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The Little Yellow Book: Quotations from Chairman Xi Dada (over-tone collection Book 1)

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300+ quotations in 182 pages, from one of the most powerful men in the world today. It also includes the story of "Xi Dada", a foreword, more than thirty notes, plus songs and poems. Out of hundreds of speeches, press releases and news, the authors curated this "best of" covering a choice of subjects since the first moment Xi Jinping assumed office, back in the winter of 2 300+ quotations in 182 pages, from one of the most powerful men in the world today. It also includes the story of "Xi Dada", a foreword, more than thirty notes, plus songs and poems. Out of hundreds of speeches, press releases and news, the authors curated this "best of" covering a choice of subjects since the first moment Xi Jinping assumed office, back in the winter of 2012, until December of 2018. An attempt at composition, with close-ups and a real-time camera running approach, about the true intentions of China’s leader.


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300+ quotations in 182 pages, from one of the most powerful men in the world today. It also includes the story of "Xi Dada", a foreword, more than thirty notes, plus songs and poems. Out of hundreds of speeches, press releases and news, the authors curated this "best of" covering a choice of subjects since the first moment Xi Jinping assumed office, back in the winter of 2 300+ quotations in 182 pages, from one of the most powerful men in the world today. It also includes the story of "Xi Dada", a foreword, more than thirty notes, plus songs and poems. Out of hundreds of speeches, press releases and news, the authors curated this "best of" covering a choice of subjects since the first moment Xi Jinping assumed office, back in the winter of 2012, until December of 2018. An attempt at composition, with close-ups and a real-time camera running approach, about the true intentions of China’s leader.

8 review for The Little Yellow Book: Quotations from Chairman Xi Dada (over-tone collection Book 1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Walt Giersbach

    Approaching the subject of China, the middle kingdom, or any of its parts is a daunting task because of the millennia of history it represents. Yet, in Quotations from Chairman Xi Dada, Julie O’Yang has carved out a small piece of history, politics and current culture of its Great Leader in one small 181-page book devoted to the published thoughts of President Xi Jinping. O’Yang’s book title, and that of Xi, comes from a blogger who in 2012 added to Xi’s titles — President, General Secretary of t Approaching the subject of China, the middle kingdom, or any of its parts is a daunting task because of the millennia of history it represents. Yet, in Quotations from Chairman Xi Dada, Julie O’Yang has carved out a small piece of history, politics and current culture of its Great Leader in one small 181-page book devoted to the published thoughts of President Xi Jinping. O’Yang’s book title, and that of Xi, comes from a blogger who in 2012 added to Xi’s titles — President, General Secretary of the Communist Party, and Chairman of the Central Military Commission — Xi Dada. Dada is a colloquial term “used in certain Chinese regions for father or grandpa. It is used almost exclusively informally and conveys a sense of family, closeness and respect,” states Richard Li, a blogger in Sydney, Australia. The nickname certainly makes him less formidable and more a man of the people. As Chairman Mao Zedong is immortalized in his Little Red Book of thoughts, Xi’s — or O’Yang’s — Little Yellow Book is seen through a collection of the Chairman’s statements. O’Yang organizes the book into 24 chapters, from Socialism and the Communist Party (chapters I and II) to Toilet Revolution, Former Leaders, Spirituality, and Upclose and Personal (chapters XXVI through XXIX) In those chapters are quotes on socialist politics, innovation, space, foreign leaders and the sort of things a political leader might ponder during quiet moments among friends. Is this insightful? Certainly. Xi is portrayed in many dimensions, which may come as a surprise to Westerners interpreting China through a very narrow political lens of daily media. As a reader, I was surprised to see a thoughtful, literate man who bears little resemblance to the two-dimensional caricatures portrayed in America’s daily media. Currently, China is going through a process of molding its people. This week’s news stories focus on eliminating “effeminate” earrings and tattoos from men. Social media that run counter to a party line are shut down. Entire cultures, like the Uighur Muslims of the Xinjiang province, are being imprisoned for their religion and possible threat to Communism. Xi has said, “We absolutely will not allow anybody, any organization, any political party, at any time and in any form, to split any part of the Chinese territory.” Words are the life-blood of politicians, but their actions speak a greater truth. And people are dying because of those words. Curiously, O’Yang exposes a softer side to Xi, one cognizant of art, literature, innovation, culture and the environment, but these qualities are dedicated in service to the party and its “correct” regimented line of thinking. This is “Chinese Socialism.” It’s not difficult to imagine an American political leader waxing philosophical prior to retirement and the reflection of age. Chairman Xi is nowhere near retirement as the National People’s Congress removed presidential term limits in 2018. It is instructive to see Xi quoted, saying, “We cannot lose even one inch of the territory left behind by our ancestors. What is other people’s, we do not want at all.” (Whew! The Taiwanese and those islands occupying Southeast Asia will be pleased to learn that.) Hong Kong and Macau may still see concerns on the horizon. Xi’s statements on the Belt and Road initiative show recognition of the Silk Road economically, culturally and historically and China’s growing relationship to Europe and Africa. In sum, this collection of Xi’s writings are interesting, but they belie actions now taking place and the manifest destiny that drives China’s leadership. Does Ms. O’Yang have an agenda as an author? If she does, it’s not apparent. Certainly, she knows her subject, having grown up in China, living for awhile then in Japan, and currently a resident of the Netherlands. It helps too that she’s multilingual. Quotations from Chairman Xi Dada is insightful and well-edited, but it is elusive if you are trying to find a truth in the leader’s words.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James Dante

    I originally reviewed this in Asia Literary Review under web exclusives. The Wisdom of Mao - Lite ‘We have yellow skin and black hair. We are called the descendants of the dragon,’ Xi Jinping told Donald Trump during the American president’s 2017 visit to Beijing. A Westerner might have trouble deciding whether Xi’s remark was intended as profound or just amusing, but hesitation in the reader’s judgement is part of the ride through this 160-page collection of quotes and excerpts from the mind of I originally reviewed this in Asia Literary Review under web exclusives. The Wisdom of Mao - Lite ‘We have yellow skin and black hair. We are called the descendants of the dragon,’ Xi Jinping told Donald Trump during the American president’s 2017 visit to Beijing. A Westerner might have trouble deciding whether Xi’s remark was intended as profound or just amusing, but hesitation in the reader’s judgement is part of the ride through this 160-page collection of quotes and excerpts from the mind of China’s current leader. The release of The Little Yellow Book: Quotations from Chairman Xi Dada, edited by Julie O’Yang, couldn’t have been timed better. While Americans fear the possibility of China’s ascendancy, the Chinese themselves grow anxious about the slowing economy and the increasing dominance of the Communist Party over their lives. The Chairman says, ‘I want to press the like button for our great Chinese people.’ Some might find this one-liner unsettling in era when old-fashioned propaganda and censorship meet Wi-Fi. The book opens with an explanation of the title. ‘Dada’ is a colloquial way of saying ‘Father’ in Northwest China, Xi Jinping’s birthplace. The Communist Party has used the expression to describe its leader since 2012. O’Yang exposes an ongoing attempt to establish a cult of personality around Xi, which includes a quiz show about the leader’s life. We even get a sense of his personal likes and dislikes. The promotion of Xi as the nation’s father figure, one who’s tough but with a tender heart would, naturally, give him more legitimacy in defining the country’s values and goals. The Little Yellow Book is organized by areas of interest such as the economy, international relations, human rights, culture, the media and corruption. The tone ranges from bureaucratic to fortune cookie and is at times peculiar. About the Communist Party, Xi tells us, ‘Our ideals and principles are like “calcium” for every Communist Party member. If we cease to have our ideas and principals, if they are not firm, it will cause spiritual “calcium deficiency” and we will be ill.’ It might, however, be the pithier quotes that most concern people both outside and inside the PRC: ‘We must dare to rule, dare to be in charge and dare to dazzle the enemy’s eye with our sword.’ Xi Jinping frequently reminds the people that the state’s official ideology is ‘socialism with Chinese characteristics.’ This suggests that Marx and Lenin share the podium with Mao and Deng. In a departure from Mao Zedong, they also need to make room for Confucius. But ‘Chinese characteristics’ is not clearly defined until the section on the economy and industry. Xi seeks to reverse some of the liberalisation that took place under Deng. He plans to expand state-owned enterprises and to ‘establish Party organization in small enterprises and even private enterprises.’ Xi regards the collapse of the Communist Party in the former Soviet Union as a warning for China, and he’s determined to maintain Party control over the military. There are, on the other hand, times when Dada is telling us what we want to hear. Xi’s stated commitment to the environment is intended to give us hope. He proclaims, ‘We would rather give up on money than give in to pollution,’ and he insists that a people must ‘protect one’s environment just like protecting one’s eyes!’ The Chairman also, for obvious reasons, wants to end the trade war with the United States. He goes further by denouncing any ‘Cold War mentality’ and rejecting the argument that China pursues hegemony. Instead, China will work toward ‘a new model of win-win and cooperation.’ It’s up to the reader to judge whether this collection provides insight into China’s future or focuses mostly on an understanding of Xi’s personality. In the end, one might interpret attempts to depict Chairman Xi as Mao-like as a sign of the leadership’s insecurity. An analyst working in The White House should have highlighter in hand when reading this book, especially at the part when Xi describes Putin as his ‘best, most intimate friend.’ Don’t expect The Little Yellow Book to have the same influence that Mao’s Little Red Book had on American universities in the 1960s. But people can take some comfort in knowing that they’re not reading the words of a mass murderer. On a personal note, I agree with the Chairman’s assertion that a wise nation must be willing to ‘fight tigers as well as flies.’ Who would argue with that?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Eloy

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rui Feng

  6. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marshal

  8. 4 out of 5

    Giselle Nath

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