hits counter The Poetry and Short Stories of Dorothy Parker (Modern Library) - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Poetry and Short Stories of Dorothy Parker (Modern Library)

Availability: Ready to download


Compare

30 review for The Poetry and Short Stories of Dorothy Parker (Modern Library)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I'm not a big fan of poetry in general--with a few exceptions to that. Dorothy Parker is number one on that list. Not concerned with social etiquette at the time, she spoke her mind, and her writings clearly exhibit this trait. A prime example on her take of relationships: SOCIAL NOTE "Lady, lady, should you meet One whose ways are all discreet, One who murmurs that his wife Is the lodestar of his life, One who keeps assuring you That he never was untrue, Never loved another one . . . Lady, lady, better I'm not a big fan of poetry in general--with a few exceptions to that. Dorothy Parker is number one on that list. Not concerned with social etiquette at the time, she spoke her mind, and her writings clearly exhibit this trait. A prime example on her take of relationships: SOCIAL NOTE "Lady, lady, should you meet One whose ways are all discreet, One who murmurs that his wife Is the lodestar of his life, One who keeps assuring you That he never was untrue, Never loved another one . . . Lady, lady, better run!"

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zweegas

    The poetry is not only clever and brilliant, it's genius. This is the best poetry in the English language. All of the short stories are good and several of the short stories achieve greatness. Big Blonde and Glory In The Daytime are a couple of my personal favorites upon first read-through. All of the short stories have some thread of classism connecting them, followed by the themes of gender and relationships and a little bit of racism thrown in for good measure. Sometimes the themes and the sat The poetry is not only clever and brilliant, it's genius. This is the best poetry in the English language. All of the short stories are good and several of the short stories achieve greatness. Big Blonde and Glory In The Daytime are a couple of my personal favorites upon first read-through. All of the short stories have some thread of classism connecting them, followed by the themes of gender and relationships and a little bit of racism thrown in for good measure. Sometimes the themes and the satirical way they're presented seems a little heavy-handed -- Horsie and Clothe The Naked, etc. -- which is not that they aren't good, but they can induce cringing. On the surface, it's not blood and guts and war and sex but these are difficult topics nevertheless. The underlying violence is subverted with humor. Ultimately, I don't consider Dorothy Parker's work to be humorous. Clever yes, funny no. I don't know if the themes relate to the fundamental human condition or if Dorothy Parker and I are just kindred mordant souls, but I relate to the whole book as if I had written it all myself (if I were a literary genius, that is). I know I've said that I didn't believe in such a thing as literary genius, but Dorothy Parker has changed my mind.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I discovered Ms. Parker through the movie starring Bridgette Fonda called Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle, I think it was- about the writers who used to meet at the Algonquin Hotel, among whom Dorothy Parker was a fixture/leader. I then re-discovered her thanks to a college poetry class where I had to do a lengthy biography type project on her, and I became fascinated. She led a fascinating, if tragic, life, and her quick wit and sharp tongue show through in much of her writing. Her poetry is I discovered Ms. Parker through the movie starring Bridgette Fonda called Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle, I think it was- about the writers who used to meet at the Algonquin Hotel, among whom Dorothy Parker was a fixture/leader. I then re-discovered her thanks to a college poetry class where I had to do a lengthy biography type project on her, and I became fascinated. She led a fascinating, if tragic, life, and her quick wit and sharp tongue show through in much of her writing. Her poetry is by turns touching and amusing. I quite enjoyed reading everything that she has written, from the poems, to the stories, to the book reviews.

  4. 5 out of 5

    B. Graves

    I really love her writing. It's hard and strong and cynical at a time when women really weren't any of those things.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marcie

    I have read this book cover to cover, over and over. I carry it or a version with me at most times. I've passed on copies to those who wish to understand me. Mrs. Parker wrote with the wit that could cut through the most pretentious of subjects. Her musings inspire me as well as comfort me. I am nothing like the author in my writing style. I could only aspire to be. It makes me happy to know that she existed and wrote a few words to prove it. Rest your soul, you beautiful woman.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenniffer

    Dorothy Parker is one of the most overlooked, underated writers of her era. It is so sad that when I mention her name to someone 9 times out of 10 they only recognize "Men rarely make passes at girls who wear glasses." To reduce a writer of such wit, poetry and great dialogue to one or two sarcastic quotes is truly sad.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Duckie

    A few sparkling turns of phrase won't disguise the fact that this is a compendium of works about people being generally horrible to each other. Even considering that Parker has a distinctive voice and that this approach was unusual for women authors of the time -- still, you know, there it is.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    She is undoubtedly an excellent writer and her characterizations are brilliant in their brevity and wealth of information conveyed. Unfortunately she is not the author for me because her poems are nearly all on the subject of depression or love and all her characters are unsympathetic.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Renetta

    Dorothy Parker is my favorite poet. She was dark and lonely and we've all been there. I would have loved to have sat, just one night, with the Algonquin Round Table. I have always had an appreciation for wordplay and clever wit. When they asked her to use the word horticulture in a sentence she immediately replied, "You can lead a 'whore to culture' but you can't make her think." I read somewhere that she's never made a spelling error or a mistake in sentence structure. I wouldn't want to know h Dorothy Parker is my favorite poet. She was dark and lonely and we've all been there. I would have loved to have sat, just one night, with the Algonquin Round Table. I have always had an appreciation for wordplay and clever wit. When they asked her to use the word horticulture in a sentence she immediately replied, "You can lead a 'whore to culture' but you can't make her think." I read somewhere that she's never made a spelling error or a mistake in sentence structure. I wouldn't want to know how many I've made in this short review! Résumé Razors pain you, Rivers are damp, Acids stain you, And drugs cause cramp. Guns aren't lawful, Nooses give, Gas smells awful. You might as well live. Symptom Recital I do not like my state of mind; I'm bitter, querulous, unkind. I hate my legs, I hate my hands, I do not yearn for lovelier lands. I dread the dawn's recurrent light; I hate to go to bed at night. I snoot at simple, earnest folk. I cannot take the gentlest joke. I find no peace in paint or type. My world is but a lot of tripe. I'm disillusioned, empty-breasted. For what I think, I'd be arrested. I am not sick, I am not well. My quondam dreams are shot to hell. My soul is crushed, my spirit sore; I do not like me any more. I cavil, quarrel, grumble, grouse. I ponder on the narrow house. I shudder at the thought of men, I'm due to fall in love again.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Fei Fei

    Changed my life as a teenager. I Know I Have Been Happiest I know I have been happiest by your side But what’s done is done, an all’s to be And small the good of lingering dolefully Gaily it lived, and gallantly it died I will not make you songs of hearts denied And you, being man, would have no tears of me And should I offer you fidelity You’d be, I think, a little terrified Yet this need of woman, this her curse To range her little gifts, and give, and give Because the throb of giving’s sweet to bear To yo Changed my life as a teenager. I Know I Have Been Happiest I know I have been happiest by your side But what’s done is done, an all’s to be And small the good of lingering dolefully Gaily it lived, and gallantly it died I will not make you songs of hearts denied And you, being man, would have no tears of me And should I offer you fidelity You’d be, I think, a little terrified Yet this need of woman, this her curse To range her little gifts, and give, and give Because the throb of giving’s sweet to bear To you, who never begged me vows nor verse My gift shall be my absence, while I live; After that, my dear, I cannot swear. Dorothy Parker

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tricia

    I adore her as a literary figure, and know that her writing doesn't quite live up to her image. I liked the explanation of her limitations in the movie (Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle), basically that she never got over her mother's death and it created a mental and creative block that she could never quite overcome. Makes sense. She herself is a loveably tragic figure, and her poems inspired me to write a decent poem in high school, and goddammit, she helped found the New Yorker, in all its I adore her as a literary figure, and know that her writing doesn't quite live up to her image. I liked the explanation of her limitations in the movie (Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle), basically that she never got over her mother's death and it created a mental and creative block that she could never quite overcome. Makes sense. She herself is a loveably tragic figure, and her poems inspired me to write a decent poem in high school, and goddammit, she helped found the New Yorker, in all its pretentious bliss, so god bless.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    I'm not a big fan of poetry, so the first half of the book didn't appeal to me much. And they got to be a bit repetitive. But, she has a unique style and was able to really make me experience what she was trying to portray. As for the stories, they were interesting in a social commentary sort of way. She had a few favorite themes that the stories seemed to revolve around, which also got a bit repetitive. Overall, though, I really admire her for writing the way she did and saying the things she s I'm not a big fan of poetry, so the first half of the book didn't appeal to me much. And they got to be a bit repetitive. But, she has a unique style and was able to really make me experience what she was trying to portray. As for the stories, they were interesting in a social commentary sort of way. She had a few favorite themes that the stories seemed to revolve around, which also got a bit repetitive. Overall, though, I really admire her for writing the way she did and saying the things she said - very unusual for a woman in the 1930s.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A must-read for any young lady finding her way in the world.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Re-read of one of my favorites as a teen. Still amazing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cvillejon

    Dorothy Parker is brilliant.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    "three be the things I shall never attain: envy, content, and sufficient champagne." I love this woman.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    I don't mind That her poems rhyme.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    More like 6 or 7 stars. To those for whom Dorothy Parker’s reputation proceeds itself, there’s an expectation of wit and tragedy and laughing at dark things, and of course there’s lots and lots of that (and it’s amazing). But having not read her stories in some time, the equally notable aspect (and one that’s aged really, really well) is her hatred for injustice and outrage toward those who’d inflict it. There are black characters fending off microaggressions (“Arrangement in Black and White”), More like 6 or 7 stars. To those for whom Dorothy Parker’s reputation proceeds itself, there’s an expectation of wit and tragedy and laughing at dark things, and of course there’s lots and lots of that (and it’s amazing). But having not read her stories in some time, the equally notable aspect (and one that’s aged really, really well) is her hatred for injustice and outrage toward those who’d inflict it. There are black characters fending off microaggressions (“Arrangement in Black and White”), there are intelligent gay characters trying to help out their friends (“Glory in the Daytime”), empathy toward a young woman who wants to get an abortion (“Mr. Durant”), empathy towards those who struggle with alcoholism (“Big Blonde” tragically, “You Were Perfectly Fine” mirthfully), and a whole lot of satirizing rich idiots (“The Custard Heart,” notably, and how about this description from “Little Curtis”: “She gave him her nickel with the manner of one presenting a park to a city.”). I remembered the monologues and soliloquies as all being a little long, but perhaps age has given me more insight into these, because I found “Sentiment” heart-wrenching (“...When it ends, only those places where you have known sorrow are kindly toward you. If you revisit scenes of your happiness, your heart must burst of its agony.”) and “The Little Hours” hilarious, and all of them left me wanting more. There’s no one like Dorothy Parker, and no reader who shouldn’t give her work a try.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Allan MacDonell

    The content of the Dorothy Parker anthology The Poetry and Short Stories of Dorothy Parker is divided roughly in half. The first portion [spoiler] collects three what might have been called slim and were certainly toned volumes of Parker’s poetry. Most of these verses rhyme out the eternal disappointments of women who bone cads. If you judge the lyrics of Lou Reed as pretty great, you may recognize that Dorothy Parker’s wry poetic laments are a step up from Reed’s trenchant odes. The Poetry and The content of the Dorothy Parker anthology The Poetry and Short Stories of Dorothy Parker is divided roughly in half. The first portion [spoiler] collects three what might have been called slim and were certainly toned volumes of Parker’s poetry. Most of these verses rhyme out the eternal disappointments of women who bone cads. If you judge the lyrics of Lou Reed as pretty great, you may recognize that Dorothy Parker’s wry poetic laments are a step up from Reed’s trenchant odes. The Poetry and Short Stories of Dorothy Parker ends after an onslaught of short fiction that sees the existential dread of any smoky French consumptive and raises it to perfect tragicomedy. Nowhere else is depth and weight so deftly disguised as enjoyment light and superficial. Read it and don’t weep.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Nicholas

    I like the poetry more than the stories, but both are great.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    Sparkling cider, sparkling wit, sparkling Parker - this is a fun and fresh despite when it was written.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ali Cherek

    Second only to Oscar Wilde among the smartass literati. I adore her.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I never did like reviewing poetry. I think the experience is a personal one, each word singing to a different part of you at that time in your life. Take for instance this quote of Parker's, "You can take a whore to culture, but you can't make her think." When I was younger I thought it was significant and telling of the women around me, my station in life in total. Now...now I just think the line is funny as hell. You can see poetry for it's beauty, amused by it's often rhythmic cadence, and ca I never did like reviewing poetry. I think the experience is a personal one, each word singing to a different part of you at that time in your life. Take for instance this quote of Parker's, "You can take a whore to culture, but you can't make her think." When I was younger I thought it was significant and telling of the women around me, my station in life in total. Now...now I just think the line is funny as hell. You can see poetry for it's beauty, amused by it's often rhythmic cadence, and carry on without it ever entering your soul. And then there are times when it is so much more. When it sings to the deepest part of you and all you can do is smile or cry because someone, somewhere, has felt exactly like you feel in this exact moment. It pushes you to be present. To be here, to feel it complete, now. With that all said, here are two of my favorite poems of Parker's: Song in a Minor Key There's a place I know where the birds swing low, And wayward vines go roaming, Where the lilacs nod, and a marble god Is pale, in scented gloaming. And at sunset there comes a lady fair Whose eyes are deep with yearning. By an old, old gate does the lady wait Her own true love's returning. But the days go by, and the lilacs die, And trembling birds seek cover; Yet the lady stands, with her long white hands Held out to greet her lover. And it's there she'll stay till the shadowy day A monument they grave her. She will always wait by the same old gate, -- The gate her true love gave her. * Inventory "Four be the things I am wiser to know: Idleness, sorrow, a friend, and a foe. Four be the things I'd been better without: Love, curiosity, freckles, and doubt. Three be the things I shall never attain: Envy, content, and sufficient champagne. Three be the things I shall have till I die: Laughter and hope and a sock in the eye.”

  24. 4 out of 5

    Art

    Fun and amusing light verse. Sometimes wistful, thoughtful and even romantic. Dorothy Parker, born 1893, was the daughter of a Scottish Presbyterian mother and a strict Jewish father. After her father died in 1913, Parker started playing piano at a dance school. Then she began writing light verse. Vanity Fair was delighted with her work and made her the drama critic. Parker left the monthly in 1925 when a new weekly began, The New Yorker, where she stayed for thirty years. Then she wrote book re Fun and amusing light verse. Sometimes wistful, thoughtful and even romantic. Dorothy Parker, born 1893, was the daughter of a Scottish Presbyterian mother and a strict Jewish father. After her father died in 1913, Parker started playing piano at a dance school. Then she began writing light verse. Vanity Fair was delighted with her work and made her the drama critic. Parker left the monthly in 1925 when a new weekly began, The New Yorker, where she stayed for thirty years. Then she wrote book reviews for Esquire. Meanwhile, from 1919-29, Parker enjoyed her status as the wittiest member and one of the few women at the Algonquin Round Table, an informal gathering of friends and writers. Parker was regarded as the funniest woman of her time. "Here We Are," Dorothy Parker's short story of 1931, takes the stage in November. Love Stories, three one-act plays, takes a four-week run this fall: http://milwaukeechambertheatre.com/pe...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Luz C. Johnson

    I read Dorothy Parker (1893-1967) many years ago. I was very young then, and a lot of her writing didn’t have any meaning to me. Now –fifteen years later and a couple of divorces under my belt –well... her writing rings a bell. It has been said that stories create the gods, goddesses and poetry, and not the other way around. Both, her poetry and her stories, have a distinctive sense of humour which touches the soul. Dorothy Parker discovers the irony, sarcasm, and laughable side of women’s heart I read Dorothy Parker (1893-1967) many years ago. I was very young then, and a lot of her writing didn’t have any meaning to me. Now –fifteen years later and a couple of divorces under my belt –well... her writing rings a bell. It has been said that stories create the gods, goddesses and poetry, and not the other way around. Both, her poetry and her stories, have a distinctive sense of humour which touches the soul. Dorothy Parker discovers the irony, sarcasm, and laughable side of women’s heartfelt sorrows in an unexpected tidy, clean, cunning, witty economy of words. For instance: INDIAN SUMMER In youth, it was a way I had To do my best to please, And change, with every passing lad, To suit his theories. But now I know the things I know, And do the things I do; And if you do not like me so, To hell, my love, with you! --Dorothy Parker [Brilliant!]

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kori Morris

    Dorothy Parker never hesitated to use her sharp wit, and my life is the better for it. If you've never read any of her works, I'll show my favorite small poem by her and hopefully hook you - because it's all worth a read. 'Resume' Razors pain you; Rivers are damp; Acids stain you; And drugs cause cramp; Guns aren't lawful; Nooses give; Gas smells awful; You might as well live.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Johan Martin

    Enjoyed the short stories more than the poetry. Loved the sarcastic wit. "Mrs. Bain cried a little in pauses in the conversation. She had always cried easily and often. Yet in spite of the years of practice, she did not do it well." "Oh, it's easy to be sweet to people before you love them.". "Solitude is the safeguard of mediocrity and the stern companion of genius." Thanks Rachel for the recommendation.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Phillip

    went back and re-read a few stories and poems i had never gotten around to - great stuff. some of the stories are a bit dated in terms of structure and prose style, but i do appreciate what she did to bring a feminine perspective into early 20th century writing. and the girl is funny! when she's on, she's dynamite.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I love her! She's so cynical and angry, and the couples are always fighting and twisting eachother's words. Even though I definitely don't want to see life the way she did, I am glad she did because I enjoy it so much. My favorite short stroy is "The Sexes" and "A Telephone Call" and my favorite poems are "Men", "There Was One", and "Inscription for the Ceiling of a Bedroom"

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gemma

    I'm enjoying her, thus far, but the poems are a bit less caustic and a bit more men-obsessed than I was somehow anticipating. The stories feel a little more sophisticated, fun, modernist social satire.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.