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In the final book of the Ash and Sand trilogy, Ruka, son of Beyla, faces the emperor of the world, yet even victory may not save his people… With the death of his ally, Farahi Alaku, Ruka ‘Godtongue’ is alone. Or not exactly… The island prince Kale Alaku now haunts his mind, rattling within his once peaceful ‘Grove’, promising revenge and growing every moment in power. Mean In the final book of the Ash and Sand trilogy, Ruka, son of Beyla, faces the emperor of the world, yet even victory may not save his people… With the death of his ally, Farahi Alaku, Ruka ‘Godtongue’ is alone. Or not exactly… The island prince Kale Alaku now haunts his mind, rattling within his once peaceful ‘Grove’, promising revenge and growing every moment in power. Meanwhile, the Pyu isles are in chaos; the coastal kingdom of the Tong is still Ruka’s enemy, and every day that passes brings the empire closer to destroying his dream of a new world for his people. Once again, the son of Beyla will need the strength of his dark twin, Bukayag. Perhaps together they can unite three peoples, gather an army of ash, and defend or destroy their way to peace. But in the end, there can be only one king of heaven…


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In the final book of the Ash and Sand trilogy, Ruka, son of Beyla, faces the emperor of the world, yet even victory may not save his people… With the death of his ally, Farahi Alaku, Ruka ‘Godtongue’ is alone. Or not exactly… The island prince Kale Alaku now haunts his mind, rattling within his once peaceful ‘Grove’, promising revenge and growing every moment in power. Mean In the final book of the Ash and Sand trilogy, Ruka, son of Beyla, faces the emperor of the world, yet even victory may not save his people… With the death of his ally, Farahi Alaku, Ruka ‘Godtongue’ is alone. Or not exactly… The island prince Kale Alaku now haunts his mind, rattling within his once peaceful ‘Grove’, promising revenge and growing every moment in power. Meanwhile, the Pyu isles are in chaos; the coastal kingdom of the Tong is still Ruka’s enemy, and every day that passes brings the empire closer to destroying his dream of a new world for his people. Once again, the son of Beyla will need the strength of his dark twin, Bukayag. Perhaps together they can unite three peoples, gather an army of ash, and defend or destroy their way to peace. But in the end, there can be only one king of heaven…

30 review for Kings of Heaven

  1. 5 out of 5

    Petrik

    I have a Booktube channel now! Subscribe here: https://www.youtube.com/petrikleo ARC provided by the author in exchange for an honest review. Kings of Heaven has carved Ash and Sand as one of the best fantasy trilogies I’ve ever read. “A man fails in only two ways, my son. He quits, or he dies.” Here we are at the end of the road of another incredible series. Kings of Heaven is the third and final book in Ash and Sand trilogy. Unlike Kings of Ash, there’s only one timeline to follow her I have a Booktube channel now! Subscribe here: https://www.youtube.com/petrikleo ARC provided by the author in exchange for an honest review. Kings of Heaven has carved Ash and Sand as one of the best fantasy trilogies I’ve ever read. “A man fails in only two ways, my son. He quits, or he dies.” Here we are at the end of the road of another incredible series. Kings of Heaven is the third and final book in Ash and Sand trilogy. Unlike Kings of Ash, there’s only one timeline to follow here, and it continues immediately from where its predecessor ended. I honestly can’t talk much else about the details of the plot; almost every unfolding event in this book can be considered a spoiler for the previous books, and as always, I don’t want that to be the one to ruin your reading experience. However, if you’re here reading this review, I’m going to assume that you’re looking for the answer to the most important questions to be asked in the last installment: “Does it live up to expectations? Does it conclude satisfyingly? And is the series worth investing our time and money if we haven’t started it?” I’m going to answer these three questions as spoiler-free as possible. “A spear held with weak hands could still kill. Any man, great or small, could rise with will alone to protect his life, unbroken before the world.” Kings of Heaven didn’t just live up to my expectations, it sky-high exceeded it. I genuinely believe that Nell has outdone himself. It’s not often I find a trilogy that thoroughly immerses and also surprises me time and time again; Nell went into a narrative direction I didn’t predict, but somehow the overall story and developments only seemed to improve because of it. I’ll elaborate on this with an example within this trilogy: the choices of POV characters. In Kings of Paradise, almost the entire novel was written from the perspective of Ruka, Kale, and Dala. In Kings of Ash, though, it was almost all told from Ruka’s POV. By this stage, my expectation automatically led me to think that Kings of Heaven will be told mostly from Ruka’s POV as well. However, that isn’t the case here. Kings of Heaven utilizes multiple POV characters—more than five characters—and you know what that means? Handled by a less competent author, these changes could’ve backfired miserably; believe me, I’ve witnessed this happened several times. Not going to lie, the lack of Ruka chapters in the first half of this book did make me worry, but there was never any need for concern, Nell knows where he’s going with his story, and everything ended up clicking superbly. “Were I you… I would not tally the cost of history. One never knows where that might end.” At the core of the narrative, Ash and Sand is a series about Ruka, the son of Beyla. Kings of Heaven, however, reminds the readers that Ruka’s tale is not just about him and his missions anymore. Ruka is one of my favorite characters of all time, he has both experienced and caused so much suffering, destruction, loss, and deaths throughout the series. He’s an avatar of devastation, change, advancement (depending on your perspective), and the epic—plus larger—scopes of the story in this book features many POV from characters that Ruka, Kale, and Dala have met throughout their journeys. Kings of Heaven concluded everyone’s main story, not just three main characters from Kings of Paradise, and I honestly didn’t expect to find myself invested in other characters other than Ruka, Bukayag, and Kale, but I certainly did. Osco, Aiden, Egil, even Kikay and Dala! This is a big deal because Dala’s story was the downside of the first book for me, but Nell was able to successfully make me care about her overarching story; I actually wouldn’t mind her having more spotlight here. These kinds of overturning expectations, unpredictability, and how everyone’s journey converged in culminating an intimate narrative about legacy, culture, war, peace, discovery, and redemption are a few out of many reasons why Kings of Heaven surpassed my expectations. “Fight your doom… Fight for those still rotting in ditches, scorned by those who should praise their toil. Fight for those who have never known love, or victory, until the mountain claims you, you will not fight alone.” Not only Kings of Heaven provided an extremely satisfying and fitting conclusion to the trilogy, but the overall reading experience of the novel itself was captivating from the first page to the last. Let me be clear about this, there’s always something going on in Kings of Heaven; no chapter felt redundant. Characterizations, character development, fascinating world-building, and compelling battle sequences are all here. As I mentioned in my review of Kings of Ash, the series has transformed into high fantasy territory, and this point is emphasized extensively as we watch a more terrifying display of power and miracles unfolds. Seriously, there were moments in the final quarter of the novel that filled me with elation. Nell’s writing can conjure cinematic and vivid feels; I was able to felt the whirlwind of chaos, see the deadly conflagrations unleashed, and hear the sound of lightning. Witness the battalion of death’s glorious charge of doom that would make Karsa Orlong from Malazan Book of the Fallen proud. Read this book for yourself; the intense duel, the brutal siege, and the insane magical confrontations deserve your utmost attention. “I am what you think I am—a monster sent from hell to devour the evil hearts of men. Do what I tell you, little thing, or be punished.” Before I close this review, I would like to say that I was gripped (in every sense of the word) by the narrative. It seems like the more I read, the more I realize the vast differences between reading a good book and a VERY good book, especially during these crazy times of pandemic where concentration seems harder to muster. It took me only a few sittings within two days to read this beast, and that’s not an easy thing to achieve lately. I was reading this book when Hugo Awards 2020 took place, and I also had a rare blogger event (invited by the publisher) with both Adrian Tchaikovsky and Christopher Paolini; I totally forgot to attend both of them. That’s how engrossed I was; I simply couldn’t put Kings of Heaven down. Although the themes in the trilogy were more often dark, bleak, and violent, it never felt overwhelming, and Nell highlighted the importance of appreciating language, different cultures, and working together despite differences in this spectacular conclusion; I enjoyed reading every moment of it. “There is no dishonor in fear. Your people are wealthy and prosperous. You have much to lose, but also much to gain. Greatness is not forged idling in cold comfort, but in the fires of mortal danger.” To fans of the series so far, I firmly believe that you’ll enjoy this conclusion. For fantasy readers who haven’t started the series at all, I’m going to assure you that this series is worth spending your time and money, even more so if you’re a character-driven epic/grimdark fantasy enthusiast. Crowning Ash and Sand as one of the two best self-published fantasy series I’ve read so far—I loved it as much as I loved The Paternus Trilogy by Dyrk Ashton, and I loved it more than Cradle by Will Wight—may not be enough because the statement appeared to imply that self-published/indie fantasy is inferior to traditionally published fantasy in terms of quality, and that couldn’t be farther from the truth; it is on par, same with traditionally published books, you just have to know where to look for the gems. Let’s end this review with a cliché statement instead, Kings of Heaven has cemented Ash and Sand as one of the best series I’ve ever read. Packed with memorable main characters, sublime characterizations, pulse-pounding actions, fascinating world-building plus magic system, accompanied by vivid scenes and engaging prose; what else do you want out of this bloody spellbinding, and most importantly, absolutely satisfying conclusion. This is the end of the road. The tale of Ruka, son of Beyla, the Butcher, the Unbroken, the Godtongue, the deformed genius with golden eyes who could see in the darkness, yet sought the light, and also the individuals he met on his blood-soaked journey ends here. I’m genuinely content that I’m able to read this series from the beginning until the end. It has been a blast, I know I’ll be doing a reread of the entire trilogy one day, and I have a good feeling I’ll love it even more by binge rereading it. I’ll definitely be looking forward to reading Nell’s next work. “We are all only observers of the past. Not one line can be changed, no glory reproduced… This is a hall of knowledge. Here on its shelves is good and evil, great and small. I will pass it on before the end, and let those with the desire draw what wisdom they can.” Series review: Kings of Paradise: 4/5 stars Kings of Ash: 5/5 stars Kings of Heaven: 5/5 stars Ash and Sand: 14/15 stars Official release date: 1st September 2020 You can pre-order the book from: Amazon UK | Amazon US The quotes in this review were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication. You can find this and the rest of my reviews at Novel Notions Special thanks to my Patrons on Patreon for giving me extra support towards my passion for reading and reviewing! My Patrons: Alfred, Alya, Annabeth, Devin, Hamad, Jimmy Nutts, Joie, Mike, Miracle, Nicholas, Zoe.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Richard Nell

    *Edit - September 1* - We have lift-off! Get reading, folks. Also I'm running two give-aways, if you like free things. One is on Twitter here, the other is on Reddit here. Happy book-day me! Oh hi. So I've finished the series. It's available September 1. Apparently Ash and Sand has as many words as Lord of the Rings + The Hobbit (and more cannibals, if we're counting - wait do Orks count as cannibals? If so I get destroyed.) In any case, as you can see, the series has ruined my sanity. It might do *Edit - September 1* - We have lift-off! Get reading, folks. Also I'm running two give-aways, if you like free things. One is on Twitter here, the other is on Reddit here. Happy book-day me! Oh hi. So I've finished the series. It's available September 1. Apparently Ash and Sand has as many words as Lord of the Rings + The Hobbit (and more cannibals, if we're counting - wait do Orks count as cannibals? If so I get destroyed.) In any case, as you can see, the series has ruined my sanity. It might do the same for you! But YMMV. You can pre-order the ebook, right now, right here: Kings of Heaven I hope you enjoy.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lukasz

    A spectacular culmination to the Ash and Sand trilogy. As a whole, the series is a masterpiece. If you haven't read it yet, you should ask yourself what the hell is wrong with you. A spectacular culmination to the Ash and Sand trilogy. As a whole, the series is a masterpiece. If you haven't read it yet, you should ask yourself what the hell is wrong with you.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    “A man fails in only two ways. He quits, or he dies.” I didn’t know it at the time, but 2017’s Kings of Paradise marked an important moment in my reading career. Before reading Nell’s work, my mind was clear and carefree, unaware of the existence of Ruka, son of Beyla, brother of Bukayag, the demon-spawn, the eidetic barbarian genius, the God-tongue. From that day forward, Ruka’s story has been a constant in my own mind-grove, haunting me with the possibilities of how his story will play out, wha “A man fails in only two ways. He quits, or he dies.” I didn’t know it at the time, but 2017’s Kings of Paradise marked an important moment in my reading career. Before reading Nell’s work, my mind was clear and carefree, unaware of the existence of Ruka, son of Beyla, brother of Bukayag, the demon-spawn, the eidetic barbarian genius, the God-tongue. From that day forward, Ruka’s story has been a constant in my own mind-grove, haunting me with the possibilities of how his story will play out, what his purpose is, how his mind truly works, and the fate of those that love and abhor him. There are other anti-heroes I’ve involuntarily compared to Ruka in recent years and have found them all wanting. No other character has captured my attention like Nell’s creation, and have deemed him the most interesting anti-hero out of the fantasy I’ve read. It’s safe to say that Kings of Heaven, the conclusion to Ruka’s story, was a book I was looking forward to reading very much. But a few chapters into it, I realized this wasn’t Ruka’s story anymore. "Every man has his use." He whispered the words like a prayer. "Every man should have a choice." After two novels of headaches and heartaches, broken dreams and broken spears, it was finally time to reunite the lands of Ash and Sand. Farahi’s presience, Dala’s maneurvering, and Kale’s determination has helped propel Ruka into the endgame with the Narianians, with the rest of the world watching. But as the story threads laced together, we were spending less time with Ruka than I'd have originally guessed. I admit that at first, I was hesitant on the concept. But certain tertiary characters were given a much bigger spotlight, and we got to experience the world through new perspectives: we are treated to the songs of skalds, touch upon the cultures of the horse riders of the steppes, and infer what lifelong sailors value most. We gain a much deeper and colorful understanding of the surrounding cultures, therefore the stakes of what Ruka is fighting for carries more weight than ever. “Ruka stood with the men and gripped iron, resisting the urge to pray. He looked at his mother's kinsmen, bare chested and burnt, standing with continental men of peace and island sailors, all in common purpose. The tide swelled at their waists, the sky cracked and thundered with a growing storm, and Ruka wished all his life could be spent like this.” It has long been established that Ruka’s mind is like a DVR in which he can watch any piece of his life on demand, with perfect clarity. And all the pain from the past never has the chance to heal over time; each emotion can be recalled to feel as fresh as when it occurred. A life full of painful memories that never has the luxury of dulling over time effects his ability to cope with trauma like an average human is built to do. As powerful and strange and wonderfully mad our beloved Ruka is, I think it’s safe to say that all this pain has led to a crippling inferiority complex. No matter how much good he achieves, anything bad that he can glean from a situation becomes his fault. He is simply unable to take sole credit for something positive, yet he reveres his enemies as heroes when his own deeds are far greater. Being born cursed and deformed hangs heavy on his shoulders throughout his life. I’ve been holding out hope that he sees the value of his deeds before he meets his end; not just for his purposes fulfilled, but as a retroactive change in his lifelong perspective. Figuring out what kind of peace Ruka was able to achieve by story’s end was one of the themes I enjoyed exploring the most in Kings of Heaven, as I think it helped determine how he would value his worth when it mattered most. It was one of many well-written, stunning moments of character depth that elevates Ruka's story into rare heights. "Only broken things know the hollow tragedy of victory. Success is a cheap balm slathered over a festering wound. It's never enough." One of the only issues that popped up in my head while reading this story was that I wish there were a bit more of it. Not out of selfishness because the trilogy was ending, but because I felt that there were a few scenes that could have been included to flesh out the story a bit more. There’s a couple of timeline jumps that I thought the reader would be privy to, but I also understand why Nell would want to keep a steady pace toward the climax without too much divergence. There’s also some revelations-by-omission potentially hinted at which will garner some discussion among the fan base in the weeks and months ahead. But this is already a long trilogy, so I know how wishing for more chapters of it sounds. Kings of Heaven concludes one of my all-time favorite series in riveting fashion. My expectations were exceeded and my anxieties were dismantled. It surprises and it saddens, and it gives the cast the ending they deserve. When I turned the final page, I was elated and drained, yet entirely fulfilled. Kings of Heaven does everything a good finale should do, while still leaving me craving for more stories from this era. And while Ruka's story might be over, he has left behind a legacy of a changed world that will suffer his impact for generations to come. In some small way, I count myself part of that legacy, as I will undoubtedly keep Ruka's story in my mind during my own long journeys ahead. 9.2 / 10

  5. 5 out of 5

    Samir

    A great conclusion to a masterpiece. Ash and Sand is one of my favorite trilogies and Ruka is one of the best and certainly the most fascinating character in fantasy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mihir

    Full review over at Fantasy Book Critic OVERVIEW/ANALYSIS: Kings Of Heaven is the long awaited ending to the Ash And Sand trilogy. It’s a book which I was itching to read from when I finished Kings Of Ash in 2019. The trilogy ending was very unusual for a couple of reasons as the series’ genre had changed from low to epic fantasy in the last volume and also the proverbial Kane vs Abel storyline had come to its conclusion in the climax of Kings Of Ash. I was curious to see what the hell the author Full review over at Fantasy Book Critic OVERVIEW/ANALYSIS: Kings Of Heaven is the long awaited ending to the Ash And Sand trilogy. It’s a book which I was itching to read from when I finished Kings Of Ash in 2019. The trilogy ending was very unusual for a couple of reasons as the series’ genre had changed from low to epic fantasy in the last volume and also the proverbial Kane vs Abel storyline had come to its conclusion in the climax of Kings Of Ash. I was curious to see what the hell the author would do with this volume considering the monumental changes he had enacted in the preceding title. For one, this book is mightily different than its predecessors by the fact that there are no dual timelines within it. It entirely takes place in a singular timepoint which is the aftermath of the climax of Kings Of Ash. Things are upended in the lands of the Ascom as well as the Pyu islands and there’s an imminent threat of an invasion from the northern continent. Ruka finds himself in a big bind as his plans with Farahi are now in tatters due to Kale’s actions. However the wheels of change are already set and there’s no going back. He’s got to try to prepare for the northern continent invasion as well as the inhabitant in his mental grove who’s causing him headaches. Overall this story gets as epic as possible. Let’s talk about why this story is so spectacular. The plot is completely streamlined to where we as the readers are taken for a thrilling ride beginning from chapter one leading all the way until the fantastic epilogue. This book similarly to Kings Of Ash is all about Ruka however in this book we get a brand new POV character as well as a return of another POV character from book 1. My favourite character Dala also returns and gets a bigger role than the previous book and she gets another chance to show her pragmatic intelligence. We get a look into the horse tribes’ culture in the lands of the Ascom and that was an interesting interlude. The characterization is top notch as ever and beginning with Ruka, who has been working his body and mind to utter exhaustion with his plan to help his people escape the land of Ash for a warmer climate and more habitable lands up north. There’s also Kale who’s present in Ruka’s mental grove and has now slowly started talking back. This leads to some fun conversations between a killer and his victim and some very interesting thoughts about the nature of the Grove, its place in reality and how it interacts with the actual world. Kale is a more subdued persona but he still has his magic and his rage is ever present. We get a brilliant new POV from Osco the mesanite who is back in his home city and is now shanghaied into helping the Naranian emperor lead his conquest towards Tong and the rest of the island nations. We are reacquainted with Egil who as we know has become a family man but yet hasn’t lost his thirst for adventure. While there are others who don’t get a POV but are thrilling to read, this list begins with Kikay who’s dangerous more than ever as now she’s lost Farahi’s calming guidance. There’s also Tane who finds himself atop the Alaku throne and has to rely on his supposed enemies to save him. There’s princess Lani who has the most to lose as she’s already lost her love and now finds her homeland in dire danger. There’s also Arun, deadly and ever in the mix of events. All of these folks and several others find themselves in the midst of a titanic struggle. The characterization singlehandedly elevates this (and the previous) volumes from its simple premise into something brilliant. The book has a quiet buildup to a siege storyline and I love sieges. Richard Nell really does his best to build up an effective first climax with this plot line and we get to see the conflict from both sides due to the dual POVs utilized. I loved this aspect and believe me the siege gets very, very brutal but at the same time, it moves along quickly and there’s a fabulous end to it. I must highlight that here the author does something even cooler with Ruka’s powers and while it hasn’t been done before, the event will send a chill up anyone’s spine. Also that moment needs a soundtrack like this one. This trilogy has had an interesting genre shift in terms of magic usage. Kings Of Paradise was a low fantasy story and it was in Kings Of Ash that the magic system really got a boost and the trilogy genre kicked into the “epic” gear with both Ruka and Kale. In this book, there’s some wild (and I mean WILD) moments that will have you saying WTF in the best way possible as well as some truly chilling ones. The author really does build Ruka up to be a superman of sorts but then we get a look into things from his perspective and then those same events don’t seem so superhuman. The pace of the book is very streamlined and beginning with a quiet sort, the plot’s threads slowly start twisting into an explosive tapestry that come together brilliantly towards the end. This book is also the smallest of the entire trilogy and while that’s definitely going against the epic fantasy norms. I believe it helps with its streamlined pace as the book’s plot is kept on a linear track with everything building up towards its dual climaxes. What I love ultimately about this trilogy is that while the nature of the world is definitely dark (maybe grimdark to some). The resolution is always about hope. Ruka’s hope towards solving all the life’s mysteries, saving his people and finally realizing that his birth isn’t a mistake. Dala’s hope for making sure that her people aren’t doomed to forever keep fighting and killing each other over small slights. Kale’s hope for keeping his remaining family safe and maybe even proving that he was a good person after all. Osco’s hope about saving his city state and his family from Naranian ambition. Kikay’s hope for saving the Alakus and finally becoming the savior she was meant to be. Egil’s hope for finally having a sound ending to his life and making sure his family are saved. These and many more of such hopes are tied along. Ultimately I think the author wanted to showcase that even when things are dark, it doesn’t mean that people should stop striving to improve their lot. Ultimately it’s about saving the Ascomi people from environmental doom and the Pyu islanders from imperial conquest. That has been the biggest drive for Ruka and Farahi and this book really pays off on those angles. The series has never been much for humour except the gallows kind and in this book we get some gems here and there. One particular instance is about what Osco does to neutralize a possible future threat from Ruka and that bit was just hilarious to read. Lastly I do want to highlight the epilogue which is from a new character and I have to highlight uttermost Gemmellian in its scope. What I mean by that is the author does his best to tickle our heart strings as he shows what happens when the final killer arrives and does what’s bound to happen. Lastly the jerk of an author had the temerity to come up with an epitaph that rivals David Gemmell’s most heart-rending scene (cough*Jaime Graymuch*cough) from Ravenheart. After reading over 570K worth of words, he manages to put in a final blow to our hearts and open up our tear ducts effortlessly. He does this by humanizing Ruka/Bukayag, a complex monster-cum-savant who does horrible things and grand magic for the eventual goal of saving a people. The only thing that didn’t quite pan out to my expectations was a proper explanation about the magic system namely the Nishad and the others. What was Ruka’s grove and who/what exactly was Bukayag? These questions don’t get answered neatly but such is life. This is a minor thing and very subjective. CONCLUSION: Kings Of Heaven is a near perfect epic fantasy conclusion to one of the best self-published fantasy trilogies. Would I go so far to say it’s a classic in the making, yes, I would indeed. I hope Richard Nell keeps enthralling us more with his stories because if this debut trilogy is any indication, this guy is going to end up as one of the genre’s giants by the time he crosses 60.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jon Adams

    Fitting ending to an amazing trilogy. Thank you Mr. Nell!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    With the Ash and Sand trilogy's conclusion, I find I'm sad. All three books gave us an increasingly wider expanse of land, people, and scope. After the interesting and rather vast setup in the first book and the surprising twist of characterization in the second, I expected something equally surprising to come out of the third. Getting a whole land, another empire, and a huge war is something of a bonus. Maybe I expected a rather huge twist to the characters, one more time. What I did get was qu With the Ash and Sand trilogy's conclusion, I find I'm sad. All three books gave us an increasingly wider expanse of land, people, and scope. After the interesting and rather vast setup in the first book and the surprising twist of characterization in the second, I expected something equally surprising to come out of the third. Getting a whole land, another empire, and a huge war is something of a bonus. Maybe I expected a rather huge twist to the characters, one more time. What I did get was quite satisfying, of course. I never expected Kale to be such a vengeful ghost. I really enjoyed Ruka's journey, his power, and his discoveries. The other nation and its characters were fine. Quite horse-lordy, a mix between Rohan and Westeros, and I'm sure they will really appeal to a lot of readers. But I was more interested in Ruka and Kale. I think the best part of this was the ultimate spiritual journey. Not that we read these particularly for that kind of journey, mind you, but I liked it. :) Oh, and fighting like a boss god doesn't hurt.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Scott M.

    This book really shines in its descriptions of battle, strategy, and loss. It weaves together various points of view characters to really give a well rounded view of world events, both big and small. It builds upon the first two books much like an addition to the Tong walls, tearing nothing down but instead building it both bigger and stronger. I find myself both equally disappointed this series has finally ended, but also thankful that the series had such an exciting and conclusive ending such a This book really shines in its descriptions of battle, strategy, and loss. It weaves together various points of view characters to really give a well rounded view of world events, both big and small. It builds upon the first two books much like an addition to the Tong walls, tearing nothing down but instead building it both bigger and stronger. I find myself both equally disappointed this series has finally ended, but also thankful that the series had such an exciting and conclusive ending such as this. The combination of feelings of relief, disappointment, and happiness for me is always a sign of a rare and special reading experience.

  10. 5 out of 5

    The Nerd Book Review

    First off I would solidly recommend this series to anyone who is a fan of Grimdark. The first book was so dark that at times it felt overwhelming. I know I say in a lot of my reviews that I get into a movie in my mind with a well written book and in the first book I saw the land that our MC lived in as being in shades of grey with very little color and this could exacerbate my feeling of doom and gloom at times. Book 2 came along and it was just absolutely amazing. Not to be too much of a fanboy First off I would solidly recommend this series to anyone who is a fan of Grimdark. The first book was so dark that at times it felt overwhelming. I know I say in a lot of my reviews that I get into a movie in my mind with a well written book and in the first book I saw the land that our MC lived in as being in shades of grey with very little color and this could exacerbate my feeling of doom and gloom at times. Book 2 came along and it was just absolutely amazing. Not to be too much of a fanboy here but it was just straight up badass! It is without a doubt my favorite 2nd book in any series ever and has to sit in my top 3-5 favorite books ever. The magic system is just plain amazing and once we add a change of scenery the contrast between the grey dreary Southland that is basically tundra in a lot of places and the tropical island paradise really popped in that movie in my mind. I will start by saying that book 2 is the real gem of this series, obviously if it’s one of my favorite books ever, but book 3 is definitely amazing. I read it way past my bedtime and read for hours and hours in a single sitting. When a book is good enough for me to see it as a movie I can fly through hundreds of pages in a relatively short time and this book obviously achieved that. With this book we get the exciting conclusion to the trilogy that Nell has written and if this truly is the end of this storyline I’m truly saddened. Ruka is probably my favorite character in fantasy and I would read novel after novel written about him and his exploits. When the series first begins he is a child who has had to resort to cannibalism to survive and by the end he is an amazingly complex character who I cared for and who I wanted to find happiness. The book has more than a few surprises and some things that I truly didn’t expect to happen that caught me off guard. I do wish Dala’s character had a little more page time but I think that the story took on a life of its own as it unfolded and Ruka was clearly the star of the show. I realize I was pretty vague about this book and any real details but it’s the 3rd book in the series and if you made it past book 1 then you should have loved book 2 and you’ll certainly want to finish the trilogy off. Thanks for the ARC and the amazing trilogy Richard! I hope to one day read another Ruka book but if we never do whatever comes next I will be looking forward to it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    William

    A satisfying conclusion to one of the best new epics in fantasy! Without spoiling too much of the series: Kings of Paradise really impressed me with its solid character arcs, and Kings of Ash kept twisting things around, and presented an amazing sorcerous battle, but both ended at crescendo notes. After such highs, Kings of Heaven had the unenviable task of winding down from all that, giving us a satisfying farewell to the series's cast of characters, and settling Nell's unique fantasy world into A satisfying conclusion to one of the best new epics in fantasy! Without spoiling too much of the series: Kings of Paradise really impressed me with its solid character arcs, and Kings of Ash kept twisting things around, and presented an amazing sorcerous battle, but both ended at crescendo notes. After such highs, Kings of Heaven had the unenviable task of winding down from all that, giving us a satisfying farewell to the series's cast of characters, and settling Nell's unique fantasy world into its new normal. It is a difficult task that many of the greatest writers struggle to pull off (there have certainly been some famous failures in that regard lately), but I think Kings of Heaven manages it well. Kings of Heaven kept me up at night. I'm normally a plodding reader, but there was an inexorable pull here. I found myself repeatedly unable to refuse just a few pages more. Just one more chapter before bed... Overall, the action is still intense, but not quite as furious as the second book. The relationships are taut, but not quite as fragile and wild as in the first. In isolation, those might seem like a criticism, but I found the slowing (although definitely not slow!) pace worked wonderfully well here. The conflicts were still epic, the stakes high, the risks great... but at the same time, there was a gradual easing of tension throughout, so that by the time the story reached its final climax, things felt right. It was a series of endings, and each ending felt well-earned. All in all, the series ends like a good meal: I feel pleasantly full. It left me happily satisfied that key questions have been answered, and delighted by the journey to reach those answers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lynn K : Grimmedian

    In this very anticipated final installment of Ash and Sand, we witness the depth of character which has carried this epic trilogy from start to finish. The prose is practically impeccable, the world building is amazing, and the story line is so engrossing it will haunt you. After things go awry in a complicated plan in Pyu, Ruka must deal with the loss of his friend and ally. Tane is now the king and his his treacherous aunt Kikay is still seeking Ruka’s death and the power she craves in the isla In this very anticipated final installment of Ash and Sand, we witness the depth of character which has carried this epic trilogy from start to finish. The prose is practically impeccable, the world building is amazing, and the story line is so engrossing it will haunt you. After things go awry in a complicated plan in Pyu, Ruka must deal with the loss of his friend and ally. Tane is now the king and his his treacherous aunt Kikay is still seeking Ruka’s death and the power she craves in the islands of the South Aluka Sea. Ruka gives the kingdom back to the Aluka to rule. His people will remain in Sri Kon, and an accord must be reached. Whether he can manage a peace with the the emperor of the world in Naran is another matter. Even convincing the King of Nong Ming Tong, father of the Pyu Queen Lani, that he is in imminent danger from Narania is a task he didn’t foresee. In Ruka’s grove, he digs a grave for Kale, the Pyu prince and his friend until the death of King Farahi when he was killed in retaliation while bringing with him the power of magic to bear on the invading men of ash in Sri Kon. But, unlike his other silent ghosts, Kale quickly learns to speak to Ruka. Kale wants Ruka to stay away from Lani, the love of his life and mother of his son. Soon his actions in the grove, reach beyond into the real world once again. After a decade of preparation, Ruka returned to a war he didn’t plan, and deaths he didn’t want to cause. It is only with the help of Queen Lani that Ruka can show King Kapoule the danger coming to his peaceful and prosperous merchant kingdom. This finale has less of Ruka, and more of the side cast from the first two books. Ruka is struggling with self doubt and and remorse at the results of his actions, even if the results are good ones. Since Ruka cannot forget a single moment of his life, all his losses and pain are always fresh in his mind. He seeks peace and must use everything at his disposal to find it. The reader will want the same and there is the hope that Ruka may find what he seeks when all is said and done. A story full with political intrigue and magic beyond description, the Ash and Sand series is a bloody tale that manages to find the root goodness of humanity in the most surprising ways and in the most surprising people.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Stacey

    A fantasy masterpiece. Highly recommended to all fans of the genre. Team Ruka all the way. *************************** We have a release date - 1 September 2020. Get preordering folks! *************************** Can’t wait for this. Hope we get it this year!

  14. 5 out of 5

    C.T. Phipps

    http://booknest.eu/reviews/charles/20... 5/5 KINGS OF HEAVEN is the grand finale of the Ash and Sand series. This is one of the best series I've ever read, fantasy wise, and I gladly mark it up with the First Law Trilogy or even the first three books of A Song of Ice and Fire. Perhaps even better than the content of the book itself is the fact that it successfully sticks to the landing. I've become somewhat disappointed in recent offerings that set up an amazing story, create a bunch of interestin http://booknest.eu/reviews/charles/20... 5/5 KINGS OF HEAVEN is the grand finale of the Ash and Sand series. This is one of the best series I've ever read, fantasy wise, and I gladly mark it up with the First Law Trilogy or even the first three books of A Song of Ice and Fire. Perhaps even better than the content of the book itself is the fact that it successfully sticks to the landing. I've become somewhat disappointed in recent offerings that set up an amazing story, create a bunch of interesting characters, and then fall apart in trying to end things. This is not the case here and I rank this book as high as I do its predecessors. The story begins with Ruka having won a pyrric victory against Prince Kale of the Pyu Isles. Ruka and King Farahi had made a deal to destroy the latter's enemies in exchange for land. However, Kale had attempted to "liberate" the island with a combination of both magic as well as the neighboring islander's forces. As such, Ruka ended up losing many of his forces in a pointless war as well as two of the strongest allies. Worse, it is on the eve of a war with the Empire of Naran that dwarfs them in both size as well as resources. I was really impressed with the decision to kill off a certain character in the previous book and said character becomes a ghost for much of the story, adding to Ruka's madness. Ironically, I felt that his "death" removed a great deal of his character development, though. Apparently, being a ghost makes you petulant and selfish. This is the only thing that I find to be a flaw in the book, though, that is an amazing Ruka continues his growth as a man who began as a savage cannibal to someone who is possibly the most educated as well as enlightened man in the world. Unfortunately, Ruka's torment remains as his mind is increasingly split between the various personalities that exist in his head. He is best at slaughter, conquest, and destruction but must rely on unsteady allies in order to try to build something permanent. All of his increased intellect and learning can't protect his people from plague or the racism of the locals, though. Worse, he is terrible at maintaining alliances through anything but fear. He is a fascinating and tragic figure, making every page following him an interesting one. I appreciate the writing of the women characters in the book as well with Kikay, Dala, and Lani all showing various sides that actually make them the most interesting characters in the book. Kikay proves to be a ruthless spymaster as well as enemy to Ruka, Dala tries to settle into the role she thought she wanted her entire life, and Lani attempts to deal with the fact that Kale was a well-intentioned idiot. I always appreciate having strong female characters and this book has developed some really good ones. This is a book full of action, intrigue, politics, world-building, and fascinating characters. I don't think that there's a book nearly as good as this out there from the indie scene right now. Something that I don't say lightly. The story leans heavily on Ruka but it doesn't exclude the development of other characters like the previous book did. We even get some development of the Naran Empire that looms as a threat above everything.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    Great finish to the trilogy I really enjoyed this series and will definitely buy all future books from this author. Can’t recommend this series enough.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    A very satisfying and often beautiful conclusion, with unexpected but fully realized narrative turns and well-juggled complexity with its roots and branches permeating the entirety of the series. Highly recommend.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Katharina

    This series is easily one of the best series I have ever read, and I read some, believe me. Mr. Nell gave a wonderful ending to one of my most cherished protagonists. I hope I will read more of his great characters.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Let me start of by saying I would have never heard of this series if it wasn't for the SPBFO Mark Lawrence puts on every year. Mark Lawrence himself is one of my favorite authors, but I just started really following the contest last year. Its a contest for Self-Published authors that regularly finds some of the best works fantasy bloggers and reviewers read through the year- if you haven't heard of it, check it out on Mr. Lawrence's blog! http://mark---lawrence.blogspot.com/ **THIS REVIEW IS FOR Let me start of by saying I would have never heard of this series if it wasn't for the SPBFO Mark Lawrence puts on every year. Mark Lawrence himself is one of my favorite authors, but I just started really following the contest last year. Its a contest for Self-Published authors that regularly finds some of the best works fantasy bloggers and reviewers read through the year- if you haven't heard of it, check it out on Mr. Lawrence's blog! http://mark---lawrence.blogspot.com/ **THIS REVIEW IS FOR THE SERIES AS A WHOLE THERE MAY BE SLIGHT SPOILERS** 3.5/5 Kings of Paradise was the first of the series which painted a bleak picture of a deformed "giant" (I'd liken these to the Jotun of Norse mythology) who is born in what can only be described as a frozen wasteland, to a mother with some degree of power in the world they're living in called the Ascom. The people there believe him to be some kind of demon and exile him and his mother to the outskirts of their tribal living. When his mother is taken from him and he is cut off from civilization, Ruka takes on a much darker persona to get him through. Although he ultimately wants peace, he becomes a brutal force of power who will do anything to survive, even resorting to cannibalism and murder of anyone who gets in his way. Then we are introduced to Kale, a prince with no immediate ascension to the throne who gets sent to train for the Navy by his father, King Farahi, who believes that is where he belongs, and focuses on his journey of growth to the Bato island where he studies to become a monk and finds himself with a power he isn't sure is even real. Our stories intertwine in different times and span their very different upbringings and relationships with others. The writing is superb, it has you on the edge of your seat and builds a world of magic, gods, ruthless leaders, but leaves you with just enough hope to read on. 5/5 Kings of Ash is more of Ruka's journey in between the times of the first book. You get to see how his relationship with King Farahi evolved into what it was and really understand the reasonings behind the action of book 1. Kale develops powers beyond that which anyone had thought possible, King Farahi has visions he cannot understand or fully explain, and Ruka comes to terms with what needs to be done. Dala, in the Land of Ash, gets more fully explored here and she takes on a stronger role to lead the people of Ascom forward in their own journey of understanding the world they're living in. Timelines converge and the world changes in a showdown that had me gripping my kindle in disbelief, but still holding onto some hope. 5/5 Kings of Heaven - where the King is dead, Kale is living in Ruka's mind, Ruka has to go above and beyond, Arun becomes a force of his own making his own decisions, Asna and Osco get a bigger spotlight, Kikay trying to control Tane and the outcome of all things Farahi was against, and Dala is a complete badass in her role of Matriarch. It follows the journey that Kale plays in Ruka's grove, Ruka's travels to the emperor, explores the power of the "gods" or "king of heaven", and brings it all together in an epic battle for the ages. Even though it is shorter, there is a lot more character development, further world building, more expansion on the magic that controls the world, with slightly less action than the first two books and even a little less dark - still I was found with my jaw on the floor in certain parts. The ending was exactly what I'd hoped for and tied the threads together in a beautiful little knot that I actually did not expect to garner as much emotion as it did. I only wish there were a few things explained like exactly what Bukayag really was - whether he was the psyche of Ruka or something else entirely, where the Grove was, and how much more power Ando really had as he was the ultimate driving force behind everything the Batonian monks were. Even with those small unanswered questions that might be best left to the mystery of the mythos of it all, I loved this series and could not recommend it more for those who like Grimdark fantasy in a mythology that spans from Norse to Asian and some others sprinkled in between with a prose that reminded me of some of the fantasy greats without being overly wordy or explanatory (looking at you Jordan.) All in all, even with the first book being a 3.5/5 stars purely for leaving me utterly perplexed at how I felt about the characters, it being a slow drag until the action began, and despite a few typos and grammatical errors (using their instead of there, this instead of these, etc.) - the entire series was a full 5 stars in classic Goodreads, "this book deserves the attention", fashion. :)

  19. 4 out of 5

    HassanTheAthenian

    A journey started has ended. I wish I could write a review for this book, and this trilogy, deserves. I will gather strength and enough wits to try and write down my thoughts. In the meantime, words are not adequate enough to describe greatness, but they're all we have. This is not a proper review, because I don't do those. So, apologies for what you are about to read. I will never forget Ruka, son of Beyla. Nor will I forget that he was not a good man. Ruka was a cannibal. Ruka was a murderer of ch A journey started has ended. I wish I could write a review for this book, and this trilogy, deserves. I will gather strength and enough wits to try and write down my thoughts. In the meantime, words are not adequate enough to describe greatness, but they're all we have. This is not a proper review, because I don't do those. So, apologies for what you are about to read. I will never forget Ruka, son of Beyla. Nor will I forget that he was not a good man. Ruka was a cannibal. Ruka was a murderer of children. But Ruka also dreamt of saving his people, the same people who shunned and outcast him. When you try to compare Ruka to other characters, the first comes to mind is Karsa Orlong from Malazan. Now Karsa has dreams of burning it all down. Ruka, on the other hand, wants to build it up, even if it means he has to burn it first. But all his sins and his evil is for a cause. Now there are somethings I wish Nell did differently. For example, Kale. Kale was truly coming into his own by the second book, and then he died. But it was not his end. The second thing that I wish was done differently was Ruka's end. Yes, it was powerful. Yes, I cried when I read the words in the epilogue. But... I wish Nell could've left it. There's a gap. So there are decades where Nell could go back and write more stories of Ruka. But I also understand why he closed Ruka's story as he did: closure. And it bloody worked. I cried, damn it, I really did. Now the final thing I disagree with. Aiden's death felt cheap, unnecessarily cheap. I believe the author should've done it differently. Dala... man, Dala is great. Her convictions, her beliefs and her success against all odds. It was so wonderful to see her on top of power. I will always remember Ruka, son of Beyla. But I will also remember all the characters that he met, that changed because of him. Yes, everyone always claims this, but Ash and Sand is one of the best series I've ever read. Richard Nell is one of the most brilliant authors.

  20. 5 out of 5

    P.T. Hunt

    This series was the first to open my eyes to the world of self-published books, and I'm happy to say it has been a fantastic and affirming journey that self-pubbed authors can contend with the best of them, traditionally published or otherwise. The Ash and Sand trilogy is my all time favorite grim-dark series. Not only is it DARKER than anything in the genre I've read, it also has more heart (IMO). Most of both these factors mainly come from one character: Ruka. He is perhaps the most complex and This series was the first to open my eyes to the world of self-published books, and I'm happy to say it has been a fantastic and affirming journey that self-pubbed authors can contend with the best of them, traditionally published or otherwise. The Ash and Sand trilogy is my all time favorite grim-dark series. Not only is it DARKER than anything in the genre I've read, it also has more heart (IMO). Most of both these factors mainly come from one character: Ruka. He is perhaps the most complex and fascinating character I've ever had the horror, as well as pleasure of, inhabiting the thoughts of. He shines brighter than ever in the conclusion to this series. Other characters I've grown to love and hate also rise to the occasion in fantastic ways, the majority of which I was satisfied with the conclusion of. And oh man, a certain something I did not see coming at all... I don't really have adequate words. I've been blathering on about this series to friends, family, anyone who will listen, really, for some time now, so I'll end this here with my favorite repeated quote from the book: “A man fails in only two ways. He quits, or he dies.”

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angela Han

    This book is about Ruka and his life calling that was introduced in the 1st book. - This book contains more fast paced action that involves external and internal warfare. I love how the focus is consistently on Ruka's life calling (vision). If I have to summarize this book in two sentence, it is this: - All key characters were gradually introduced and described in depth in 1st and 2nd book. In the third book, every character introduced plays an important role in changing the world. *** you must This book is about Ruka and his life calling that was introduced in the 1st book. - This book contains more fast paced action that involves external and internal warfare. I love how the focus is consistently on Ruka's life calling (vision). If I have to summarize this book in two sentence, it is this: - All key characters were gradually introduced and described in depth in 1st and 2nd book. In the third book, every character introduced plays an important role in changing the world. *** you must read the 1st and 2nd book to understand the key characters.*** Whats better? Kale (dead god prince) comes back in 3rd book and plays an minor yet important role. He transforms from a lost princeling to god prince who disovered his identity and life purpose.

  22. 5 out of 5

    A.R

    This book was fantastic. Non stop action, betrayal, growth and more. A massive battle at the end that fits the series, enourmous sacrifice and loss, everything is just oh so good. The author did an excellent job bringing everyone's stories together and giving a fitting end to....well everything. Plotlines I thought would be left alone were closed, things happening right up to the final pages. Seriously, almost this entire book, definitely at least the last half feels like one massive climax. This book was fantastic. Non stop action, betrayal, growth and more. A massive battle at the end that fits the series, enourmous sacrifice and loss, everything is just oh so good. The author did an excellent job bringing everyone's stories together and giving a fitting end to....well everything. Plotlines I thought would be left alone were closed, things happening right up to the final pages. Seriously, almost this entire book, definitely at least the last half feels like one massive climax.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jamftw

    TLDR : One of my fav books serie of the last few years. Reread the serie in preparation of the outcoming third book. Really enjoyed the first as well as the second one (which didnt disappoint!), so let's just say that I was waiting the third and last book with open arms. Well, I loved it. I usually dont write reviews, english not being my mother tongue, but I liked it so much, that I felt it deserved praised. More often than not, fantasy series stumble on the final books, for the ending is always TLDR : One of my fav books serie of the last few years. Reread the serie in preparation of the outcoming third book. Really enjoyed the first as well as the second one (which didnt disappoint!), so let's just say that I was waiting the third and last book with open arms. Well, I loved it. I usually dont write reviews, english not being my mother tongue, but I liked it so much, that I felt it deserved praised. More often than not, fantasy series stumble on the final books, for the ending is always the hardest part, especially when the previous ones were good. Wasnt the case here. Ruka's journey and story was great, and the ending, I found, fitting. Shed some tears for the son of Beyla and his mighty deeds. Well, nothing more to say, just read the damn book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I absolutely loved this series and hope the author keeps writing. The whole trilogy was well written, unique, and engaging. I would recommend this series to anyone that likes fantasy.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Koeur

    Rating: 4.4/5 Review: The author redeems this series after #2's epic failure and picks up the pace where war and strife collide for reasons still unknown to me. Paradise? Doesn't really sound like it. The Barbarians didn't have it so bad, just depends on perspective. I liked how the story line diverged across this known world, following the main characters through to the end. The Son of Heaven was well written, so much that I enjoyed his demise. Dala is still mostly a dipshjt but also finds redemp Rating: 4.4/5 Review: The author redeems this series after #2's epic failure and picks up the pace where war and strife collide for reasons still unknown to me. Paradise? Doesn't really sound like it. The Barbarians didn't have it so bad, just depends on perspective. I liked how the story line diverged across this known world, following the main characters through to the end. The Son of Heaven was well written, so much that I enjoyed his demise. Dala is still mostly a dipshjt but also finds redemption by acting rather than directing. I don't get the author's penchant for traitorous women. For example, Lani. Really, she was scummier than the killing and plotting perpetrated by the King's sister. At least Kikay was never in denial of her shortcomings and was fully aware of actions taken. Lani grew up with Kale, supposedly loved him deeply, bore his son and was killed by Ruka. Lani gets all hot and misty eyed for Ruka while holding him blah, blah, blah. She wants to help the poor and displaced with her boundless love but is mired in her own hypocrisy. Really, she should have been flung from a trebuchet into shark infested waters. The epilogue did this series no favors. This vast world has yet to be explored and Ruka's ending really spoiled what may become an expanded series. Much like the temporal back-and-forthing we saw in the first novel this undermines any heightened enjoyment through unknown discovery. Now we know the Fuka makes it through. Still, dam good writing and a great story line, just don't let all the grammatical errors get in the way.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Ell

    A satisfying and imaginative conclusion to this trilogy (No spoilers) I love Ruka's character. Incredibly multifaceted and relatable. The story ends in a satisfying and action-filled finale. The only thing is that I would've like to read more about Ando but and felt that the last third of the book was a little rushed. But I'm still very satisfied. Please keep writing! This is an author whom I will be following very closely. A satisfying and imaginative conclusion to this trilogy (No spoilers) I love Ruka's character. Incredibly multifaceted and relatable. The story ends in a satisfying and action-filled finale. The only thing is that I would've like to read more about Ando but and felt that the last third of the book was a little rushed. But I'm still very satisfied. Please keep writing! This is an author whom I will be following very closely.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Arundeepak Jayaseelan

    Perfect Ending to the best Anti-Hero character I've read so far... When I first saw that the book was only 430 pages I immeduately felt panic and had flashbacks about Game of Thrones Season 8. What if the author rushed or ruined the ending of one of my favourite Grimdark fantasy series ?? But that's definitely not the case. Richard wrapped up the trilogy nice and easy. Not only Ruka, all the character's arcs were done spectacularly. SPOILERS BELOW: And I'm ending this review with a quote from this Perfect Ending to the best Anti-Hero character I've read so far... When I first saw that the book was only 430 pages I immeduately felt panic and had flashbacks about Game of Thrones Season 8. What if the author rushed or ruined the ending of one of my favourite Grimdark fantasy series ?? But that's definitely not the case. Richard wrapped up the trilogy nice and easy. Not only Ruka, all the character's arcs were done spectacularly. SPOILERS BELOW: And I'm ending this review with a quote from this book which sums up Ruka's journey perfectly in the Ash and Sand trilogy "Here lies Ruka, son of Beyla, who could see in darkness, yet sought the light"

  28. 4 out of 5

    Torje

    Wow!!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sergiu

    Incredible trilogy, fantastically well written and constructed. The ending feels incomplete, which will hopefully compel the author to produce more books of this wonderful world. Highly recommended!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam Wheeler

    A fantastic culmination to a great series. Ruka is one of the most interesting characters in all of fantasy and his story should not be missed!

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