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A gorgeously illustrated, first-ever graphic novel adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s beloved American classic. First published in 1925, The Great Gatsby has been acclaimed by generations of readers and is now reimagined in stunning graphic novel form. Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, Daisy Buchanan, and the rest of the cast are captured in vivid and evocative illustrations by a A gorgeously illustrated, first-ever graphic novel adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s beloved American classic. First published in 1925, The Great Gatsby has been acclaimed by generations of readers and is now reimagined in stunning graphic novel form. Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, Daisy Buchanan, and the rest of the cast are captured in vivid and evocative illustrations by artist Aya Morton. The iconic text has been artfully distilled by Fred Fordham, who also adapted the graphic novel edition of To Kill a Mockingbird. Blake Hazard, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s great-granddaughter, contributes a personal introduction. This quintessential Jazz Age tale stands as the supreme achievement of Fitzgerald’s career and is a true classic of 20th-century literature. The story of the mysteriously wealthy Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy is exquisitely captured in this enchanting and unique edition.


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A gorgeously illustrated, first-ever graphic novel adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s beloved American classic. First published in 1925, The Great Gatsby has been acclaimed by generations of readers and is now reimagined in stunning graphic novel form. Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, Daisy Buchanan, and the rest of the cast are captured in vivid and evocative illustrations by a A gorgeously illustrated, first-ever graphic novel adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s beloved American classic. First published in 1925, The Great Gatsby has been acclaimed by generations of readers and is now reimagined in stunning graphic novel form. Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, Daisy Buchanan, and the rest of the cast are captured in vivid and evocative illustrations by artist Aya Morton. The iconic text has been artfully distilled by Fred Fordham, who also adapted the graphic novel edition of To Kill a Mockingbird. Blake Hazard, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s great-granddaughter, contributes a personal introduction. This quintessential Jazz Age tale stands as the supreme achievement of Fitzgerald’s career and is a true classic of 20th-century literature. The story of the mysteriously wealthy Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy is exquisitely captured in this enchanting and unique edition.

30 review for The Great Gatsby: The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Reid

    I’ve made no secret that I’m a chronic Great Gatsby rereader. I have many different copies of it around my house, in multiple formats. This past month, my friends and I started a virtual book club where we read “Classics” (which we are defining very ambiguously). Our first read was Gatsby and I loved it all over again. But I also got to experience it in a completely different way. It's been turned into a graphic novel by Aya Morton and Fred Fordham. And it brings the entire story to life in such I’ve made no secret that I’m a chronic Great Gatsby rereader. I have many different copies of it around my house, in multiple formats. This past month, my friends and I started a virtual book club where we read “Classics” (which we are defining very ambiguously). Our first read was Gatsby and I loved it all over again. But I also got to experience it in a completely different way. It's been turned into a graphic novel by Aya Morton and Fred Fordham. And it brings the entire story to life in such vivid, quick-turning pages. The parties, the dresses, the mansions, the green light—all illustrated here beautifully. And it still packs the wallop that the original does!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    3.5. "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy----they smashed Up things and creatures and then retreated back to their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together and let other people clean up the mess they had made------- I'm not a big graphic novel reader, in fact I've read so few I know this is only my fifth endeavor. I enjoyed it, the illustrations were gorgeous, soft pastels and I did get the feel of the time period. Of course, one doesn't get the depth of 3.5. "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy----they smashed Up things and creatures and then retreated back to their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together and let other people clean up the mess they had made------- I'm not a big graphic novel reader, in fact I've read so few I know this is only my fifth endeavor. I enjoyed it, the illustrations were gorgeous, soft pastels and I did get the feel of the time period. Of course, one doesn't get the depth of the novel, but this rendering did a good job of condensing the story but giving enough so one receives the bones of the story. I was afraid the emotion would be lacking,and while not as intense, it was still there. Think this was well done. May try another graphic of a classic, much better than the cliff notes that we had to waddle through. ARC from Scribner.

  3. 4 out of 5

    The Artisan Geek

    6/7/20 Surprisingly, I feel rather indifferent to this one. The art fit the story perfectly and it held my attention long enough to finish the story. Now having seen the movie and read the graphic novel, I'm not too sure if I'd still be interested in reading the entire novel, but who knows? Perhaps if I try and read more of Fitzgerald's work. 5/7/20 Scribner was so kind to gift me a copy of the graphic novel :) I haven't read the novel, but I have watch the movie adaptation and read a chunk of lett 6/7/20 Surprisingly, I feel rather indifferent to this one. The art fit the story perfectly and it held my attention long enough to finish the story. Now having seen the movie and read the graphic novel, I'm not too sure if I'd still be interested in reading the entire novel, but who knows? Perhaps if I try and read more of Fitzgerald's work. 5/7/20 Scribner was so kind to gift me a copy of the graphic novel :) I haven't read the novel, but I have watch the movie adaptation and read a chunk of letters exchanged between Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda. You can find me on Youtube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website | The Storygraph

  4. 4 out of 5

    Olivia (Stories For Coffee)

    I always love seeing different renditions of The Great Gatsby, one of my favorite classic novels ever. I love revisiting the story and seeing how people interpret a story I’m so familiar with. This graphic novel was very similar to the 2013 adaptation in terms of aesthetic and the way the story is structured in a swift way that feels as though the story is full of jump-cute between scenes, moving quickly from one setting to the next. The art style is beautifully colored with pastels and has a qu I always love seeing different renditions of The Great Gatsby, one of my favorite classic novels ever. I love revisiting the story and seeing how people interpret a story I’m so familiar with. This graphic novel was very similar to the 2013 adaptation in terms of aesthetic and the way the story is structured in a swift way that feels as though the story is full of jump-cute between scenes, moving quickly from one setting to the next. The art style is beautifully colored with pastels and has a quintessential 20s art style that encompassed the mood of the story very well— although I do wish the characters’ facial expressions were more pronounced and there was more diversity in skin tones and facial structures because Tom, Gatsby, and Nick looked too similar to one another. I would say, if one hasn’t read The Great Gatsby, they wouldn’t get the full effect and appeal of the story from this graphic novel because it is choppy and sometimes the dialogue didn’t flow as well as it did as a full-fledged novel, but I enjoyed returning back to the storyline in a different medium because I am so familiar with it. There are pros and cons to this adaptation. I enjoyed it simply for the ability to see a favorite story of mine through another lens.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Fred Fordham does a good job of distilling an American classic to the drawn page. I still would suggest reading the original first but this is a good followup for fans of the source material. Aya Morton's art has a look reminiscent of the 1920's. The pale colors and simple faces remind me of advertisements or movie posters of the time. Received a review copy from Scribner and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned. Fred Fordham does a good job of distilling an American classic to the drawn page. I still would suggest reading the original first but this is a good followup for fans of the source material. Aya Morton's art has a look reminiscent of the 1920's. The pale colors and simple faces remind me of advertisements or movie posters of the time. Received a review copy from Scribner and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brogan Lane

    hmmmmm well, this didn't make me want to read The Great Gatsby - it made me glad that I hadn't read it if I'm being completely honest. I've never felt so bored reading a graphic novel until this one. The illustrations by Aya Morton were very unique and fit with the story being set during the 1920s, but other than that, I just really didn't like this. hmmmmm well, this didn't make me want to read The Great Gatsby - it made me glad that I hadn't read it if I'm being completely honest. I've never felt so bored reading a graphic novel until this one. The illustrations by Aya Morton were very unique and fit with the story being set during the 1920s, but other than that, I just really didn't like this.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. It was very nice to see this great and famous American classic turned into a graphic novel. I appreciated how faithful this book was to the original material and also how some quotes of the book were actually included here. I expected a little more from the art, even though it was all drawn very nicely I would have preferred to see more vibrant colors instead of the ones that were chosen, but that The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. It was very nice to see this great and famous American classic turned into a graphic novel. I appreciated how faithful this book was to the original material and also how some quotes of the book were actually included here. I expected a little more from the art, even though it was all drawn very nicely I would have preferred to see more vibrant colors instead of the ones that were chosen, but that's just a personal preference.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gerardine Betancourt

    Thank you so much to edelweiss and Simon & Schuster for received this beautiful and gorgeous Arc I'm so happy and blessed right now. This novel never gets old. The artist's illustrations were beautiful. If you are new to this story or if you already know everything about Gatsby, I recommend that you grab this beauty because i know I'll will. Thank you so much to edelweiss and Simon & Schuster for received this beautiful and gorgeous Arc I'm so happy and blessed right now. This novel never gets old. The artist's illustrations were beautiful. If you are new to this story or if you already know everything about Gatsby, I recommend that you grab this beauty because i know I'll will.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessi

    I love THE GREAT GATSBY and when I saw Scribner was releasing this one on June 30th, I had to have it. I’ll get my preorder in here shortly, but until then all I have to say is that if you’re a lover of Gatsby you’re going to want this. The art style and coloring is so tasteful and beautiful. The attention to detail is incredible (minus the characters faces… don’t ask me what it is but I was not a fan of it.) Everything else, yes. What I really loved was how true to the original it was without b I love THE GREAT GATSBY and when I saw Scribner was releasing this one on June 30th, I had to have it. I’ll get my preorder in here shortly, but until then all I have to say is that if you’re a lover of Gatsby you’re going to want this. The art style and coloring is so tasteful and beautiful. The attention to detail is incredible (minus the characters faces… don’t ask me what it is but I was not a fan of it.) Everything else, yes. What I really loved was how true to the original it was without being an exact replica. Included within the new text are some of the original lines too and the lines chosen were perfect. They made my heart flutter and reignited my love for this novel. It’s by no means a replacement, but it held its own. I’ll be happy to have this gem on my shelf. I think the finished product will be even more stunning.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    As I've mentioned in previous reviews, I teach "The Great Gatsby" every year I teach juniors. I find the language rich, the story and setting engaging, and the themes/social commentary particularly useful in the classroom. The text can be challenging for a small group of students, so I've been dying to get my hands on a decent graphic novel version. And 2020 has blessed us with two! Where this graphic novel differs from others is its inclusion of a decent chunk of the text from the original novel As I've mentioned in previous reviews, I teach "The Great Gatsby" every year I teach juniors. I find the language rich, the story and setting engaging, and the themes/social commentary particularly useful in the classroom. The text can be challenging for a small group of students, so I've been dying to get my hands on a decent graphic novel version. And 2020 has blessed us with two! Where this graphic novel differs from others is its inclusion of a decent chunk of the text from the original novel. I was surprised to see what made the cut, and shocked to see not much didn't. This is particularly helpful in a classroom setting when teaching graphic novels; too often I find myself having to sacrifice too much of the original text to make it worthwhile teaching it in this format. I think this version balances what teachers (and lovers of the original text) need and want with the genre format well. Where this book didn't work for me was the art. With exception of a few beautiful splash pages, I found the art didn't intrigue me or enhance the story in any way. There were a lot of missed opportunities from the textual imagery to the visual imagery, and some missteps (eyes of T.J. Eckleberg were pretty bizarre). The character faces were flat (perhaps reflecting their characters, but I'm guessing not), and I couldn't stop seeing Daisy's character as an exact replica of Princess Di. I think this would work well for students who struggle with understanding the text of the novel form in a clear way. I can foresee many English teachers being happy with this compromise and willing to adapt it for their curriculum

  11. 4 out of 5

    Scottsdale Public Library

    For those who like pictures with their stories, this retelling of the Great Gatsby will deftly bring readers into Gatsby's world. The characters and the feel of the time period come to life with beautiful illustrations and a compelling, well written story. Highly recommend this for classic and graphic novel lovers. – Jennifer K. For those who like pictures with their stories, this retelling of the Great Gatsby will deftly bring readers into Gatsby's world. The characters and the feel of the time period come to life with beautiful illustrations and a compelling, well written story. Highly recommend this for classic and graphic novel lovers. – Jennifer K.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    It's always so hard to rate adaptations like this. The curmudgeonly/snobbish side of me is irritated our culture has to constantly remake things when there is already a perfectly wonderful (well, usually wonderful. sometimes maybe just assumed to be wonderful) original version of a book or movie or song or whatever. The kinder, more creative, and probably more correct side of me is happy to accept any and all adaptions on an original because it opens something to a larger audience and gives autho It's always so hard to rate adaptations like this. The curmudgeonly/snobbish side of me is irritated our culture has to constantly remake things when there is already a perfectly wonderful (well, usually wonderful. sometimes maybe just assumed to be wonderful) original version of a book or movie or song or whatever. The kinder, more creative, and probably more correct side of me is happy to accept any and all adaptions on an original because it opens something to a larger audience and gives authors/artists a chance to put their own spin on it. After all, basically none of my fourth grade students are ready to read Anne of Green Gables without lots of assistance (maybe as like a bedtime story, which is how I first read it) but they all love Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel (and I do too). A small part of me is sad knowing many or even most of them may never take the time to step up to trying the chapter book. But a bigger part of me is happier that although time passes on and so much changes, her story still proves to be relevant and fun for young girls. Anyways. Gatsby. I don't really have strong feelings about Gatsby one way or the other. I read it in maybe my late teens or early 20s. Old enough to get at some of it, but still too young to fully get at what I thought and what it all meant. Now I get the meaning more behind it and have learned a lot more about the book/Fitzgerald, but never really had a strong feeling about the actual book when I read it. I never re-read it (keep meaning to). But I feel like in the years since, I have constantly read essays about it or seen it referenced somehow, or was watching the 2013 movie version (I love that version, I don't care what anyone says). I actually just watched the movie with Leo on New Year's Eve because it seems like the perfect NYE movie. Point being, when a story is that widely known and all the little details are saturated so deeply in your brain (the green light! the famous last line! the symbolism! etc) it's really hard to evaluate the story with a fresh eye and figure out if you actually like it or what it means to you personally (if anything). So. For what this was, I did enjoy it. The art was beautiful and it (seems) the author kept many of the most important and beautiful lines and phrases. I loved how they were incorporated into the art. I love that this will keep the story fresh and relevant for a whole group of readers who don't want to get to the actual book yet (and maybe never will). It's just very hard to rate because I still heard Tobey Maguire as Nick narrating the entire thing, and I saw many of the scenes exactly as I just saw them in the movie, almost as if they were taking the place of the pages. Not the author's fault, but can we have too much of one story or adaptation? Can it become pointless to keep redoing it?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    The artwork was stunning and didn’t overshadow the beauty of the language Fitzgerald has written. Staying true to the original novel, this graphic adaptation is extremely well done. The colors used were very muted which made it feel very classic and not too modern or comic book-esque.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I'm not a fan of the original novel, but I thought I'd give this a go since it turned up at the local library. I shouldn't have bothered. Even in graphic novel format this book is filled with one of the most unlikable cast of characters I've come across. What a bunch of losers. Art, color palette, fonts -- none of them were particularly appealing either, though that could just be my mind souring on them due to their relation to this story. I'm not a fan of the original novel, but I thought I'd give this a go since it turned up at the local library. I shouldn't have bothered. Even in graphic novel format this book is filled with one of the most unlikable cast of characters I've come across. What a bunch of losers. Art, color palette, fonts -- none of them were particularly appealing either, though that could just be my mind souring on them due to their relation to this story.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kate Crabtree

    3.5. It’s not perfect, but it’s a lovey rendition of The Great Gatsby and simplifies the plot quite nicely while including most of the memorable phrases we all remember from the novel. The artwork is stunning.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Scrima

    I just love The Great Gatsby so much! I loved being able to read it in this format. Ugh I just love this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Briana

    While The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald was hardly my favorite book to read in high school English literature class. I enjoy the story for what it is as a portrait of American society. Tom and Daisy Buchanan are historically known for being snobs, Nick Carroway is pretentious, and Jordan Baker, Jay Gatsby, and Myrtle Wilson are pretenders. I’d say the one victim in the whole thing, besides the reader, is Mr. Wilson who represents an overwhelming majority of Americans in general. Because of While The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald was hardly my favorite book to read in high school English literature class. I enjoy the story for what it is as a portrait of American society. Tom and Daisy Buchanan are historically known for being snobs, Nick Carroway is pretentious, and Jordan Baker, Jay Gatsby, and Myrtle Wilson are pretenders. I’d say the one victim in the whole thing, besides the reader, is Mr. Wilson who represents an overwhelming majority of Americans in general. Because of this, I enjoy different renditions on The Great Gatsby and graphic novel versions of classics are always interesting because I get to visualize these works of literature beyond nearly falling asleep in class. Fred Fordham did an excellent job adapting this. As stated in the introduction by Fitzgerald’s great-granddaughter Blake Hazard, the biggest star of The Great Gatsby is the text. Aya Morton’s illustrations paint a nice picture of the iconic scenes in the original work like Gatsby’s parties, New York City, and the lazy days at the Buchanan household. I read the original book twice—once in high school literature class and another later in life to decide that this book is still full of snobbish aloofness that I cannot get behind. Still, reading this graphic novel allowed me to recall certain aspects of this book that I wouldn’t be able to recite at random. The story is familiar and the graphic novel format makes it refreshing. This book is 96 years old and we have seen different takes on the story in cinematic form and through nouveau riche character archetypes in American arts and culture. We can always expect extravagance but none of that adds anything new. Here, it was nice to see the characters in this format because it adds to the fact that this story is a bit fantastical. One of the enjoyable factors of this story has always been self-awareness. Fitzgerald knows that these characters are snobs in an almost cartoonish way, and so I like that this element was brought with the graphic format and this adaptation. Reading Challenge: Pop Culture Readathon: 80s films Challenge Prompt: “Duckie Dale” — Unrequited Love

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Thrilled to have finally opened this graphic novelization of one of my most-read books. Because it was different from the ways in which I have experienced this classic in the past, my attention was drawn to previously unnoticed aspects of the story and I was able to see it with new eyes and emotions. Highly recommend giving it a try!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    I love when classic are adapted into graphic novels, and The Great Gatsby was no exception. The colour palette is what stood out to me- there was something dreamlike about it. I did enjoy the illustrations but have to agree with other reviewers when they say that it was difficult to tell the men apart. I do wonder whether I would have fully appreciated this if I hadn't already read the full novel. It is always fascinating to me to see what is included in a graphic novel like this one as well as I love when classic are adapted into graphic novels, and The Great Gatsby was no exception. The colour palette is what stood out to me- there was something dreamlike about it. I did enjoy the illustrations but have to agree with other reviewers when they say that it was difficult to tell the men apart. I do wonder whether I would have fully appreciated this if I hadn't already read the full novel. It is always fascinating to me to see what is included in a graphic novel like this one as well as what is left out!

  20. 4 out of 5

    R.

    Uncanny Valley of Ashes There was something flat, uninspired about the otherwise prettily colored illustrations.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I always love the story of Gatsby, and this was a quick way to revisit that. I had trouble telling the male characters apart. They all looked so similar and I found that frustrating.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    The Great Gatsby is one of my all-time favorites. So, to read an adaptation? Well, I was reluctant. But I won a copy in a Shelf Awareness/Library Journal giveaway (that I don’t ever remember entering!). And, my reading slump feels so overwhelming at this point, a graphic novel was a good way to at least jump-start some kind of reading. Despite the “pared down” bit that is necessary in a graphic novel format, I still felt like I was reading Fitzgerald’s work. Text adaptor Fred Fordham did a master The Great Gatsby is one of my all-time favorites. So, to read an adaptation? Well, I was reluctant. But I won a copy in a Shelf Awareness/Library Journal giveaway (that I don’t ever remember entering!). And, my reading slump feels so overwhelming at this point, a graphic novel was a good way to at least jump-start some kind of reading. Despite the “pared down” bit that is necessary in a graphic novel format, I still felt like I was reading Fitzgerald’s work. Text adaptor Fred Fordham did a masterful job using just-the-right-bits of Fitzgerald’s gorgeous, lyrical prose. I knew this was an A#1 work when I had the same emotions, tingles, love that I do when reading the original work. My only qualm was the artwork. While I loved the muted coloring, I was increasingly frustrated with the way-too-similar male characters. During the scene in the Plaza, I actually had to reread and really look to see who was who. Not good. It took me out of the story. And, I have read the source material. Can you imagine the struggle for someone who is reading the story for the first time? Then, after looking at Fred Fordham’s website and seeing he did the complete adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird, I wonder why he did not do this one as well. The foreword by Fitzgerald’s great-great-granddaughter offered an explanation: a long, exhaustive search for the artist. But did the exhaustive search include Fordham’s work? I’m just puzzled. So, despite the artwork hiccup, I would highly recommend this graphic novel. I thank Mr. Fordham for giving me a beautiful work to, hopefully, ease myself out of a reading slump.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Abbey

    It was...choppy. If I hadn't already read the book/knew the story well, I don't think I could have followed the storyline. And Daisy's role felt less significant and as if she were more a victim than the horrid person she actually was. This is one of my favorite books & authors of all time... I had such high hopes for this graphic novel and I was sorely disappointed, and annoyed, to be completely honest. It was...choppy. If I hadn't already read the book/knew the story well, I don't think I could have followed the storyline. And Daisy's role felt less significant and as if she were more a victim than the horrid person she actually was. This is one of my favorite books & authors of all time... I had such high hopes for this graphic novel and I was sorely disappointed, and annoyed, to be completely honest.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Brown

    It's hard to rate this one. I've always thought Gatsby was a well written novel and I've actually read it multiple times. The graphics, however, were quite dull. I expected more. So 5 stars for the story and 3 for the illustrations! It's hard to rate this one. I've always thought Gatsby was a well written novel and I've actually read it multiple times. The graphics, however, were quite dull. I expected more. So 5 stars for the story and 3 for the illustrations!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    There’s something about this graphic rendition that achieves the underlying pathos of the original classic. The balance of illustrations to text is incredibly effective, drawing the reader further and further into the story and leaving haunting impressions along the way. Newcomers to Fitzgerald’s account of Nick, Daisy, Tom, and Gatsby as well as veteran readers will find a rich interpretation here to consider alongside their own. Ultimately, it is a unique and beautiful work of art. Thank you to There’s something about this graphic rendition that achieves the underlying pathos of the original classic. The balance of illustrations to text is incredibly effective, drawing the reader further and further into the story and leaving haunting impressions along the way. Newcomers to Fitzgerald’s account of Nick, Daisy, Tom, and Gatsby as well as veteran readers will find a rich interpretation here to consider alongside their own. Ultimately, it is a unique and beautiful work of art. Thank you to NetGalley and Scribner Press for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    J Lopez

    I wish they would have used more vibrant colors in this graphic novel. The watercolors did not do the story justice.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    A fun adaptation of one of my all time favorite novels. I enjoy seeing the classics adapted into graphic novels, and this one was no exception. Fordham did well adapting the text, preserving the spirit of the original novel while distilling it down to what fits with telling the story via this form of media. It’s not a substitute for reading F. Scott Fitzgerald’s great novel (I’d recommend doing so before reading this if you haven’t already), but it’s a fun and fresh take for those who hold the b A fun adaptation of one of my all time favorite novels. I enjoy seeing the classics adapted into graphic novels, and this one was no exception. Fordham did well adapting the text, preserving the spirit of the original novel while distilling it down to what fits with telling the story via this form of media. It’s not a substitute for reading F. Scott Fitzgerald’s great novel (I’d recommend doing so before reading this if you haven’t already), but it’s a fun and fresh take for those who hold the book dear. The feel and spirit of the art is good—The color palette, deco-esque style, and small details are evocative of the world of the original novel. The facial renderings, however, are cringily bad. Morton did alright with hair, bodies, eyes, but the mouths and noses and facial structure of the characters are terribly homogenous and childish in a way that doesn’t feel appropriately intentional or charming. In other words, that component of the art is just poorly done, and it distracts from the more positive elements of the art and as a result from the graphic novel as a whole. *I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'The Great Gatsby: The Graphic Novel' by F. Scott Fitzgerald with adaptation by Fred Fordham and art by Aya Morton is based on the classic novel. Nick Carraway moves to a new house, near his cousin, Daisy Buchanan, and becomes involved in intrigue surrounding his wealthy new neighbor, Jay Gatsby. There are lots of sparkling parties, and even a few tragedies, but it all hides some secrets that go back years. I've not read an adaptation of this novel before, but I know there is at least one. This on 'The Great Gatsby: The Graphic Novel' by F. Scott Fitzgerald with adaptation by Fred Fordham and art by Aya Morton is based on the classic novel. Nick Carraway moves to a new house, near his cousin, Daisy Buchanan, and becomes involved in intrigue surrounding his wealthy new neighbor, Jay Gatsby. There are lots of sparkling parties, and even a few tragedies, but it all hides some secrets that go back years. I've not read an adaptation of this novel before, but I know there is at least one. This one seems to distill the novel pretty well. The art wasn't my favorite at first, but I realized the author was doing a jazz age kind of style and I liked it better. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Scribner and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Toby

    Oh lord. Suffice to say I’m glad I did not waste my life reading the actual novel. Wow. Such a depressing story populated with an absolute mess of human beings. That being said, I do want to read Nick by Michael Farris Smith (prequel to The Great Gatsby from Nick’s perspective) and The Chosen & the Beautiful by Nghi Vo (retelling of The Great Gatsby but with a queer Asian MC plus magic). So I felt that I needed to at least know the bones of Gatsby before jumping into either of those books. Mission Oh lord. Suffice to say I’m glad I did not waste my life reading the actual novel. Wow. Such a depressing story populated with an absolute mess of human beings. That being said, I do want to read Nick by Michael Farris Smith (prequel to The Great Gatsby from Nick’s perspective) and The Chosen & the Beautiful by Nghi Vo (retelling of The Great Gatsby but with a queer Asian MC plus magic). So I felt that I needed to at least know the bones of Gatsby before jumping into either of those books. Mission accomplished. Also? The art was beautiful. I really loved the colors used — all different shades of pastel, cool and warm shades were used with the correspondingly emotional scenes. So much love for Aya Morton’s art!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christy Broderick

    This was a great recreation of the original classic! Thanks again to NetGalley and Scribner for allowing me to read this ARC in exchange for feedback. This graphic novel provided a great illustrated version of the classic that I’ve both read and watched. I know of Fred Fordham’s other work with another great take on a classic, so I was excited to see what his take on Gatsby would look like. I was taken back in time with Gatsby, Nick, Daisy, and everyone else and was reintroduced to the famous li This was a great recreation of the original classic! Thanks again to NetGalley and Scribner for allowing me to read this ARC in exchange for feedback. This graphic novel provided a great illustrated version of the classic that I’ve both read and watched. I know of Fred Fordham’s other work with another great take on a classic, so I was excited to see what his take on Gatsby would look like. I was taken back in time with Gatsby, Nick, Daisy, and everyone else and was reintroduced to the famous lines that we all know and love. If you haven’t read the original book, you should give it a try and then check this one out! I know what was going to happen, but this graphic novel made it interesting for me the entire way through ☺️

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