hits counter The Great Chicago Fire: Rising From the Ashes - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Great Chicago Fire: Rising From the Ashes

Availability: Ready to download

A deadly blaze engulfs Chicago for two terrifying days! A brother, a sister, and a helpless puppy must race through the city to stay one step ahead of the devilish inferno. But can they reunite with their lost family before it’s too late? In History Comics: The Great Chicago Fire, writer Kate Hannigan and illustrator Alex Graudins tell the true story of how a city rose up f A deadly blaze engulfs Chicago for two terrifying days! A brother, a sister, and a helpless puppy must race through the city to stay one step ahead of the devilish inferno. But can they reunite with their lost family before it’s too late? In History Comics: The Great Chicago Fire, writer Kate Hannigan and illustrator Alex Graudins tell the true story of how a city rose up from one of the worst catastrophes in American history, and how this disaster forever changed how homes, buildings, and communities are constructed.


Compare

A deadly blaze engulfs Chicago for two terrifying days! A brother, a sister, and a helpless puppy must race through the city to stay one step ahead of the devilish inferno. But can they reunite with their lost family before it’s too late? In History Comics: The Great Chicago Fire, writer Kate Hannigan and illustrator Alex Graudins tell the true story of how a city rose up f A deadly blaze engulfs Chicago for two terrifying days! A brother, a sister, and a helpless puppy must race through the city to stay one step ahead of the devilish inferno. But can they reunite with their lost family before it’s too late? In History Comics: The Great Chicago Fire, writer Kate Hannigan and illustrator Alex Graudins tell the true story of how a city rose up from one of the worst catastrophes in American history, and how this disaster forever changed how homes, buildings, and communities are constructed.

30 review for The Great Chicago Fire: Rising From the Ashes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    Non fiction graphic novel about the fire that destroyed Chicago in 1871. The story is told by a little boy and girl who lose their family and go searching for them while the fire rage is all around their town. Very interesting retelling of an historical event

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    My brother had this and I needed books for my reading challenge lol

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cat Gemkow

    The suspense in this book is so beautifully maintained, as you follow a pair of siblings and a little puppy struggle to outrun the flames as the Great Fire of 1871 sweeps through the city of Chicago. Overall, I'm very pleased with the story telling, as well as the timeline and references included in the back of the book. I would recommend for about 3rd/4th grade and up, as it is naturally an upsetting story. The suspense in this book is so beautifully maintained, as you follow a pair of siblings and a little puppy struggle to outrun the flames as the Great Fire of 1871 sweeps through the city of Chicago. Overall, I'm very pleased with the story telling, as well as the timeline and references included in the back of the book. I would recommend for about 3rd/4th grade and up, as it is naturally an upsetting story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Meredith Ann

    I'm a grown woman and didn't know a lot about this topic, so I think middle grader readers will find it really intriguing. The pacing threw me off at a few times but overall, an interesting read. I liked how the myths were dispelled, as well as going into anti-immigrant sentiments. (As a fan of world's fair histories, the glimpse at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago at the end had me especially interested!) I'm a grown woman and didn't know a lot about this topic, so I think middle grader readers will find it really intriguing. The pacing threw me off at a few times but overall, an interesting read. I liked how the myths were dispelled, as well as going into anti-immigrant sentiments. (As a fan of world's fair histories, the glimpse at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago at the end had me especially interested!)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    3.5 stars I am not sure what genre this would be so I am going to call it a narrative nonfiction graphic novel that I really enjoyed. Focusing on the Great Chicago Fire we follow a brother and sister as they navigate the streets of Chicago trying to find their parents while also contending with the treachrous fire closing in on them and the city. This was the perfect mix of fact and story and it would be a great read for students. I look forward to reading more in the History Comics series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    A fascination look at one of the most devastating tragedies in American history.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    A good introduction to The Great Chicago Fire for children in a graphic novel format. I personally was looking for a little more depth, but my 10 year old enjoyed it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    Always love when history comes alive, and particularly enjoy reading about historical events near me. 2nd-6th graders will love this new graphic novel series.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christy Broderick

    This was a very factual, yet pleasing, graphic novel for children. Thanks again to NetGalley and First Second for allowing me to read this ARC in exchange for feedback. This is a middle grade graphic novel that allowed me to learn more about the Great Chicago Fire without feeling overwhelmed with all of the facts. It not only talked about the fire, but also provided information about how it possibly started to what was done after the fire diminished. It didn’t break the people that lived there d This was a very factual, yet pleasing, graphic novel for children. Thanks again to NetGalley and First Second for allowing me to read this ARC in exchange for feedback. This is a middle grade graphic novel that allowed me to learn more about the Great Chicago Fire without feeling overwhelmed with all of the facts. It not only talked about the fire, but also provided information about how it possibly started to what was done after the fire diminished. It didn’t break the people that lived there during that time; it helped them rebuild the city to what it is now (and providing ways to make construction of buildings better than it was). I loved the illustrations and can’t wait to read more History Comics!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie Reilley

    Lots to love about this new graphic novel series. A historical fiction time machine filled with an urgent storyline and plenty of information about this important event in Chicago history.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Bange

    A fictionalized tale told in graphic novel format about the Great Chicago Fire and 1893 World's Columbian Exposition (Chicago World's Fair). J.P. and Frannie are separated from their parents the night the Great Chicago Fire burns up about 1/4 of Chicago. They desperately search for them, heading from site to site as they flee the flames. Two days later, they are happily reunited. The story jumps J.P. and Frannie ahead 21 years to the World's Fair to show how Chicago has risen from the ashes into A fictionalized tale told in graphic novel format about the Great Chicago Fire and 1893 World's Columbian Exposition (Chicago World's Fair). J.P. and Frannie are separated from their parents the night the Great Chicago Fire burns up about 1/4 of Chicago. They desperately search for them, heading from site to site as they flee the flames. Two days later, they are happily reunited. The story jumps J.P. and Frannie ahead 21 years to the World's Fair to show how Chicago has risen from the ashes into a vibrant, modern city. This was a satisfying story, although I never felt a strong connection to J.P. and Frannie. Their sense of fear and uncertainty was palpable, but never gripping. Hannigan includes plenty of facts and events that happened that ground this, however action and conversation is framed around two fictional characters, making this historical fiction. For this reader, the page turn jump in time was a little abrupt and the section on the World's Fair felt a bit disconnected, awkward, and forced - like she was trying to cram a lot of facts and detail into a small space. Graudins' cartoony illustrations are colorful and appropriate. A couple of maps are included in the story to give the reader a sense of the magnitude of the fire. There was a printing problem on pp. 106-107 in the review copy; it is off just enough to make the 2-page spread blurry in comparison to the sharpness found throughout the rest of the book. The introduction by Rev. John McNalis, chaplain for the Chicago Fire Department, was a nice touch and gave historical perspective. Unfortunately, I suspect many comic book readers will skip over this due to its length (3 1/2 pages) and density of text. Backmatter includes an author's note, a timeline of the fire, a list of sites and a map to their locations that visitors can see today, a page of miscellaneous facts about the fire, a bibliography and list of resources for more information. A solid overview of the Great Chicago Fire for younger readers. Readers in grades 4-8 who want more detail and a more satisfying reading experience will find it in Jim Murphy's Newbery Honor Book The Great Fire (Scholastic, c1995). Additional for grades 2-4.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    Middle grade graphic novel, historical fiction. After the success of the Science Comics series, the publisher has ventured into history. Kate Hannigan wrote the inaugural book, which makes sense since her historical fiction for this age is wonderful. The Great Chicago Fire in 1871 burned for 30 hours, destroyed 1/3 of the homes in the city, and changed architecture forever. After a letter from a Chicago Fire chaplain and historian, Hannigan takes us right to the neighborhood of infamous (and inn Middle grade graphic novel, historical fiction. After the success of the Science Comics series, the publisher has ventured into history. Kate Hannigan wrote the inaugural book, which makes sense since her historical fiction for this age is wonderful. The Great Chicago Fire in 1871 burned for 30 hours, destroyed 1/3 of the homes in the city, and changed architecture forever. After a letter from a Chicago Fire chaplain and historian, Hannigan takes us right to the neighborhood of infamous (and innocent) Mrs. O'Leary. We see the fire unfold through the eyes of J.P. and Franny, Irish American siblings who got separated from their family while trying to reunite a puppy with its mother. As they try to escape the flames and find their own family, they hear a lot of anti-Immigrant rhetoric. When the rain finally puts out the fire, they witness the devastation of their city. The last section shows the World Fair in 1893, which is celebrated as Chicago's "rebirth" after the fire. Back matter includes an author's note, an expanded timeline of the events of the fire, a map of the city with relevant landmarks, additional facts about Chicago and the Fire, and an extensive resource list. I had heard about this event of course, but not recently and not in this detail. Reading that 100,000 people lost their homes, that over 70 miles of streets were destroyed, and that the damages would cost $4 billion in today's currency is just shocking. Seeing those numbers, it amazes me that only 300 people died from the fire. This story is done very well, with the fictional parts in white text boxes and the historical facts or primary source quotes being framed by beige text boxes. This keeps the flow of the story going while keeping a clear line between what is fact and what is story. The ways that the fire changed the city (it burnt so quickly because everything was made of wood) were also very interesting to read. Ending the story with the Columbian Fair keeps it from ending on a depressing note and also shows how quickly innovations can happen. Recommended for history and architecture buffs or anyone who wants to learn more about this famous tragedy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kate Waggoner

    Thank you to #NetGalley and First Second Books for allowing me the opportunity to read a digital ARC of History Comics: The Great Chicago Fire: Rising From the Ashes by Kate Hannigan. This book will be released on June 30, 2020. All opinions are my own. In this installment of History Comics, it's 1871 and a fire is blazing through Chicago. The story follows a two siblings as they struggle to stay ahead of the fire and reunite with their family. It not only discusses theories about how the fire s Thank you to #NetGalley and First Second Books for allowing me the opportunity to read a digital ARC of History Comics: The Great Chicago Fire: Rising From the Ashes by Kate Hannigan. This book will be released on June 30, 2020. All opinions are my own. In this installment of History Comics, it's 1871 and a fire is blazing through Chicago. The story follows a two siblings as they struggle to stay ahead of the fire and reunite with their family. It not only discusses theories about how the fire started, but it goes through why the fire was so damaging, and what changes came about in regards to architecture and city planning due to the fire. I found this to be a fun way to learn more about the Great Chicago Fire. I liked that it discussed more than just the Old Lady Leary theory. I also like that it stated that Mrs. Leary was cleared of fault. There was a big focus on architecture and how the fire changed the way buildings were built. In 1871, Chicago was a wooden city and that had fatal repercussions. I also liked that it discussed the Chicago World's Fair and all of the events and things that occurred there. The Orville brothers play a cameo as do Frederick Douglas, Ida B. Wells, and Buffalo Bill. There is also a focus on acceptance. It examines the way Irish immigrants were treated and then Polish, Greek, Italian, and Jewish immigrants. One of the young characters questions why we can't all get along which is a question still being asked today. Another character makes it a point to state that we're all originally from somewhere else. I think this book could spark great discussions with students and is a fun way to introduce them to the topic of the Great Chicago Fire.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky B

    Readers follow two kids trying to reunite a very young puppy with its mother on the night of the start of the Great Fire in Chicago. Their quest turns into one of trying to find any family and stay ahead of the flames. As they go along, readers get loads of information about the historic even, Chicago of that time period, the anti-Irish immigrant prejudice of the time and how that fed the myth of Mrs. O’Leary’s cow, how the fire changed the city of Chicago, and then how the Columbian Exposition Readers follow two kids trying to reunite a very young puppy with its mother on the night of the start of the Great Fire in Chicago. Their quest turns into one of trying to find any family and stay ahead of the flames. As they go along, readers get loads of information about the historic even, Chicago of that time period, the anti-Irish immigrant prejudice of the time and how that fed the myth of Mrs. O’Leary’s cow, how the fire changed the city of Chicago, and then how the Columbian Exposition of 1892 sought to show the world how Chicago had recovered from the disaster. This was very informative but still engaging and a quick read. I learned quite a few things from reading this, and I think kids will eagerly gobble it up. It will both entertain and satiate their curiosity about the past. The drawing style is such that both elementary and middle school readers will be drawn to this. If you’re looking for a way to teach kids about the Chicago Fire in a way they will remember, look no further. Highly recommended to reluctant history readers, history buffs, and graphic novel fans. Notes on content [based on the ARC]: No language issues. No sexual content. Deaths and injuries in the fire are mentioned but not really shown. Property destruction is shown and an animal death. I received an ARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    This was the kind of history comic book that should exist. A tumultuous event in Chicago's history that was not only a great disaster precipitated by environmental concerns (little rain, windy Chicago, etc.) but also created hatred and paranoia around immigrants (specifically Irish Catholics) that was already there. Focusing on a fictitious brother and sister who are trying to return an un-weaned puppy, they get caught up as the fire begins to rage and are separated from their family. Not only d This was the kind of history comic book that should exist. A tumultuous event in Chicago's history that was not only a great disaster precipitated by environmental concerns (little rain, windy Chicago, etc.) but also created hatred and paranoia around immigrants (specifically Irish Catholics) that was already there. Focusing on a fictitious brother and sister who are trying to return an un-weaned puppy, they get caught up as the fire begins to rage and are separated from their family. Not only do they want to find them, but they are seeing the destruction everywhere since they're traversing Chicago to try to get to other family members but the fire is changing their direction and leaping over water. The air is horrible, they're starving. Plus it also includes the aftermath, aid, and political and structural problems that Chicago was left with. It's comprehensive without being such. It is visually appealing and those visuals tell much of the trauma. It's well-rounded and fits the audience.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is another historical fiction graphic novel that I really enjoyed. All in all, the characters are mostly white Europeans- so it lacks diversity in the skin color area- but it does talk about how during the time of the Chicago Fire white Europeans were not all treated equally either- Italian and Irish were especially hated. The story itself doesn't just focus on the Great Chicago Fire but also looks at how Chicago changed and rose again largely due to the fire- I had no idea the fire spurred This is another historical fiction graphic novel that I really enjoyed. All in all, the characters are mostly white Europeans- so it lacks diversity in the skin color area- but it does talk about how during the time of the Chicago Fire white Europeans were not all treated equally either- Italian and Irish were especially hated. The story itself doesn't just focus on the Great Chicago Fire but also looks at how Chicago changed and rose again largely due to the fire- I had no idea the fire spurred so many architectural advancements that were focused on fire-proofing. The story moved quickly and the inclusion of Lucky the dog added a great "aww" factor to a story that easily could have become overwhelming in it's tragedy- even for kids. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in history or likes graphic novels. Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Doyon

    Kate Hannigan, author of the Cape series, does it again with another highly engaging historical fiction novel. This one is told in graphic novel format, which only enhances its appeal. Hannigan tells the story of a brother and sister who become separated from their parents at the onset of the Great Chicago Fire. As they flee north, they notice familiar landmarks being destroyed along the way. Using these landmarks along with maps, the reader is given an idea of the large scope of destruction. Th Kate Hannigan, author of the Cape series, does it again with another highly engaging historical fiction novel. This one is told in graphic novel format, which only enhances its appeal. Hannigan tells the story of a brother and sister who become separated from their parents at the onset of the Great Chicago Fire. As they flee north, they notice familiar landmarks being destroyed along the way. Using these landmarks along with maps, the reader is given an idea of the large scope of destruction. The end section of the novel is devoted to the 1893 World Fair, where Chicago was able to show off its absolute stunning rebuild and resurrection. Educators: the front and back matter of this book is very useful, and includes a letter from a Chicago fireman as well as facts that loop in the Chicago of today. Highly recommend for classrooms in grades 3 to 6. Thank you to the author, First Second books and Netgalley for an early copy to review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Margie

    Having grown up in the Midwest, most people are familiar with one particular tragic historical event. In fact, it's probably covered in numerous classrooms throughout the United States for its significance as a life-changing disaster and for how people responded to it. It lasted for more than thirty agonizing hours. It happened in Chicago, Illinois in the month of October 1871. History Comics: The Great Chicago Fire: Rising From The Ashes (First Second, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press, June 30, Having grown up in the Midwest, most people are familiar with one particular tragic historical event. In fact, it's probably covered in numerous classrooms throughout the United States for its significance as a life-changing disaster and for how people responded to it. It lasted for more than thirty agonizing hours. It happened in Chicago, Illinois in the month of October 1871. History Comics: The Great Chicago Fire: Rising From The Ashes (First Second, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press, June 30, 2020) written by Kate Hannigan with art by Alex Graudins is one of the first volumes in a new graphic novel series of narrative nonfiction. You'll have to remind yourself to breathe as you race from one horrific moment to the next with siblings separated from their parents. Facts are deftly woven into the thoughtful narrative and stellar artwork. My full recommendation: https://librariansquest.blogspot.com/...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    As a fan of Science Comics (I own 11 of them and share with students), I was thrilled to see that publisher First Second has ventured into history. History Comics brings life to the terror and resilience brought about by the Great Chicago Fire. As a California resident, I understand the ferocity of swift-moving fire and the disorienting smell of smoke. Out of the Great Fire came changes in building materials, fire warning systems, architecture, and emergency preparedness. The author also depicts As a fan of Science Comics (I own 11 of them and share with students), I was thrilled to see that publisher First Second has ventured into history. History Comics brings life to the terror and resilience brought about by the Great Chicago Fire. As a California resident, I understand the ferocity of swift-moving fire and the disorienting smell of smoke. Out of the Great Fire came changes in building materials, fire warning systems, architecture, and emergency preparedness. The author also depicts how immigrants in general and the Irish in particular were openly scapegoated for the tragedy. I will purchase this title, but I was disappointed that the term "firemen" was used instead of "firefighters" and that "mankind" was not "humankind." Thank you NetGalley and First Second Publishing for the eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Monica Fumarolo

    My students are obsessed with Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales, so I'm always interested in new graphic novels exploring history. This is an additional purchase for libraries like mine where there is a demand. Considering the relatively short length of the book, I was a little confused in the opening pages about who were the parents, aunts, uncles, cousins, etc. (For example, a sister knew her brother was afraid of heights, but how was he not aware that she couldn't swim?) All in all, especially gi My students are obsessed with Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales, so I'm always interested in new graphic novels exploring history. This is an additional purchase for libraries like mine where there is a demand. Considering the relatively short length of the book, I was a little confused in the opening pages about who were the parents, aunts, uncles, cousins, etc. (For example, a sister knew her brother was afraid of heights, but how was he not aware that she couldn't swim?) All in all, especially given that I live and work in the Chicago suburbs, I'll be buying this for my library's collection because students will absolutely be able to make connections to the event and parts of the city that still exist today.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Dertinger

    I have always been intrigued by history, especially history near to my home. This graphic novel telling of The Great Chicago Fire will be great for young readers. I loved that it was a mix of panels, speech bubbles, diagrams, and other text features. The illustrations are wonderful, and I think it is overall pretty engaging (I think for reluctant readers too). My only worries is the hard to follow pace. There were moments where it felt rushed and you kind of asked yourself, "What did I just read I have always been intrigued by history, especially history near to my home. This graphic novel telling of The Great Chicago Fire will be great for young readers. I loved that it was a mix of panels, speech bubbles, diagrams, and other text features. The illustrations are wonderful, and I think it is overall pretty engaging (I think for reluctant readers too). My only worries is the hard to follow pace. There were moments where it felt rushed and you kind of asked yourself, "What did I just read?" But then there were parts/text features that could have been placed elsewhere so it would flow better. Other than that, I think this is a great start to a series that I would like to add to my classroom.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Firstly, big thanks to Goodreads First Reads for me winning this book. I actually entered to win this book for my kids but I got first dibs. This was history very well done for children. As an historian, I liked the abundance of facts and the inclusion of actual quotes from newspapers and such. As a parent, I have to say that the graphic novel format is appealing to children and makes it an easier read. The storyline and main characters aren't terribly complicated, but are definitely good enough Firstly, big thanks to Goodreads First Reads for me winning this book. I actually entered to win this book for my kids but I got first dibs. This was history very well done for children. As an historian, I liked the abundance of facts and the inclusion of actual quotes from newspapers and such. As a parent, I have to say that the graphic novel format is appealing to children and makes it an easier read. The storyline and main characters aren't terribly complicated, but are definitely good enough for drawing the story along and allow room for pointing things out. I definitely suggest this for getting kids to enjoy some history for a change, and it's a good read for adults, too, who don't know much about the fire.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mary Bronson

    I thought this was such a great book about the Chicago Fire that happened back in the 1800s. I loved how the author who is a Chaplin for the fire stations in Chicago and loves history put together a book for young readers to understand what happened back when the fire started, how they rebuild afterwards, and also how narrow minded people were in blaming an Irish immigrant for the massive fire. I liked how it was told in two siblings points of view on how they were outside their home trying to c I thought this was such a great book about the Chicago Fire that happened back in the 1800s. I loved how the author who is a Chaplin for the fire stations in Chicago and loves history put together a book for young readers to understand what happened back when the fire started, how they rebuild afterwards, and also how narrow minded people were in blaming an Irish immigrant for the massive fire. I liked how it was told in two siblings points of view on how they were outside their home trying to catch up with their aunt and uncle to give back a puppy they left behind and being out in the streets when the fire hit. How they worked together to make it to safety and back to their parents.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Marshall

    Another title in the History Comics Collection. I love that they explained the story of O'Leary's cow and how racism made her a scapegoat. There were also theories that I had not heard of before. The dialogue did get a bit awkward in places, but nothing that interrupted the flow of the story. This is definitely a must-add to my classroom library. The timeline and maps of places to visit in Chicago really helped show the impact of the fire. Creative Team: Written by Kate Hannigan Art by Alex Graud Another title in the History Comics Collection. I love that they explained the story of O'Leary's cow and how racism made her a scapegoat. There were also theories that I had not heard of before. The dialogue did get a bit awkward in places, but nothing that interrupted the flow of the story. This is definitely a must-add to my classroom library. The timeline and maps of places to visit in Chicago really helped show the impact of the fire. Creative Team: Written by Kate Hannigan Art by Alex Graudins

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tedi

    I really like the way the story of The Great Chicago FIre was told in this graphic novel. I found the story easy to follow and compelling. Tying the story together with young characters and a puppy is a great way to keep kids connected to the text. I did find the pages about Chicago architecture at the end a little bit hard to stay engaged by and would have preferred it just explained the way the fire changed Chicago, but overall, I think this is an excellent graphic telling of a historical even I really like the way the story of The Great Chicago FIre was told in this graphic novel. I found the story easy to follow and compelling. Tying the story together with young characters and a puppy is a great way to keep kids connected to the text. I did find the pages about Chicago architecture at the end a little bit hard to stay engaged by and would have preferred it just explained the way the fire changed Chicago, but overall, I think this is an excellent graphic telling of a historical event and am excited to incorporate this into my classroom.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Reynolds

    Thank you NetGalley and publisher for an e-ARC in exchange for an honest review History Comics reminds me so much of Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales which my students adored reading this year. I love how it not only highlighted the Great Chicago Fire, but also the ways that Chicago rose as a result of it. It was a super quick and easy read. I think this will be great for upper elementary and middle grade students who love historical fiction, I Survived, or Hazardous Tales. This is a title I cannot Thank you NetGalley and publisher for an e-ARC in exchange for an honest review History Comics reminds me so much of Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales which my students adored reading this year. I love how it not only highlighted the Great Chicago Fire, but also the ways that Chicago rose as a result of it. It was a super quick and easy read. I think this will be great for upper elementary and middle grade students who love historical fiction, I Survived, or Hazardous Tales. This is a title I cannot wait to add to the graphic novel section of our classroom library!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Follow two siblings as they flee the great Chicago fire devouring their city, and worry about being reunited with their parents. Along with a high action adventure, readers will also learn about social issues of the time in Irish immigrants being incorrectly blamed and harassed for starting the fire, and the structural problems that actually started the fire. Although a tragic tale, it ends on a high note of learning from mistakes, growing as a society, and innovating and inventing the way into Follow two siblings as they flee the great Chicago fire devouring their city, and worry about being reunited with their parents. Along with a high action adventure, readers will also learn about social issues of the time in Irish immigrants being incorrectly blamed and harassed for starting the fire, and the structural problems that actually started the fire. Although a tragic tale, it ends on a high note of learning from mistakes, growing as a society, and innovating and inventing the way into the future.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Molli B.

    Good! Interesting! Definitely geared toward kids (9-12 is for whom the book says it's intended, and that seems right). But I learned a bunch of stuff I hadn't known about Chicago. The book also does a good job pointing out that xenophobia and bias are not new American concepts. I like how the story was framed, from the viewpoint of the kids. I also liked all of the Irish names...every time we met a new person, it was a name from my family. :) Enjoyable and educational! Good! Interesting! Definitely geared toward kids (9-12 is for whom the book says it's intended, and that seems right). But I learned a bunch of stuff I hadn't known about Chicago. The book also does a good job pointing out that xenophobia and bias are not new American concepts. I like how the story was framed, from the viewpoint of the kids. I also liked all of the Irish names...every time we met a new person, it was a name from my family. :) Enjoyable and educational!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Suzan Jackson

    History Comics - I loved these! Fascinating, engrossing, and beautifully illustrated. Check out my reviews of The Roanoke Colony: America's First Mystery & The Great Chicago Fire: Rising from the Ashes. History class in school was never this fun or interesting! Full reviews of both books, plus sample illustrations: https://bookbybook.blogspot.com/2020/... History Comics - I loved these! Fascinating, engrossing, and beautifully illustrated. Check out my reviews of The Roanoke Colony: America's First Mystery & The Great Chicago Fire: Rising from the Ashes. History class in school was never this fun or interesting! Full reviews of both books, plus sample illustrations: https://bookbybook.blogspot.com/2020/...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I receieved a free ARC from Net Galley in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. 3.5 stars. Interesting and engaging graphic novel. I like that it teaches about the Great Chicago Fire without being too overt about it. I think kids will be on the edge of their seats and want to keep reading to find out what happens.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.