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Eighty years! Eighty creators! An army of legendary creators! All in one sensational hardcover! In celebration of Marvel's 80th anniversary, we gathered together the greatest array of talent ever to be assembled between two covers! Names from the past, from the present and even the future! Every page is filled with all-new work from this cavalcade of comic book luminaries! Eighty years! Eighty creators! An army of legendary creators! All in one sensational hardcover! In celebration of Marvel's 80th anniversary, we gathered together the greatest array of talent ever to be assembled between two covers! Names from the past, from the present and even the future! Every page is filled with all-new work from this cavalcade of comic book luminaries! A mystery threads throughout the Marvel Universe - one that began in MARVEL COMICS #1 and unites a disparate array of heroes and villains throughout the decades! What is the Eternity Mask? And who is responsible for the conspiracy to keep it hidden? As secrets are peeled away, answers await the entirety of the Marvel Universe! The landmark event is collected together with an awesome assortment of bonus features! COLLECTING: MARVEL COMICS 1000-1001, TBD


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Eighty years! Eighty creators! An army of legendary creators! All in one sensational hardcover! In celebration of Marvel's 80th anniversary, we gathered together the greatest array of talent ever to be assembled between two covers! Names from the past, from the present and even the future! Every page is filled with all-new work from this cavalcade of comic book luminaries! Eighty years! Eighty creators! An army of legendary creators! All in one sensational hardcover! In celebration of Marvel's 80th anniversary, we gathered together the greatest array of talent ever to be assembled between two covers! Names from the past, from the present and even the future! Every page is filled with all-new work from this cavalcade of comic book luminaries! A mystery threads throughout the Marvel Universe - one that began in MARVEL COMICS #1 and unites a disparate array of heroes and villains throughout the decades! What is the Eternity Mask? And who is responsible for the conspiracy to keep it hidden? As secrets are peeled away, answers await the entirety of the Marvel Universe! The landmark event is collected together with an awesome assortment of bonus features! COLLECTING: MARVEL COMICS 1000-1001, TBD

30 review for Marvel Comics #1000

  1. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    To celebrate 80 years of Marvel Comics Marvel put together Marvel Comics #1000 and Marvel Comics #1001. It is comprise of over 110 single page stories by numerous creative teams (100+!). There are three main themes, an ongoing mystery spanning the 80 years of the Marvel universe, mostly written by Al Ewing but with numerous individual creators, centred around the Eternity Mask. This story, that attempts to create a conspiracy that is rooted in the birth of the Marvel universe and has continued to To celebrate 80 years of Marvel Comics Marvel put together Marvel Comics #1000 and Marvel Comics #1001. It is comprise of over 110 single page stories by numerous creative teams (100+!). There are three main themes, an ongoing mystery spanning the 80 years of the Marvel universe, mostly written by Al Ewing but with numerous individual creators, centred around the Eternity Mask. This story, that attempts to create a conspiracy that is rooted in the birth of the Marvel universe and has continued to this very day, is an OK read, but one that I feel would have been better if told in serial form with a set creative team. There's a number of stories where a Marvel characters is essentially asked why they do what they do; some stories are just spoofs or satire (think Deadpool); some stories promote an individual character or team. Overall too many of these stories were pointless or predictable. What I did like was that for the first stories, each one was linked to a big moment from that year, starting from 1939 and the creation of the Original Human Torch! My favourite story by a long way was a She Hulk one-pager by... Rainbow Rowell! Overall though this only gets a 5 out of 12, although I accept single page storytelling can be very hit and miss.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    I really, really enjoyed this enormous collection of single-page stories from the entire eighty year history of the Marvel Universe. It really is incredible what some creators can do in just a single page; some of them even made me shed a wee tear (that's 'wee' in the Scottish sense, you sickos). The only reason I'm not giving this the full 5 stars is because, well, in any anthology there are going to be the occasional pieces that don't quite live up to the standard of the rest. Also, I can't bri I really, really enjoyed this enormous collection of single-page stories from the entire eighty year history of the Marvel Universe. It really is incredible what some creators can do in just a single page; some of them even made me shed a wee tear (that's 'wee' in the Scottish sense, you sickos). The only reason I'm not giving this the full 5 stars is because, well, in any anthology there are going to be the occasional pieces that don't quite live up to the standard of the rest. Also, I can't bring myself to give any book Rob Liefeld was involved in 5 stars, even if he did only do one page... :-D I'm really looking forward to seeing where Al Ewing's Eternity Mask story goes; the teasers in this book have me salivating! I think the concept of a mask that makes the wearer an even match to any opponent is a fantastic one.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Benji Glaab

    Very cool collection with some of my favourite creators in marvel history for sure. Basically each creator/ creative team gets one page to Focus on 1 year in marvel history. Obviously some of the picks can't be memorable for everyone, and everything pre 90's for me was a history lesson of course. Still it's a fun concept and a great way to celebrate marvel's 80th b-day. I feel like this would be better to read in small doses like the daily newspaper funnies. It's a barrage on the senses to read Very cool collection with some of my favourite creators in marvel history for sure. Basically each creator/ creative team gets one page to Focus on 1 year in marvel history. Obviously some of the picks can't be memorable for everyone, and everything pre 90's for me was a history lesson of course. Still it's a fun concept and a great way to celebrate marvel's 80th b-day. I feel like this would be better to read in small doses like the daily newspaper funnies. It's a barrage on the senses to read one after the other. As a collection we get a nice hardcover, and lots of variant covers. I would of liked to see some sort of interview or Q and A in here to see the process of how it all came together

  4. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    So this is an anthology full of a big pile of creators doing one page stories of various Marvel stuff to celebrate 80 years of Marvel. I was lucky enough to get the Skottie Young variant (been meaning to add at least one to my comic collection) and read this fun comic! There’s a lot here and to do something different I’ll discuss just the parts I love and the parts I hate, I can’t go over all of the book because that review would be way too long. LOVE: 8 Bells by Al Ewing, Steve Epting, Frank D’arm So this is an anthology full of a big pile of creators doing one page stories of various Marvel stuff to celebrate 80 years of Marvel. I was lucky enough to get the Skottie Young variant (been meaning to add at least one to my comic collection) and read this fun comic! There’s a lot here and to do something different I’ll discuss just the parts I love and the parts I hate, I can’t go over all of the book because that review would be way too long. LOVE: 8 Bells by Al Ewing, Steve Epting, Frank D’armata, VC’s Clayton Cowles- Perfect way to begin this, very well written and of course great art from Epting. Fight For Love by Jeremy Whitley, Kene Koh, Felipe Sobreiro, VC’s Clayton Cowles- I don’t know much about this America character but this is a fun story that approaches a commonly poorly executed message very well. Good job there! Return of Not Brand Echh by Jeph Loeb, Tim Sale- Love this. It’s a hilarious cartoony page of Marvel picking on themselves. Last Word by Alex Ross, John Johnson- A little silly? Sure but mostly laugh out loud humorous and Alex Ross art. Stan’s Soapbox- Not a story but cool that they included this. RIP Stan Lee. Professor Cold Call by Phil Lord, Christopher Miller, Javier Rodriguez, VC’s Travis Lanham- Funny tale that both captures the spirit and points out the ridiculousness of Spider-Man. Seven Things You Can Always Count On by Kelly Sue DeConnick, David Lopez, Matthew Fairbairn, VC’s Travis Lanham- Fun, exciting and adorable one page Captain Marvel adventure! Sorta funny how I tried a volume of this writer’s Captain Marvel and was sorta meh but loved this one page story. Blade Week by Jim Zub, Nick Bradshaw, John Rauch, VC’s Cory Petit- A wordless short story that still managed to be intense, a complete story and captured the character perfectly. Even has a cute and funny ending. We Are What We Are by Matthew Rosenburg, Leinil Francis Yu, Sunny Gho, VC’s Cory Petit- Damn, in one page these guys tell a gripping, bad-ass and gritty Punisher tale. Nice! Glory Days by Patrick Gleason, Marte Gracia, VC’s Joe Sabino- Really well done and fittingly patriotic Captain America page. Turkey Soup For The Deadpool Soul by Gail Simone, David Baldeon, Jesus Aburtov, VC’s Joe Sabino- I didn’t ever think that Gail Simone would be a Deadpool kinda author (though admittedly I’ve only read a bit of her work) but she does a pretty damn great job at writing Deadpool here and the art is also great. Monsters by Kelly Thompson, Pepe Laraz, David Curiel, VC’s Joe Sabino- I don’t know much about the main character (Bloodstone or something) but it includes an adorable land-shark puppy thing so I like it a lot! Gridlocked by Derek Candy, Paco Medina, Jesus Aburtov, VC’s Joe C- Deadpool parodies Tom King in a way only Deadpool could. Very funny stuff! In Memoriam- Not a story but very nice that they included a little RIP for Marvel comic creators that aren’t around anymore and it includes a very fitting image. HATE: Six Tips For Selfie Success by Kathryn Immonen, Stuart Immonen, VC’s Clayton Cowles- No... just no. This is a cheesy attempt at humor in a “fellow kids” type story, it’s just so cringe. Stuart Immonen’s art isn’t as good as usual in it either. The Membrane by Al Ewing, Cory Smith, Laura Martin, VC’s Clayton Cowles- Professor MonkeyHead (I don’t remember the character’s actual name) babbles for a page about... I don’t remember. It’s very boring and bland though. Of Kings and Sinners by Ralph Macchino, Marc Checcheto, VC’s Clayton Cowles- The opportunity for a bad-ass one page Conan The Barbarian story is wasted on other Conan world characters blabbing and being boring. Invisible No More by Jimmy “Taboo” Gomez, Benjamin Jackendoff, Jeffery Veregge, VC’s Travis Lanham- A colorful background of... something doesn’t excuse the boring wall of text seen on that page. The McDuffie Device by Adam F Goldberg, Adam Riches- Damage Control story is cheesy with awful artwork, weak humor and bad dialogue. How To Save A Set of Keys by Jason Reynolds, Patrick O’Keefe, VC’s Joe Carmagna- Yay, a poorly written and boring as shit Miles Morales story by Jason Reynolds, exactly what we needed, not like there’s an entire fucking novel of that... I was hoping after that mentioned novel was slammed by several comic fans Reynolds would have done something better in this but no. Sure the illustration background is good but the wall of text is fucking awful. The Choice by Charles Soule, Steve Mcnivven, VC’s Cory Petit- A boring Silver Surfer story with ugly art. No thanks. Overall: Those are just my favorites and least favorites, there are several more in this creator filled anthology. While there are a lot of meh parts and even a few bad parts, I would say it’s mostly good and I had a lot of fun with it. This anthology despite it’s long list of creators involved will probably only be fun if you’re a Marvel fan however. There’s a lot about the Marvel characters and universe that would be hard to understand if you aren’t already into it. That being said if you enjoy Marvel comics you’ll probably enjoy reading this anthology and I’m someone who (when they’re good) enjoys Marvel comics. 4/5

  5. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    This was a mix bag. Some fun stories, especially the Spider-man stuff. I liked almost all the stories in there for him. There's also one shots here and there that worked really well. Then some that were dull and did nothing for me. All mattered which story. Either way worth reading for the accomplishment of getting to 1,000! This was a mix bag. Some fun stories, especially the Spider-man stuff. I liked almost all the stories in there for him. There's also one shots here and there that worked really well. Then some that were dull and did nothing for me. All mattered which story. Either way worth reading for the accomplishment of getting to 1,000!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Like most jam issues that have a bunch of writers and artists involved, this is a mix bag, with some good and bad stuff. The Al Ewing story that runs throughout is pretty good. I like how they’ve started a thread with the original human torch and managed to bring it into the modern day. Some of the other highlights are also the Spider-man page by Slott and Marcos Martin, the Hulk page by Alex Ross and even the Daredevil page by Quesada is good. But there’s other stuff here that just lands flat a Like most jam issues that have a bunch of writers and artists involved, this is a mix bag, with some good and bad stuff. The Al Ewing story that runs throughout is pretty good. I like how they’ve started a thread with the original human torch and managed to bring it into the modern day. Some of the other highlights are also the Spider-man page by Slott and Marcos Martin, the Hulk page by Alex Ross and even the Daredevil page by Quesada is good. But there’s other stuff here that just lands flat and is boring to read. I think I’d have preferred an issue that’s just the Al Ewing story, but that wouldn’t have been able to sell as many variants

  7. 5 out of 5

    Travis Duke

    a fine tribute to marvel with a new(?) story intertwined called the masked raider. The new story is cool, has a Brubaker vibe which I liked. The tribute stories are just 1 page but are fun, some better than others. The art is really awesome, so many artists and styles. A good book to have sitting on a coffee table.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    Interesting tribute that is both pushing forward a story I would like to see with tributes mixed in. I have no idea way the 1001 material wasn’t just worked into 1000. It would have made more sense.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lindsi (Do You Dog-ear?)

    This issue was a hot mess. The stories were mostly uninteresting, and I thought the main thread was hard to follow. I wish I had skipped this one altogether.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    This hardcover contains issue #1000 and #1001. For someone who's been reading Marvel Comics for decades, this was a fun trip down memory lane. Each page marks a significant "event" in Marvel Comics, for example: First appearance of a particular character, first Iron Man movie, etc. That page is usually reverential to whatever significance that event had. Sometimes it's funny, sometimes it's an epilogue. For the most part, they are really well done, both writing and art, able to fit an idea or emo This hardcover contains issue #1000 and #1001. For someone who's been reading Marvel Comics for decades, this was a fun trip down memory lane. Each page marks a significant "event" in Marvel Comics, for example: First appearance of a particular character, first Iron Man movie, etc. That page is usually reverential to whatever significance that event had. Sometimes it's funny, sometimes it's an epilogue. For the most part, they are really well done, both writing and art, able to fit an idea or emotion on a single page. A few of the event choices are questionable though, leaving the reader to ask "why is that so important to be included" or "why didn't they include xyz"? Mixed in are bits and pieces of the origin of a "new" character and the cosmic prop that he uses. It's one of those where the character has been around this whole time, but nobody really knew about them. I won't give it a way, but it's sort of weaved in and out of Marvel history, presumably to have an important part of some current or future storyline. Issue #1001 is also included in this book. It uses the same format but it drops the significant event and largely has one-page per character, with only a few pages written and/or drawn by well-known creators, while the majority of them are by either-up and coming or lesser known professionals. Also, most of the character selections are on the lower end of the popularity scale. It doesn't have anywhere near the charm or nostalgia the first issue had and when you are finished it just feels like a quick cash grab. I would have much preferred a second issue that touched on many of the other events that weren't included, even if they weren't in chronological order.

  11. 4 out of 5

    The_J

    The promise of a great sweep of Marvel Comics history, some joy, but just shown with greater clarity, wqhy I need to stop reading these works. The revisions only disturb me, and the beauty is superficial. The world turns and the relics of the past are defiled by the successive generations, I will wait for the next turn of the carousel and hope the next ring will actually be of brass, rather than the dross they attempt to pawn off today.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Any anthology series is going to be a mixed bag, and this certainly was that. Unfortunately for every good one-page story, there were three mediocre (or just plain bad ones). 80 years of publishing comics is certainly an accomplishment worth celebrating, and this was a neat idea that just didn't really come together in the execution. The first issue, Marvel Comics # 1000, devotes one page to each of Marvel's 80 years of publishing, and while it's a neat tour through Marvel's history, I found som Any anthology series is going to be a mixed bag, and this certainly was that. Unfortunately for every good one-page story, there were three mediocre (or just plain bad ones). 80 years of publishing comics is certainly an accomplishment worth celebrating, and this was a neat idea that just didn't really come together in the execution. The first issue, Marvel Comics # 1000, devotes one page to each of Marvel's 80 years of publishing, and while it's a neat tour through Marvel's history, I found some of the events they chose to highlight for a particular year to be baffling. For example, you might have expected them to highlight Giant Size X-Men # 1 for the year 1975, the issue that revitalized the X-Men by introducing the team consisting of Storm, Nightcrawler, Wolverine, etc.--and easily one of the most important Marvel Comics issues ever published. But instead they devoted that year's page to the reveal of the Punisher's origin (not the introduction of the Punisher, mind you--but just the telling of his origin). These events are hardly equal in their overall impact to the history of Marvel Comics. You might also have expected 2013's page to be about the introduction of Kamala Khan, who, along with Miles Morales, is one of the two most successful Marvel characters introduced in the last decade. Instead they spent that page on Cable returning to lead X-Force. Seriously? That's what you're going to focus on for all of 2013? A number of other years were similarly disappointing--I flipped the page numerous times with an expectation of what it might be about (1984 must surely be about Secret Wars, right? No, instead it's about the debut of Spider-Man's black costume in his own title, something that actually happened for the first time in Secret Wars. So it's weird that they choose to highlight a specific thing that happened during an event rather than the event itself). For a lot of the earlier years of Marvel there apparently weren't many interesting things to highlight, so writer Al Ewing puts together a narrative that loosely threads its way through the book about three mysterious scientists calling themselves the Three Xs and the Eternity Mask, an artifact that makes its wearer the equal to any opponent, regardless of their power level. While I applaud the effort to put together a new narrative thread and make something out of very little, unfortunately it's just not that interesting. And it's completely uneven in its presentation, really only coming up in years where there was nothing much else to focus on. As a result, it's heavily featured in the early years, and then only shows up very sporadically after the 1960s, when all of the Stan Lee characters first showed up and Marvel's shared universe started getting more interesting. It shows up again a few more times toward the end, hinting that this will be the focus of some upcoming Ewing story, but nothing about it is compelling enough for me to currently have any interest in following the story where it goes next. Marvel Comics # 1001 drops the "each page devoted to a single year" conceit entirely, and just becomes a completely unfocused anthology, where each writer just devotes one page to a character that they wanted to highlight. It's extremely uneven in quality, with maybe only 25% of it actually generating any joy or interest from me as a reader. The result is that while the 1000 issue felt like a genuine attempt to celebrate 80 years of publishing, 1001 just feels like a blatant money-grab that was completely unnecessary. And the Eternity Mask story line is nearly absent altogether from this issue, apart from two bookend pages by Ewing that were nearly identical to each other. Nothing about this book will be remembered five years from now.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    A curious item celebrating 80 years of Marvel comics, not that they were called that for the first few decades, and even if you think in terms of the internal timeline, well, some bits of that still sit where they were (Captain America is still a product of the Second World War), and others have been shifted up (Peter Parker was bitten by a radioactive spider well after the fall of the Twin Towers – which at least means that dreadful 9/11 issue never happened). But every page has to be tied to a A curious item celebrating 80 years of Marvel comics, not that they were called that for the first few decades, and even if you think in terms of the internal timeline, well, some bits of that still sit where they were (Captain America is still a product of the Second World War), and others have been shifted up (Peter Parker was bitten by a radioactive spider well after the fall of the Twin Towers – which at least means that dreadful 9/11 issue never happened). But every page has to be tied to a particular year anyway, even if Bleeding Cool noticed that some of them got shuffled at the last minute because they initially got the release of the Deadpool film wrong. Some of them are tied to epochal moments in Marvel publishing history, like Wolverine’s debut; others really aren’t, as when it’s a Wolverine/Punisher miniseries that isn’t even the good one. But, the latter gives us a really good page from Jason Aaron and Goran Parlov where the two most familiar Marvel badasses discuss bath bombs, so I’ll take it, as also the one with Elsa Bloodstone and her new pet. Much of the book is single pages where either the current creative team set out their stall (Rosenberg on Punisher, Hickman on Apocalypse); elsewhere creators return to the characters with which they’re most associated (Liefeld on Cable, Gillen on Loki). Except when they don’t, like Walt Simonson doing…Iron Man? And then running through and around it, in all the years where nobody else had anything much to do, Al Ewing (who ends up writing maybe a third of the whole thing, and even for saying he’s Marvel’s best current writer that feels lopsided) and all manner of artists weave a mystery centred on a historical conspiracy and an incredibly powerful mask, which runs through the decades without ever especially connecting with any of the other pages dropped in amongst it, and is clearly trailing a new book rather than celebrating old ones, and while the new book does look good, and this story is fun, that still feels faintly off somehow. Oh yeah, and a rework of Mark Waid’s Captain America speech already has the conspiracists who only just found out about Ike Perlmutter circling, even though there’s no way you could interpret the published version as anything but opposed to everything Trump stands for. Still, the Gaiman and Buckingham Miracleman page is gorgeous, even if it is just a footnote to The Golden Age. And the Tessie the Typist page is probably enough to start a rumour that she’s pivotal in the MCU’s Phase 4.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matt Graupman

    There’s a reason Marvel Comics is known as The House Of Ideas. Virtually everything they publish is big and bold and brimming with adventure. So it only makes sense that, on the company’s 80th birthday, they’d put together a huge book to commemorate the occasion. Boasting eighty jam-packed pages - one marking each year of their existence - by eighty different creative teams, “Marvel #1000” is part continuity-adjusting prequel, part nostalgic ride down Memory Lane, and part company-wide victory l There’s a reason Marvel Comics is known as The House Of Ideas. Virtually everything they publish is big and bold and brimming with adventure. So it only makes sense that, on the company’s 80th birthday, they’d put together a huge book to commemorate the occasion. Boasting eighty jam-packed pages - one marking each year of their existence - by eighty different creative teams, “Marvel #1000” is part continuity-adjusting prequel, part nostalgic ride down Memory Lane, and part company-wide victory lap. Does it work on all those levels? Certainly not. But after eighty freakin’ years, you can’t expect anything less from Marvel. It’s an experimental anthology that varies widely from page to page but still provides some excellent entertainment, highlighting unforgettable moments, indelible characters, and some insanely talented creators (although there are some notable snubs, like Skottie Young, Joe Madureira, and - most egregiously - Chris Bachalo). If nothing else, “Marvel #1000” proves that the House Of Ideas is built on one very solid foundation. FAVORITES: “Doctor Strange: Spin Cycle” - The Sorcerer Supreme struggles with his Cloak Of Levitation on laundry day. Silly fun. (Writer: Joe Hill, Artist: Michael Allred) “A Midwinter’s Night Dream” - As children, Steve Rogers and Bucky Barnes are unaware of the men they will someday become. (Writer: Gerry Duggan, Artist: Chris Samnee) “Seven Things You Can Count On” - Captain Marvel counts off several guaranteed elements of fighting a super-villain. (Writer: Kelly Sue DeConnick, Artist: David Lopez) “Bloodbath” - The Punisher and Wolverine share a quiet moment during a lull in battle. (Writer: Jason Aaron, Artist: Goran Parlov) “The Route” - Peter Parker describes his typical rounds through the city and what makes them significant. (Writer: Donny Cates, Artist: Geoff Shaw) “Turkey Soup For The Deadpool Soul” - Deadpool breaks the fourth wall. ‘Nuff said. (Writer: Gail Simone, Artist: David Baldeon)

  15. 5 out of 5

    D: The Reading Man

    A brilliant retrospective of a magnificent, long running universe; that was much better than I thought it’d be, that’s for sure! As per usual when it comes to anthologies, some are better than others; but all of the stories convey a sense of care for the characters that makes it such a pleasant read. With each story, you’re also getting the history of Marvel Comics which progresses the stories in real time, which is neat. What stole the show were definitely Al Ewing’s stories that were woven tog A brilliant retrospective of a magnificent, long running universe; that was much better than I thought it’d be, that’s for sure! As per usual when it comes to anthologies, some are better than others; but all of the stories convey a sense of care for the characters that makes it such a pleasant read. With each story, you’re also getting the history of Marvel Comics which progresses the stories in real time, which is neat. What stole the show were definitely Al Ewing’s stories that were woven together throughout the issue. Al Ewing reintroduces a very old character and manages to make them interesting. Going into the book I expected self contained one shots, and while most were, all of Al Ewing’s built up the return of........**spoiler**.........THE MASKED RAIDER! Definitely a character that I didn’t think I’d care about. He expertly built up a mythos for the character and the mantle. I am excited and hopeful that Al Ewing gets to write a Masked Raider miniseries or ongoing. Judging from his masterful run on IMMORTAL HULK, I know he has more great stories to tell. All in all, MARVEL COMICS #1000 is worth a read and is a nostalgia tour for people who grew up on comics. Some stories are memorable, and others fade together. But what had me hooked was none other than Al Ewing’s great writing. Bravo to everyone else who contributed to this massive issue. This is what comics should be.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Standard this is an anthology and quality varies line. That said, this volume works best when it was about individual moments in Marvel history and letting the creators kick back and celebrate what they loved and not the let's try and tell a story throughout the Marvel history. Maybe I'm just bummed that Al Ewing gets more credits than all the women combined but his mysterious mask tale was the weakest link and could easily have been scrapped and more interviews with superheroes added. The Thing Standard this is an anthology and quality varies line. That said, this volume works best when it was about individual moments in Marvel history and letting the creators kick back and celebrate what they loved and not the let's try and tell a story throughout the Marvel history. Maybe I'm just bummed that Al Ewing gets more credits than all the women combined but his mysterious mask tale was the weakest link and could easily have been scrapped and more interviews with superheroes added. The Thing got a few moments to shine and Mr. Fantastic had a cameo but where was the rest of the Fantastic Four? More X-men could have been added in. Or a taste of the future. Where was Kamala Khan?

  17. 4 out of 5

    Omar

    8.5 good This was a very fun comic book to celebrate the 80 years of marvel comics. The theme Is very vague in this comic book but majority of pages written by al Ewing is linked to this mask crusader. It's very fun and goofy, not supposed to be taken seriously. It's a very light hearted ckmjc book. Love how the art is different on each page. It just shows what happens through the hears and is a MUSTVREAD for any marvel fan. However I cant give it more than an 8.5 sicne it will be an over praise. 8.5 good This was a very fun comic book to celebrate the 80 years of marvel comics. The theme Is very vague in this comic book but majority of pages written by al Ewing is linked to this mask crusader. It's very fun and goofy, not supposed to be taken seriously. It's a very light hearted ckmjc book. Love how the art is different on each page. It just shows what happens through the hears and is a MUSTVREAD for any marvel fan. However I cant give it more than an 8.5 sicne it will be an over praise.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    The more stories you cram into a page count, the less satisfying each one is. And he less satisfying those pages are. My brain hurts after reading 80+ single-page comics. Each of them with too little time to do anything. The best part of the issue was wondering what event would be highlighted for each year. I regret spending the money and, after reading this, am also glad I didn't get around to ordering #1001 The more stories you cram into a page count, the less satisfying each one is. And he less satisfying those pages are. My brain hurts after reading 80+ single-page comics. Each of them with too little time to do anything. The best part of the issue was wondering what event would be highlighted for each year. I regret spending the money and, after reading this, am also glad I didn't get around to ordering #1001

  19. 5 out of 5

    James

    This almost got a 2.5 star rating but some cool stories popped up toward the end. The coolest part of this was the mystical mask story running thru the issue. The rest is as most have said here, a mixed bag. I mean you have one page to tell some kind of story. Some were useless, some were just Ok and some were actually pretty cool.

  20. 4 out of 5

    William Tyler Davis

    Some amazing pages brought down by an attempt to tell a cohesive story. They left out some of Marvel’s best characters and plenty of writers and artists that deserved to be on this book. It’s a swing and a miss for me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Hope

    would've been real cool to see founding avenger janet van dyne on any of the 89 pages of marvel retrospective 65/100 would've been real cool to see founding avenger janet van dyne on any of the 89 pages of marvel retrospective 65/100

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Ridiculously long... took almost a month to get through. A semi-coherent story mixed in with fun weird little whimsys. The Nemo in Slumberland was my favorite.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Normally, I would complain about a book that only collects two issues, but these were two huge, jam-packed issues, so I didn't mind. Marvel Comics #1000 has 80 one page stories, each inspired by an event that took place during one of Marvel's 80 years. #1001 also has 80 one page stories, each inspired by a character or team from some point in Marvel's history, mostly characters that are still around. Like every anthology from multiple creators that I've ever read, the quality is mixed. Happily, Normally, I would complain about a book that only collects two issues, but these were two huge, jam-packed issues, so I didn't mind. Marvel Comics #1000 has 80 one page stories, each inspired by an event that took place during one of Marvel's 80 years. #1001 also has 80 one page stories, each inspired by a character or team from some point in Marvel's history, mostly characters that are still around. Like every anthology from multiple creators that I've ever read, the quality is mixed. Happily, none of the stories are garbage, which makes sense. You have to work really hard to suck with only one page. Most of the stories are decent, several are good, and there are a few that are standouts. My favorites were the Nightcrawler story, of course, and a wonderful little Spider-Man story: pressed by a pregnant woman who wants to name her unborn child after him, Spidey tells her his name is Ben. And then kept doing so, leading to a string of tiny Bens born all over NYC. Also great is Spider-Man's Last Fight. Oddly, I'd say that most of the really good stories starred Spider-Man, which I suppose is a tribute to the depth of the character and of the deep love the audience has for him. Both issues have a slight running thread of a new character, called the Masked Rider. There's just enough here to interest me, without saturating what was meant to be a tribute to the past with a teaser for the future. I'd say that, of the 160 short stories, something like 15 had the Masked Rider or anything to do with him, a number I consider perfectly acceptable. Maybe this is going to be the next event, and I'm at least tentatively on board. As a tribute, it's a good one. It showcases the breadth and depth of the Marvel Universe, and allows a huge range of writers and artists to put their stamp on it. I was also surprised and pleased to see that a few out of continuity properties that Marvel publishes were included. I never expected to see Star Wars, Conan, or Miracleman, and yet here they are, and all three stories were really good entries. I think most Marvel fans will find at least a few things to love in here.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    COLLECTS MARVEL COMICS ISSUES #1000 AND #1001 As a celebration of Marvel's 80th birthday, Marvel Comics #1000 features eighty one-page stories, with each story corresponding to one year of Marvel's existence. Eighty different creators are involved, however there is a small plot weaved throughout, and I believe those were exlusively being written by Al Ewing. Issue #1001 continues the story that Ewing started in Issue #1000, but also includes extra pages that feel like they were leftover and/or un COLLECTS MARVEL COMICS ISSUES #1000 AND #1001 As a celebration of Marvel's 80th birthday, Marvel Comics #1000 features eighty one-page stories, with each story corresponding to one year of Marvel's existence. Eighty different creators are involved, however there is a small plot weaved throughout, and I believe those were exlusively being written by Al Ewing. Issue #1001 continues the story that Ewing started in Issue #1000, but also includes extra pages that feel like they were leftover and/or unused from Issue #1000. I'm ot sure that I'm doing a good job at selling this, but while it was a time-consuming read, I definitely felt like it was a worthwhile read. There was a Spider-Man story in Issue #1000 that I thought was really beautiful (about someone that he saved wanting to name their kid after him), and I wish that I had made note of which year it corresponded to so that I could list it here. Because there is an abundance of stories to consume, this collection is a lot of hit-or-miss, with some amazing hidden gems along the way. Final rating = 4.5 stars

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Edmonds

    A mixed bag of one page stories by a variety of writers and artists, with each page highlighting 1 thing that happened in each year of Marvel's 80 year history. Like most of these anthology issues with so many writers and artists, some of the bits are better than others. The idea that there has been a common thread running thru the Marvel Universe since the first issue and is now coming to light is a cool idea, but does feel a little forced, as the idea of the Eternity Mask seems shoehorned into A mixed bag of one page stories by a variety of writers and artists, with each page highlighting 1 thing that happened in each year of Marvel's 80 year history. Like most of these anthology issues with so many writers and artists, some of the bits are better than others. The idea that there has been a common thread running thru the Marvel Universe since the first issue and is now coming to light is a cool idea, but does feel a little forced, as the idea of the Eternity Mask seems shoehorned into some aspects of the story, but I do think it's a clever idea and I'm interested to see how this will all play out in the grand scheme of things in the Marvel comic universe.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Will Cooper

    The Al Ewing over-arcing story is fun to see the golden age Human Torch connect to modern day and some of the Spider-Man one offs are really nice. At first I thought this was just going to highlight all the big hits about Marvel from the beginning till now, but once we got to the 90s, I realized each page was just something that happened each year. So while yes introduction of Black Panther and the death of Gwen Stacy should be in there, I didn't really care "Mary Jane reveals why she can't be wi The Al Ewing over-arcing story is fun to see the golden age Human Torch connect to modern day and some of the Spider-Man one offs are really nice. At first I thought this was just going to highlight all the big hits about Marvel from the beginning till now, but once we got to the 90s, I realized each page was just something that happened each year. So while yes introduction of Black Panther and the death of Gwen Stacy should be in there, I didn't really care "Mary Jane reveals why she can't be with Peter Parker." I would've rather just had all the milestones after each other.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    2.5 Stars. While I appreciate the hundreds of contributors to this, art and story that was compelling, and a setup of the "Eternity Mask", which I'm sure will play out in the Marvel Comics Universe soon... To have a huge landmark book like this contain 5 or less pages of X-Men stuff is a HUGE Disappointment! X-Men are not only the reason I love Marvel, but they were the reason I started reading comics in the first place. I know you can't satisfy everyone with a book like this, but I felt it was ex 2.5 Stars. While I appreciate the hundreds of contributors to this, art and story that was compelling, and a setup of the "Eternity Mask", which I'm sure will play out in the Marvel Comics Universe soon... To have a huge landmark book like this contain 5 or less pages of X-Men stuff is a HUGE Disappointment! X-Men are not only the reason I love Marvel, but they were the reason I started reading comics in the first place. I know you can't satisfy everyone with a book like this, but I felt it was extremely skewed to the MCU. Recommend... but with warning.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Oli Kidsley

    A fun trek through the history of Marvel made up of one page comics. Much like a comedy film hitting a joke every few seconds, Marvel Comics #1000 is such a quick read of one page stories that if you don't like one it's over before you can complain, and so all it needs to do is have a higher ratio of good pages than bad pages, and it does that quite well. I'll also say, it has given me new things to explore and possibly read in the future that I hadn't heard of before, and that is really the big A fun trek through the history of Marvel made up of one page comics. Much like a comedy film hitting a joke every few seconds, Marvel Comics #1000 is such a quick read of one page stories that if you don't like one it's over before you can complain, and so all it needs to do is have a higher ratio of good pages than bad pages, and it does that quite well. I'll also say, it has given me new things to explore and possibly read in the future that I hadn't heard of before, and that is really the biggest plus of this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ανδρέας Μιχαηλίδης

    Exactly what it says: a compact anthology of mostly one-pagers, going through the milestones of Marvel Comics' publishing history, using the Eternity Mask from 1939 as a sort of connective thread. Most new readers probably won't care about this one, but it was an 80th Anniversary Celebration piece, so eh, painless read with a few interesting points along the publishing timeline. Exactly what it says: a compact anthology of mostly one-pagers, going through the milestones of Marvel Comics' publishing history, using the Eternity Mask from 1939 as a sort of connective thread. Most new readers probably won't care about this one, but it was an 80th Anniversary Celebration piece, so eh, painless read with a few interesting points along the publishing timeline.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Erica McGillivray

    Meh. Not everyone can tell a story in a single page. I cannot believe there wasn't one commemorating the launch of the X-Men. Clearly, this book was to push Al Ewing's Black Mask dude book. Heavy on male creators and characters and pretty white in character choices. Meh. Not everyone can tell a story in a single page. I cannot believe there wasn't one commemorating the launch of the X-Men. Clearly, this book was to push Al Ewing's Black Mask dude book. Heavy on male creators and characters and pretty white in character choices.

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