hits counter Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century

Availability: Ready to download

Women's contributions to science fiction over the past century have been lasting and important, but critical work in the field has only just begun to explore its full range. Justine Larbalestier has collected 11 key stories--many of them not easily found, and all of them powerful and provocative--and sets them alongside 11 new essays, written by top scholars and critics, t Women's contributions to science fiction over the past century have been lasting and important, but critical work in the field has only just begun to explore its full range. Justine Larbalestier has collected 11 key stories--many of them not easily found, and all of them powerful and provocative--and sets them alongside 11 new essays, written by top scholars and critics, that explore the stories' contexts, meanings, and theoretical implications. The resulting dialogue is one of enormous significance to critical scholarship in science fiction, and to understanding the role of feminism in its development. Organized chronologically, this anthology creates a new canon of feminist science fiction and examines the theory that addresses it. Daughters of Earth is an ideal overview for students and general readers. Content: 1. The Fate of Poseidonia - Clare Winger Harris, 1927 2. The Conquest of Gola - Leslie F. Stone, 1931 3. Created He Them - Alice Eleanor Jones, 1955 4. No Light in the Window - Kate Wilhelm, 1963 5. The Heat Death of the Universe - Pamela Zoline, 1967 6. And I Awoke and Found Me Here on the Cold Hill Side - James Tiptree Jr., 1971 7. Wives - Lisa Tuttle, 1976 8. Rachel in Love - Par Murphy, 1987 9. The Evening and the Morning and the Night - Octavia E. Butler, 1987 10. Balinese Dancer - Gwyneth Jones, 1997 11. What I Didn't See - Karen Joy Fowler, 2002


Compare

Women's contributions to science fiction over the past century have been lasting and important, but critical work in the field has only just begun to explore its full range. Justine Larbalestier has collected 11 key stories--many of them not easily found, and all of them powerful and provocative--and sets them alongside 11 new essays, written by top scholars and critics, t Women's contributions to science fiction over the past century have been lasting and important, but critical work in the field has only just begun to explore its full range. Justine Larbalestier has collected 11 key stories--many of them not easily found, and all of them powerful and provocative--and sets them alongside 11 new essays, written by top scholars and critics, that explore the stories' contexts, meanings, and theoretical implications. The resulting dialogue is one of enormous significance to critical scholarship in science fiction, and to understanding the role of feminism in its development. Organized chronologically, this anthology creates a new canon of feminist science fiction and examines the theory that addresses it. Daughters of Earth is an ideal overview for students and general readers. Content: 1. The Fate of Poseidonia - Clare Winger Harris, 1927 2. The Conquest of Gola - Leslie F. Stone, 1931 3. Created He Them - Alice Eleanor Jones, 1955 4. No Light in the Window - Kate Wilhelm, 1963 5. The Heat Death of the Universe - Pamela Zoline, 1967 6. And I Awoke and Found Me Here on the Cold Hill Side - James Tiptree Jr., 1971 7. Wives - Lisa Tuttle, 1976 8. Rachel in Love - Par Murphy, 1987 9. The Evening and the Morning and the Night - Octavia E. Butler, 1987 10. Balinese Dancer - Gwyneth Jones, 1997 11. What I Didn't See - Karen Joy Fowler, 2002

30 review for Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Linda Robinson

    I want to now read every anthology with science fiction by women constructed the way Larbalestier put this book together. 11 scifi short stories by women in published chronological order beginning with Clare Winger Harris in 1927, and ending with Karen Joy Fowler in 2002. Each short story is followed by an essay written by a feminist scholar. Larbalestier introduces us to the collection explaining she chose the essayists and let each pick the story to write about. The essays are academic, and di I want to now read every anthology with science fiction by women constructed the way Larbalestier put this book together. 11 scifi short stories by women in published chronological order beginning with Clare Winger Harris in 1927, and ending with Karen Joy Fowler in 2002. Each short story is followed by an essay written by a feminist scholar. Larbalestier introduces us to the collection explaining she chose the essayists and let each pick the story to write about. The essays are academic, and difficult to stuff in my brain because of the vast knowledge on the subject the writers bring. A bibliography covers background materials, and there are plenty of footnotes. I learned more from this book than I learned from looking at the subject for decades. Because of the span of years, it is easy to follow the timeline of sf women writers. Clare Winger Harris was a fan of sf, and a letter-to-the-editor writer, who then became a sf writer. My guess is she always was one. We can see clearly the segue from fan to contributor. From the early sf collection magazines, we get to the slicks - the magazines that showed up after WWII when it was socioculturally necessary to get the women out of the workforce, back in the kitchen and make them like it. Slicks like Good Housekeeping did not publish sf, and the editors of sf magazines got it stuck in their pans that women had other venues for writing now. Housewife sf, some male editors called it. Harry Harrison called sf by women "tears and tampax sf." And here we are in the 21st century. Makes me wanna holla. Information is power, knowledge is how to act on that. Talking with a friend recently about how women can improve their standing in the world overall, and particularly in the realm of writing and filmmaking, we arrived at this: the game is rigged. What we need is to find the hacker's back door and tip the gameboard. The women who wrote, and continue to write, science fiction do exactly that. I am inspired by them.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nat Smith

    So far, I am really enjoying some of the groundbreaking fiction, though it seems as if they are deemed feminist by merely being by women writers or centralizing female characters to say nothing of the lack of black and brown writers. In my book feminism is more than that, or not that at all. But the pieces are important ones, dating back to 1927, in terms of the history of the recognition of women spec fic writers. The essays that accompany each piece are really interesting. I am not much of a l So far, I am really enjoying some of the groundbreaking fiction, though it seems as if they are deemed feminist by merely being by women writers or centralizing female characters to say nothing of the lack of black and brown writers. In my book feminism is more than that, or not that at all. But the pieces are important ones, dating back to 1927, in terms of the history of the recognition of women spec fic writers. The essays that accompany each piece are really interesting. I am not much of a literary essay fan, but I appreciate the added depth. A couple of my favorites are in here, like Octavia Butler's The Evening and the Morning and the Night. But as it was published in 2006, if it is truly highlighting feminist writers, it is remiss in not including LeGuin, Hopkinson, and dare I say Delaney to name a few. So, yes, read it. Is it feminist? depends upon your brand of feminism.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    An outstanding anthology that pairs stories with critical pieces. Of the stories, I thought the best were those by Zoline, Tiptree, Murphy, Jones and Fowler. These were just mind-blowing, especially the last three. Duchamp's essay on Fowler's story was also extremely rewarding, as was Hairston's essay on a (very good) story by Octavia Butler. An outstanding anthology that pairs stories with critical pieces. Of the stories, I thought the best were those by Zoline, Tiptree, Murphy, Jones and Fowler. These were just mind-blowing, especially the last three. Duchamp's essay on Fowler's story was also extremely rewarding, as was Hairston's essay on a (very good) story by Octavia Butler.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    100817: an excellent critical/anthology work. several stories i have read before (and i awoke..., the evening..., rachel in love, heat death...) but here united with lit crit essays on each. some sense of history, context, society, of each era of work, some understanding of how each is 'feminist', some satire, some genre boundary disputes, some understanding of texts 'in conversation' with others. exactly how enlightened sff was then or is now in dispute. unfortunate lack of some big names (le g 100817: an excellent critical/anthology work. several stories i have read before (and i awoke..., the evening..., rachel in love, heat death...) but here united with lit crit essays on each. some sense of history, context, society, of each era of work, some understanding of how each is 'feminist', some satire, some genre boundary disputes, some understanding of texts 'in conversation' with others. exactly how enlightened sff was then or is now in dispute. unfortunate lack of some big names (le guin... ) but this work assumes you are familiar with her work. interesting to imagine what passed as lit in say 1927 of first story or 1931 or... and often how different or similar is the sff in concerns and style... 'heat death...' remains one of my favourite short stories of any lineage...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    I think the hybrid form of this anthology is genius.

  6. 5 out of 5

    maddie

    This had some really great stories, some were definitely misses for me but the ones I did like I REALLY enjoyed. "Wives", "What I Didn't See", "And I Awoke and Found Me Here" were some personal favourites. This had some really great stories, some were definitely misses for me but the ones I did like I REALLY enjoyed. "Wives", "What I Didn't See", "And I Awoke and Found Me Here" were some personal favourites.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This was a fantastic collection of feminist science fiction and criticism. I encountered it while doing research on a woman SF writer for my job and it was TOO GOOD not to read. I loved receiving an education in Feminist SF from the essays and I learned a lot about the history of the genre. I learned that women's science fiction was once called "diaper SF" or "housewife heroine SF"... and learning about that genre was very relevant to the videogame I'm helping to write, since it's about childrear This was a fantastic collection of feminist science fiction and criticism. I encountered it while doing research on a woman SF writer for my job and it was TOO GOOD not to read. I loved receiving an education in Feminist SF from the essays and I learned a lot about the history of the genre. I learned that women's science fiction was once called "diaper SF" or "housewife heroine SF"... and learning about that genre was very relevant to the videogame I'm helping to write, since it's about childrearing in an SF setting. I learned about the controversial hyper-masculine James Tiptree who turned out to be the pen name of Alice Sheldon, and whose works took on a different meaning when readers found out that Tiptree's main persona (?) was a woman. As I look over the table of contents, I'm reminded of how many of these stories were absolutely revelatory. "And I Awoke and Found Me Here On the Cold Hill's Side" was about a world where humans felt attracted to aliens in unexplainable ways yet were constantly rebuffed, with obvious and problematic parallels to human colonization but nevertheless disturbing. "No Light in the Window" was about a husband and wife striving to qualify to qualify to be on a space shuttle, with the husband reacting stoically to all psychological tests while the wife responded candidly and emotionally. In a twist ending, she was the one to qualify because she found outlets for her frustrations. I felt SO surprised by the ending; I felt a little silly but also grateful for an SF story that supported the importance of emotional expression even in 1963. Octavia Butler's "The Evening and the Morning and the Night" also made me think. It's about a woman with a disease that could make her start mutilating herself at any minute. The disease was a byproduct of cancer treatments. Bizarre enough, right? But Butler takes it further. The protagonist is uniquely situated to help others with her disease before she succumbs to it, and she decides to help them out of duty, even though it's not her passion. I recommend actually reading it because this summary isn't adequate to convey the emotional power of her decision. The accompanying essay also made me want to read some of Butler's novels. The essay on "What I Didn't See" highlighted the importance of knowing the history of feminist SF to understand current feminist SF. The author argued that, essentially, the way the story references Tiptree's "The Women Men Don't See" places it in the SF genre and changes the way readers view the story. The essay also helped me to really delve into what the ending meant and helped me piece together a few things I missed. If you like science fiction I highly recommend this book! One of my favorites of 2017.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    I read a lot of feminist science fiction and expected that I would be familiar with many of the stories in this collection. Well, I was wrong. I was only familiar with one story out of the 11 in this book. I was really impressed with how many feminist stories there were to discover. All excellent. And the essays are mini-dissertations on the history of science fiction and women authors writing on feminist themes. So I highly recommend reading this book even if you think you already know all the I read a lot of feminist science fiction and expected that I would be familiar with many of the stories in this collection. Well, I was wrong. I was only familiar with one story out of the 11 in this book. I was really impressed with how many feminist stories there were to discover. All excellent. And the essays are mini-dissertations on the history of science fiction and women authors writing on feminist themes. So I highly recommend reading this book even if you think you already know all the feminist science fiction that is out there. I suspect you will be surprised as I was....

  9. 4 out of 5

    emma

    my favourites stories were Wives, What I Didn't See, and The Evening and the Morning and the Night :) i really enjoyed reading this anthology my favourites stories were Wives, What I Didn't See, and The Evening and the Morning and the Night :) i really enjoyed reading this anthology

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mav

    I don’t admit to knowing much about feminism, nor am I an avid reader of science fiction. I’d recommend this for everybody, whether or not you read the essays. It’s just one of those books that you read, and at some point, you’re going to run into a sentence, a line that you take issue with. It’s an eye opening experience for the complete sci-fiction newbie. First off, Daughters of Earth isn’t a complete introduction, especially if you read the essays, While the stories are wonderful introduction I don’t admit to knowing much about feminism, nor am I an avid reader of science fiction. I’d recommend this for everybody, whether or not you read the essays. It’s just one of those books that you read, and at some point, you’re going to run into a sentence, a line that you take issue with. It’s an eye opening experience for the complete sci-fiction newbie. First off, Daughters of Earth isn’t a complete introduction, especially if you read the essays, While the stories are wonderful introductions to the genre’s best stories, the essays are confusing to anyone who is unfamiliar with women’s history and the history of the science fiction community. The essays keep making passing references to other titles, other authors, other significant figures in the development of feminist science fiction. One thing that drove me mad was the constant references to a James Tiptree and Alice Sheldon and how they changed the world of science fiction. Only by reading nearly every essay did the picture start to come together. I was plowing along, accepting with some skepticism after reading the essays that the stories were feminist, until I got to “Heat Death of the Universe” and it’s corresponding essay. Not only was my mind half asleep, but the part still paying attention was screaming in outrage: “BS! BS!” I didn’t agree with the essay’s case for why the story was science fiction and feminist. Sure, I could agree, the science parts were a metaphor for the women’s mental breakdown, but for me, alternating paragraphs on the laws of thermodynamics does not equal “science fiction”. So why am I recommending this book to you? Because I kept reading. And the stories kept amazing me and the essays, now that I had a better understanding of the history of feminist science fiction, ensured I kept an open mind. And the introduction, which just sums up everything so nicely, got me thinking. If anything else, this book served to change the modern person’s perception of what “feminism” is. Please note, this reviewer is under 18. This reviewer’s idea of feminism stems from books and media that exaggerate feminism and usually portray it as a radical and negative thing. Feminists aren’t out to overthrow men and nor is feminist science fiction about matriarchal societies treating males as dirt. Rather, feminist, claim these essayists, is more about awareness of gender and the roles associated with it. Feminists and feminist science fiction question not just the roles of men and women, but also other aspects of society we take for granted. Equally important is what feminist science fiction means for science fiction itself. Because the stories are arranged in chronologically order, we get to see why this question is such a big issue. More and more women are exploring society through science fiction, developing their own style. becoming more like today’s women’s fiction, a fact that causes controversy amongst the community. Fine examples lay in the third category of what I didn’t like. Does alternating paragraphs about the law of thermodynamics make a science fiction story? Does a story about gorillas in Africa count? Do they even count as feminist? But while the essays provide some insight and opinions, it is ultimately up to the reader to make their own conclusions. I just wish we got to hear the editor’s opinion of these stories. The introduction hints that she didn’t always completely agree with some of these stories. (and I stress again, read the introduction before AND after finishing this anthology). Read this with a pen(cil) and paper in hand. Even if you don’t read the essays, the least you can get out of it is a list of authors to check out. And a mind buzzing with reactions to each story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shara

    Daughters of Earth is far more than a critical text of the genre. It's a short story anthology. There are eleven short stories in this volume, each with a companion critical essay discussing the story itself, the author and her other work, and the feminist and historical times in which the story was written. And I must say, this was fascinating stuff. I'd kill to find more critical texts like this one, because not only did it give me access to stories I may have never found otherwise, but it all Daughters of Earth is far more than a critical text of the genre. It's a short story anthology. There are eleven short stories in this volume, each with a companion critical essay discussing the story itself, the author and her other work, and the feminist and historical times in which the story was written. And I must say, this was fascinating stuff. I'd kill to find more critical texts like this one, because not only did it give me access to stories I may have never found otherwise, but it allowed me to read the story, make my own judgments, and then put those judgments in context. [return][return]It's a fantastic format. I learned a lot, and gained a new appreciation for how history and the feminism at the time impacted the stories being written. And I'll be the first to say it's not a perfect survey of the 20th century: due to the nature of how the stories were selected, anything from the 40s was regrettably left out, and several prominent authors aren't in here either. I was fine with that, and it makes me wish that there'd be a volume two of this series, even though I know, based on her blog, that Larbalestier has left her scholarly days of feminist SF behind.[return][return]I would definitely recommend this text to anyone interested in the history of women writing in SF. Feminism, as noted in Larbalestier's introduction, is often in the eye of the beholder, and what a reader may view as feminist or not might directly conflict with what the essay sheds light upon. I'll stress again what a fantastic format this really is, with the stories and their companion essays. Like I said earlier, I'd love to see a volume two of this sucker, but I'd also love to see more SF (or fantasy) critical texts done in this manner. It's enlightening and it makes you think a little harder about the stories than you might otherwise, which I think is always cool. :)[return][return]For a full, story-by-story review, please click here: http://calico-reaction.livejournal.co...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Camelia Rose

    One can not claim to be a feminist and an avid reader of sci-fi without knowing any of the writers in this collection. Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century includes eleven sci-fi short stories written by women and with some or strong feminism theme. It begins with Clare Winger Harris in 1927, and ends with Karen Joy Fowler in 2002. I have read Octavia E. Butler and Karen Joy Fowler before, but none of the eleven stories. They are all excellent, well worth readin One can not claim to be a feminist and an avid reader of sci-fi without knowing any of the writers in this collection. Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century includes eleven sci-fi short stories written by women and with some or strong feminism theme. It begins with Clare Winger Harris in 1927, and ends with Karen Joy Fowler in 2002. I have read Octavia E. Butler and Karen Joy Fowler before, but none of the eleven stories. They are all excellent, well worth reading. Here are stories that impressed me most: The Conquest of Gola (Leslie F. Stone, 1931), is the first that introduced the (now well-spent) plot of "battle of sexes" in science fiction. And I Awoke and Found me Here on the Cold All Side (James Tiptree Jr. 1972), deals with the topic of human nature: can human race, the gene-propagating machines, never be able to get off the hedonic treadmill? Baliness Dancer (Gwyneth Jones, 1997), a near future world in a gradual apocalypse. I like the subtle writing style. The Evening and the Morning and the Night (Octavia E. Butler, 1987), a prediction of manmade genetic decease. Each story is followed by an essay written by a feminist scholar. The essays are academic and informative--you get a very good picture of the development of feminism in science fictions in last 100 years.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shel

    "The Heat Death of the Universe," by Pamela Zoline and "Rachel in Love," by Pat Murphy and "What I Didn't See," by Karen Joy Fowler were highlights of this collection of short fiction. Includes Octavia Butler's "The Evening and the Morning and the Night," about an invented Duryea-Gode disease which makes people tear at their own flesh, and is also in her collection Bloodchild and Other Stories. The essays that follow each story provide a great introduction to feminist science fiction and point t "The Heat Death of the Universe," by Pamela Zoline and "Rachel in Love," by Pat Murphy and "What I Didn't See," by Karen Joy Fowler were highlights of this collection of short fiction. Includes Octavia Butler's "The Evening and the Morning and the Night," about an invented Duryea-Gode disease which makes people tear at their own flesh, and is also in her collection Bloodchild and Other Stories. The essays that follow each story provide a great introduction to feminist science fiction and point to resources for further study, reading in the tradition.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    A collection of 11 science fiction stories and essays about them. I liked the more recent stories much better than the older ones, but would recommend alongside The Left Hand of Darkness, Woman on the Edge of Time and the Xenogenesis trilogy as a great introduction to feminist science fiction.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century is an anthology of eleven short stories which was collected and edited by Justine Larbalestier. This anthology collects eleven short science fiction stories written in the twentieth century with a feminist view. For the most part, I really like most of these contributions. Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century is a short anthology collection of eleven science fiction stories that run the gamut of Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century is an anthology of eleven short stories which was collected and edited by Justine Larbalestier. This anthology collects eleven short science fiction stories written in the twentieth century with a feminist view. For the most part, I really like most of these contributions. Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century is a short anthology collection of eleven science fiction stories that run the gamut of story types within the genre. It also ranges through time – the earliest story written by Clare Winger Harris was published in 1927 to the latest story written by Karen Joy Fowler which was published in 2002 – technically the twenty-first century, but it is just a small quibble. Like most anthologies there are weaker contributions and Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century is not an exception. There were a couple of short stories that I didn’t connect to as well as the others or was – comparatively speaking, not as written as well. However, it didn't dilute the overall enjoyment of the anthology. All in all, Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century is a well written anthology about feminism in science fiction that was written predominantly in the twentieth century, by women authors.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Akemi G.

    This is an excellent anthology of short SF written by women; each story is followed by an essay that reviews the work and the historical meaning of it. I had read some of the stories in The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction, another great anthology, yet I found a few new favorites, including Rachel In Love by Pat Murphy and Wives by Lisa Tuttle. This is an excellent anthology of short SF written by women; each story is followed by an essay that reviews the work and the historical meaning of it. I had read some of the stories in The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction, another great anthology, yet I found a few new favorites, including Rachel In Love by Pat Murphy and Wives by Lisa Tuttle.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Megan ❀

    dnf at 131 pages

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Wow! Some of these stories just blew me away! I was very surprised to see how early feminist sf was being written! I had no idea! The first story: The Fate of the Poseidonia was written in 1927. Sure the language usage is a little dated, but it kinda still works even after all these years. Some of the events in the story are relevant to today's headlines. (Such as that Indonesia airplane that disappeared 4 months ago). The second story: The Conquest of Gola, was written in 1931! and the third s Wow! Some of these stories just blew me away! I was very surprised to see how early feminist sf was being written! I had no idea! The first story: The Fate of the Poseidonia was written in 1927. Sure the language usage is a little dated, but it kinda still works even after all these years. Some of the events in the story are relevant to today's headlines. (Such as that Indonesia airplane that disappeared 4 months ago). The second story: The Conquest of Gola, was written in 1931! and the third story: Created He them, in 1955! I enjoyed all the stories and the essays after each one. The were very educational and informative. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in feminist sf!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    This is a fine book and a great mix of excellent stories and thoughtful commentary, but it only gets four stars because it's a book about feminist science fiction without a single story by Ursula K. LeGuin or Joanna Russ, and that's like putting out an anthology on Elizabethan drama without anything by Shakespeare or Marlowe. The editor gives the lame excuse that none of the contributors wanted to write essays on the two, but when every contributor's essay mentions LeGuin or Russ, you march back This is a fine book and a great mix of excellent stories and thoughtful commentary, but it only gets four stars because it's a book about feminist science fiction without a single story by Ursula K. LeGuin or Joanna Russ, and that's like putting out an anthology on Elizabethan drama without anything by Shakespeare or Marlowe. The editor gives the lame excuse that none of the contributors wanted to write essays on the two, but when every contributor's essay mentions LeGuin or Russ, you march back to your editor's office and force someone to change their author.

  20. 5 out of 5

    dejah_thoris

    Looking to read a wide variety of feminist science fiction? Start with this collection! Spanning most of the twentieth century, each of these eleven short stories has an accompanying critical essay to better understand how it relates to the genre and feminism as a whole. None of these stories disappointed me and a few really broadened my conception of the genre. Wonderful thanks to all my foremothers. I will read more of your work now that I know your names.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This book is incredible. It's 11 science fiction stories by (mostly) feminists spanning the century, each followed by a feminist essay on the story. The stories are all very solid, and the essays give such great perspectives and historical background about both sci fi at the time, and feminism at the time. It was an excellent introduction to a whole bunch of new writers for me. This book is incredible. It's 11 science fiction stories by (mostly) feminists spanning the century, each followed by a feminist essay on the story. The stories are all very solid, and the essays give such great perspectives and historical background about both sci fi at the time, and feminism at the time. It was an excellent introduction to a whole bunch of new writers for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I read this for my thesis (expect to see that opening A LOT in the next few months) and I really enjoyed it. The book has one story from each decade of the twentieth century with an accompanying essay. The essays were generally enlightening and helped me to develop a better feel for the history of feminist SF. The stories were excellent. Highly recommended if you're a fan of SF in general. I read this for my thesis (expect to see that opening A LOT in the next few months) and I really enjoyed it. The book has one story from each decade of the twentieth century with an accompanying essay. The essays were generally enlightening and helped me to develop a better feel for the history of feminist SF. The stories were excellent. Highly recommended if you're a fan of SF in general.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Full of good sf w/ feminist themes from 1920's to the present that explore human sexuality and the role of the feminine. Includes stories by James Tiptree Jr and Octavia E Butler. Stories are paired with an essay analysis that make for interesting reading between the short stories. Full of good sf w/ feminist themes from 1920's to the present that explore human sexuality and the role of the feminine. Includes stories by James Tiptree Jr and Octavia E Butler. Stories are paired with an essay analysis that make for interesting reading between the short stories.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Kozma

    Another great delve into the history and criticism of science-fiction.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    The ratings are for stories with 3stars or more: The fate of Poseidonia, by Clare Winger Harris 4stars This story is about a martian come to Earth looking for water for his planet. Martians find a way to take away approximately 2 million tons of ocean water to their planet. The Martians are depicted as looking like native Americans, their headdresses are part of their skin. It's a racist story, otherwise I would have given it 5 stars. Poseidonia is a ship that was spirited away to Mars. The Conquest The ratings are for stories with 3stars or more: The fate of Poseidonia, by Clare Winger Harris 4stars This story is about a martian come to Earth looking for water for his planet. Martians find a way to take away approximately 2 million tons of ocean water to their planet. The Martians are depicted as looking like native Americans, their headdresses are part of their skin. It's a racist story, otherwise I would have given it 5 stars. Poseidonia is a ship that was spirited away to Mars. The Conquest of Gola, by Leslie F. Stone 4stars Definitely a feel-good story for misandrists. A matriarchal society on the planet GOLA Is visited by men from Earth, who want to exploit their planet and"put the men in charge." The queen puts them in their place. Ah, sublime! Created He Them, by Alice Eleanor Jones 3stars A bleak after-apocalyptic story about housewives and marriage in an over-the-top patriarchical society. Children are mostly born deformed from the radiation left from WWIII, so those who breed healthy children don't get to pick who their spouses are, in a society already devastated by shortages of food, electricity, uncontaminated water, and areas of Earth that can sustain human life. No Light in the Window, by Kate Wilhelm 3stars A story that answers back to all the times men (smugly) say that a woman can't do (blank) because she's too emotional. A finite number of humans on a military base will be chosen to be included in a ship to the stars. They are all being watched and psychologically tested, and many are eliminated. No one knows what are the characteristics they are looking for, so there is no use pretending, and the strain is making all of them brittle enough to snap. And I Awoke and Found Me Here, by James Tiptree, Jr. 3stars This strange story makes an analogy between the destruction of Polynesia by its contamination by white men, and the destruction of humans by the intermingling of alien races with humans. Its particular emphasis is on the sexual allure of aliens for human men and their following ruination, read: karma. Wives, by Lisa Tuttle 3stars A planet and its natives are hunted, subjugated and exploited by men from Earth. The few remaining survivors are forced into the role of"wives" by the male humans inhabiting the planet. They wear skinsuits, binding their third breast, makeup, wigs, perfume, to act the part of human females. Rachel in Love, by Pat Murphy 4stars This is a bittersweet tale, about a chimpanzee who believes she is a human girl. Her father was a scientist who taught her ASL, and they lived happily together in a ranchhouse in the desert. But one day her father dies, having succumbed to a heart attack (he was a drinker and a smoker), and as he had made no preparations in the case of his death, Rachel is thrown on her own resources. Captured by workers from a Primate Resource Center, the evil place that Rachel calls her home for the next few weeks, she makes plans for her escape, and for her plans to live"happily ever after." Balinese Dancer, by Gwyneth Jones 3stars A puzzling story, containing as characters a married couple--Spanish wife and American husband--on the outs, and their boy Jake. They are camping out in their yurt in the countryside in France because the English channel tunnel is blockaded, the beaches are blockaded, because France and England are in some trade-and-otherwise dispute. Tensions are running high, people are uneasy, and Anna has lost her University biology lab job because of some paper she and her team published. (This paper is the puzzling part.) At a lonely campground, an abandoned Birman cat (sort of like a Siamese) attaches himself to them. The story got an extra star for reminding me of my Siamese cat Arnulfo. What I Didn't See, by Karen Joy Fowler 4stars A story carefully crafted by the author that has much in common with"The Women Men Don't See," by Alice Sheldan (James Tiptree Jr). In this story where the ugly dualisms of white imperialism against black African natives, female against male, and gorillas against humans is played out within a group of scientists who journey into the jungles of a part of Africa with their 200 native porters.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pippa

    This was a really good book. I loved all of the stories, except one, which just didn't resonate with me. ('The Heat Death of the Universe' - which is about one woman's breakdown... very bitty, just didn't engage me at all). The analysis after the stories is very interesting too. As nearly sixty year old woman (still can't believe that!) I was aware of some of the history, but it was still good to see it being recorded. Very interesting altogether - and may inspire young writers. This was a really good book. I loved all of the stories, except one, which just didn't resonate with me. ('The Heat Death of the Universe' - which is about one woman's breakdown... very bitty, just didn't engage me at all). The analysis after the stories is very interesting too. As nearly sixty year old woman (still can't believe that!) I was aware of some of the history, but it was still good to see it being recorded. Very interesting altogether - and may inspire young writers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Esther

    I started the year with what - to me - was a perfect book. Was it perfect in that it made no mistakes? Not at all! For me, it was perfect in that it fed so many different parts of me. It fed me as an academic (albeit in a different field), a story lover, a feminist and a follower of science fiction. I loved being able to alternate between all these different aspects of myself in one book. The book is structured as an introduction to the subject matter - feminist science fiction - followed by elev I started the year with what - to me - was a perfect book. Was it perfect in that it made no mistakes? Not at all! For me, it was perfect in that it fed so many different parts of me. It fed me as an academic (albeit in a different field), a story lover, a feminist and a follower of science fiction. I loved being able to alternate between all these different aspects of myself in one book. The book is structured as an introduction to the subject matter - feminist science fiction - followed by eleven short stories, each accompanied by an essay about the story by a different scholar. It is a fabulous structure and I would love to find more anthologies that follow this approach. Even as the book looks at one story at a time, it also provides an insightful overview into the history of feminist science fiction. I put it down feeling that I had a firmer grip both on the history of science fiction and the history of feminism. The essays constantly situate themselves in their wider context and I feel that my ability to appreciate feminist science fiction has been increased. The choice of stories may not be perfect. Some readers have criticised it for leaving out certain key authors - and it does. It admits this up-front. To be honest, I liked the mix of well-known and lesser-known authors as the development of a movement does not necessarily only dwell in the hands of the most well-known proponents. Some of the stories are arguably not feminist - like the first, "The Fate of the Poseidonia" (by Clare Winger Harris) - or not science fiction - like "The Heat Death of the Universe" (by Pamela Zoline) or "What I Didn't See" (by Sarah Joy Fowler). But in each case, the essayists argue persuasively for why their choice of story belongs in a historical anthology of feminist science fiction. One of the sub-movements that this book identifies that I found quite interesting was that of the "angry housewife". There are a suprisingly large amount of stories that focus on the fate of the housewife in this anthology, including "Created He Them" (by Alice Eleanor Jones), "The Heat Death of the Universe" (by Pamela Zoline) and "Wives" (by Lisa Tuttle). Seeing how this sub-movement evolved was interesting. Though some of the other essayists didn't seem as in favour of this sub-movement or other 'quieter' forms of feminism. And that was another thing I enjoyed about this book. Feminism itself has evolved, and has many different forms, and I felt like this book did grapple with that complexity. For myself, one of the best things this book gave me was a reading plan for the year. Last year I read Lightspeed Magazine, June 2014: Women Destroy Science Fiction! Special Issue and one of the challenges was to read science fiction only by women for a year. I don't intend to go that far, but I've noticed for the last two years my reading has been 2/3rds male authors and I intend to reverse that this year. What this book allowed me to do is identify a reading list not just of female authors, but of female authors who have added something both to the history of science fiction and the history of feminism.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andy Hickman

    Wives – Lisa Tuttle (1976) Shockingly grotesque inditement against patriarchal selfishness. *** Opening line: “A smell of sulphur in the air on a morning when the men had gone, and the wives, in their beds, smiled in their sleep, breathed more easily, and burrowed deeper into dreams.” “Susie began to cry, and the dust drank her tears as they fell. She didn't understand how this had all begun, how or why she had become a wife, but she could bear it no longer.” The replacement 'Susie' unperceivabley c Wives – Lisa Tuttle (1976) Shockingly grotesque inditement against patriarchal selfishness. *** Opening line: “A smell of sulphur in the air on a morning when the men had gone, and the wives, in their beds, smiled in their sleep, breathed more easily, and burrowed deeper into dreams.” “Susie began to cry, and the dust drank her tears as they fell. She didn't understand how this had all begun, how or why she had become a wife, but she could bear it no longer.” The replacement 'Susie' unperceivabley continues to provide Jack with what he wants, not who she is. Their marriage (as all the contrived marriages in this story) are impersonal fabricated constructions. Closing line: “'Three tits and the best coffee in the universe,' he said with satisfaction, squeezing one of the bound lumps of flesh on her chest. 'With this to come home to, it kind of makes the whole war-thing worthwhile.'” - - -

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    My reactions to these stories were occasionally, "Is this really science fiction?" and occasionally, "I wouldn't call that feminist!" But that's one of the great things about an anthology that spans a century of social change, scifi, and feminist theory. Still my favorites were almost all at the end with the more recent writers. Standouts for me were "Wives" by Lisa Tuttle and "The Evening and the Morning and the Night" by Octavia Butler. (I really have to read more Butler.) I've seen some compl My reactions to these stories were occasionally, "Is this really science fiction?" and occasionally, "I wouldn't call that feminist!" But that's one of the great things about an anthology that spans a century of social change, scifi, and feminist theory. Still my favorites were almost all at the end with the more recent writers. Standouts for me were "Wives" by Lisa Tuttle and "The Evening and the Morning and the Night" by Octavia Butler. (I really have to read more Butler.) I've seen some complaints that there were omissions, but as I've read Le Guin, but almost none of the others, I was happy to see a variety of authors.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rift Vegan

    What a great book! I don't read very much theory, but the essays really add to the value of the stories... Usually I read too fast to actually think about the underlying themes and such, so the essays -- "think about this" -- were enjoyable. My favorite story is Pat Murphy's "Rachel In Love", about a little girl's human brain in a chimp body. Of course my animal rights side was screaming at the lab, but it's a great story to expose people to these issues. And it should be obvious: if you are a fe What a great book! I don't read very much theory, but the essays really add to the value of the stories... Usually I read too fast to actually think about the underlying themes and such, so the essays -- "think about this" -- were enjoyable. My favorite story is Pat Murphy's "Rachel In Love", about a little girl's human brain in a chimp body. Of course my animal rights side was screaming at the lab, but it's a great story to expose people to these issues. And it should be obvious: if you are a feminist, you should be an animal rights activist and vegan... because dairy cows and laying hens are females too!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.