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A illustrated biographical tale that follows Hollywood revolutionary Rod Serling's rise to fame in the Golden Age of Television, and his descent into his personal Twilight Zone. We recognize Rod Serling as our sharply dressed, cigarette-smoking tour guide of The Twilight Zone, but the entertainment business once regarded him as the "Angry Young Man" of Hollywood. Before he A illustrated biographical tale that follows Hollywood revolutionary Rod Serling's rise to fame in the Golden Age of Television, and his descent into his personal Twilight Zone. We recognize Rod Serling as our sharply dressed, cigarette-smoking tour guide of The Twilight Zone, but the entertainment business once regarded him as the "Angry Young Man" of Hollywood. Before he became the revered master of science fiction, Rod Serling was a just a writer who had to fight to make his voice heard. He vehemently challenged the networks and viewership alike to expand their minds and standards―rejecting notions of censorship, racism and war. But it wasn’t until he began to write about real world enemies in the guise of aliens and monsters that people lent their ears. In doing so, he pushed the television industry to the edge of glory, and himself to the edge of sanity. Rod operated in a dimension beyond that of contemporary society, making him both a revolutionary and an outsider.


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A illustrated biographical tale that follows Hollywood revolutionary Rod Serling's rise to fame in the Golden Age of Television, and his descent into his personal Twilight Zone. We recognize Rod Serling as our sharply dressed, cigarette-smoking tour guide of The Twilight Zone, but the entertainment business once regarded him as the "Angry Young Man" of Hollywood. Before he A illustrated biographical tale that follows Hollywood revolutionary Rod Serling's rise to fame in the Golden Age of Television, and his descent into his personal Twilight Zone. We recognize Rod Serling as our sharply dressed, cigarette-smoking tour guide of The Twilight Zone, but the entertainment business once regarded him as the "Angry Young Man" of Hollywood. Before he became the revered master of science fiction, Rod Serling was a just a writer who had to fight to make his voice heard. He vehemently challenged the networks and viewership alike to expand their minds and standards―rejecting notions of censorship, racism and war. But it wasn’t until he began to write about real world enemies in the guise of aliens and monsters that people lent their ears. In doing so, he pushed the television industry to the edge of glory, and himself to the edge of sanity. Rod operated in a dimension beyond that of contemporary society, making him both a revolutionary and an outsider.

30 review for The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    The Twilight Man by Koren Shadmi is a 2019 Life Drawn publication. An imaginative biographical novel Rod Serling would approve of! Well, how cool is this? The second I saw this book I knew I had to read it! Why? Because I love, love, love The Twilight Zone! I was also a fan of ‘Night Gallery’ and loved Serling’s narration of both anthology series. But, once I started reading the book, I realized I didn’t really know anything at all about Rod Serling. As his story unfolds, I learned about his mil The Twilight Man by Koren Shadmi is a 2019 Life Drawn publication. An imaginative biographical novel Rod Serling would approve of! Well, how cool is this? The second I saw this book I knew I had to read it! Why? Because I love, love, love The Twilight Zone! I was also a fan of ‘Night Gallery’ and loved Serling’s narration of both anthology series. But, once I started reading the book, I realized I didn’t really know anything at all about Rod Serling. As his story unfolds, I learned about his military service and some daredevil stunts he participated in. But, before he found success, he went through more than his fair share of rejections. He was just too far ahead of his time, unafraid of addressing uncomfortable subject matter. His journey to success is fascinating. He was indeed a revolutionary, challenging the television establishment- which earned him the moniker of “Angry Young Man”. I think we owe Serling more than we realized! This is a must for fans of the Twilight Zone and Rod Serling, but anyone who likes entertainment history will find this book very interesting. Rod packed a lot of living in his short life and his legacy is one that has far surpassed his wildest imagination. The deep meanings of some of the Twilight Zone episodes go far beyond mere science fiction and unexplained phenomena. While I do believe I have watched every episode at least twice, I sometimes find myself in the mood to watch the series over again. Each time I am struck by the imagination and genius of the show- now I’m struck by imagination and genius behind the show! 5 stars!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jen/The Tolkien Gal/ジェニファー

    It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man's fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call the Twilight Zone. The Lonely Rod Serling's life narrated by himself and told- not only is it disguised as a criticism of censorship, but it's told as if it's an episode of the Twilight Zone with a signature It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man's fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call the Twilight Zone. The Lonely Rod Serling's life narrated by himself and told- not only is it disguised as a criticism of censorship, but it's told as if it's an episode of the Twilight Zone with a signature and shocking twist. that had me slack-jawed at the author/artist's creativity. One for the angels I've always felt that The Twilight Zone was different, so ludicrous and wonderful that the show is still relevant today. It proves to be cheesy, but the dialogue, character acting and stories have aged so well that the show is well-worth watching. God damn it, it's definitely a work of art you need to scratch off your bucket list! Time Enough at Last: Part I Rod Serling is on a plane with a mysterious but alluring woman who recognises him and asks him all about his life. "I'm sure I've seen your face before...give me a clue, will you she smiled. Alright mystery man. Are you traveling for business or pleasure. A little bit of both, you could say. He took a drag of his half-bent cigarette It feels as though this flight might last forever.Time can be deceitful when you're up in the stratosphere The Four of Us Are Dying: Part II Rod feels like an old friend at this point - an amiable uncle who pats you on the shoulder and reminds you of your inherent human greatness. But he's also that uncle whose PTSD was labelled "shell-shock" and thrown aside. Shell-shock was always thought to be a temporary consequence of war. Rod shows exactly how war will taint your psyche for life, but influence your art too. Rod's experiences in the war are not only evil, but so well crafted - the writing and art are so well integrated that your very own reality feels augmented into that of Rod's. And let me tell you, it's not a fun experience. Rod joins the Paratroopers, a lifelong wish of his. Where is Everybody? During his twelve year struggle of fighting censorship, shameless advertising, anti-antisemitism against his people Rod finally knew that stories about current politicians, corruption and wordly problems could only be criticised through a lens of science-fiction and fantasy. But like all great artists, Rod produced the labour of his love almost entirely on his own, barring Ray Bradbury and Richard Matheson (whose character's are wonderfully fleshed out despite them only being in ten or so pages each). Rod gives in to the stress of his work. One cigarette. Another? Bring me a pack. Bring me four packs. Mr Denton on Doomsday: The demise of a cultural icon, who's just a damn human. The latter part of the comic was drawn out painfully - and that's a compliment. After the Twilight Zone was cancelled, Rod caved inwards. He attempted writing for television shows. He succeeded, but everything he wrote was censored, just as he hated. To make money he appeared in advertisements - the very thing he loathed. Go ahead and learn of his death yourself. This comic is the Magnum Opus of Rod Serling biographies. I laud any biography that finds a wonderful way to portray the person at hand. The brilliance of conveying Rod's life in black and white makes you feel that you are a character lost in the Zone itself. Rod, his family, colleagues, friends and foes have such raw emotion and relatable dialogue that I found myself in tears. The author made an audacious attempt at telling a man's story in first person (!) Well hell, the risk paid of and I'm impressed by Koren Shadmi all round. Not only that, but the comic itself is an episode of the Twilight Zone! This was absolutely brilliant and the best comic I've read all year. To discuss Serling's life in a comic format with black and white, is the perfect homage to the man himself. I feel that Rod would approve of the lack of censorship in his book. I'm always in awe of the tenacity of writers who change the world. Serling goes on with his writing despite being told his writing isn't meant for radio. Rod was different - he didn't want to write what people liked - he wanted to write what challenged people and their beliefs. This wasn't an easy task for a country fueled by the nuclear family and American Dream. I Am The Night: Colour Me Black: an addendum of fascinating aspects of Rod's life The Emmett Till case, where a black boy was beaten up by two men for allegely wolf whistling at their sister, died from the injuries sustained. The all white jury declared Till guilty and he was sentenced to death. Rod was outraged and wanted to film a half-an-hour piece about it. In the adaptation, Rod's script went from meaningful to "American Dream" Till was turned white, the word "lynch" was censored because of the sensitivity and association with The South, which we know is still prevalent, since Georgia banned an episode of Arthur where two male rats get married. This fueled Rod to fight censorship against minorities such as himself. Rod helped forward Richard Matheson's (Born Charles Leroy Nutt) career, annoyed Ray Bradbury and finally mentioned Spielberg in passing as a famous actress refuses to be in a film directed by a twenty year old. If only she knew. The "surprise motherf*cker" ending of Planet of the Apes was largely due to Matheson's input. He wanted to make the movie darker so they scrapped his script, but kept the ending. Every writer is a frustrated actor who recites his lines in the hidden auditorium of his skull. - Rod Serling I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. A big thanks to the publishers and author for giving me the chance to read this.

  3. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I wasn't inclined to like this book, as I have mixed-feelings memories of the one book I had read from Shadmi, his kind of shallow story of his year as a Love (Sex) Addict, going on dating sites obsessively. And then, when I pick up The Twilight Man he admits the topic was kind of random for him, he was trying to figure out another project to do, and oh, yeah, I once had this passing interest in Serling, I had bought some biographies, ho hum, guess I'll do this. And he's young, Twilight Zone was I wasn't inclined to like this book, as I have mixed-feelings memories of the one book I had read from Shadmi, his kind of shallow story of his year as a Love (Sex) Addict, going on dating sites obsessively. And then, when I pick up The Twilight Man he admits the topic was kind of random for him, he was trying to figure out another project to do, and oh, yeah, I once had this passing interest in Serling, I had bought some biographies, ho hum, guess I'll do this. And he's young, Twilight Zone was a later discovery for him, he's not passionate about it, it's a research project, the next book, eh. You see, I grew up with Twilight Zone, and I wanted to discover this book to be more than a passing fancy from the author. I wanted Twilight Zone Addict, because I had once been one and was hoping it would make me one again. When I finally started it I saw it as a pretty conventional and straightforward biography, culled from the various dusty conventional and straightforward biographies he had on his shelf. Well, to be fair there's a slight surprise, it's first person, he's telling his life story to a woman on a plane, okay fine. And I knew a bunch about Serling, had been traumatized by his experiences in the war, that he had been one of the early pioneers of tv, had written the very fine Requiem of a Heavyweight, had been in on Planet of the Apes in addition to Twilight Zone. I knew he was almost inseparable from a cigarette, sometimes four packs a day (which was probably part of what led to the heart attacks that killed him). I did not know he was, like Shadmi, a "love" addict, but hey, good for you, there's a connection, Koren, shared shame! And I did not recall that he had deep social justice commitments that were undermined by the tv industry, leading him to write these issues into sci/fi stories. So I have to say, I began to like it more and more as I read, and it is cartooned so well I had to admit his admission of half-heartedness kind of melted away. It's good! And what cinched it for me, something I love, is that we discover the tale is actually a kind of Twilight Zone episode. At that point my 3.5 rating eased up to 4, stars for that finish. If you like Twilight Zone or liked it, you should check this out.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    I am a big Rod Serling fan - so it is hard for me not to like anything about him. This GN is a balanced and reflective examination of one of our great playwrights (yes, I said great playwrights) and looks past the 'dimensional trap' that the Twilight Zone (TZ) so often confines Rod's legacy into: almost as if he became a character in one of the TZ episodes. His constant fear of having everything he worked so hard for taken away is palpable; his fear of rejection understood by anyone who has ever I am a big Rod Serling fan - so it is hard for me not to like anything about him. This GN is a balanced and reflective examination of one of our great playwrights (yes, I said great playwrights) and looks past the 'dimensional trap' that the Twilight Zone (TZ) so often confines Rod's legacy into: almost as if he became a character in one of the TZ episodes. His constant fear of having everything he worked so hard for taken away is palpable; his fear of rejection understood by anyone who has ever tried to create. The art is perfect - evocative of the series - but very original. Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Literary Soirée

    This graphic novelized bio of The Twilight Zone creator offers a sensitive, creative take on Serling and is sure to be coveted by the many rabid fans of the show. It captures the essence of the genius once known as the “angry young man” of Hollywood, who often clashed with TV execs and sponsors over such issues as war, racism and censorship. Serling spoke at my hubs’ fifth grade English class, smoking cig after cig the whole time. He started his professional career in Cincinnati as a continuity This graphic novelized bio of The Twilight Zone creator offers a sensitive, creative take on Serling and is sure to be coveted by the many rabid fans of the show. It captures the essence of the genius once known as the “angry young man” of Hollywood, who often clashed with TV execs and sponsors over such issues as war, racism and censorship. Serling spoke at my hubs’ fifth grade English class, smoking cig after cig the whole time. He started his professional career in Cincinnati as a continuity writer for WLW, going on to write for TV on WKRC. We claim him as our own, so I know many in the Queen City will also really dig this fine book with its TZ-vibed illustrations and story. 5/5 Pub Date 08 Oct 2019. Thanks to the author, Humanoids and NetGalley. Opinions are mine. #TheTwilightMan #NetGalley

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    This was excellent. Shadmi uses a framing device where Serling tells his life story to an airplane passenger sitting next to him. It has the feeling of an episode of The Twilight Zone. Not only do we see Serling's life from the time he entered the Pacific Theater during World War II, but his his rise as a TV writer. Serling lived a complicated life. One that I was instantly enthralled in while reading this. The Twilight Zone is a show that I feel still plays today. Maybe today more than ever. It This was excellent. Shadmi uses a framing device where Serling tells his life story to an airplane passenger sitting next to him. It has the feeling of an episode of The Twilight Zone. Not only do we see Serling's life from the time he entered the Pacific Theater during World War II, but his his rise as a TV writer. Serling lived a complicated life. One that I was instantly enthralled in while reading this. The Twilight Zone is a show that I feel still plays today. Maybe today more than ever. It started during the Red Scare of the fifties, telling morality tales of social issues of the day disguised with a science fiction veneer. There's a lot of similarities between that time period and now with the rise of white nationalism since the election of Trump. It's amazing how one can still watch a show created in the fifties and find parallels in today's society.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    An informative and engaging biography of Rod Serling told as if it were an episode of "The Twilight Zone." It delves deeply into the influence that World War II, PTSD, and boxing had on Serling's writing, while touching more lightly on personal problems like infidelity, plagiarism, and the price of fame.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ed Erwin

    Wonderful short biography of Rod Serling, done in a way that feels like an episode of The Twilight Zone. I'd known basically nothing about him before. Turns out his life story is pretty interesting. And the story of the early days of TV, which he was a part of, is also very interesting. Serling wanted to do stories that dealt with serious contemporary social issues, but that was difficult due to interference from executives and advertisers. But by giving his stories in a SF/F he was able to bypas Wonderful short biography of Rod Serling, done in a way that feels like an episode of The Twilight Zone. I'd known basically nothing about him before. Turns out his life story is pretty interesting. And the story of the early days of TV, which he was a part of, is also very interesting. Serling wanted to do stories that dealt with serious contemporary social issues, but that was difficult due to interference from executives and advertisers. But by giving his stories in a SF/F he was able to bypass the censors. It is clear from this that he had natural talent, and worked very, very hard, but also had the luck to be in the right place at the right time to be successful.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Before I say anything else, that ending, OOF! So good and a great hat-tip to The Twilight Zone. It's amazing how so many things I read, even when not specifically about war, always show in some way, that war is hell, fighting and death are a waste and communication and connection could do so much to prevent the horrors of war. I love the Twilight Zone. The episodes I've seen were all amazing, weird and some made me cry. (The one with the guy and the library and the clock and the glasses. You know Before I say anything else, that ending, OOF! So good and a great hat-tip to The Twilight Zone. It's amazing how so many things I read, even when not specifically about war, always show in some way, that war is hell, fighting and death are a waste and communication and connection could do so much to prevent the horrors of war. I love the Twilight Zone. The episodes I've seen were all amazing, weird and some made me cry. (The one with the guy and the library and the clock and the glasses. You know which one I mean. YOU try not blubbering like an idiot every time you watch it!) But I didn't know much about it, or how hard it was to get on the air. I just took it for granted. I knew even less about the life of the person who created it. This book filled in the gaps and made me acutely aware that we really shouldn't take anything for granted, not even good tv! I don't want to go into spoiler territory, so I won't say much other than the story was amazing, the subject matter handled with tact and honesty and the artwork was quality. There is war violence, lots of gruesome death as war tends to yield and some adultering, but just hinted at and no sex shown. Just be aware. Life isn't pretty and it doesn't always end the way one would like. But this ending was something else. I would recommend this book if only for that whole tie-together. 5, don't you want to enter The Twilight Zone, stars. My thanks to NetGalley and Humanoids/Life Drawn for an eARC copy of this book to read and review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    For those who are familiar with the Twilight Zone, this graphic novel version of Rod Serling's life reads like an extended twilight zone story. It starts with Rod on board a flight, where he strikes up a conversation with his seat mate, who asks him about the story of his life, so he begins with the army. It helps that we start there, because we get the essence of what shaped him. I grew up watching the Twilight Zone, though it must have been in syndication, because it was over before I was old en For those who are familiar with the Twilight Zone, this graphic novel version of Rod Serling's life reads like an extended twilight zone story. It starts with Rod on board a flight, where he strikes up a conversation with his seat mate, who asks him about the story of his life, so he begins with the army. It helps that we start there, because we get the essence of what shaped him. I grew up watching the Twilight Zone, though it must have been in syndication, because it was over before I was old enough to have understood what was going on. Nicely done. I wanted to go back and reread it once I was done, to see if I caught everything that was going on. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Phrodrick

    Koren Shadmi’s The Twilight Man is a pretty decent effort to tell the story of Rod Serling. The media of graphic non-fiction imposes limitations on the ability to delve, fully explore or detail the larger context. The result is something like a Cliff Notes version of a full biography but with many more pictures. I finished it thinking I had a decent introduction to a man whose television show was in my house a must see. For many readers this book contains more than enough about Mr. Serling. I wo Koren Shadmi’s The Twilight Man is a pretty decent effort to tell the story of Rod Serling. The media of graphic non-fiction imposes limitations on the ability to delve, fully explore or detail the larger context. The result is something like a Cliff Notes version of a full biography but with many more pictures. I finished it thinking I had a decent introduction to a man whose television show was in my house a must see. For many readers this book contains more than enough about Mr. Serling. I would have preferred more, but that thicker hypothetical book would not have been as well illustrated. Mr. Shadmi has for us to consider the man who created The Twilight Zone as he arrives in the US Army a short Jewish, enlisted soldier who goes beyond the usual process to be accepted as a paratrooper. Serling would experience WW II as it was fought in the Pacific, at or in front of the battle lines. Seriously wounded in the body and ending the war with what is now called PTSD he was a man driven to write and found his place writing for television. I had the benefit of seeing The Twilight Zone when black and white programming was the norm and when television special effects a matter of suggestion. Production values were barely more than simple sets. Twilight Zone specialized in the grey areas of humans. A fanatic reader given access to all of the books in the world, only to break his glasses. Can there be a hell worse than one where you always win? Or a frequently referred to episode of the question of beauty, in a world where ugly is the norm. These are episodes that call on the mind. Only rarely do things explode and sometimes death might be a preferred escape. For all of you fans of the stopping time with a stop watch plot; Serling broadcast it first. Shadmi makes it clear that as the television business grew and The Suits took over, no one had ever understood what he intended and why it worked. Instead he was squeezed out from the budget side, even as he was over extending himself with outside projects. This may be an oversimplification, but this is a graphic Bio and there is only so much time.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nostalgia Reader

    An excellent biography of one of television’s pioneers. I knew pretty much nothing about Serling before reading this, but when I finished I came away with a greater appreciation for his works and what he did to try and break the mold of the radio & television industry. The bio starts off in Serling’s teenage years in the military, showcasing his early attempts at creative writing as well as the horrors he witnessed that later inspired both his horror-based imagery as well as the social commentari An excellent biography of one of television’s pioneers. I knew pretty much nothing about Serling before reading this, but when I finished I came away with a greater appreciation for his works and what he did to try and break the mold of the radio & television industry. The bio starts off in Serling’s teenage years in the military, showcasing his early attempts at creative writing as well as the horrors he witnessed that later inspired both his horror-based imagery as well as the social commentaries he wove into his scripts and stories. Radio and TV were at the mercy of the advertisers who funded their shows and had plenty of say over what could and couldn’t be shown or scripted in a program. Serling disagreed with that–not only did it cause stunted creativity, but it inevitably didn’t allow certain observations and commentaries to be made in scripts. After all, something controversial would reflect badly on the brand(s) sponsoring the show! It took many scripts before Serling found the way to write what he wanted while making the commentaries he wanted, and when he did he created one of the most pioneering shows in TV history. I loved the narrative style of the story and in itself it paid excellent homage to Serling’s style and works. The illustrations themselves I wouldn’t necessarily call amazing, but they deeply captured Serling’s looks and emotions throughout the story, which made it much more powerful. Definitely a recommended read for anyone who likes television history! Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a free copy to review! (Cross posted on my blog.)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Well-paced biography of Rod Serling, that deftly avoids the stuffiness that tends to be a common problem of graphic biographies. It even ends on a pretty solid plot twist.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley I am not usually one for biography books, but I do really love The Twilight Zone and I figured a graphic novel was much less of a commitment than a prose book of the same length [I have a poor attention span, what can I say]. This was a pretty good story about Rod's early life and his work creating The Twilight Zone. I did like how the author framed it as Rod telling his own story in what was essentially an episode of The Twilight Zone complete w I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley I am not usually one for biography books, but I do really love The Twilight Zone and I figured a graphic novel was much less of a commitment than a prose book of the same length [I have a poor attention span, what can I say]. This was a pretty good story about Rod's early life and his work creating The Twilight Zone. I did like how the author framed it as Rod telling his own story in what was essentially an episode of The Twilight Zone complete with a twist ending. On the other hand a lot of the information presented seemed very personal and came across as a bit off-putting knowing that this was written by someone after the person in question was already dead. I would hope much of this type of information came from interviews or people who knew Rod, because otherwise the author projected an awful lot of emotions onto him that we have no way of knowing whether he was actually feeling at the time. Still, it was a pretty good read and it's interesting [and sad] to see how he had to fight censorship his whole life and even at times write for anti-Semitic people who did not want Jewish people in the scripts despite them literally being written by a Jewish man. It's sad that he had to use so much smoke and mirrors to talk about social issues, but ultimately a great show came out of it that people are still watching today.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    It's rare for a graphic bio to actually shed light on a person rather than beat the dead horse of his career highlights. Read, learn and remember, for we shall not see his like again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    Fascinating look into Rod Serling and why he saw potential with the Sci-Fi genre to bring some of the freshest and most thought-provoking entertainment to a then-fledging medium. There's a reason that The Twilight Zone still holds appeal to audiences beyond the nostalgia factor, and this graphic gives some insight into why.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    A heartfelt tribute biography to the man who created "The Twilight Zone," the famous 1960s television show that was ahead of its time. A Jewish underdog intellectual, a daredevil paratrooper in World War II, and a writer who saw the potential in television, Serling's hard work and driven nature consumed him. I've seen some "Twilight Zone" episodes long ago but, after reading this, I'm now inspired to watch the entire series this winter. The graphic illustrations are powerful and sharply drawn, a A heartfelt tribute biography to the man who created "The Twilight Zone," the famous 1960s television show that was ahead of its time. A Jewish underdog intellectual, a daredevil paratrooper in World War II, and a writer who saw the potential in television, Serling's hard work and driven nature consumed him. I've seen some "Twilight Zone" episodes long ago but, after reading this, I'm now inspired to watch the entire series this winter. The graphic illustrations are powerful and sharply drawn, and lend a vintage quality to the text.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Interesting biography of Rod Serling and how he got started in television. It succeeds on some levels in telling his story but shortens up in other ways.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Griffin

    THE TWILIGHT MAN: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television, written and illustrated by Koren Shadmi, tells the story of the genius behind The Twilight Zone. Shadmi, living in India, didn’t see the original Twilight Zone until 2009, but they were smitten. Who was this creator of strange stories? Covering Serling’s World War II experience is an important part of what made his personality. Shadmi then covers how Serling fell into writing in college, his professional beginnings in New York, and the hig THE TWILIGHT MAN: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television, written and illustrated by Koren Shadmi, tells the story of the genius behind The Twilight Zone. Shadmi, living in India, didn’t see the original Twilight Zone until 2009, but they were smitten. Who was this creator of strange stories? Covering Serling’s World War II experience is an important part of what made his personality. Shadmi then covers how Serling fell into writing in college, his professional beginnings in New York, and the highs and lows of working in Hollywood. I highly recommend this graphic novel for readers of biographies, history, and the entertainment industry. I thank #Netgalley for the honor of reading this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hilary (Melted Books)

    I love Rod Serling. I thought this was an excellent depiction of his life, and I learned a lot (though to be honest, I’m not sure how many creative liberties were taken; there’s a bibliography at the back of the book, which is reassuring that it’s pretty factual). The art in this graphic novel was great. As I was reading, I reflected on the artistic choice to keep the pages in black and white, since that evokes the time period (late 1950s through the 1960s) in which Serling’s TV presence was pro I love Rod Serling. I thought this was an excellent depiction of his life, and I learned a lot (though to be honest, I’m not sure how many creative liberties were taken; there’s a bibliography at the back of the book, which is reassuring that it’s pretty factual). The art in this graphic novel was great. As I was reading, I reflected on the artistic choice to keep the pages in black and white, since that evokes the time period (late 1950s through the 1960s) in which Serling’s TV presence was prominent. Also, I loved the creepy ending to the book. Classic Serling-esque twist.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Wendopolis

    Absorbing biography of Rod Serling. If you’ve ever enjoyed The Twilight Zone, you will enjoy this look at the creator’s life.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    4.5 stars -- THE TWILIGHT ZONE is truly a classic of TV's golden era. It's a testament to the series' enduring influence that nearly everyone is at least somewhat familiar with it--and it's been referenced and parodied so frequently that even those who have never seen the original series know of THE TWILIGHT ZONE. But how much do you know of the most familiar component of the series, its host, Rod Serling? I knew nothing about him, as it turns out. This biographical comic is an enlightening, gri 4.5 stars -- THE TWILIGHT ZONE is truly a classic of TV's golden era. It's a testament to the series' enduring influence that nearly everyone is at least somewhat familiar with it--and it's been referenced and parodied so frequently that even those who have never seen the original series know of THE TWILIGHT ZONE. But how much do you know of the most familiar component of the series, its host, Rod Serling? I knew nothing about him, as it turns out. This biographical comic is an enlightening, gripping read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amy Layton

    With semi-realistic illustrations and a truly fitting outer-plotline, Koren Shadmi's biography of Rod Serling does him justice.  With purple hues that hark to science-fiction and alternate dimensions and various means of transmitting a story (usual frame/gutter style, full pages, television-screen frames, and so on), Shadmi effortlessly manages to tell Serling's story truthfully.  Visiting events in his life such as serving in the army, boxing, getting married, and going through the tumultuous j With semi-realistic illustrations and a truly fitting outer-plotline, Koren Shadmi's biography of Rod Serling does him justice.  With purple hues that hark to science-fiction and alternate dimensions and various means of transmitting a story (usual frame/gutter style, full pages, television-screen frames, and so on), Shadmi effortlessly manages to tell Serling's story truthfully.  Visiting events in his life such as serving in the army, boxing, getting married, and going through the tumultuous journey of being successful in show business, and his fight against censorship and fight for producing quality and thought-provoking plots. I hardly knew anything about Rod Serling prior to reading this, especially how much he produced and all the while working so largely with The Twilight Zone.  Even more interesting to me, perhaps, was the fact that Serling didn't have lasting faith for his creation--to me it seems so obvious that The Twilight Zone would be a cult classic, but hindsight is certainly 20/20.   I also had no idea that he worked as a professor in his later years, and more importantly, I had no idea that he was Jewish!  Anti-semitism was explored so well within the pages, including rude neighbors and obviously racist television producers.  Such conversations were subtle yet provided an undeniable clarity as to what he was experiencing. Overall, this was so interesting and intriguing, and it was a total joy to learn about someone so prolific in the American profile.  Definitely worth reading for knowing more about Serling, and certainly worth reading for the Twilight Zone-esque vibe and setting. Review cross-listed here!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television is a biographical graphic novel written and illustrated by Koren Shadmi, which is a concise biography of Rod Serling – screenwriter and television producer. Rodman Edward Serling was an American screenwriter, playwright, television producer, and narrator known for his live television dramas of the 1950s and his science-fiction anthology TV series, The Twilight Zone. Serling was active in politics, both on and off the screen, and helped for The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television is a biographical graphic novel written and illustrated by Koren Shadmi, which is a concise biography of Rod Serling – screenwriter and television producer. Rodman Edward Serling was an American screenwriter, playwright, television producer, and narrator known for his live television dramas of the 1950s and his science-fiction anthology TV series, The Twilight Zone. Serling was active in politics, both on and off the screen, and helped form television industry standards. He was known as the "angry young man" of Hollywood, clashing with television executives and sponsors over a wide range of issues including censorship, racism, and war. This sharp graphic biography mimics Rod Serling's gift for mordant trickery without descending into parody. Shadmi approximates Serling's clipped and portentous style as the narrative describes Serling's life. Crushed by the futility of combat, Serling nearly succumbs to PTSD, but the success of his 1956 teleplay Patterns sparked a streak culminating in the 1959 launch of his groundbreaking anthology show The Twilight Zone. The subversive series ended in 1964 and Serling's later years were a struggle, lightened by the surprise hit of his Planet of the Apes screenplay. The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television is written and constructed rather well. Shadmi's art evokes the show's signature hard lines and stark framing. While the book introduces the kind of dramatic final twist its subject would have approved, less attention is paid to the psychology behind why Serling so often concocted them. Nevertheless, it's a perceptive take, which celebrates and illuminates one of early television's true artists. All in all, The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television is a wonderful biographical graphic novel that portrayed the life of one of television's earliest television producers – Rod Serling.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    The author and artist of this work, took Rod Sterling’s life and presented it as an episode of The Twilight Zone. And it was AMAZING. The reader is hooked right from the start. We are on a plane with a long time before landing, and horror of all horrors no one brought a book. So Rod starts telling his story. I had no idea he was a paratrooper, or how hard he fought to control his stories. I knew he wrote with amazing people and sci-fi juggernauts, but everything else was new to this reader. The The author and artist of this work, took Rod Sterling’s life and presented it as an episode of The Twilight Zone. And it was AMAZING. The reader is hooked right from the start. We are on a plane with a long time before landing, and horror of all horrors no one brought a book. So Rod starts telling his story. I had no idea he was a paratrooper, or how hard he fought to control his stories. I knew he wrote with amazing people and sci-fi juggernauts, but everything else was new to this reader. The story is a bit sad, but so were most TTZ episodes. But they made you think. The team behind this book did such an amazing job, a reader hears Rod in their head as they go panel to panel, they picture his iconic black and white works, and evoke the same emotions we get from revisiting the zone. A masterwork of graphic biography for graphic novel readers and everyone else.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    An interesting subject for a graphic novel, especially coming from Humanoids. I was excited to read this because it seems to be quite hard to find writing on Serling and The Twilight Zone that's still in publication (though this might be changing with renewed interest in the show now), and I didn't know much about his life. Shadmi did a pretty good job of sketching a profile of a tortured man, if not a very deep one (and very forgiving of his less impressive behaviour in regards to his wife). It An interesting subject for a graphic novel, especially coming from Humanoids. I was excited to read this because it seems to be quite hard to find writing on Serling and The Twilight Zone that's still in publication (though this might be changing with renewed interest in the show now), and I didn't know much about his life. Shadmi did a pretty good job of sketching a profile of a tortured man, if not a very deep one (and very forgiving of his less impressive behaviour in regards to his wife). It was the framing story that let it down for me, especially at the end, because it felt like an unnecessary plot device to make an obvious Twilight Zone joke. The biography stands on its own without any need for framing at all. Still, it was a solidly drawn and written story for someone who's looking for some initial background into Serling.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    More than just a biography of Rod Serling, The Twilight Man is also a tale of wartime horror and a fascinating look at screenwriting during the advent of television. It's a great read, even if Koren Shadmi skips Serling's childhood, shortchanges his family life, and makes Serling seem hard-up for money while living in a nine-bedroom Hollywood mansion. It's a graphic biography, though - it's hard not to cut a few corners when every page has to be illustrated. And Shadmi's art is worth the price of More than just a biography of Rod Serling, The Twilight Man is also a tale of wartime horror and a fascinating look at screenwriting during the advent of television. It's a great read, even if Koren Shadmi skips Serling's childhood, shortchanges his family life, and makes Serling seem hard-up for money while living in a nine-bedroom Hollywood mansion. It's a graphic biography, though - it's hard not to cut a few corners when every page has to be illustrated. And Shadmi's art is worth the price of admission - crisp and detailed in black and white. With its good looks and acres of new information (for me, at least), I found it easy to get sucked into The Twilight Man. Just as importantly, I found it easy to forgive those missing elements. I'm definitely happy to know Rod Serling as more than just the man from the Twilight Zone Tower of Terror now.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    Told in graphic novel form, this is the biography of Rod Serling, best known as creator and writer of The Twilight Zone. The story is told within the frame of Rod speaking to a woman next to him on a flight, telling her his life story. He begins with him becoming a paratrooper during World War II, and continues through his life in college and beginning his career as a writer. Fans of The Twilight Zone will love the behind the scenes look at his writing process and negotiations, but he also just Told in graphic novel form, this is the biography of Rod Serling, best known as creator and writer of The Twilight Zone. The story is told within the frame of Rod speaking to a woman next to him on a flight, telling her his life story. He begins with him becoming a paratrooper during World War II, and continues through his life in college and beginning his career as a writer. Fans of The Twilight Zone will love the behind the scenes look at his writing process and negotiations, but he also just had a fascinating life. The style of the art is reminiscent of The Twilight Zone in the black and white panels, and scenes from the show will be recognizable to fans. This gave me insight into a writer I knew little about, and it put his work into perspective for me. **Read via NetGalley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I found this graphic novel rather interesting since I have always been a fan of The Twilight Zone. I like the way the author told Rod Serling's story as a story he told a seat mate on an airplane. The author did a fine job of giving us details of Rod's life while making it appear that we were in a Twilight Zone episode ourselves. Bravo!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Margie

    The life story of Rod Serling in a graphic novel, to me, it's like reading a comic book. The story consists of many facts of his life before he wrote the Twilight Zone series , during the hectic years of writing so many shows while busy doing other things and what follows. Interesting and a quick read.

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