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Running with the Dragon: How India Should Do Business with China

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Are there lessons to learn from the manner Chinese companies have grown tenfold or more in their home markets, and pushed away competitors of all hues in the US, Europe, Asia and Africa? What drives China's international trade surplus, which was $351 billion in 2018, while India ended the 2018-19 financial year with trade deficit of $103 billion? Are we in India ready to l Are there lessons to learn from the manner Chinese companies have grown tenfold or more in their home markets, and pushed away competitors of all hues in the US, Europe, Asia and Africa? What drives China's international trade surplus, which was $351 billion in 2018, while India ended the 2018-19 financial year with trade deficit of $103 billion? Are we in India ready to learn and seize new opportunities as part of the overall objective to become a $5-trillion economy? The Chinese invest hugely in understanding foreign cultures and markets while basking in the knowledge that their competitors and would-be allies are unlikely to make sufficient effort to understand them. This is one reason why Chinese manufacturers have broken into the Indian market, making brands like Xiaomi, Haier, Huawei, ZTE, and Lenovo household names in major cities. Hardly any Indian product, with the exception of Tata Motors' Jaguar, seen primarily as a British brand, has gained a foothold in China. However, huge opportunities exist and it is possible to both compete and collaborate with the Chinese on our own terms. Entrepreneurs like Rajendra S. Pawar, chairman of NIIT, have shown the way, spending years learning the Chinese way of doing business, going on to establish IT teaching facilities in nearly a hundred universities and institutions in China. Some Indian pharmaceutical companies are also making their mark in China. Running with the Dragon seeks answers about what Chinese companies are likely to do next to expand in the Indian market under different scenarios. Things are likely to change as the government is keen on removing stumbling blocks for Chinese investments amidst a decelerating economy. Indian businesses in different sectors will have to decide if they want to fight the new competition or collaborate with rivals. The book reflects the experience of over forty Indian and Chinese businesspeople, officials and experts besides the author's own analysis.


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Are there lessons to learn from the manner Chinese companies have grown tenfold or more in their home markets, and pushed away competitors of all hues in the US, Europe, Asia and Africa? What drives China's international trade surplus, which was $351 billion in 2018, while India ended the 2018-19 financial year with trade deficit of $103 billion? Are we in India ready to l Are there lessons to learn from the manner Chinese companies have grown tenfold or more in their home markets, and pushed away competitors of all hues in the US, Europe, Asia and Africa? What drives China's international trade surplus, which was $351 billion in 2018, while India ended the 2018-19 financial year with trade deficit of $103 billion? Are we in India ready to learn and seize new opportunities as part of the overall objective to become a $5-trillion economy? The Chinese invest hugely in understanding foreign cultures and markets while basking in the knowledge that their competitors and would-be allies are unlikely to make sufficient effort to understand them. This is one reason why Chinese manufacturers have broken into the Indian market, making brands like Xiaomi, Haier, Huawei, ZTE, and Lenovo household names in major cities. Hardly any Indian product, with the exception of Tata Motors' Jaguar, seen primarily as a British brand, has gained a foothold in China. However, huge opportunities exist and it is possible to both compete and collaborate with the Chinese on our own terms. Entrepreneurs like Rajendra S. Pawar, chairman of NIIT, have shown the way, spending years learning the Chinese way of doing business, going on to establish IT teaching facilities in nearly a hundred universities and institutions in China. Some Indian pharmaceutical companies are also making their mark in China. Running with the Dragon seeks answers about what Chinese companies are likely to do next to expand in the Indian market under different scenarios. Things are likely to change as the government is keen on removing stumbling blocks for Chinese investments amidst a decelerating economy. Indian businesses in different sectors will have to decide if they want to fight the new competition or collaborate with rivals. The book reflects the experience of over forty Indian and Chinese businesspeople, officials and experts besides the author's own analysis.

21 review for Running with the Dragon: How India Should Do Business with China

  1. 4 out of 5

    Saurabh Sharma

    I have read many business and policy books on China but most of them offer a western perspective. Coming from India, I always wished someone documented what Indian businesses and policy makers could learn from China. Saibal's book has done that. This book is structured exactly the way I like business and policy books to be. In each of the 11 chapters, the author introduces a unique concept about doing business in China. He then illustrates his observations with a case study. There are 9 unique c I have read many business and policy books on China but most of them offer a western perspective. Coming from India, I always wished someone documented what Indian businesses and policy makers could learn from China. Saibal's book has done that. This book is structured exactly the way I like business and policy books to be. In each of the 11 chapters, the author introduces a unique concept about doing business in China. He then illustrates his observations with a case study. There are 9 unique case studies in all. The book is a no-nonsense account of how some Indian businesses have engaged successfully in China, gained and grown. It can easily be a go-to book for Indian businesses and policy makers looking to benefit in and with China. My only gripe is that Saibal didn't write about OYO’s stellar success in China. OYO in China is also a case study that many Indian businesses could learn from. Second edition may be?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ravi Shankar

    Chinese digital ecosystem have developed a unique approach tailored to China’s mobile-first consumer. It is faster, cheaper, and in some respects more effective than globally accepted marketing paradigm. It is also more embracing of risk. For Indian companies that hope to enter China or grow existing operations there, understanding the Chinese marketing mindset will be essential to achieving success. Saibal Dasgupta’s book “Running with the Dragon: How India should do Business with China” looks Chinese digital ecosystem have developed a unique approach tailored to China’s mobile-first consumer. It is faster, cheaper, and in some respects more effective than globally accepted marketing paradigm. It is also more embracing of risk. For Indian companies that hope to enter China or grow existing operations there, understanding the Chinese marketing mindset will be essential to achieving success. Saibal Dasgupta’s book “Running with the Dragon: How India should do Business with China” looks at an holistic approach by sharing experiences of businesses who have been successful in China. The books presents consumer and business insights for doing business in China from entrepreneurs, consumers and employees. The book talks about the various entrepreneurial challenges and intricacies that Indian companies face in various areas and suggests with the help of case studies on the best approaches here. It covers a wide selection of companies picked up from education to digital solutions to cultural agencies.   The book is a must read for anyone trying to understand China business environment from a granular level and offers some great case studies on India-China business collaboration.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Vijai Singh

    Saibal Dasgupta’s book “Running with the dragon” is a full PESTAL analysed along with case study and interviews with various expatriates working in China and India. It is certainly useful not only to get all information on business strategy but also to start exploring various kind of business opportunities in China which is a great source of all kind of commodities and products. It’s also helpful in analysing current demand and forecast of Indian market trend. I recommend all business communitie Saibal Dasgupta’s book “Running with the dragon” is a full PESTAL analysed along with case study and interviews with various expatriates working in China and India. It is certainly useful not only to get all information on business strategy but also to start exploring various kind of business opportunities in China which is a great source of all kind of commodities and products. It’s also helpful in analysing current demand and forecast of Indian market trend. I recommend all business communities to study this book for understanding critical information for starting or expanding business in various sectors and commodities. Saibal can be approached for giving proper guidance and arranging one to one’s meeting with right and appropriate authorities for fruitful meeting and discussion for understanding sourcing or marketing of all kind of products on a win-win basis. I suggest Saibal to create a proper platform for all newcomers seeking business help and support for assisting them and arranging all due diligence activities so that they understand the pros and cons of doing business in China and ensure success in both favourable and difficult situations like economic slowdown and trade war.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Debashish Mukerji

    Very insightful, focusing on day to day practicalities of Indians doing business with China (and to a lesser extent, the reverse). Saibal Dasgupta has shown how, despite the historical baggage of animosity between the two countries, and the provocative positions China sometimes takes on matters concerning India, it is still possible for the two to do business with each other. And there is much to gain for businessmen willing to take risks.

  5. 5 out of 5

    mansidesai1211

  6. 4 out of 5

    Harshil Sheth

  7. 4 out of 5

    Prakash

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  9. 4 out of 5

    Praneesh K

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mayank Malviya

  11. 5 out of 5

    Partha Sarathi

  12. 5 out of 5

    Raj

  13. 5 out of 5

    Devlina Padhye

  14. 4 out of 5

    Abhishek Thakur

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lakshmi

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ayush Rampuria

  17. 4 out of 5

    Supriti Swati

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lucian

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shakib Duste

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yash Verma

  21. 5 out of 5

    Divyani Ghatole

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