her relationship with her father. While the book is specifically about the last years with her parents, it covers a lifetime of their relationships. If you have not experienced supporting an elderly parent, then the book might not touch all the feelings that it would if you have had the experience. But it is a lovely memoir even if you haven’t had that in your life. Elizabeth Berg writes in such an accessible way that you feel that you are sitting with her as she tells the story. “I learned that the frustration and anger that come up in these situations goes both ways: you’re frustrated and/or angry with your parents, and they’re frustrated and/or angry with you. I saw how deep the despair can be in understanding that you can no longer properly care for yourself, but I also saw how accepting the love and help that are offered can foster a whole new level of appreciation and understanding between parents and children. I learned that in the middle of what can feel like a gigantic, painful mess, there can suddenly be the saving grace of humor, or the salve of a certain kind of insight.” Elizabeth Berg In summary, I liked the book. I read the book in one day, which tells you how absorbing it was and that it is a quick read. The book is out today (Happy Publication Day!). I was given a copy of this book in exchange for a fair and unbiased review. Thanks for reading! Share this:

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review. At 70 years old, author Elizabeth Berg reflects on the decline in her aging parents back in 2010. Her 89 year old father begins to show signs of Alzheimer’s disease which is heartbreaking. She remembers him as a strict, militant Army “lifer” who slowly starts to “lose” it. During that time Elizabeth and her siblings try to support and ensure their parents are safe with her bro I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review. At 70 years old, author Elizabeth Berg reflects on the decline in her aging parents back in 2010. Her 89 year old father begins to show signs of Alzheimer’s disease which is heartbreaking. She remembers him as a strict, militant Army “lifer” who slowly starts to “lose” it. During that time Elizabeth and her siblings try to support and ensure their parents are safe with her brother living in Hawaii and her living in Chicago, the major responsibilities fall on her sister Vicki who lives nearby. This is ultimately the year or so before the death of her father and eventually her mother. Her parents had married in January 1943 at an Army base in TX. They always lived a modest life relying on each other throughout their years together. They would take her father to visit his brother Frank in a nursing home where they could reminisce on their past military days. It was her mother Jeanne who seemed to struggle the most with the all changes of aging and declining health. She was resistant and resentful about the curveball life has thrown at her refusing to resign to the life of an “old” person. It is not a sappy love story about parents who “lived happily ever after” fairytale. She describes a history to which most can probably relate with imperfect parents whose lives slowly change in ways they never anticipated. The independent father soon becomes the frail confused man in need of constant surveillance and reliance on his wife. The mother who becomes angry and resentful when having to resign to selling their family home. It’s a touching story of endurance and support as well as the frustrations that arise with aging. I think most people would prefer to age gracefully with our pride and dignity intact. It’s a delicate and precarious balance to ensure that happens while maintaining the safety and support that is essential.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gloria ~ mzglorybe

    I've been looking forward to this memoir. I'm not big on memoirs but I know for a fact that if Berg has written it I probably won't be disappointed. I'm a staunch fan and have read almost all of her novels. I marvel at how she writes like women think. Each novel is so different from the others, and beginning one is much like opening a quality box of chocolates, you don't exactly know what you will get in the first bite, but you know it will be good. One reason I enjoyed this so much is that my li I've been looking forward to this memoir. I'm not big on memoirs but I know for a fact that if Berg has written it I probably won't be disappointed. I'm a staunch fan and have read almost all of her novels. I marvel at how she writes like women think. Each novel is so different from the others, and beginning one is much like opening a quality box of chocolates, you don't exactly know what you will get in the first bite, but you know it will be good. One reason I enjoyed this so much is that my life has paralleled hers quite a bit insofar as how our parents affected our lives and how much they loved each other, marrying as young sweethearts, until death did they part. They were an inspiration for their offspring and beyond, even the great-grands. Dementia and Alzheimer's challenge many life-long relationships, and it's not just the person or persons afflicted with it, as it is a family as a whole that must educate oneself on the disease, learn how to cope with it without making the afflicted feel as if it's his fault he can't remember or asks questions over and over. It's a challenging and teaching experience for all. I knew the subject matter would be heartbreaking, having been through it myself with my Dad, but knowing how Ms Berg writes, in her inimitable and realistic style, I knew she wouldn't make this a depressive read. Her touches of humor and her loving nature shines through, making this reading a rewarding experience for me. I won't tell you anymore about it. Read it for yourself. My thanks to #NetGalley #RandomHousePublishing and #ElizabethBerg for the ARC. I am pleased to recommend this to any and all readers. A strong 4+ rating. At your favorite retailer this month. Release date 10/27/2020

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.