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Today, F. Scott Fitzgerald is known for his novels, but in his lifetime, his fame stemmed from his prolific achievement as one of America's most gifted (and best-paid) writers of stories and novellas. In 'The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald', Matthew J. Bruccoli, the country's premier Fitzgerald scholar and biographer, assembles a sparkling collection that encompasses Today, F. Scott Fitzgerald is known for his novels, but in his lifetime, his fame stemmed from his prolific achievement as one of America's most gifted (and best-paid) writers of stories and novellas. In 'The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald', Matthew J. Bruccoli, the country's premier Fitzgerald scholar and biographer, assembles a sparkling collection that encompasses the full scope of Fitzgerald's short fiction. The forty-three masterpieces range from early stories that capture the fashion of the times to later ones written after the author's fabled crack-up, which are sober reflections on his own youthful excesses. Included are classic novellas, such as "The Rich Boy," "May Day," and "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz," as well as a remarkable body of work he wrote for the Saturday Evening Post and its sister "slicks." These stories can be read as an autobiographical journal of a great writer's career, an experience deepened by the illuminating introductory headnotes that Matthew Bruccoli has written for each story, placing it in its literary and biographical context. Together, these forty-three stories compose a vivid picture of a lost era, but their brilliance is timeless. This essential collection is a monument to the genius of one of the great voices in the history of American literature.


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Today, F. Scott Fitzgerald is known for his novels, but in his lifetime, his fame stemmed from his prolific achievement as one of America's most gifted (and best-paid) writers of stories and novellas. In 'The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald', Matthew J. Bruccoli, the country's premier Fitzgerald scholar and biographer, assembles a sparkling collection that encompasses Today, F. Scott Fitzgerald is known for his novels, but in his lifetime, his fame stemmed from his prolific achievement as one of America's most gifted (and best-paid) writers of stories and novellas. In 'The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald', Matthew J. Bruccoli, the country's premier Fitzgerald scholar and biographer, assembles a sparkling collection that encompasses the full scope of Fitzgerald's short fiction. The forty-three masterpieces range from early stories that capture the fashion of the times to later ones written after the author's fabled crack-up, which are sober reflections on his own youthful excesses. Included are classic novellas, such as "The Rich Boy," "May Day," and "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz," as well as a remarkable body of work he wrote for the Saturday Evening Post and its sister "slicks." These stories can be read as an autobiographical journal of a great writer's career, an experience deepened by the illuminating introductory headnotes that Matthew Bruccoli has written for each story, placing it in its literary and biographical context. Together, these forty-three stories compose a vivid picture of a lost era, but their brilliance is timeless. This essential collection is a monument to the genius of one of the great voices in the history of American literature.

30 review for The Short Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    MihaElla

    What a wonderful world described by F S Fitzgerald in this pretty dense collection of short stories. Loved it. A great number. 54. It was worthwhile the time I dedicated to it and the efforts to keep myself undistracted. Stories about people with a life very strong in them, fighting for themselves to be happy, although in many cases they end up being and feeling ashamed of themselves and miserable. Stories about people that were financial and professional successes (sadly not for long) for which What a wonderful world described by F S Fitzgerald in this pretty dense collection of short stories. Loved it. A great number. 54. It was worthwhile the time I dedicated to it and the efforts to keep myself undistracted. Stories about people with a life very strong in them, fighting for themselves to be happy, although in many cases they end up being and feeling ashamed of themselves and miserable. Stories about people that were financial and professional successes (sadly not for long) for which they work harder than others, or it seemed so, for they had eventually begun to pay a price for their irregular lives, if we take into account that their faces over thirty are discontented and unhappy. Stories that lead one back to first youth and days of hope. Surely, other sort of hope than the current flow of hope. Stories about people that get hurt but are still people of action, full of the strong vitality of the late twenties (of last century, of course), about people that were drinking too much and needed someone on the gray days of reaction (as a rule, they ended up getting married suddenly..) Stories that are bitterly humorous about the characters they present, by describing all their problems of hate and bitterness, of pains and grieving, and concluding in a tragic note to say we are all failures. As one character finely said it “he had stacked the cards dexterously, but Life had played a trump from its sleeve at the last.” Stories about certain old-fashioned convictions. For all my sense of possession, I felt how old-fashioned I am too. Ha. Stories that show that it’s all so silly! Stories that show the glamour of an old world. Stories that show entertainments, eccentricities, and well spoiled men and women. Stories that show that you go up or down in this world. Well, it doesn’t matter if it’s happening in last century or present century. Stories about Josephine. Oh, yes! Josephine. What a charming fine girl – certainly my favourite (of course I don’t compete with the great Chris Rea and his beloved Josephine) – one of the best, the belle of Chicago, the golden girl of the golden West - an incontestable little beauty of just sixteen years of age. A representative of her generation as the principal agent of corruption (of course I mean she had character) though she openly recognized her being fickle (and that’s just human, isn’t!?) she is proud to claim her motto as “Live and let live. Everybody has a right to do what they want”. To make long story short this means just have fun with boys, dancing, parties! Doubtless it’s really unendurable the way she’s behaving – and yes, it’s mostly dangerous and alarming when out of sudden a peculiar look is flashing across her face, a sort of expression that is easily associated with a prominent character in Faust. HA. It is curious - though her emotional maturity had seemed not quite proper (definitely also related to the environment she was circling around), when she was putting on more sophisticated clothes – this very fact only, contributed to the change of attitude towards her and she was accepted by at least the male half in any party, or gathering. The only thing she cared about in the world was being in love and being with the person she currently loved, but oddly enough, the romantic mystery of the world moved quite often into another man. And she was just sixteen years of age yet. It was sheer fun to watch her doing all kinds of different things – and never tired of trying anything (she really holds a fast-beating excitement in every affair she gets involved into) despite the fact that sometimes it meant just to work herself into hysteria – but never forgetting that her ultimate goal is to always mark a revision of everyone’s else opinion of her. She is chiefly revolving around an aura of new boys – centaurs in new cars (!), new tunes, parties and house parties yet to be. Goodness! I have honestly forgotten what early youth is all about. Or, it was about. In general, she sees by instinct rather than logic, and that helps her know if there is something she failed to understand. She knows that to remain stuck for long in a certain place will eventually ruin her fine reputation - as “nobody thinks of anything but boys and dances from morning till night. They go out in their cars and kiss them from morning till night, as all these boys are just simply immoral, that’s all.” Sounds like a child letter. Funny and simple. What a lot of nonsense to be bothered about nowadays! I mean it was a silly reason. But I am not sure this is so far away from present times. Especially for a sixteen-year-old girl. In my weekends’ walks to the park I see a lot of groups of teens – a solid mix of girls and boys – who mostly keep shouting, yelling, talking very noisily, pushing and pulling of themselves, walking like they are some legendary personages from some movies. Girls look much more mature than the boys, and this gives to the view a very funny contrast, as something is not proper. It is lovely however how they try to exchange a few warm glances one with each other, especially when some pairs are already established. I know that I have a strong prejudice or a biased judgement when I take them in my eye. But the good thing is that on most occasions I find myself roaring with laughter. Good God! I am so happy that I have passed that critical age. Not that I have been something like that. Still, it has some silly touch to hear how they provoke each other, by entangling themselves into plots, just for the sake of being occupied with something. In my past, a nice quiet place was best to be and it was really making a difference. By itself it had a promise of its own. In was developing in me a rather gently social vein. So now, to put the matters in a new light, let’s remember how Chris Rea is singing about his Josephine: There's rain on my window, And I'm thinking on you, Tears on my pillow, But I will come thru... Josephine, I'll send you all my love, And every single step I'll take I'll take for you. Now there's a stone on my radar, But I can still fly. You are the reason, That's ruling my sky. Life with a pain in, I was walking away. In the coldest of winter, Night becomes day. Josephine, I'll send you all my love, And every single step I'll take I'll take for you. My Josephine, I'll send you all my love, When I fall away, I'll send you all my love, Josephine...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    So different from Gatsby and This Side of Paradise, but exceedingly clever and often funny. Of course, this is where Fitzgerald made his money, so the stories tend to lean more toward entertainment than does his "serious" work. There's even a film based on "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett. If kids were forced to read that and "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz", perhaps more people would be Fitzgerald fans. Or perhaps not. So as I continue to read, more and So different from Gatsby and This Side of Paradise, but exceedingly clever and often funny. Of course, this is where Fitzgerald made his money, so the stories tend to lean more toward entertainment than does his "serious" work. There's even a film based on "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett. If kids were forced to read that and "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz", perhaps more people would be Fitzgerald fans. Or perhaps not. So as I continue to read, more and more stories echo or foreshadow The Great Gatsby, which I suppose is not much of a surprise. This does not make them bad. The more I read, the more I feel like Scott and I would have been friends, if, you know, I had money and went to Princeton and lived the high life during the Jazz Age. Favorite line from a short story so far (from "The Sensible Thing"): "Well, let it pass, he thought; April is over, April is over. There are all kinds of love in the world, but never the same love twice."

  3. 4 out of 5

    DJ

    A collection of 14x of F. Scott Fitzgerald's earliest stories, written between 1909 and 1917. The stories (and my ratings of them) are: The Mystery of the Raymond Mortgage” - 5 Stars “Reade, Substitute Right Half” - 3 Stars “A Debt of Honor” - 4 Stars “The Room with the Green Blinds” - 5 Stars “A Luckless Santa Claus” - 5 Stars “Pain and the Scientist” - 5 Stars “The Trail of the Duke” - 4 Stars “Shadow Laurels” - 3 Stars “The Ordeal” - 2 Stars “The Debutante” - 5 Stars “The Spire and the Gargoyle” (aka “ A collection of 14x of F. Scott Fitzgerald's earliest stories, written between 1909 and 1917. The stories (and my ratings of them) are: The Mystery of the Raymond Mortgage” - 5 Stars “Reade, Substitute Right Half” - 3 Stars “A Debt of Honor” - 4 Stars “The Room with the Green Blinds” - 5 Stars “A Luckless Santa Claus” - 5 Stars “Pain and the Scientist” - 5 Stars “The Trail of the Duke” - 4 Stars “Shadow Laurels” - 3 Stars “The Ordeal” - 2 Stars “The Debutante” - 5 Stars “The Spire and the Gargoyle” (aka “Spires and Gargoyles”) - 4 Stars “Babes in the Woods” - 3 Stars “Sentiment- and the Use of Rouge” - 3 Stars “The Pierian Springs and the Last Straw” - 4 Stars

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    The Short Stories of F Scott Fitzgerald. This is a lengthy book. You would be hard pressed to read this collection and not gain some deep insights into what Fitzgerald was going through in his real life. That’s because most of these stories are autobiographical or written with his friends and Zelda in mind. But the excess. Reading this collection makes you want to shout “Just stop the drinking!” Of course Fitzgerald never could stop. And beyond the effects of alcohol that led to his deteriorating The Short Stories of F Scott Fitzgerald. This is a lengthy book. You would be hard pressed to read this collection and not gain some deep insights into what Fitzgerald was going through in his real life. That’s because most of these stories are autobiographical or written with his friends and Zelda in mind. But the excess. Reading this collection makes you want to shout “Just stop the drinking!” Of course Fitzgerald never could stop. And beyond the effects of alcohol that led to his deteriorating health and to his premature death, it struck me that Fitzgerald rarely wrote about anything else. Of course he wrote so perceptively about this era for a decade for the Saturday Evening Post and was rewarded handsomely. So the stories just kept coming and it’s undoubtedly what the readers wanted from him. His novels though did not sell well at the time and they were not nearly as popular as today. So he really was known for the 150 or so stories of which 40 are in this collection. Here are my favorite stories. 1. The Ice Palace - a clever story about a southern belle marrying a Yankee. An early story in Fitzgerald’s career. 2. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - an imaginative story of an old man who ages in reverse. 3. The Rich Boy - Fitzgerald’s most famous novella and for good reason. An insightful and surprisingly sympathetic view of a rich young man. 4. The Swimmers - my favorite story. An interesting contrast between America and the old ways of Europe and an American who comes up with a clever plan to get back at his unfaithful French wife. 5. The Bridal Party - a man has come into money and wishes to stop his ex-girlfriend - for whom he still has feelings - from getting married to a broker who just lost his savings in the stock market crash. 6. Babylon Revisited - a man arrives back in Paris (Babylon) several years after the roaring ‘20s and the stock market crash. He tries to persuade his daughter and her guardians to let the child come live with him now that he’s recovered. But the past is not so easy to shake off. Perhaps Fitzgerald’s most famous short story. 7. Dearly Beloved - a story about a young black couple whose dreams end in the pandemic of 1918. A very short story and more lyrical than his others. 4 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris

    "Shocking" as it may seem, I had never read even a single line written by F. Scott Fitzgerald till this week and this rather short collection of stories. Never watched any of the big screen adaptations of his novels either, most notably of The Great Gatsby. I had a feeling I'd love him - and in a way I was "reserving" him in my mind as something exceptional for a difficult time - but I had no idea of how much I'd love him! Even though I read these short stories in a very old and stilted Greek tr "Shocking" as it may seem, I had never read even a single line written by F. Scott Fitzgerald till this week and this rather short collection of stories. Never watched any of the big screen adaptations of his novels either, most notably of The Great Gatsby. I had a feeling I'd love him - and in a way I was "reserving" him in my mind as something exceptional for a difficult time - but I had no idea of how much I'd love him! Even though I read these short stories in a very old and stilted Greek translation from the early 60s, I'm in awe of his writing skills and of the totally original and penetrating way he treated his subjects that were very removed from my usual interests. Pure genious! Can't wait to buy his whole œuvre - in the original English this time! - and immerse myself in his world.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I have read this book countless times. If you only ever buy one F. Scott book, buy this one. His development as an author unfolds before your eyes as you read his early stories of ambitious youth and eventually wander into his later tales of reflection on human frailty. From Bernice and her Bob to Emotional Bankruptcy and everything in between, this is a collection of short stories to keep on your bedside table for a lifetime.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    We all know I’m giving this as many stars as I can possibly give, so let’s just go ahead and take care of that right now. A constellation and a galaxy of Gatsby’s silver-peppered stars. Also, in case you’re wondering, “The Ice Palace” and “The Offshore Pirate” are two of my favorite stories of all time.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marc

    Scott Fitzgerald surely could write short stories, but this collection has too much variation in quality. I was delighted by a poem though (yes, a poem) in the novelle 'May Day 1920', a real gem. Scott Fitzgerald surely could write short stories, but this collection has too much variation in quality. I was delighted by a poem though (yes, a poem) in the novelle 'May Day 1920', a real gem.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Petra-X Off having adventures

    This book of short stories - novellas really, as each story is an hour or so long - are very much of their time. People don't live like that any more. Its a three and a half star book, the boring stories, Benediction and the Camel's Back getting two stars each and the really good ones, Bernice and Benjamin Button getting four. The Lees of Happiness is right in the middle with three. Bernice Bobs her Hair is a lovely story of how the makeover of an unpopular cousin rebounds on the one generous eno This book of short stories - novellas really, as each story is an hour or so long - are very much of their time. People don't live like that any more. Its a three and a half star book, the boring stories, Benediction and the Camel's Back getting two stars each and the really good ones, Bernice and Benjamin Button getting four. The Lees of Happiness is right in the middle with three. Bernice Bobs her Hair is a lovely story of how the makeover of an unpopular cousin rebounds on the one generous enough to help the girl but not quite generous enough to give up her own man and place in the spotlight. Bernice gets her own back! Benediction is a story that might appeal to Catholics a lot more than it did to me. The Camel's Back was probably very amusing at the time but now the tales of the rich and louche who offer money to those they consider their social inferiors as a way of getting them to do what they want has been taken over by endless tales of Hollywood stars and rich nobodies like Paris Hilton, Kim Kardashian and those of their ilk. Time, and wrinkles, will put them (back) in their place! The Curious Case of Benjamin Button was a better film, a marvellous film, that it was short novel. Its an interesting concept, starting off old and working backwards in life and F. Scott Fitzgerald told it better than anyone. The last story, the Lees of Happiness, meandered hither and thither and there was an overdone contrast between the bleached blonde and the good woman who stood by her man 'til the very end. However, it was the bleached blonde that came out with what she wanted, although I don't think I was supposed to draw that conclusion. I think my sympathies were supposed to lie with the virtue of the good woman and so they did, until the end. What point is there in maintaining virtue over happiness when there is no one to benefit? You can listen to the stories here: http://librivox.org/selected-short-st...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    First of all, I really appreciated Bruccoli's collection. The introduction is personable and informative and the small explanations before each story help to place the writer within his context. Some might say that so many stories might become drab. How much rich whining and "poor in spirit" can one take? I think this is something we take for granted now. Then, before and after the Crash and The Great Depression, when the national identity and arrogance was wrapped up in the frivolity of day-to-d First of all, I really appreciated Bruccoli's collection. The introduction is personable and informative and the small explanations before each story help to place the writer within his context. Some might say that so many stories might become drab. How much rich whining and "poor in spirit" can one take? I think this is something we take for granted now. Then, before and after the Crash and The Great Depression, when the national identity and arrogance was wrapped up in the frivolity of day-to-day vacationing and swollen bank accounts, such a view on the "Rich" was either inconsequential, beyond surface acknowledgement, or pure fantasy and scholastic foreplay. I think it unfair to discount Fitzgerald's perspective and clarity of mind simply because of his subject matter. As was so poignantly captured in "Dearly Beloved", youth was the strength of Fitzgerald's understanding. Not the physical vigor or potential prowess of it, but the dreaming and looking to a better day. But what better day is there than being in youth? it's one plague the distraction toward the future. Perhaps Fitzgerald tried to remain in his youth, much to his own disillusionment. This was an excellent collection, an excellent read and I feel I now know the writer and would tell anyone that I prefer his short stories to his novels.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anna Tatelman

    There are times when Fitzgerald can quite literally make me gasp, sigh, laugh, become teary-eyed, or even place a hand over my heart as I am reading; he is just one of those authors with the beautiful ability to transcend the page and put the story's very breath right into me. Then there are times when I just could not care less about yet another flapper girl, emotionally desolate American, broken dream, etc, etc. There are stories in here that are pure beauty, there are those that are mediocre, There are times when Fitzgerald can quite literally make me gasp, sigh, laugh, become teary-eyed, or even place a hand over my heart as I am reading; he is just one of those authors with the beautiful ability to transcend the page and put the story's very breath right into me. Then there are times when I just could not care less about yet another flapper girl, emotionally desolate American, broken dream, etc, etc. There are stories in here that are pure beauty, there are those that are mediocre, and there are those that I was bored to pieces with. My favorites of the collection: Head and Shoulders The Ice Palace The Offshore Pirate The Bowl At Your Age The Swimmers Two Wrongs The Bridal Party Babylon Revisited Crazy Sunday Afternoon of an Author (this one doesn't actually have nearly as much emotional power as the others, actually, but I'm including it here because it's a great little satire on the life of a writer and really lets Fitzgerald show off his wit and humor)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    My friend recommended this book, and I really wanted to like it. While Fitzgerald's pedigree cannot be debated, this anthology is a good example of drinking from a fire hose. How many stories of Ivy League socialites or bored Southern heiresses does one need? For me the answer is about 300 pages fewer than the 750 contained in this volume. Skip around and skim - there's plenty to enjoy here, but no need to take in everything. Special mention must be made of "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," My friend recommended this book, and I really wanted to like it. While Fitzgerald's pedigree cannot be debated, this anthology is a good example of drinking from a fire hose. How many stories of Ivy League socialites or bored Southern heiresses does one need? For me the answer is about 300 pages fewer than the 750 contained in this volume. Skip around and skim - there's plenty to enjoy here, but no need to take in everything. Special mention must be made of "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," Fitzgerald's wildly imaginative tale of a man who ages backward.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lettie

    fitzgerald is my favorite short story author of all time. he is one of the few writers (including even the great flannery, herself) that can hold my attention throughout an entire book of short stories. most authors seem to delve into formulaic patterns of how they write stories. fitzgerald stand firm, funny, witty, a little sad round the edges, attempting to keep the sparkle in the eyes, knowing that the lights gone out...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Been reading this book for like a month and a half but thats why I like short story collections--you can take some time off and not forget everything that has happened.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carolina Morales

    Highly recommend it to all of you who search for a view of US culture from the inside.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    Somewhat uneven, but the good ones are dang good. "Bernice Bobs Her Hair," "The Ice Palace," and "The Swimmers" were my favorites. Somewhat uneven, but the good ones are dang good. "Bernice Bobs Her Hair," "The Ice Palace," and "The Swimmers" were my favorites.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Piper

    Huzzah! Finally finished this 2 months later! Started reading this around when classes went online and tried to read a story or two a day. I really like Fitzgerald’s style and although a lot of his stories deal with the same sort of commentary, they differed greatly on humor and seriousness. I would recommend his short stories but reading them all at once like this is a big thing to tackle...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Briana

    I didn't read every single story. Somewhere good and some not so much. I didn't read every single story. Somewhere good and some not so much.

  19. 4 out of 5

    JP

    Over 30 of his best, favorite, and most telling short stories; quote by F. Scott: "My whole theory of writing I can sum up in one sentence. An author ought to write for the youth of his own generation, the critics of the next, and the schoolmasters of ever afterward." My favorites of these stories: "Head and Shoulders" for it's irony and certain parallels in my own life; "The Offshore Pirate" just because it was entertaining; "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" due to the perspective if sheds Over 30 of his best, favorite, and most telling short stories; quote by F. Scott: "My whole theory of writing I can sum up in one sentence. An author ought to write for the youth of his own generation, the critics of the next, and the schoolmasters of ever afterward." My favorites of these stories: "Head and Shoulders" for it's irony and certain parallels in my own life; "The Offshore Pirate" just because it was entertaining; "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" due to the perspective if sheds on our life cycle; "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz" because it was so outlandish and so real; "Basil and Cleopatra," the answer to Tom Sawyer; "The Swimmers" for the drama and justice; "Six of One" for the well-put moral; and "The Freeze Out" mostly because the bit with the grandmother at the end made me laugh out loud (on the ferry). Scott's themes included North vs. South, America vs. Europe, principal vs. habit, and the changes universal to all our lives. As writers do, his writings always involved what he new from his own life: Ivy League schools, deb culture, intermingling classes, the society of the 20's and 30's, roller-coaster finances, travel, love and loss, and human growth. To me, he was a great writer because he conveyed a flourish of emotional meaning and physical description with limited verbiage, by using the perfect phrases and details. Rather than create a caricature of his characters, he draws the minimum lines needed to distinguish them from anyone else.

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Roark

    Very enjoyable read... Fitzgerald has a way with words that is unlike anyone else I've read. I stand his work up well with Hemingway's, and of course he has his own post-war flavor and a unique gift for phrasing. I definitely want to check into some of his longer works as well. Some of the stories in the later portion of the book deserve a mention, as I've mentioned others along the way...The Swimmers was cool how the swimming actually became the thing that leveraged the rights to the character' Very enjoyable read... Fitzgerald has a way with words that is unlike anyone else I've read. I stand his work up well with Hemingway's, and of course he has his own post-war flavor and a unique gift for phrasing. I definitely want to check into some of his longer works as well. Some of the stories in the later portion of the book deserve a mention, as I've mentioned others along the way...The Swimmers was cool how the swimming actually became the thing that leveraged the rights to the character's child away from the antagonist in the boat. Another highlight was The Hotel Child. I thought More Than Just A House was great and turned out nice. Boil Some Water--Lots of It! was a slightly bizarre and funny one. Also Last Kiss held true to many of the author's melancholic tendencies but was another involving story. Babylon Revisited is one that stands out as well, with its autobiographical elements and story of the character trying to redeem himself and get his daughter. Also, What A Handsome Pair!, with the musician angle, and the recurring theme of a sought-after woman, who really is lost to both of the leading male characters of the story in the end.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    Loved this collection. I am a huge fan of The Great Gatsby but haven't read anything else's of Fitzgerald's until now. I usually have a hard time reading an entire collection of a writer's work, and though this took me awhile, it was more because of the length than the content. I impressed but he breadth of situations Fitzgerald covered, from childhood to teenage years, relationships, engagements, and marriage, personal issues like alcoholism, and even a bit of fantasy (The Diamond as Big as the Loved this collection. I am a huge fan of The Great Gatsby but haven't read anything else's of Fitzgerald's until now. I usually have a hard time reading an entire collection of a writer's work, and though this took me awhile, it was more because of the length than the content. I impressed but he breadth of situations Fitzgerald covered, from childhood to teenage years, relationships, engagements, and marriage, personal issues like alcoholism, and even a bit of fantasy (The Diamond as Big as the Ritz). My absolute favorite was The Offshore Pirate, but I also really enjoyed Bernice Bobs Her Hair, Winter Dreams, The Sensible Thing, Love in the Night (one that actually has a good ending!), The Rich Boy, One Trip Abroad, and Babylon Revisited. I especially recommend this edition because before each story there is a little paragraph on the story. So if you don't want to read each story, you might be able to decide based on the context. However, I couldn't pass any of them up.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie Mooney

    The only other book of short stories I have ever read had been "Barrel Fever" by David Sedaris, and having also read "Gatsby", I expected this to be very different. I was right. My two favorite stories had to be The Offshore Pirate and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, (ironically the first and last stories in the book.) The Offshore Pirate was about Ardita, a young, spunky woman who found herself being swept away by an unlikely pirate. Benjamin Button was the story of a man who aged backward The only other book of short stories I have ever read had been "Barrel Fever" by David Sedaris, and having also read "Gatsby", I expected this to be very different. I was right. My two favorite stories had to be The Offshore Pirate and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, (ironically the first and last stories in the book.) The Offshore Pirate was about Ardita, a young, spunky woman who found herself being swept away by an unlikely pirate. Benjamin Button was the story of a man who aged backwards (you may have seen the film). They were my favorite stories simply because of their whimsical plots, but I'm sure if F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote the McDonald's menu I would thoroughly enjoy that as well. He wrote with an unmatchable grace. It takes incredible skill to unfold a reader's imagination with fifty pages or less, and Fitzgerald does it in one sentence. I loved, loved, loved this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hayden Trenholm

    Although Fitzgerald is best remembered for his novels, particularly The Great Gatsby, a perenniel of high school curriculae, he was like his sometime friend, Ernest Hemingway, a master of the short story. Perhaps because he wasn't burdened with the need to write the great American novel, he let his sense of whimsy, play and pathos have full play. "Bernice Bobs her Hair" and the "Diamond as Big as the Ritz" were particularly memorable and both captured the exurbance and hope, not to mention the f Although Fitzgerald is best remembered for his novels, particularly The Great Gatsby, a perenniel of high school curriculae, he was like his sometime friend, Ernest Hemingway, a master of the short story. Perhaps because he wasn't burdened with the need to write the great American novel, he let his sense of whimsy, play and pathos have full play. "Bernice Bobs her Hair" and the "Diamond as Big as the Ritz" were particularly memorable and both captured the exurbance and hope, not to mention the frantic pursuit of fun, that marked the Roaring Twenties.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ambra

    Wow, I had no idea that F. Scott Fitzgerald practiced writing The Great Gatsby by writing a ton of short stories with the same theme. Poor boy, rich girl...ugh. Don't get me wrong. I love The Great Gatsby and I LOVE the way Fitzgerald writes, but I got hung up so long on that string of "Gatsby Stories" I didn't finish the book before the library said I had too many renewals...meaning I had the book for over 2 months and had to turn it in. I will come back and finish it someday. There are a few r Wow, I had no idea that F. Scott Fitzgerald practiced writing The Great Gatsby by writing a ton of short stories with the same theme. Poor boy, rich girl...ugh. Don't get me wrong. I love The Great Gatsby and I LOVE the way Fitzgerald writes, but I got hung up so long on that string of "Gatsby Stories" I didn't finish the book before the library said I had too many renewals...meaning I had the book for over 2 months and had to turn it in. I will come back and finish it someday. There are a few real gems in there. The Offshore Pirate alone makes it a book worth reading.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alor Deng

    Masterful short-story writer. For me, the greatest American writer ever. It's little quotes like the ones below that always stun me. "Dexter stood perfectly still, his mouth slightly ajar. He knew that if he moved forward a step his stare would be in her line of vision- if he moved backward he would lose his full view of her face." "Well, let it pass, he thought; April is over, April is over. There are all kinds of love in the world, but never the same love twice." Masterful short-story writer. For me, the greatest American writer ever. It's little quotes like the ones below that always stun me. "Dexter stood perfectly still, his mouth slightly ajar. He knew that if he moved forward a step his stare would be in her line of vision- if he moved backward he would lose his full view of her face." "Well, let it pass, he thought; April is over, April is over. There are all kinds of love in the world, but never the same love twice."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I love them all. I reread them for the lyricsm of his writing. I'm reminded of the scene in Good Will Hunting when Will is describing how he cannot play the piano (it's a bunch of keys), but that he can see a math equation and it makes sense. Words made sense to Fitzgerald like no one before or after. I love them all. I reread them for the lyricsm of his writing. I'm reminded of the scene in Good Will Hunting when Will is describing how he cannot play the piano (it's a bunch of keys), but that he can see a math equation and it makes sense. Words made sense to Fitzgerald like no one before or after.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    Overall I really liked this collection of short stories. Fitzgerald is a great writer. My favorite was Benjamin Button, but I liked a few others too a lot. Some of the stories got boring toward the end after I realized that he has an obsession with characters that go or attended universities such as Yale.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I liked about a third of the stories. I liked best Stockton's "A Tale of Negative Gravity," Marryatt's "The Werewolf" (which is made all the better when you think about when it was written), Wodehouse's "Providence and the Butler," and Hornung's "To Catch a Thief." A few were decent, and a few others I simply didn't get into; but that is common with any collection. I liked about a third of the stories. I liked best Stockton's "A Tale of Negative Gravity," Marryatt's "The Werewolf" (which is made all the better when you think about when it was written), Wodehouse's "Providence and the Butler," and Hornung's "To Catch a Thief." A few were decent, and a few others I simply didn't get into; but that is common with any collection.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Raul

    this book kept close, on my library shelf is one I grab every time I need a bit of cheering up. The early stories are my favorite as I've always been interested in the 20's and Fitzgerald seems to tell it all. Makes my day. this book kept close, on my library shelf is one I grab every time I need a bit of cheering up. The early stories are my favorite as I've always been interested in the 20's and Fitzgerald seems to tell it all. Makes my day.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kirk Weikart

    Do yourself a favor and read short stories, especially old serials by the masters. I was intrigued by The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, but was delighted to find that there were many more of that quality and higher in FSF's arsenal. Do yourself a favor and read short stories, especially old serials by the masters. I was intrigued by The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, but was delighted to find that there were many more of that quality and higher in FSF's arsenal.

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