hits counter Murder in Old Bombay - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Murder in Old Bombay

Availability: Ready to download

In 19th century Bombay, Captain Jim Agnihotri channels his idol, Sherlock Holmes, in Nev March’s Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Award-winning debut. In 1892, Bombay is the center of British India. Nearby, Captain Jim Agnihotri lies in Poona military hospital recovering from a skirmish on the wild northern frontier, with little to do but re-read In 19th century Bombay, Captain Jim Agnihotri channels his idol, Sherlock Holmes, in Nev March’s Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Award-winning debut. In 1892, Bombay is the center of British India. Nearby, Captain Jim Agnihotri lies in Poona military hospital recovering from a skirmish on the wild northern frontier, with little to do but re-read the tales of his idol, Sherlock Holmes, and browse the daily papers. The case that catches Captain Jim's attention is being called the crime of the century: Two women fell from the busy university’s clock tower in broad daylight. Moved by Adi, the widower of one of the victims — his certainty that his wife and sister did not commit suicide — Captain Jim approaches the Parsee family and is hired to investigate what happened that terrible afternoon. But in a land of divided loyalties, asking questions is dangerous. Captain Jim's investigation disturbs the shadows that seem to follow the Framji family and triggers an ominous chain of events. And when lively Lady Diana Framji joins the hunt for her sisters’ attackers, Captain Jim’s heart isn’t safe, either. Based on a true story, and set against the vibrant backdrop of colonial India, Nev March's Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Award-winning lyrical debut, Murder in Old Bombay, brings this tumultuous historical age to life.


Compare

In 19th century Bombay, Captain Jim Agnihotri channels his idol, Sherlock Holmes, in Nev March’s Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Award-winning debut. In 1892, Bombay is the center of British India. Nearby, Captain Jim Agnihotri lies in Poona military hospital recovering from a skirmish on the wild northern frontier, with little to do but re-read In 19th century Bombay, Captain Jim Agnihotri channels his idol, Sherlock Holmes, in Nev March’s Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Award-winning debut. In 1892, Bombay is the center of British India. Nearby, Captain Jim Agnihotri lies in Poona military hospital recovering from a skirmish on the wild northern frontier, with little to do but re-read the tales of his idol, Sherlock Holmes, and browse the daily papers. The case that catches Captain Jim's attention is being called the crime of the century: Two women fell from the busy university’s clock tower in broad daylight. Moved by Adi, the widower of one of the victims — his certainty that his wife and sister did not commit suicide — Captain Jim approaches the Parsee family and is hired to investigate what happened that terrible afternoon. But in a land of divided loyalties, asking questions is dangerous. Captain Jim's investigation disturbs the shadows that seem to follow the Framji family and triggers an ominous chain of events. And when lively Lady Diana Framji joins the hunt for her sisters’ attackers, Captain Jim’s heart isn’t safe, either. Based on a true story, and set against the vibrant backdrop of colonial India, Nev March's Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Award-winning lyrical debut, Murder in Old Bombay, brings this tumultuous historical age to life.

30 review for Murder in Old Bombay

  1. 5 out of 5

    MarilynW

    Update: On my friend Farshana's review comments, the author mentioned that she is writing a sequel. I was pleasantly surprised at just how much I enjoyed this historical crime novel, set in 1892 British India.  Thirty year old Captain Jim Agnihotri, son of an unknown English father and an Indian mother who left him with a church before she died, has been convalescing in a hospital, from injuries that occurred over a year ago. During the skirmish that killed all but a handful of his fellow soldie Update: On my friend Farshana's review comments, the author mentioned that she is writing a sequel. I was pleasantly surprised at just how much I enjoyed this historical crime novel, set in 1892 British India.  Thirty year old Captain Jim Agnihotri, son of an unknown English father and an Indian mother who left him with a church before she died, has been convalescing in a hospital, from injuries that occurred over a year ago. During the skirmish that killed all but a handful of his fellow soldiers, Jim was injured so badly that he has only become aware of his surroundings in the last few months. He's left with horrible nightmares, panic attacks, and an overpowering sense of guilt and grief for not being able to save his companions. During his time of recuperation, Jim rereads Sherlock Holmes stories and scours newspapers for information on the deaths of two young women who fell from a clock tower. The book is full of references to Holmes and Watson, as Jim decides to investigate the suspicious deaths of the two women, once he's out of the hospital. Parsee Adi Framji, widower of one of the women, along with his entire family, take Jim in as one of their own, glad to have his help and friendship. Being of mixed heritage, Jim, having been an orphan from the age of two, values the time he spends with this loving family, knowing he is never really a part of any group, because of his mixed heritage.  The story is told in Jim's words and for this reason, we aren't always sure of the thoughts and motivations of others in this story. Jim knows that he really has no place in the life of this family, other than as an employee, but he can't help having feelings for Adi's sister, Diana. Jim also values his friendship with Adi and the way that Adi's parents show real feelings for him, in the manner of a mother and father.  Midway through the book, Jim travels to Lahore, right before the fighting breaks out and he must make his way to safety. During this time, he acquires five traveling companions and I loved this part of the book and Jim's relationship with his five charges. The author allows us to see Jim from many sides, because he really does belong to no one group but instead can pass for both Indian or an Englishman. So much of the book reminds me of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes, as Jim is able to use disguises, mirroring the way Sherlock would change his looks and demeanor.  Publication: November 10, 2020 Thank you to St. Martin's Press/Minotaur Books and NetGalley for this ARC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ~ Bantering Books

    Be sure to visit Bantering Books to read all my latest reviews. 3.5 stars Okay. Get ready for yet another average, middle-of-the-road review. Because I liked Murder in Old Bombay, but I didn’t love it. I’m not hot on it. I’m not cold on it. I’m lukewarm on it. Set in British India in 1892 and based on a true story, Nev March’s Murder in Old Bombay is a historical whodunit, heavily inspired by The Sherlock Holmes Mysteries. Captain Jim Agnihotri, recovering in Poona military hospital in Bombay after Be sure to visit Bantering Books to read all my latest reviews. 3.5 stars Okay. Get ready for yet another average, middle-of-the-road review. Because I liked Murder in Old Bombay, but I didn’t love it. I’m not hot on it. I’m not cold on it. I’m lukewarm on it. Set in British India in 1892 and based on a true story, Nev March’s Murder in Old Bombay is a historical whodunit, heavily inspired by The Sherlock Holmes Mysteries. Captain Jim Agnihotri, recovering in Poona military hospital in Bombay after being injured in battle, spends his days surveying the newspapers and rereading the stories of his sleuthing hero, Sherlock Holmes. One local case, in particular, draws Captain Jim’s attention -- the death of two young women, their bodies plunging to the ground from the top of the university’s clock tower in broad daylight, supposedly in a dual act of suicide. Inspired by a letter written by Adi Framji, the surviving husband of one of the victims, in which Adi fervently insists that his wife and sister’s deaths were not self-inflicted, Captain Jim approaches the family upon his release from the hospital. He is immediately retained by the Framjis and asked to investigate the deaths of the two women. Captain Jim hopes to bring closure and peace to Adi and the rest of the Framji family by uncovering the truth behind what transpired that day at the clock tower. But his investigation soon brings more chaos than closure, as the Captain unwittingly sets off a series of events that will forever alter the course of his life – and his heart. I think I’m about to sound like a broken record. Because once again, the reason for my tepid praise of Murder in Old Bombay is that I believe March tries to do too much with the story. It’s a common problem; one that I’ve repeatedly mentioned in a handful of my reviews this year. And I have found that when an author bites off more than he or she can chew, the end result is always the same – the novel is cluttered, unfocused, and stretched too thin. If March would have held tight to the historical mystery path, I think the novel would have been terrific. But instead, she broadens the story too widely. One minute the novel feels like a cozy, the next a romance, and after that, an adventure story and a military war drama. There are also far too many ancillary storylines and characters of which to keep track, and the mystery at the novel’s core, the deaths of the two Framji women, is often lost in the shuffle of it all. And since the story is chocked so full of, well, everything, none of the everything is developed sufficiently because March has not given herself space in the narrative to do so. The novel greatly lacks substance and weight. Consequently -- The major plot points are unrealized and too quick. The characters are one-dimensional and not fully fleshed. The motivations for character behavior are sometimes nonsensical. On top of all that, the detective work is just too unbelievably easy for Captain Jim. The dots all connect, exactly when he needs them to connect. Somehow, his amateur deductive reasoning skills are always spot on, without him ever having any prior investigative experience. (I also found many of his assumptions and much of his reasoning to be flimsy and faulty stretches of logic. He takes some great leaps in his thinking, let me tell you.) He locates whomever and whatever he needs to locate at the precise, necessary moment. But you know what? I still found Murder in Old Bombay to be a pleasant and mildly compelling read. The historical backdrop of 19th century Bombay is certainly interesting, and Captain Jim and the Framjis are appealing characters. I cared about their welfare and hoped for their happiness. Did you catch that? March made me care. I was engaged and invested in the story. I anxiously awaited the unveiling of the solution to the mystery surrounding the deaths of the of two women. I felt hope for the love story and Captain Jim’s fragile heart. And March got me with the ending. She moved me. Tugged on my soul. The novel’s final scene warmed my cold, cold heart and brought a tear to my eye. I may have even felt a goosebump or two. (Or maybe three. But no more than three.) So, I must give credit where credit is due. Regardless of however lightweight and middle-of-the-road the novel may be, Murder in Old Bombay is nevertheless enjoyable. By no means is the novel a poor recipient of your precious reading time. But to read or not to read? Always, that is the ever important question. This time, I will give you a nudge slightly in the direction of read. Nudge. Nudge. My sincerest appreciation to Minotaur Books and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy. All opinions included herein are my own. Bantering Books Instagram Twitter Facebook

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sumit RK

    Set in 19th century British India, Murder in Old Bombay is the story of Army Captain Jim Agnihotri. While recovering from his battle injuries in a military hospital in Poona, he comes across a mysterious case. Two women have fallen to their death from the city’s busy university clock tower, with the only suspect walking free. Moved by the sorrow of the widower of one of the victims, Captain Jim approaches the Parsee family and is hired to investigate the case. Set against the backdrop of colonia Set in 19th century British India, Murder in Old Bombay is the story of Army Captain Jim Agnihotri. While recovering from his battle injuries in a military hospital in Poona, he comes across a mysterious case. Two women have fallen to their death from the city’s busy university clock tower, with the only suspect walking free. Moved by the sorrow of the widower of one of the victims, Captain Jim approaches the Parsee family and is hired to investigate the case. Set against the backdrop of colonial India, Murder in Old Bombay, is an old school mystery, reminiscent of a classic Sherlock Holmes case. Murder in Old Bombay is much more than a murder mystery. It’s an adventure, an autobiography, a character-driven drama, sprinkled with romance and it also takes a look at the then elite society of colonial Bombay. What starts as a murder mystery, slowly immerses the readers into the life and main characters of the story. The mystery slowly reveals itself with plenty of interactions with eyewitnesses and painstakingly collected clues from all over the country. The story unfolds slowly with lots of characters, but March’s writing style keeps you hooked throughout, as the mystery keeps unfolding one chapter at a time. The story feels lively and vibrant, with lots of mystery and drama. The writing was descriptive and fast-paced. The setting of the story felt unique, including the use of some of the landmarks of the city. Having visited these landmarks several times, I can say the writer was successful in capturing the mood and setting of Old Bombay. Captain Jim, is clearly inspired by the adventures of Sherlock Holmes, so most of Jim’s methods; from using disguises, hunting for clues, and interrogating suspects and witnesses remind you a lot of Sherlock. There were places when I felt the story dragged a little especially towards the end and I think it could have been wrapped up sooner. The story went in a totally different direction midway with Jim’s travels all across India but it was all brought to a satisfactory conclusion. The story remained entertaining throughout despite the slower pace at times. Nev March has created some well-written characters and a fascinating story that takes readers on an intriguing adventure alongside. Captain Jim Agnihotri is a flawed yet likable protagonist. From his life as an orphan to joining the military life, never fully accepted by the society and haunted by the loss of his army brothers, Jim’s character as a brooding tormented protagonist is multi-faceted and well flashed out. Jim’s backstory and romantic angle give a human angle to Jim’s character but it never distracts from the main plot. Overall, Murder in Old Bombay is a highly entertaining novel with a great story and some excellent characters. The ending hints at a sequel which will be quite interesting to read. If you love reading mysteries with a historical setting, you will love this book. 3.5 stars rounded to 4 Many thanks to the publishers St. Martin's Press, Minotaur Books, and Netgalley for the ARC.  

  4. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    3.5 stars rounded up for an entertaining romantic mystery set in 1890s India. Our dashing hero, Captain Jim Agnihotri, son of an English father and Indian mother, reads Sherlock Holmes mysteries during a 2 year hospital stay because of injuries in battle. He reads newspapers also. An article about what the paper calls "the crime of century' catches his eye. Two women have fallen to their death from a tower. The husband of 1 woman, and brother to the other, writes a letter to the paper, insisting 3.5 stars rounded up for an entertaining romantic mystery set in 1890s India. Our dashing hero, Captain Jim Agnihotri, son of an English father and Indian mother, reads Sherlock Holmes mysteries during a 2 year hospital stay because of injuries in battle. He reads newspapers also. An article about what the paper calls "the crime of century' catches his eye. Two women have fallen to their death from a tower. The husband of 1 woman, and brother to the other, writes a letter to the paper, insisting that his wife and sister did not commit suicide. Jim decides to investigate. He goes to the newspaper editor and asks to be hired to investigate. He is hired at 30 rupees a week. He then goes to Adi Framji's house to interview the widower about the death of his wife and sister. Adi questions Jim about why he wants to do this and how long it will take. He is pleased with Jim's answers and offers to hire Jim at 40 rupees a week to investigate for him, instead of the newspaper. According to the blurb, this book is based on a true story. The book, not due to be published until Nov 10, has won an award for a debut mystery novel. Jim does discover the truth behind their deaths and more. There is a forbidden romance and an enlightening look at the British Raj at the height of its power in India. Jim is classed as a native officer and Captain is as high as he will go. He is given a medical discharge. The British are cast as the good guys and the Indians fighting for independence are truly evil villains. All in all, British India seen through rose colored glasses. I learned something new: Parsees are medieval refugees to India from Pars, Persia(Iran). The Parsees number about 100.000 and forbid marriage to non Parsees. Three quotes: Jim on British hierarchy: "Indian hierarchy dogging me again. At the top, admired. obeyed and watched, always watched, were British officers. Next came 'the civil' administrators, Englishmen regardless of education or connections. Then non-coms, followed by native officers of high caste. All high castes, Brahmins,-the priestly class--and Shatriya warriors preceded Sikhs and Gurkhas. Parsees might figure with non-coms, educated, wealthy and influential. At the bottom, ignored at best, often just despised, were the low castes: traders,and tribesman thought to be crude, ignorant carpet peddlers like the Pathans, like me. High castes could escape crimes perpetrated upon lower castes." "Indians did not rise above Subedar-Major, equivalent to the rank of Captain, since young Englishmen could not be expected to follow a native." Jim's romantic thoughts: "Having her near was to drink after weeks in the desert. Those delicate fingers, now clenched at her side in fields of pale blue. Her arms, slender and so perfectly shaped, her softly heaving bosom." If you like a romantic mystery with little violence, no profanity or sex, and a dashing hero, then this book is for you. Thank you St. Martin's Press for sending me this eARC through NetGalley.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I wish to thank NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the ARC of this grand, epic tale set in Bombay during the latter part of the 19th century. The book gives a vibrant picture of life, luxury and turmoil during the British Raj and the Princely States which were never fully a part of British India in colonial times. These semi-independent states had their own regional rulers and had tenuous alliances with England, but often resented British rule. The book vividly portrays divisions in class, cul I wish to thank NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the ARC of this grand, epic tale set in Bombay during the latter part of the 19th century. The book gives a vibrant picture of life, luxury and turmoil during the British Raj and the Princely States which were never fully a part of British India in colonial times. These semi-independent states had their own regional rulers and had tenuous alliances with England, but often resented British rule. The book vividly portrays divisions in class, culture, caste, race, religion, and the place of women in society. Captain Jim Agnihotri is recovering during a long stay in hospital after being wounded in a battle in the northern frontier. While his body is healing, his memory is muddled and he experiences episodes of PTSD. He is overcome by grief due to the feeling that he failed his military team. He has never known the love of a real family. His father was English and his mother Indian. Because of his mixed heritage, he doesn't quite fit in with either race. He grew up in an orphanage and entered the army at an early age. He had kindly, supportive mentors at both stages of his youth. While lying in the hospital, Jim's attention is drawn to reports of the deaths of two young women in the newspapers. The two young women, one married, and her sister-in-law fell to their death from a University tower. He feels the women's deaths are suspicious. He also reads a letter in the paper from the grieving widower and is determined to discover the cause of their deaths. Being a great fan of the Sherlock Holmes stories, he feels he can use Holmes' power of deduction and sleuthing to solve the mystery and bring closure to the husband. It is believed by the police the two women committed suicide together for unknown reasons. Once released from the hospital, Jim is hired by the newspaper to write about the deaths. When he interviews the wealthy Parsee family, he is convinced they may have been murdered, but why?. He develops a strong attachment to the family who offers him the job investigating why they died. They will pay more than the newspaper, but he agrees primarily because he is now in the centre of a loving family with whom he sympathizes. I found the first part of his investigation compelling and which presented some tantalizing mysteries and intriguing characters. Later, I thought the story meandered too much as he donned many disguises to search for suspects and witnesses far and wide, becoming rather convoluted and moved along with a slower pace. I did not care for the romance with the flighty and flirtatious daughter in the family. This detracted from the investigation, and I found their love story to be melodramatic and overwrought. As Parsees do not marry outside their religion, this worry was an impediment to his investigation and state of mind. Some earlier tumultuous history is mentioned that relates fierce, bloody battles between British regiments and native forces resulting in the slaughter of thousands. Were the participants of these uprisings patriots or terrorists? How does this history relate to Jim's investigation? Overall, I found this a riveting, complex mystery that could have been shortened by omitting irrelevant tangents. There is an ending that hints that some of the characters may be continuing their story in America. I will hope that book will be forthcoming but will miss the dynamic, colourful, historic Bombay setting. 3.5 to 4 stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    Murder in Old Bombay was not on my radar prior to receiving it, and I cannot tell you how grateful I am to Minotaur for sending it along. I love historical mysteries, and this one is steeped in Indian culture, so I loved it all the more. It’s also based on a true story, so what’s not to love here? And the cover is stunning! Murder in Old Bombay takes place in the late 1890s when India was a British colony. It’s a time when loyalties were understandably divided and uncertain. Captain Jim is a dete Murder in Old Bombay was not on my radar prior to receiving it, and I cannot tell you how grateful I am to Minotaur for sending it along. I love historical mysteries, and this one is steeped in Indian culture, so I loved it all the more. It’s also based on a true story, so what’s not to love here? And the cover is stunning! Murder in Old Bombay takes place in the late 1890s when India was a British colony. It’s a time when loyalties were understandably divided and uncertain. Captain Jim is a detective inspired by his idol, Sherlock Holmes. I loved visiting the destinations as Captain Jim travels and observing his analytical process while investigating a double suicide that may instead be a murder. The land and its people are described in a lyrical and beautiful way by the author, and I see now that she has won an award for this book. Overall, I enjoyed every bit of the rich storytelling, characterization, and mystery held in the pages of this book. While the story is complete as is, I’d love to read of more adventures with Captain Jim! I received a gifted copy from the publisher. Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader

  7. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I rarely indulge in historical mysteries for some reason. Not sure why, as I enjoy both mysteries and historical fiction. And I truly enjoyed this book. Nev March paints a complete picture of India in 1892, providing plenty of background to understand the time and place. I felt I learned a great deal all while enjoying a good mystery. James Agnihotri is a mixed blood Indian-English retired Army Officer. He’s known as the ‘hero of Karachi’ for reasons we are initially not privy to. What we do kno I rarely indulge in historical mysteries for some reason. Not sure why, as I enjoy both mysteries and historical fiction. And I truly enjoyed this book. Nev March paints a complete picture of India in 1892, providing plenty of background to understand the time and place. I felt I learned a great deal all while enjoying a good mystery. James Agnihotri is a mixed blood Indian-English retired Army Officer. He’s known as the ‘hero of Karachi’ for reasons we are initially not privy to. What we do know is that he suffers from PTSD because of it. He agrees to investigate the possible double suicide of two young women from a wealthy Indian family. James is a fan of Sherlock Holmes and attempts to channel his hero to solve the puzzle of their deaths. All the characters are richly developed, especially James. This doesn't read like a debut novel. It’s well polished and finely crafted. It moves at a brisk pace and kept me engaged. It took some turns I never expected. I also liked that, for once, the romance was told from the male point of view. It was fascinating to realize this was based on a true story. It deserves the award for debut mystery that the Mystery Writers of America’s bestowed on it. My thanks to netgalley and St. Martin’s Press for an advance copy of took

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marialyce

    Our mystery story starts out with two suspected suicides. Two young women seem to jump from the university's tower in Bombay but all seems quite shady and devious. As Captain Jim Agnihotri reviews the case in his hospital room in Pooma, where he is recovering from wounds suffered on the northern frontier, he puzzles over the case and the pieces he puts together do not make any sense to him. He once again reverts to his fascination with his idol Sherlock Holmes and believes these deaths are more Our mystery story starts out with two suspected suicides. Two young women seem to jump from the university's tower in Bombay but all seems quite shady and devious. As Captain Jim Agnihotri reviews the case in his hospital room in Pooma, where he is recovering from wounds suffered on the northern frontier, he puzzles over the case and the pieces he puts together do not make any sense to him. He once again reverts to his fascination with his idol Sherlock Holmes and believes these deaths are more than meets the eye. He wonders what would Holmes think and do as he recovers from his injuries. Adi, the husband and brother of the victims, approaches the Captain and enlists his help for he too, believes the ladies did not kill themselves. Jim then finds himself embroiled in a case that will test his wits and his reliance on the keen advice found in the books by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle of his idol Sherlock Holmes. The Framji family, a wealthy family, is anxious to know the truth and Jim is on the trail of many nefarious characters who seem to have the finding of a special letter foremost on their minds and will do whatever is required to obtain it. While becoming closer to the family, Jim meets the beautiful Lady Diana Framji, sister to Adi. Their attraction to one another is strong but Captain Jim is a half breed, half British and half Indian, so he is considered inferior and no match for Lady Diana. She joins Jim in his pursuit of the truth placing herself in danger, but also showing a cunning that endears her even more so to Jim. Was this a double suicide or were the ladies murdered by the dark forces that seem to swirl around the family and the times they live in? What is so special about this letter and could it be the one thing that gives this case its direction? Will Diana and Jim find out the truth as they find themselves becoming more enamored with one another? Based on an actual event, the story paints a wonderful revealing background of colonial India with all its enviorments and visual beauty that it was. Ms March does a fine job with the background as well as the characters which she portrays against the lushness, the beauty, riches and also the sordid parts of India back in the 1890s. Thank you to Nev March, Minotaur Books, and NetGalley for a copy of this convincing tale due out on November 10, 2020.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    After being injured in a battle in Karachi in the early 1890s, Anglo-Indian Army Captain Jim Agnihotri is slowly recovering in a hospital in Poona. During his recuperation, Agnihotri reads the Sherlock Holmes story 'The Sign of Four' and gets the sleuthing bug. Serendipitously Agnihotri finds a mystery to solve in 'The Chronicle of India' tabloid. A letter to the editor from a Bombay resident named Adi Framji upbraids the newspaper for calling the deaths of his wife and sister suicides. Adi insi After being injured in a battle in Karachi in the early 1890s, Anglo-Indian Army Captain Jim Agnihotri is slowly recovering in a hospital in Poona. During his recuperation, Agnihotri reads the Sherlock Holmes story 'The Sign of Four' and gets the sleuthing bug. Serendipitously Agnihotri finds a mystery to solve in 'The Chronicle of India' tabloid. A letter to the editor from a Bombay resident named Adi Framji upbraids the newspaper for calling the deaths of his wife and sister suicides. Adi insists that his 19-year old wife Bacha..... .....and 16-year-old sister Pilloo - who fell from a university clock tower minutes apart - were murdered. Upon being released from the hospital Agnihotri goes to Bombay, contacts Framji, and arranges to look into the deaths of Bacha and Pilloo, whose tragic passing cast a pall over the entire Framji family. While Agnihotri is investigating, he spends a lot of time in the wealthy Framji household, which consists of Adi, his father and mother, and his four remaining siblings, including his pretty sister Diana, who just returned from a stay in England. Agnihotri examines the scene of death, interviews witnesses, and attempts to track down suspects - aided in part by Diana, who thinks of herself as Watson to Agnihotri's Holmes. Agnihotri's queries upset SOMEONE, because he's viciously attacked and someone attempts to burgle the Framji house. To pursue his inquiries Agnihotri has to travel around India, and - like Sherlock Holmes - dons disguises to remain incognito. During one trip, Agnihotri even assists the army, which has a group of soldiers trapped in rebel territory. As the story unfolds we see the contrast between the rich and poor in 19th century India as Agnihotri attends wonderful dinners and elegant parties at the Framji home, then encounters starving children during his travels. We also learn a bit about Indian history, like the Sepoy Mutiny of 1857; the uppity attitude of the British to Indians, Pakistanis, etc.; and native groups that wanted to overthrow the British Raj. The book is part mystery, part travelogue, and part romance. Agnihotri inevitably falls for Diana, but is forbidden to pursue her because she's Parsee and he isn't. Agnihotri moons over Diana continually, which felt a bit too much like a Regency romance to me. This is an engaging - though a tad meandering - historical mystery, recommended to fans of the genre. Thanks to Netgalley, the author (Nev March), and the publisher (Minotaur Books) for a copy of the book. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot.com

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katie B

    As soon as I saw this book was a historical mystery taking place in 19th century Bombay, I knew I had to read it. I was hoping I would get the opportunity to learn a thing or two and the author really did a good job incorporating a little bit of history into the book. Unfortunately while the story starts off with promise, my interest level did start to dip at about a third of the way in. A neat premise but a few problems with the execution. Captain Jim Agnihotri has been recovering in a military As soon as I saw this book was a historical mystery taking place in 19th century Bombay, I knew I had to read it. I was hoping I would get the opportunity to learn a thing or two and the author really did a good job incorporating a little bit of history into the book. Unfortunately while the story starts off with promise, my interest level did start to dip at about a third of the way in. A neat premise but a few problems with the execution. Captain Jim Agnihotri has been recovering in a military hospital when a local news story catches his interest. Two women fell off a university clock tower. Adi Framji is the widower of one of the woman and the brother of the other one. He is convinced neither one committed suicide and he hires Jim to investigate. With Jim searching for answers, will he be able to uncover the truth? There are many Sherlock Holmes references throughout the story and it helped contribute to a bit of a light tone to the story. I'm not sure if technically this book can be classified as a cozy mystery but in my opinion it had that vibe going on. The story hooked me pretty much at the beginning as I felt as interested as Jim in finding out what really happened to the two women. I do think the story loses focus after awhile especially as you are learning more about Jim's backstory and a potential romance is brewing. While I appreciate the attempt to give a character depth, it was a weak part of the story. I think maybe the author was over ambitious and tackled too many things. Strangely enough I stopped caring about the two women and actually would have been fine if the story completely shifted to a regular romance novel. At 400 pages it's a long mystery without a significant payout. I didn't love the story, but I didn't hate it either. Not sure if this book is the setup to a planned series or not, but if it is I would consider reading future books just as long as the focus is on the case rather than other side plots. Thank you to Netgalley and Minotaur Books for providing me with an advance digital copy in exchange for an honest review!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Nothing beckons the imagination and the forthcoming thrill as a murder set in the panorama of Old Bombay. It's 1892 and Captain Jim Agnihotri is recovering in a Bombay hospital. He has served honorably in the 14th Light Cavalry Regiment for twelve years on the Frontier. Jim has come to a crossroads and has decided to take on a job as a journalist for the Chronicle of India. But as strangers cross paths, Jim is contacted by a wealthy businessman, Adi Framji, who is about to change Jim's life with a Nothing beckons the imagination and the forthcoming thrill as a murder set in the panorama of Old Bombay. It's 1892 and Captain Jim Agnihotri is recovering in a Bombay hospital. He has served honorably in the 14th Light Cavalry Regiment for twelve years on the Frontier. Jim has come to a crossroads and has decided to take on a job as a journalist for the Chronicle of India. But as strangers cross paths, Jim is contacted by a wealthy businessman, Adi Framji, who is about to change Jim's life with a proposition. Adi's young wife, Bacha, and her cousin, Pilloo, fell from the top of the Clock Tower in the main plaza. The police ruled it as a double suicide. Adi thinks otherwise and hires Jim to investigate what he believes is murder. And here is where Nev March takes us deep into the bindings of what is based on a true story. Her well developed character of Jim is laden with a remarkable backstory. March has Jim hitting the ground running in each chapter as he follows his instincts along with some nebulous clues into what exactly happened to these two women in broad daylight in the market. March fills her storyline with the vivid sights and sounds of life in India. The customs of Indian society ruled by the British in the 19th century draw us into the history that benefitted some and eliminated others. Nev March injects the story with a bit of true history weaved within. This all comes to pass along these pages filled with the reality of its people and the fight for survival during trying times. Murder in Old Bombay is quite the read. I'm wondering if the story will continue in a future offering. The character of Captain Jim Agnihotri is one to follow into a promising next adventure. I received a copy of this book through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Minotaur Books and to Nev March for the opportunity.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Farshana ❤️rainnbooks❤️

    Many thanks to Net Galley, St. Martin’s Press, and the author for a chance to read and review this book. All opinions are expressed voluntarily. I am in such a happy place, thrilled beyond measure to be transported to the OLD BOMBAY of the 19th century. The author has captured the era so beautifully that one can hear the clock tower chiming the hour from the Rajabai tower. The story is one of those rare treasure that has brilliantly interwoven a murder mystery with pure historical facts. The autho Many thanks to Net Galley, St. Martin’s Press, and the author for a chance to read and review this book. All opinions are expressed voluntarily. I am in such a happy place, thrilled beyond measure to be transported to the OLD BOMBAY of the 19th century. The author has captured the era so beautifully that one can hear the clock tower chiming the hour from the Rajabai tower. The story is one of those rare treasure that has brilliantly interwoven a murder mystery with pure historical facts. The author’s website gives a gallery of the images that had inspired her characters and have to say each of those are inspiring. Captain James Agnihotri has been given a medical discharge; Sherlock Holmes, his ray of hope during the long months of recuperation in the hospital. It is this ardent desire to emulate his hero that a newspaper report of a double suicide that sounds mysterious and dubious piques his interest and sets him on the road of self-discovery. The enquiries that he undertakes for the sake of the Framji family his means of escape as the son Adi becomes his best friend and the daughter Diana his sunshine. The journey of clues takes him across to Lahore, to Shimla, to borders of Pathankot in Kabul, the war torn countryside tearing him into pieces as he becomes aware of the children torn away from their homes and the lovable tale of Chutki woven thru the story gives a depth to the character of James, an Anglo Indian who always feel bereft, neither an Indian nor ‘Angrez’ (English/British) enough to belong to either sides. The romance between Diana and James showcases the class and religious divide that was predominant in those days but I loved how the author has shown a father who is unable to break free of his traditions and beliefs. Murder In Old Bombay has lot going for it, the amazing and detailed writing that entrances a reader and enchanting us with varied and diverse culture and subjects. There’s something about a story that touches the very core of one’s heart, one can’t help but love it immensely and this book is just that for me. Looking forward in anticipation to the sequel of this dynamic tale. This review is published in my blog, rainnbooks.com, medium.com, Amazon India, Goodreads and Twitter.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kate Baxter

    This book is set in an exotic locale, is an historical fiction with mystery, has an added touch of adventure, and provides quite the story. If that weren't enough, it's a story based on a true one. India - February, 1892 We're introduced to recovering soldier, Captain James Agnihotri, as he celebrates his 30th birthday in hospital. Although of mixed heritage, (Indian and presumably, English), he is quite well educated and well mannered. He's been reading the Chronicle (newspaper) and a bit of She This book is set in an exotic locale, is an historical fiction with mystery, has an added touch of adventure, and provides quite the story. If that weren't enough, it's a story based on a true one. India - February, 1892 We're introduced to recovering soldier, Captain James Agnihotri, as he celebrates his 30th birthday in hospital. Although of mixed heritage, (Indian and presumably, English), he is quite well educated and well mannered. He's been reading the Chronicle (newspaper) and a bit of Sherlock Holmes to while away his recuperation. The sensational headlines speak of two Bombay women plunging to their deaths from the library tower but the details seem a bit off to James. He then, on a certain level, empathizes with the widower of one of the ladies as he reads the husband's letter to the editor. Soon, James is physically healed, honorably discharged, and on his way to Bombay in search of employment at the Chronicle. He believes that he has the skill set needed to get to the bottom of this story with the added benefit of segueing into a civilian career. While interviewing the widower, Adi Framji, James is enticed by Framji to do his sleuthing for Adi. Arrangements are made with the Chronicle to "loan" James to Framji's family in pursuit of the truth, which Adi so desperately craves. And so the story begins. James Agnihotri is a bit of a tormented soul, struggling with a sense of not belonging. Purity of line plays a strong role during this time in history, to which James was not immune. Despite his strength of character, honor, will, knowledge and even bodily strength, he struggles with insecurity. He doesn't know who is father is. Growing up in an orphanage, he relied on a priest to provide fatherly guidance and care. Yet, his upraising and military service made him the man that he is - one of tremendous character. Author Nev March spins a wonderful tale, filled with adventure, mystery, and a touch of romance. The writing is excellent and highly descriptive. One is swept away to Victorian Bombay through the marvelous scene settings, descriptions of attire, food and mannerly practices. Her understanding of India's history and its delicate colonialism of the day is beautifully rendered. The way in which she writes dialogue among people of differing cultures and castes is insightful and delivers a strong understanding of the rising desire for Indian self-rule. Yet, India has much to learn at this juncture lest it tear itself apart. The story was thoroughly captivating and I cannot wait until the next book in series makes its way into the world. I am grateful to publisher Minotaur Books for having provided a complimentary uncorrected digital galley of this book through NetGalley. Their generosity however, has not influenced this review - the words of which are mine alone.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    There are nearly 3 different books here. Certainly too much for one volume. That's the primary and major downfall. So much, too much. Happening now crimes, in past dire, in casted society, in divisions of labor or placements reality. On and on categories of plot threads. The disguises are apt and nifty but that doesn't make up for the meandering crisis after crisis. In the physical outcomes alone- Jim is hospital fodder more days than he is active detective. Historical? I'm not learned enough abo There are nearly 3 different books here. Certainly too much for one volume. That's the primary and major downfall. So much, too much. Happening now crimes, in past dire, in casted society, in divisions of labor or placements reality. On and on categories of plot threads. The disguises are apt and nifty but that doesn't make up for the meandering crisis after crisis. In the physical outcomes alone- Jim is hospital fodder more days than he is active detective. Historical? I'm not learned enough about India to give an answer full boat. I do know about Karachi and the endless sects and proclivities of Afghan wars. Centuries of them. This soldier with PTSD under other names, that was done well. But overall I would give it a 2.5 stars only rounded up for the mores, places, people of India. The plotting became only a thread or pie piece of other plots and the power of Indian nobles over other classes. The journey back with the 5 kids from the war zone should have been a book by itself at the minimum. Because Thanksgiving is this week I have a rather apt analogy. This book is like trying to make and serve a 3 or 5 dish Italian dinner BEFORE the turkey courses. You end up too filled with glut amounts by 1/2 time to enjoy any particular feature of the bird meal. Epics need to be done with far less redundant circular parts. For an introduction? Diana and he and her family are interesting enough but there is a cartoonish aspect which I doubt will transfer to Liverpool or London. Don't expect to read this one in a couple of days. It took me longer than a 600 pager. It wasn't just the languages or foreign words either, it was the continuity factors. Nev March has some skills to learn. I'm into about 3 or 4 India continent placed in a row. I sure hope the next are better prose skill crux poignant than this one was. Be warned for future readers: nearly every social ill of India has a cabal group or troop thread in this one. Orphans, to assassins, to child and women traffickers and on and on.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Blaine DeSantis

    Thank you St. Martin's Press and Net Galley for this free ARC in return for an honest review. For a first novel this is quite good! I really enjoy novels/mysteries that are set in foreign locales and here we travel back to late 19th Century India as the author takes us quite and journey to lead us to find the killer of tw0 young girls who are members of an elite family in Bombay. He introduces us to a gentleman who is recovering from both battle wounds and what appears to be PTSD, one Jim Agniho Thank you St. Martin's Press and Net Galley for this free ARC in return for an honest review. For a first novel this is quite good! I really enjoy novels/mysteries that are set in foreign locales and here we travel back to late 19th Century India as the author takes us quite and journey to lead us to find the killer of tw0 young girls who are members of an elite family in Bombay. He introduces us to a gentleman who is recovering from both battle wounds and what appears to be PTSD, one Jim Agnihotri who is part Indian and part English which puts him on the outside of both societies. Two girls are killed after a jury determines the ladies fell off the top of a clock tower and it was ruled a suicide. The family is not content with this and eventually hires Jim, who is a firm believer in the Sherlock Holmes method of solving cases. Jim takes us throughout India, and along the ways has numerous side adventures, all of which will eventually be part of the plot. We learn a lot about Indian society, as well as a possible love interest for Jim. Lots going on in this book and the middle part of the book was a bit labored even if they eventually tie into the overall plot and solution to the murders. I liked this book a whole lot and thought that it really picked up steam the last 125 pages.

  16. 4 out of 5

    CYIReadBooks (Claire)

    It is colonial India, 1892. Two women fall to their deaths from the university's clock tower. One of the women is the wife of Adi Framji, son of a prominent family in Bombay, India. The other woman is Adi's sister. Intrigued by a news article about the two women's deaths, Captain Jim Agnihotri convinces the Framji family to hire him to further investigate the crime. Murder in Old Bombay is an interesting read with cultural references and customs. That being said, the novel references a number of E It is colonial India, 1892. Two women fall to their deaths from the university's clock tower. One of the women is the wife of Adi Framji, son of a prominent family in Bombay, India. The other woman is Adi's sister. Intrigued by a news article about the two women's deaths, Captain Jim Agnihotri convinces the Framji family to hire him to further investigate the crime. Murder in Old Bombay is an interesting read with cultural references and customs. That being said, the novel references a number of East Indian terms. Luckily, there is a glossary of terms in the book. The storyline had its ups and downs primarily because there are a few tangential narratives that took away from the main focus -- a murder mystery. Coupled with the numerous East Indian terminology, it was somewhat of a slog to read. Nevertheless, Murder in Old Bombay was still a likeable read. Three stars -- I liked it. I received a digital ARC from St. Martin's Press through NetGalley. The review herein is completely my own and contains my own thoughts and opinions.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Blaine DeSantis

    Thank you St. Martin's Press and Net Galley for this free ARC in return for an honest review. For a first novel this is quite good! I really enjoy novels/mysteries that are set in foreign locales and here we travel back to late 19th Century India as the author takes us quite and journey to lead us to find the killer of tw0 young girls who are members of an elite family in Bombay. He introduces us to a gentleman who is recovering from both battle wounds and what appears to be PTSD, one Jim Agniho Thank you St. Martin's Press and Net Galley for this free ARC in return for an honest review. For a first novel this is quite good! I really enjoy novels/mysteries that are set in foreign locales and here we travel back to late 19th Century India as the author takes us quite and journey to lead us to find the killer of tw0 young girls who are members of an elite family in Bombay. He introduces us to a gentleman who is recovering from both battle wounds and what appears to be PTSD, one Jim Agnihotri who is part Indian and part English which puts him on the outside of both societies. Two girls are killed after a jury determines the ladies fell off the top of a clock tower and it was ruled a suicide. The family is not content with this and eventually hires Jim, who is a firm believer in the Sherlock Holmes method of solving cases. Jim takes us throughout India, and along the ways has numerous side adventures, all of which will eventually be part of the plot. We learn a lot about Indian society, as well as a possible love interest for Jim. Lots going on in this book and the middle part of the book was a bit labored even if they eventually tie into the overall plot and solution to the murders. I liked this book a whole lot and thought that it really picked up steam the last 125 pages.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Linden

    It’s 1892, and Captain Jim Agnihotri is recovering in a military hospital when he reads about a puzzling case: two women have fallen from a clock tower. The husband of one of the women is certain that they didn’t die by suicide, and hires Jim to investigate. Jim is a devotee of Sherlock Holmes, and tries to use his methods to solve the mystery. The setting of India during British rule is unique, and the author seems to have done quite a bit of research to create the novel’s unique ambiance. Reco It’s 1892, and Captain Jim Agnihotri is recovering in a military hospital when he reads about a puzzling case: two women have fallen from a clock tower. The husband of one of the women is certain that they didn’t die by suicide, and hires Jim to investigate. Jim is a devotee of Sherlock Holmes, and tries to use his methods to solve the mystery. The setting of India during British rule is unique, and the author seems to have done quite a bit of research to create the novel’s unique ambiance. Recommended for readers who enjoy historical mysteries with a different twist. Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the ARC.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jammin Jenny

    I really enjoyed this book set in Bombay in the late 1890s, during the British occupation of that country. I thought the author did a great job describing the country, the caste system, and how hard it was for people from different castes to be together. I enjoyed the mystery and intrigue, and the romance between Jim and Diana. Great storytelling.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dee Arr

    Author Nev March has captured the perfect atmosphere for this book. It has the feel of a book written around the turn of the twentieth century yet doesn’t carry the stodginess of some of the books of that era. Thus, the period comes alive while the writing is still as interesting as a present-day novel. As the title indicates, there is a murder-mystery to be solved. Captain Jim Agnihotri, recently released from the hospital and the army, is intrigued by an article he read in the paper, talking ab Author Nev March has captured the perfect atmosphere for this book. It has the feel of a book written around the turn of the twentieth century yet doesn’t carry the stodginess of some of the books of that era. Thus, the period comes alive while the writing is still as interesting as a present-day novel. As the title indicates, there is a murder-mystery to be solved. Captain Jim Agnihotri, recently released from the hospital and the army, is intrigued by an article he read in the paper, talking about a double suicide of two young women. The facts as he sees them do not add up, and Jim determines that he could ferret out the truth. His favorite author is Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and what better detective could one learn from than the famous Sherlock Holmes. Jim is hired by Adi Framji, husband of Bacha and bother to Pilloo, the two woman who supposedly committed suicide. Adi’s younger sister Diana also wishes to help, and Jim finds himself in a precarious position when he begins to develop feelings for her. The author delicately blends the minor plot elements in and out of the main storyline, which kept me continually interested in the story. Mr. March never allowed the attraction between Jim and Diana to overwhelm the mystery while still supplying plenty of moments that reveal both characters’ thoughts and emotions. It is the mystery that takes center stage most of the book, and the author shares each clue as it appears and allows us to put the pieces together with Jim rather than slyly holding back and revealing everything in a final chapter. “Murder in Old Bombay” slowly builds until before you know it, you are hooked and completely immersed in the story. There is action, old-fashioned detective work, and a lot of character interaction that helps to reveal motivations. Overall, a solid and entertaining novel. Five stars. My thanks to NetGalley, St. Martin’s Press, and Minotaur Books for a complimentary electronic copy of this title.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mainlinebooker

    Based on real events, this novel was pure Sherlock Holmes with an Indian flair. Having been to modern India several times, it was a consummate pleasure to be transported to the late 19th Century . The dialogue so perfectly portrayed a prismatic view of this period in time. Romance, history and a perfectly plotted story engulfed all my senses and vividly conveyed to me the mysterious dimension of colonial India. At the beginning, Captain Jim Agnihotri,an Anglo-Indian,is recovering in a hospital c Based on real events, this novel was pure Sherlock Holmes with an Indian flair. Having been to modern India several times, it was a consummate pleasure to be transported to the late 19th Century . The dialogue so perfectly portrayed a prismatic view of this period in time. Romance, history and a perfectly plotted story engulfed all my senses and vividly conveyed to me the mysterious dimension of colonial India. At the beginning, Captain Jim Agnihotri,an Anglo-Indian,is recovering in a hospital convalescing from wounds sustained in combat in the Northern Frontier. While reading an article about a crime where two women apparently jumped to their death, he is deeply affected. In a circuitous manner, he becomes an investigator for one of the women's husband who believes they were murdered. The husband, Adi, is willing to sacrifice anything to find out the truth. Captain Jim becomes involved in many skirmishes trying to ascertain the truth for the family. As time progresses he becomes deeply attached to the family and vows to seek explanations for all that went wrong. I loved being transported to a different place in a land I cherish. The reader will love the suspense, as the author unveils a literary onion, constantly adding pieces to the puzzle. Can you tell I was enamored of this book? It only got better as one read further. My only hope is that there will be a sequel! Thank you to Net Galley for this ARC in return for an honest review

  22. 5 out of 5

    Literary Soirée

    Oh my was this a wonderful read! Winner of Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Award, Nev March gives us a sumptuous setting (1892 Bombay), a discerning character whose idol is Holmes, and a perplexing double suicide that may be murder. I luxuriated in the heat, the compelling locale and Dev’s deft narrative style. Sure to please any reader who digs exotic historical mysteries. Ah, India! 5 of 5 Stars Pub Date 10 Nov 2020   Thanks to the author, St. Martin's Press and NetGa Oh my was this a wonderful read! Winner of Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Award, Nev March gives us a sumptuous setting (1892 Bombay), a discerning character whose idol is Holmes, and a perplexing double suicide that may be murder. I luxuriated in the heat, the compelling locale and Dev’s deft narrative style. Sure to please any reader who digs exotic historical mysteries. Ah, India! 5 of 5 Stars Pub Date 10 Nov 2020   Thanks to the author, St. Martin's Press and NetGalley for the review copy. Opinions are mine. #MurderInOldBombay #NetGalley

  23. 5 out of 5

    The Library Lady

    Interestingly when I got this I had just read The Widows of Malabar Hill and The Satapur Moonstone, which are set in Bombay (as it was then) some decades later. The family at the center is Parsee, just like the family in the Massey books.There's even a mention of India's first woman lawyer in both books. I liked those books, but I LOVED this one. I didn't expect to, as I found the initial prose a bit stiff. And I am still bothered with why Jim insists on referring to the woman whose death he ends Interestingly when I got this I had just read The Widows of Malabar Hill and The Satapur Moonstone, which are set in Bombay (as it was then) some decades later. The family at the center is Parsee, just like the family in the Massey books.There's even a mention of India's first woman lawyer in both books. I liked those books, but I LOVED this one. I didn't expect to, as I found the initial prose a bit stiff. And I am still bothered with why Jim insists on referring to the woman whose death he ends up investigating as "Lady" Bacha. Her family even laughingly notes that she had not been elevated to the peerage! I also found the romance predictable. I was ready to write this one off. And then Jim has an incredible adventure that somehow changes the whole story, and I was hooked, and rolled right through it to the end, which was also a bit predictable, but none the less, pleasing. I'm not sure if there are plans for a sequel, as Jim's adventures are taking him to new places, but if March writes it, I will read it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review. This story based on true events flowed smoothly unrolling a mystery in colonial British India. While Captain Jim Agnihotri is recovering in a Poona military hospital in 1892, he spends time reading Sherlock Holmes novels to pass the time. When he comes across the suspicious deaths of two women in the paper, Jim goes into investigative mode. He becomes interested in solving the I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review. This story based on true events flowed smoothly unrolling a mystery in colonial British India. While Captain Jim Agnihotri is recovering in a Poona military hospital in 1892, he spends time reading Sherlock Holmes novels to pass the time. When he comes across the suspicious deaths of two women in the paper, Jim goes into investigative mode. He becomes interested in solving the mystery of two young women falling from the university clock tower. Captain Agnihotti initially decides to approach the Chronicle editor Tehmul Byram about writing an article based in his investigation into the case. After meeting with Adi Framji, the widow of Bacha and her sister Pilloo, Adi hires him to investigate the case privately. Oddly, Jim finds that Byram is friends with Burjor, Adi’s influential father. Byram agrees to “loan” Jim to the Framji family for the investigation. The family bring Jim into their fold which he is consciously aware of his “outsider” status. They include him at meals to which are more elaborate than he is accustomed. In typical Sherlock style, Adi offers him clothing so that he might investigate under the guise of a solicitor for Brown and Batliwala where Adi works. Lady Diana Framji, Adi’s sister, wants to help the in way home providing little known family particularly about Pilloo. Apparently, she came to live with the Framji family follow by the death of her parents in Lahore after the flu epidemic. They knew little about her as she married Jhansi at the young age of 16 which was just after Bacha had married Adi. Although this is based on true events it does read in a lyrical fashion which is easy to read. The story is intriguing as the mystery begins to unfold and Jim develops feelings for Lady Diana. Unfortunately, there are many people who do not want Jim poking around as he discovers conflicting information. He soon encounters danger as he continues to uncover the truth. The story seemed to drag on longer than it needed with excessive details.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    There are certain captivating words that will have me snatching up a debut book without seeing its cover or reading its blurb. I saw ‘murder’ and I saw ‘Old Bombay’ and it was a done deal. I love historical mysteries particularly when set in an exotic (to me) location. Murder in Old Bombay takes place during India’s British-run colonial period. The main character was a blend of British and Indian due to his heritage of Indian mother and unknown British father. Captain Jim Agnihotri was reared in There are certain captivating words that will have me snatching up a debut book without seeing its cover or reading its blurb. I saw ‘murder’ and I saw ‘Old Bombay’ and it was a done deal. I love historical mysteries particularly when set in an exotic (to me) location. Murder in Old Bombay takes place during India’s British-run colonial period. The main character was a blend of British and Indian due to his heritage of Indian mother and unknown British father. Captain Jim Agnihotri was reared in an orphanage and joined the British army, first as a horse handler, and then worked his way up the ranks pretty much as far as someone from his background could hope to go. He was in an ugly skirmish that left him in hospital and a need to do something new with his life. Reading about a horrific pair of deaths and subsequent trial in the newspapers gave him the idea to offer his services as a private detective in the spirit of his favorite fictional hero, Sherlock Holmes. This book did not feel like a debut much of the time. For one, there are many layers and elements that weave together well. The historical backdrop and historical background of the setting and characters was well-developed. For those who have no clue about Indian history, the blended culture of British and Indians in Victorian era India, Indian religious, racial, and social backgrounds, or British military, this book fills one in without bogging down the story. I loved that I was able to see with my imagination the place and people with the descriptions. Jim was a colorful and engaging lead character. He is both just what he seems and a great deal more that is revealed as the story unfolds. He’s a man caught between two worlds, without family or family history, and lonely for what he sees in his new friends’ family group as a result. He’s protective and loyal as a result without much bitterness. He gets beaten down, but gets right back up to keep going. This started as a typical historical murder mystery in format, but then it added some action adventures for Jim. He also gets a chance to explore his past and figure out a complicated romance. It has everything, really. All in all, I was enthralled with this author’s first effort and I hope she returns to historic India with more murder mysteries. Those who love this genre should definitely consider this book. I picked up this book from Net Galley to read in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Murder and more! Wow! I don't know why I'm so enamored with historical fiction/mysteries set particularly in the Indian subcontinent. But I am totally hooked! Amidst the Indian struggles for Independence, the influence of the East India Company and the results of British rule, there's much to set as a background that beckons. In this mystery, placed mostly in Bombay (now Mumbai) of 1892, an injured illegitimate Eurasian soldier formerly of the Fourteenth Light Dragoons, until recently stationed in Murder and more! Wow! I don't know why I'm so enamored with historical fiction/mysteries set particularly in the Indian subcontinent. But I am totally hooked! Amidst the Indian struggles for Independence, the influence of the East India Company and the results of British rule, there's much to set as a background that beckons. In this mystery, placed mostly in Bombay (now Mumbai) of 1892, an injured illegitimate Eurasian soldier formerly of the Fourteenth Light Dragoons, until recently stationed in Burma and the Northwest Frontier, Captain James Agnihotri, is recovering from terrible injuries incurred in Karachi. James reads a newspaper report about the suicides of two young women and decides there are too many loose ends. He's particularly struck by a letter to the editor written by the husband of one of the women. The young man proclaims, "They are gone but I remain." Sentiments of grief James can relate to, particularly after Karachi. He determines to call on his inner Sherlock Holmes to do all he can to investigate the truth of the matter. Firstly as an investigate journalist and then as a Private Investigator for James takes up the baton. Captain Jim's quest takes him inside the workings of a warm and wealthy Zoroastrian Parsee family, the Framji's, whom he comes to admire, even as he falls further into danger and intrigue. For the reader it's a trip through the Anglo-Indian politics and cultural etiquettes of the day. Along with a journey of prejudices, "Indians did not tolerate the mingling of races any more than the English." The power of the British Raj in certain places hovers in the background, in others it has no jurisdiction. Jim falls in love but must remain aloof. He finds a family and looses it. He finds himself! So many wonderful characters from the young girl he adopts as a sister to the determined young woman he cares for. A radiant, emotionally satisfying read that unravels towards a rewarding and complex end. A St. Martin's Press ARC via NetGalley

  27. 5 out of 5

    Guylou (Two Dogs and a Book)

    📚 Hello Book Friends! I just finished MURDER IN OLD BOMBAY by Nev March. This detective story was absolutely enthralling and captivating. I could not put it down. I have been looking for a book that will get my reading mojo going and this was it. The characters are fabulous and well defined. The plot is intelligent and surprising page after page. Based on true events, this story has adventures, epic fights, love, and honour. If you are a fan of Sherlock Holmes, this book is for you. 🎅🏻📕 CHRISTMAS 📚 Hello Book Friends! I just finished MURDER IN OLD BOMBAY by Nev March. This detective story was absolutely enthralling and captivating. I could not put it down. I have been looking for a book that will get my reading mojo going and this was it. The characters are fabulous and well defined. The plot is intelligent and surprising page after page. Based on true events, this story has adventures, epic fights, love, and honour. If you are a fan of Sherlock Holmes, this book is for you. 🎅🏻📕 CHRISTMAS IS COMING! Are you looking for the perfect gift for a book lover? Look no more and go check out the beautiful book sleeves and bookmarks available at Reading in the country shop Their products are rightly priced, and shipping is free in Canada. Click here to access their Etsy store. Don't forget to use my code: TWODOGS25 and save 25% on your order! Shipping is FREE in Canada 📕🤶🏻 #bookstadog #poodles #poodlestagram #poodlesofinstagram #furbabies #dogsofinstagram #bookstagram #dogsandbooks #bookishlife #bookishlove #bookstagrammer #books #booklover #bookish #bookaholic #reading #readersofinstagram #instaread #ilovebooks #bookishcanadians #canadianbookstagram #bookreviewer #bookcommunity #bibliophile #bookphotography #murderinoldbombay #nevmarch #bookreview

  28. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This story takes place in 1892 Bombay. The main character Jim is a half English, half Indian soldier, who is recovering from injury at the start of the book. He becomes interested in a newspaper story about two women who died falling from a clocktower. Although it was ruled suicide, Jim suspects murder, possibly because he is also a bit fan of Sherlock Holmes mysteries. When he leaves the hospital and the service, Jim goes to investigate the deaths. There are quite a few Sherlock Holmes reference This story takes place in 1892 Bombay. The main character Jim is a half English, half Indian soldier, who is recovering from injury at the start of the book. He becomes interested in a newspaper story about two women who died falling from a clocktower. Although it was ruled suicide, Jim suspects murder, possibly because he is also a bit fan of Sherlock Holmes mysteries. When he leaves the hospital and the service, Jim goes to investigate the deaths. There are quite a few Sherlock Holmes references - methodology, disguises, etc. I also learned a lot about the culture at the time, where the country has been transitioning from rule by the East Indian Company to still different (but still British Ruled) government. I liked reading about that history and also about how the different castes in the country functioned. The mystery was good and so was the atmosphere. There was adventure, and romance, and I just really enjoyed it. My thanks to netgalley for the advance reader copy!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    'In 1892, Bombay is the center of British India. Nearby, Captain Jim Agnihotri lies in Poona military hospital recovering from a skirmish on the wild northern frontier, with little to do but re-read the tales of his idol, Sherlock Holmes, and browse the daily papers. The case that catches Captain Jim's attention is being called the crime of the century: Two women fell from the busy university’s clock tower in broad daylight. Moved by Adi, the widower of one of the victims — his certainty that hi 'In 1892, Bombay is the center of British India. Nearby, Captain Jim Agnihotri lies in Poona military hospital recovering from a skirmish on the wild northern frontier, with little to do but re-read the tales of his idol, Sherlock Holmes, and browse the daily papers. The case that catches Captain Jim's attention is being called the crime of the century: Two women fell from the busy university’s clock tower in broad daylight. Moved by Adi, the widower of one of the victims — his certainty that his wife and sister did not commit suicide — Captain Jim approaches the Parsee family and is hired to investigate what happened that terrible afternoon. But in a land of divided loyalties, asking questions is dangerous. Captain Jim's investigation disturbs the shadows that seem to follow the Framji family and triggers an ominous chain of events. And when lively Lady Diana Framji joins the hunt for her sisters’ attackers, Captain Jim’s heart isn’t safe, either. Based on a true story, and set against the vibrant backdrop of colonial India, Nev March's Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Award-winning lyrical debut, Murder in Old Bombay, brings this tumultuous historical age to life.' ___________________________ Murder in Old Bombay is Nev March's debut novel and is a historical fiction and mystery set in colonial India. I loved this book. It was long with a lot of twists and turns and at times it felt like the mystery would never be fully unwoven, but each aspect of the story comes to rights in its own time and balances perfectly in the end. There were many layers of mystery threaded throughout the book, from the initial mystery of death of the two young women at the clock tower to the circumstances surrounding Jim's leaving the military and several others that were told alongside them. Murder in Old Bombay has earned itself a spot on my favorites shelf. I enjoyed all the central characters in the book and became invested in each of them, but none so much as Jim. I truly loved Jim's character, he performed an interesting balancing act of soldier and investigator, alongside his many disguises. I have read other books before set in colonial India, but none as  detailed as Murder in Old Bombay. This book shares both beauty and ugliness during that time and details some of the difficult political situations, which were often changing. And although this information is not the main storyline, it is also central to the mystery and adds to the realness of the book, you feel like you're there with the characters (and there is also a glossary at the back of the book to help keep track of the titles, clothing, and terms just in case). I see March won MWA's award for Best First Crime Fiction, which is very well deserved. And I also saw that she is writing a sequel, which I'm very excited about! I hope that Jim will still be the main character in the sequel because I absolutely adored his character, but either way I'll be adding it to my TBR. _____ I would like to thank NetGalley and St. Martin's Press, Minotaur Books for sharing an eARC of Murder in Old Bombay by Nev March with me. This is my honest review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lilisa

    Set in the late 1800s in colonial India - in the city of Bombay, this is a rather expansive historical mystery involving the death of two young women in the Framji family and a bit of romance thrown in for good measure. The Framjis are Parsees (or Parsis), a community of people originally from Persia, and are a respected well-connected family at ease among the British social structure and part of Bombay’s influential business establishment. Two women of the family are dead - having apparently “f Set in the late 1800s in colonial India - in the city of Bombay, this is a rather expansive historical mystery involving the death of two young women in the Framji family and a bit of romance thrown in for good measure. The Framjis are Parsees (or Parsis), a community of people originally from Persia, and are a respected well-connected family at ease among the British social structure and part of Bombay’s influential business establishment. Two women of the family are dead - having apparently “fallen” from the university’s clock tower. The deaths are suspicious, but no one is talking. Adi Framji, husband of one of the women ends up hiring Jim Agnihotrii, a recuperating captain in the army to help privately investigate the case. So begins the many treks to follow the clues scattered throughout the storyline. Captain Jim sure travels a lot and is adept at many disguises. Threaded throughout the story are the political, social, and cultural issues of the time, sometimes it felt those were the central characters of the book and the murders were incidental. Luckily, I enjoy that sort of stuff, and although the book probably ended up being longer than it should have been, they all contributed to the final coming together of the mystery surrounding the deaths of the two women. I enjoyed the writing style with the story told from Captain Jim’s point of view. A man who has had to struggle to get where he is in life, a social question mark, he fights for the underdog, despite his own demons. Overall, the book was an enjoyable historical mystery set during an interesting period in India’s history and about a not often featured community - the Parsee - who are an integral part of Indian society. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.