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Flying Kites

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Flying Kites is a collaborative project at Stanford University's Graphic Novel Project. Flying Kites is a collaborative project at Stanford University's Graphic Novel Project.


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Flying Kites is a collaborative project at Stanford University's Graphic Novel Project. Flying Kites is a collaborative project at Stanford University's Graphic Novel Project.

14 review for Flying Kites

  1. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    My friend Peter (co) wrote this! And Maybe I'll use it in school. My friend Peter (co) wrote this! And Maybe I'll use it in school.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ecaterina

    Loved seeing this important social movement covered.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    Jackie's pick for March 2020, but our dinner was cancelled bc of Covid shutdown. It was okay. I was expecting something a little more powerful and gritty. I didn't feel like it was raw enough. I never quite got the desperate feeling they were trying to convey. For example, for the four heads of the four warring crime families to come together and cooperate in a hunger strike to protest prison conditions is a pretty surprising turn of events, but it didn't feel all that dramatic in the book. The p Jackie's pick for March 2020, but our dinner was cancelled bc of Covid shutdown. It was okay. I was expecting something a little more powerful and gritty. I didn't feel like it was raw enough. I never quite got the desperate feeling they were trying to convey. For example, for the four heads of the four warring crime families to come together and cooperate in a hunger strike to protest prison conditions is a pretty surprising turn of events, but it didn't feel all that dramatic in the book. The prison guards were presented as jerks, caricatures of the "evil prison guard". I don't doubt that they were exactly that awful in their treatment of the prisoners. But why were they like that? Could the authors have cited another Stanford project, Dr. Phillip Zimbardo's 1971 Stanford Prison experiment, to explain it? Excerpts from the book "Unbroken" describes the prison guards who exact cruel punishments on their prisoners, and offers reasons why they acted that way. Part of the comic is about Luz and her relationship with her incarcerated father, Rodrigo. Their relationship becomes strained when Luz finds out that Rodrigo plagiarized a passage from a book in his letter to her, which is played out in a scene where Luz accuses Rodrigo of lying to her. But what about the murder that got Rodrigo convicted in the first place? We are supposed to feel sympathy for Rodrigo when he is unreasonably classified as a gang member, but where is his feeling of responsibility or regret for the crime that got him committed? One thing I learned from this comic was that the United Nations has determined that keeping a person in solitary confinement more than 14 days amounts to torture, yet some of the prisoners had been held in solitary confinement for YEARS. In Flying Kites, there's mention of how isolation permanently affects the mind, and I'm reminded that many people outside of the prison system are similarly isolated, ie elderly shut-ins, etc. One section that I thought worked particularly well was the way the comic depicted the repetition and "drudging monotony of solitary confinement" when first you see Rodrigo's activity in eight squares, then the same activity in 32 squares, then in 128 squares. Very impactful! A graphic novel that I highly recommend is "A Fire Story" by Brian Fies. In it, he describes surviving the 2017 North Bay fires, and what it's like to rebuild your life in its aftermath. Another graphic novel I liked is "The Best We Could Do" by Thi Bui. It's a memoir her family’s escape from war-torn Vietnam to an indifferent USA. It was required reading for incoming students at UofO in 2018. Also, I don't think I even knew where Pelican Bay state prison was located, which is probably why this fun story from one of my favorite SF Chronicle writers, Beth Spotswood, caught my eye. She writes about finding a beautiful beach in the shadows of San Quentin prison. She briefly mentions that she headed over to San Quentin inspired by her father, who was noticeably affected by recent volunteer work in the prison, aka “Q". Here's a link to her story from 3/5/2020: https://datebook.sfchronicle.com/ente... fin.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Linguomancer

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ariana

  6. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

  7. 4 out of 5

    H R Venkatesh

  8. 4 out of 5

    Juliet

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jude

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tory

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jackie De Anda

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Vacek

  13. 5 out of 5

    B Williams

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shelby Bocks

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