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The Prom: A Novel Based on the Hit Broadway Musical

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Seventeen-year-old Emma Nolan wants only one thing before she graduates: to dance with her girlfriend at the senior prom. But in her small town of Edgewater, Indiana, that's like asking for the moon. Alyssa Greene is her high school's "it" girl: popular, head of the student council, and daughter of the PTA president. She also has a secret. She's been dating Emma for the las Seventeen-year-old Emma Nolan wants only one thing before she graduates: to dance with her girlfriend at the senior prom. But in her small town of Edgewater, Indiana, that's like asking for the moon. Alyssa Greene is her high school's "it" girl: popular, head of the student council, and daughter of the PTA president. She also has a secret. She's been dating Emma for the last year and a half. When word gets out that Emma plans to bring a girl as her date, it stirs a community-wide uproar that spirals out of control. Now, the PTA, led by Alyssa's mother, is threatening to cancel the prom altogether. Enter Barry Glickman and Dee Dee Allen, two Broadway has-beens who see Emma's story as the perfect opportunity to restore their place in the limelight. But when they arrive in Indiana to fight on Emma's behalf, their good intentions go quickly south. Between Emma facing the fray head-on, Alyssa wavering about coming out, and Barry and Dee Dee basking in all the attention, it's the perfect prom storm. Only when this unlikely group comes together do they realize that love is always worth fighting for.


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Seventeen-year-old Emma Nolan wants only one thing before she graduates: to dance with her girlfriend at the senior prom. But in her small town of Edgewater, Indiana, that's like asking for the moon. Alyssa Greene is her high school's "it" girl: popular, head of the student council, and daughter of the PTA president. She also has a secret. She's been dating Emma for the las Seventeen-year-old Emma Nolan wants only one thing before she graduates: to dance with her girlfriend at the senior prom. But in her small town of Edgewater, Indiana, that's like asking for the moon. Alyssa Greene is her high school's "it" girl: popular, head of the student council, and daughter of the PTA president. She also has a secret. She's been dating Emma for the last year and a half. When word gets out that Emma plans to bring a girl as her date, it stirs a community-wide uproar that spirals out of control. Now, the PTA, led by Alyssa's mother, is threatening to cancel the prom altogether. Enter Barry Glickman and Dee Dee Allen, two Broadway has-beens who see Emma's story as the perfect opportunity to restore their place in the limelight. But when they arrive in Indiana to fight on Emma's behalf, their good intentions go quickly south. Between Emma facing the fray head-on, Alyssa wavering about coming out, and Barry and Dee Dee basking in all the attention, it's the perfect prom storm. Only when this unlikely group comes together do they realize that love is always worth fighting for.

30 review for The Prom: A Novel Based on the Hit Broadway Musical

  1. 4 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    This was an interesting mixture of fluffy and frothy...but with some serious content matter. I received the paperback for review so I didn't actually know it was a Broadway musical adaption. Once I realised that, the style made sense. It's extremely "telling" instead of showing, fast-paced, and doesn't delve very deep. Basically it's like Queer Eye x Broadway, where a gay teen just wants to go to prom with her girlfriend but the town is outraged and some failed Broadway stars come "fix" everythi This was an interesting mixture of fluffy and frothy...but with some serious content matter. I received the paperback for review so I didn't actually know it was a Broadway musical adaption. Once I realised that, the style made sense. It's extremely "telling" instead of showing, fast-paced, and doesn't delve very deep. Basically it's like Queer Eye x Broadway, where a gay teen just wants to go to prom with her girlfriend but the town is outraged and some failed Broadway stars come "fix" everything up. I'm happy for more fluffy gay romcoms, for sure, but the content matter for this hit me hard: especially Emma being thrown out of her home by her parents for being gay. But it's so nonchalantly told. Emma is "lolol what can u do!" in tone. And all the "villains" are so shallow, their arcs quickly fixed by a good "telling off" so they become better people. Maybe this worked in musical format (where things aren't realistic anyway; and it's all about the glitz and glamour and singing numbers) but as a book it felt a little wan.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Isa Cantos (Crónicas de una Merodeadora)

    I really enjoyed this book! At first I thought it was a bit shallow because of all the prom thing, but when you go past that, this book really puts out a lot of issues like homophobia, how parents can be cruel to their children when they reveal themselves as not straight, religious fanatism and how dangerous and hurting can closed-minded people be. Before going into details, I must say that I had no previous knowledge about the Broadway Musical this book is based on, so I cannot compare them. Th I really enjoyed this book! At first I thought it was a bit shallow because of all the prom thing, but when you go past that, this book really puts out a lot of issues like homophobia, how parents can be cruel to their children when they reveal themselves as not straight, religious fanatism and how dangerous and hurting can closed-minded people be. Before going into details, I must say that I had no previous knowledge about the Broadway Musical this book is based on, so I cannot compare them. The Prom is about a couple of girls, one of them lesbian and the other pansexual, that promise to each other they're going to go to their prom together. The thing is they live in Edgewater, a lost town in the middle of Indiana and that, fun fact, was the last State in the US to legalize same-sex marriage. But anyway, Emma is out already, but Alyssa (who's pansexual) is not and is struggling with it because her mom is the president of the Parent-Teacher Association and a very christian woman. Emma is waiting for Alyssa to tell her mom so they can go to prom, but Alyssa is really afraid of how her very conservative mother is going to react, so she keeps pushing back the issue. One day, Alyssa's mother finds out that a lesbian girl is going to attend prom, so she creates new rules so no LGBT+ person can go to prom. And everyone is outraged because they think prom is going to be cancelled and they blame Emma. After all that, Emma, who has a YouTube channel, uploads a video complaining about the situation and she goes absolutely viral! From that page on, the book is an absolute rollercoaster of emotions. You can feel everything Alyssa and Emma are feeling. They're sad, mad, outraged, disappointed, happy, then sad again. I think The Prom really depicts what is to live in fear of what other people think of you and how the stupid prejudices some people have can really hurt and deeply affect other people. I loved how real all the struggles were in Alyssa and Emma's relationship. How can you truly love someone who's still hiding? But also... how can you judge someone for wanting time to come to terms and talk freely about who they really are? Their situation is really complex and it was hard to read. They were hurting each other but also desperately finding their way out of this mess together. In the end, I loved everything about The Prom. I found it to be a really inclusive and eye-opening book with lots of real situations and emotions.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julia Sapphire

    I was provided an ARC of this novel by Penguin Teen, all thoughts are honest and my own. Firstly, I wanted to say that I adored this musical and already was invested in Emma and Alyssa's relationship. I also thought it was interesting how lines from the musical were directly put into this novel. The writing was quirky and had that senses of humor to it. There were a few lines that were very awkward to me or just frankly poor sentences. Some of the slang used also got on my nerves such as "OG". I was provided an ARC of this novel by Penguin Teen, all thoughts are honest and my own. Firstly, I wanted to say that I adored this musical and already was invested in Emma and Alyssa's relationship. I also thought it was interesting how lines from the musical were directly put into this novel. The writing was quirky and had that senses of humor to it. There were a few lines that were very awkward to me or just frankly poor sentences. Some of the slang used also got on my nerves such as "OG". There were also many jokes that felt super flat, in my opinion. I typically stay away from looking at other reviews of a book until I write my own. But, this book I did look over something that I noticed and wanted to clarify. They change one of the character's sexualities from lesbian to pansexual. Some people are saying that the author just did this to add more representation. So it is something I wanted to ensure I mention in my review. I enjoyed my reading experience because it reminded me of the musical. Honestly, if you are interested in an f/f romance with lesbian representation, I would highly recommend watching the Broadway musical instead. I think without my prior knowledge of the story, this would have fallen even flatter. This does have some important themes nonetheless of sexuality, identity, romance, bullying, etc.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Valentina

    The Prom is my favorite musical, but I absolutely refuse to read this book. Alyssa Greene is a lesbian in the musical, something which the author has acknowledged, and yet her sexuality was changed for the book. Taking away lesbian representation for pansexual people isn’t a good way to give pansexual people representation. And Alyssa Greene is a lesbian, which is a huge part of her story in the musical. Changing that is a disservice to her character and her arc. Please do not support this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Hannafey

    OMG! This book was just CUTE and BEAUTIFUL to read! I loved the musical, but the novel version was EVERYTHING! Emma knows better than anyone that Edgewater, Indiana, is not a great place to be gay. But she's had enough of high school homophobia, and is determined to take her girlfriend Alyssa, to prom. But when their classmates find out, the backlash exceeds Emma's worst nightmares. In Manhattan, Barry and Dee Dee are Broadway stars of yesteryear. Their new show has bombed, and they're desperate OMG! This book was just CUTE and BEAUTIFUL to read! I loved the musical, but the novel version was EVERYTHING! Emma knows better than anyone that Edgewater, Indiana, is not a great place to be gay. But she's had enough of high school homophobia, and is determined to take her girlfriend Alyssa, to prom. But when their classmates find out, the backlash exceeds Emma's worst nightmares. In Manhattan, Barry and Dee Dee are Broadway stars of yesteryear. Their new show has bombed, and they're desperate for the applause and attention they once had. Then they hear about Emma's problem, and decide to step in and create a prom for everyone. Suddenly, Edgewater is the centre of a national news story. As the drama queens of New York take over the town, chaos happens and the glare of the spotlight is brighter than anyone could have guessed. But all Emma and Alyssa want is to dance together, is that all they ask? A delicious, snazzy novel that filled with laughter, dreams, and love for everyone. A wonderful book that you should definitely read!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    My review of The Prom is up on my blog now! https://bookreviewsfromanovelnerd.wor... My review of The Prom is up on my blog now! https://bookreviewsfromanovelnerd.wor...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jessica | Booked J

    (3.5 stars) Blog | Twitter | Instagram My stop on the official blog tour can be found here and features a photo journal of the novel as well as a few mood boards. Review can be found here at Booked J. As always, a copy of this book was provided by the publisher or author in exchange for my honest review and/or participation in the blog tour. This does not effect my opinion in any way. Before you all ask me: yes, the finished copy fixes the issue from the ARC where Alyssa Greene's sexuality (3.5 stars) Blog | Twitter | Instagram My stop on the official blog tour can be found here and features a photo journal of the novel as well as a few mood boards. Review can be found here at Booked J. As always, a copy of this book was provided by the publisher or author in exchange for my honest review and/or participation in the blog tour. This does not effect my opinion in any way. Before you all ask me: yes, the finished copy fixes the issue from the ARC where Alyssa Greene's sexuality was erased/changed. When I scheduled my stop on the blog tour, I wasn't initially aware of the controversy surrounding the changing of Alyssa Greene's sexuality from lesbian to pansexual. Alyssa states in her narration that she is a lesbian; as does Emma, as it should be. This kind of representation is very important. I have not read the ARC in which this erasure occurs. That being said, your voices were very much heard and the issue that should have never happened to begin with has been fixed, thankfully. Representation matters and the fact that this was even questioned is frustrating. The Prom wouldn't be what it is without Emma and Alyssa, their relationship, and their identities. Everyone who knows me knows that I'm a musical theatre person first and foremost. I've never loved anything like I love the stage and music. The Prom is one of those shows that feels like home and will always stir up emotions in me. There is so much to it that calls to me; Emma, Alyssa, their bond, the fact that its setting is not unlike my own hometown in Indiana. Everything about it sparkles. I was a little worried about a novel based upon a stage production. I've never been the best with novelizations of scripts. Don't ask me why. I genuinely don't know, considering musicals and literature are my two passions. The more that I thought about The Prom the more it reminded me how important it was to have this story out there in a way that will speak to those who desperately need it in their lives but aren't tuned into musical theatre. This is the representation so many needed. I thought the story itself translated sweetly to page, there are plenty of references to the production in its prose and I really appreciated that. Some changes were hits, others were misses, but honestly? That's okay with me. Because at the end of the day, I still really enjoyed The Prom and its mix of honesty and fluffiness. Page after page, I found myself screaming about how soft I was for these characters and it truly gave me the warm and fuzzies. As a contemporary YA novel, there is something that just works about The Prom, and I can't stress that enough. From the moments where your heart begins to ache for the characters, to the more heart-warming scenes, The Prom was a delight from start to finish. I only wish it were longer. In short, The Prom reminds us of the good and the bad in our world, life in a small town and most importantly what it's like to be young and in love.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    lesbian erasure is NOT GOOD. not only does it hurt so many fans of this show but generations to come.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anniek

    I watched the movie adaptation a few days ago, and while I enjoyed parts of it, I also had a slew of issues with it, varying from the lack of depth Emma's and especially Alyssa's story got and the way Alyssa needing to come out was handled, to the focus on the adults in the story, when the focus should have been on Emma and Alyssa. All in all, I wasn't the biggest fan of the movie. And if you agreed on any of these counts, I can confirm the book is better. Because here, we do get a main focus on I watched the movie adaptation a few days ago, and while I enjoyed parts of it, I also had a slew of issues with it, varying from the lack of depth Emma's and especially Alyssa's story got and the way Alyssa needing to come out was handled, to the focus on the adults in the story, when the focus should have been on Emma and Alyssa. All in all, I wasn't the biggest fan of the movie. And if you agreed on any of these counts, I can confirm the book is better. Because here, we do get a main focus on Emma and Alyssa - they both get POVs. And there's a lot more nuance in the story overall. So I mostly enjoyed this book! It was a quick read with a clear message, but I personally didn't think the tone and the content matched very well. Where the tone was very light-hearted, the content was often pretty heavy, and that was hard to digest because of the light tone. CWs: (religious) homophobia, past abandonment by parents

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Johnson

    honestly i’m furious over the removal of Alyssa’s canon lesbianism. you can’t erase her core identity and characterization without wiping out her entire character arc. And to remove Angie and Trent? Trent is the reason the kids begin to have a change of heart. Angie helps Emma find the self confidence she didn’t have before. Removing them removes central parts of the story. It gives the story less depth and heart. It ruins a lot of the continuity. and to act like any of this is okay is absolutel honestly i’m furious over the removal of Alyssa’s canon lesbianism. you can’t erase her core identity and characterization without wiping out her entire character arc. And to remove Angie and Trent? Trent is the reason the kids begin to have a change of heart. Angie helps Emma find the self confidence she didn’t have before. Removing them removes central parts of the story. It gives the story less depth and heart. It ruins a lot of the continuity. and to act like any of this is okay is absolutely ridiculous. Saundra this is not what the fans want. This is becoming more and more like terrible fan fiction which was the last thing we wanted

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emma L.

    *** This review potentially contains both spoilers for the book and the musical. It's also quite a harsh, brutal review *** Rating: 🌟🌟 (2/5 stars). Uhm... BITCH WHAT? HOW DID I NOT KNOW THIS EXISTED? ONE OF MY FAVORITE MUSICALS BEING ONCE AGAIN TURNED INTO A NOVEL? FUCK YES. CALL ME THE FUCK IN and I definitely just didn't order this (lol I totally did and when it arrives I'm going to read it as soon as possible). And then all my hopes and dreams got killed, destroyed, slaughtered by reading this *** This review potentially contains both spoilers for the book and the musical. It's also quite a harsh, brutal review *** Rating: 🌟🌟 (2/5 stars). Uhm... BITCH WHAT? HOW DID I NOT KNOW THIS EXISTED? ONE OF MY FAVORITE MUSICALS BEING ONCE AGAIN TURNED INTO A NOVEL? FUCK YES. CALL ME THE FUCK IN and I definitely just didn't order this (lol I totally did and when it arrives I'm going to read it as soon as possible). And then all my hopes and dreams got killed, destroyed, slaughtered by reading this dumpster fire of a book. God, I hated/hate this novel so much. What is this feeling so sudden so new? LOATHING. But here are all my complaints and reasons why I didn't like this book. And I'm sorry if I'm really harsh but this is truly how I feel. I'm sincerely like what the actual fuck was this. But let's get on with my meanness opinions uhmm... Barry never went to prom so why the hell would this be changed? I also don't like how novel Emma literally thought some quite harmful things about Barry. Like how he is the gayest person she's ever met, like the stereotypical kind of gay. And also that he is the queeniest person she knows. I truly don't like this. WHERE THE FREAKING HELL WHERE THE FUCK IS MY FAVORITE CHARACTER IN THIS MUSICAL? WHERE IS MY BAE? SERIOUSLY WHERE THE FUCK IS TRENT? Trent is in my opinion the best character in this musical but also he is the whole freaking reason why the teenagers turned around and became aware of their bigotry. So where is he? And why the fuck is he erased from this book? Also where is my cutie, my girl Angie? Why is she also erased and not present in this novel? Angie is the whole reason how Emma gets her confidence and like self confidence from. Book Dee Dee shouldn't be allowed to use Angie's zazz line. I'm also getting annoyed at the unnecessary irrelevant pop culture references. I'm so done and over that. Barry calling himself auntie is a bit weird? It just makes him more of a stereotype. I miss my Trent. Like he was so much better at reforming teenagers beliefs and he always had something sincere while I feel like book Barry and book Dee Dee are just super fake. Musical Barry & Dee Dee are soo much better and actually go through character development and learn from their mistakes. And besides Trent singing love thy neighbour is just the bomb. Also Emma didn't turn gay, god. She was just always gay. She was born that way. I really don't like how the book only used the lines about Emma turning gay and erasing the line that she always was it. Also why has only Shelby learned that she was bigoted? Oh and Kevin learned from his mistake too but why only those two? Because Kaylee & Nick learned it too in the musical. SO WHY THE FUCK DID THE AUTHOR CHANGE THIS TOO? Besides this novel containing some homophobic or like passages that I truly don't like. As someone who is queer (bi), part of the LGBTQ+ community some lines or scenes put a bad taste in my mouth. And some things were simply offensive or harmful in my opinion. Like the only complain I also have about the musical is like how they used the word dyke in the reprise of changing live. This is still considered as an insult word to lesbian people. But the rest I think it's done wonderfully and respectfully. But unlike the musical, this book totally completely fails to do that. While the musical is so inspirational, beautiful, important and makes my little queer heart incredibly happy. But not the novelization of the amazingness that is the musical. I sincerely would say skip reading this book, listen to the perfection that is the musical and read better non offensive harmful queer books. Oh I also think this is very important to know and also shows why I'm not happy that Saundra Mitchell wrote this book. In the musical Alyssa Greene is gay, lesbian. This utterly canon and confirmed but in advanced reader copies/proofs/original version the author decided to make Alyssa Greene pansexual and totally erased her sexuality. This is just a big NO NO for me and also gives me the feeling that the author doesn't truly grasp the LGBTQ+ community. I know that the published version, the version you can buy (aka the version I read) changed well restored Alyssa's sexuality but it simply should have never even been changed in the first place. I truly don't like this. Besides as a musical novelization this is really crappy and shitty. So many things have been changed or like freaking erased. In my opinion a good novelization of a Broadway show should follow the original content closely, answer questions the musical doesn't answer, adding little things, have some references or lines from the original product and the author should add their own touch to it. In my opinion, Saundra Mitchell almost completely failed to do this. I sincerely would have suggested that she should have looked at Dear Evan Hansen and how to do a YA novelization of a musical right since she absolutely didn't do that in my opinion. I do have to say that I really appreciated how Mitchell put quite some lines from the Broadway Show in her book. Everytime when I spotted one, it truly made me happy. But then she didn't even use to lines/references right at times. Like seriously was it so difficult and hard to use the lyrics of Unruly Heart when Emma made her second YouTube video that went viral instead of using the lyrics of dance with you? Was that really too much too asked? Also how dare you to erase, remove Trent and Angie from the story? I will be truly upset about this for forever. Besides, I also don't like how Mitchell wrote Barry and Dee Dee. They're so much more likeable and better in the musical. Hell everybody is more likeable in the original. Another complaint I have about this book, was the writing style. Quite a few times I was actually cringing about the sentences and words Saundra used. No book, how accurate it may be, should ever use the word OG. I'm truly sad that this book made me so angry and filled me with rage and disappointment. I truly had high hopes for this book and I really thought I was going to love it but the opposite happened. I'm still super mad that there was no Trent. I'm seriously like HOW COULD YOU ERASE HIM?? Tell me why.... I did listen to the original Broadway cast recording while reading this book and I Byatt want to give it my eternal gratitudes because without this album I wouldn't have been able to finish this book. Singing along to the magnificent songs while reading this this thing I want to erase from existence, totally saved my soul. Also, my sincere apologies and condolences to the Broadway show, it's creators, it's actors/actresses and anybody else involved that this piece got butchered and shredded to pieces. I'm truly sorry. So yeah, Go watch, listen to the musical this book is based on. I promise you that you'll love it and it is thousand times better than the dumpster fire piece of trash this book was. I know this is so harsh but the musical is one I really truly deeply love and hold dear. It's a story that's so close to my heart and I really hated how someone butchered, destroyed it. Seriously one of the very few things I do actually like about this book was the amazingness that was Emma's grandmother and the cover of this book which is stunningly beautiful. And one of these reasons is super superficial. Also, I went into this book excepting to really love it but that definitely didn't go as I had planned. The only reason I'm rating this book as a 2 star and not as a 1 star is because my heart can't handle that and it somehow feels I'm betraying one of my favorite musicals if I give it a one star rating. So I can't. My advice would be: Go listen to this beautiful musical, read every other well done queer book but just skip this one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mehsi

    Two girls who want to go to prom together in a backwater town find trouble and chaos. Sadly, there were also things that were just unbelievable which lessened my liking for the book. I just love books like this. We don't have prom here, so I am always looking for books that are about it. And this one was even higher on my OMG list when I found out it was about two sweet girls who wanted to go to the prom together. And the difficulties that followed. Because this town doesn't like LGBT people. This Two girls who want to go to prom together in a backwater town find trouble and chaos. Sadly, there were also things that were just unbelievable which lessened my liking for the book. I just love books like this. We don't have prom here, so I am always looking for books that are about it. And this one was even higher on my OMG list when I found out it was about two sweet girls who wanted to go to the prom together. And the difficulties that followed. Because this town doesn't like LGBT people. This town doesn't want them there. And Emma just wants to go to prom. I could feel that. And I was just heartbroken that all the things that already happened to her (her parents throwing her out of her home, bullying since then) only got worse and worse, and still she wanted to continue, because she also deserves to go to a prom. I just wanted to hug Emma so many times. Because things are hard and they get harder and harder, especially when prom happens and something awful happens. The poor girl completely falls apart and again I just wish I was there so I could hold her. No one deserves the things she went through. No one. While I knew something was up with those Broadway stars I still enjoyed seeing them around, especially Barry was a favourite of mine. He really helped out Emma, he was there for her, and he made her feel like she wasn't alone. And I loved that they did everything they could for Emma and the prom. Sure, they had some egotistical reasons, but I know that at least Barry also meant it when he did all the things he did. Of course, I was a bit pissed when things came out. I expected it, but I was hoping it just wouldn't be true. I was a big fan of Emma's grandma who was a kick-ass lady who didn't take crap from anyone and I loved how she helped out Emma, consulted with her if she really wanted something. She was just the sweetest and I am so happy Emma got to live with her. I would have loved to see more romance between Alyssa and Emma. Now we have to rely on a lot of memories, and maybe a couple of moments. I am glad that we saw POVs of both the girls, Alyssa and Emma. I have to say I was pulled more to the Emma POV. I don't know Alyssa is a sweet girl, but something was just not working with her for me. I still don't get why people are afraid or angry at LGBT people. It isn't a disease, it isn't something bad, it isn't contagious. People should really be more open about things, and maybe read the bible a bit better and not just pick out the parts they like or that fit with their ideas. However, there were at least three things that I found a bit too magical and which is why the book was almost a 4 star, but in the end there was enough to like so 4.5 star. I will put these under spoilers. (view spoiler)[ That the teens in the school were all very bigoted but when one celebrity talks to them about the bible just once they suddenly open up to everything. Sorry, it just doesn't go that fast. Believe me. That the mom from the MC who was still in the closet would be totally OK with her daughter being gay. Or well, much better than anticipated. I don't believe that in the slightest. I have seen people like that mom and believe me they don't just go POOF and become slightly more normal people in just a couple of minutes. We do see that she is having a bit of a struggle with it, but that is all. Sorry, not believable. That in the end Emma makes a vlog about the situation and writes a very sad song and everyone in the school is all OMG EMMA IS AMAZING and we are so so sorry, at least most of the peeps at school did that and it just made my eyes roll. It just felt a bit too magical and a bit too much like oh the ending is coming and I need to make it a happy and glittery one. Sure, I would have liked a happy ending, but this is just not how it works. People who are bigoted don't just magically change because of a song, or a conversation. It takes time. Talking. Time. More talking. Hope and praying that they will understand. Believe me, there is a reason why I didn't come out as Bi until like 2 years ago. I have been grown up religiously (and still am Christian), and while my parents were pretty acceptable at points.. it was also not a situation to come out. Not to mention I don't know how the church would handle it but given they gave me a big speech about Harry Potter being evil, I think it is best I didn't explore things too much. So yeah, I just don't believe these situations would go the way they went. (hide spoiler)] Now I can hear you say, but Mehsi what about those Broadway stars that coincidentally hit the town. I can believe that, I have seen some stuff in newspapers, mostly from the US though, where this stuff is possible. I don't know how, but Youtube is a powerful medium that can make stuff happen. The ending was pretty sweet and I loved that there were second chances for many things (and no I won't spoil which ones). I also LOVE LOVE the cover, it is so sweet and I love the purple colour. All in all, in overall, I loved reading this one, it was a good read. I would recommend it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    varvara

    I want to start of by saying that: no, Alyssa's sexuality wasn't erased. It wasn't changed to pansexual. Even though the author planned on doing so. I was really confused nevertheless when every review seemed to say that it was changed. Maybe those people haven't read this book properly but I eventually revisited my library only to check my point and boom Alyssa herself says it "[...] my being a lesbian still wouldn't be okay with her." So there's that. If this keeped you from reading this book I want to start of by saying that: no, Alyssa's sexuality wasn't erased. It wasn't changed to pansexual. Even though the author planned on doing so. I was really confused nevertheless when every review seemed to say that it was changed. Maybe those people haven't read this book properly but I eventually revisited my library only to check my point and boom Alyssa herself says it "[...] my being a lesbian still wouldn't be okay with her." So there's that. If this keeped you from reading this book you don't have to restrain yourself anymore. But honestly this book was pretty average. You have to know that it was based on the Broadway musical the Prom and seemingly the team that worked on it possibly decided to project the formula of their musical onto a book and this is the result. Every 3nd Broadway show that wasn't based on a book already actually does this thing where they produce a book based on their show if their show was immensely successful. Well, it was alright. It had no further potential to be groundbreaking, but it wasn't bad either. You just had a lot of "my dad left my mom for another woman and started a new family; my mom is super depressed and thinks if I, her daughter will be perfect - my dad would come back" or "my parents kicked me out because I'm a lesbian. I live with my grandmother." You have all those very relevant social struggles but this book never digs deeper than just that, it just mentions all those crucial situations by the way and moves on and where the musical would have some fun dancebreak this book obviously has nothing. Even the homophobic villains, who are essentially Emma and Alyssa's classmates are (in the musical) convinced to be tolerant by a fun song Love Thy Neighbor and in this book... they are basically convinced the same way but without the music. This Broadway formula of ending Homophobia through a song usually only works in a Musical. It doesn't work the same way as a book. It just feels unrealistic and sort of cringy. (I have to say btw that the characters of Trent Oliver and Angie Dickinson were completely cut and everything they did in the musical was done by Barry Glickman in the book.) Honestly this book is more or less a waste of time. Even the parts of it that feature Emma and Alyssa's sapphic relationship were written very superficial. If you really want to experience this story I would skip this book and listen to the Broadway/the movie adaptation's soundtrack, maybe watch the movie adaptation itself at your own risk instead. On the other hand if you enjoy having your time wasted and don't mind superficial writing and just want a more or less short read, maybe you want to fill up your reading challenge quickly. I rated this book 3/5 because it did felt unnecessary but it was enjoyable to a certain degree nevertheless. In other words. Go for it! Have fun!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maddie Davis

    For those considering spending your money on this book. I wouldn’t. The prom is based off a musical that is currently on broadway. In the musical Alyssa Greene is. Canon lesbian however the author of the book adaptation took it into her own hands to erase her sexuality which the author refuses to answer our questions about it and continues to ignore us. which is incredibly offensive to lesbians. Lesbians are being left out of lgbtq+events and are given little to representation so having the prom For those considering spending your money on this book. I wouldn’t. The prom is based off a musical that is currently on broadway. In the musical Alyssa Greene is. Canon lesbian however the author of the book adaptation took it into her own hands to erase her sexuality which the author refuses to answer our questions about it and continues to ignore us. which is incredibly offensive to lesbians. Lesbians are being left out of lgbtq+events and are given little to representation so having the prom was a massive thing for our validation. So understable many wlw are very upset with this change from the musical to the book. Another big change from the musical to the musical is the easure of 2 of the main characters, Angie and Trent this change makes literally no sense and completely changes the entire plot of the show. Before wasting your money on this book I deeply recommend you support the original musical, by buying the cast recording which can be found in stores and also on digital form, on sites such as Spotify, Apple Music and iTunes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Clara (The Bookworm of Notre-Dame)

    Now I just really want to see the musical.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Landice (Manic Femme)

    Actual rating: 4.5/5 stars. I binged this at the beginning of December and apparently forgot to mark it as read here. I read the book first and watched the Netflix adaption a week or so later and while I enjoyed both, I definitely liked the book more. There are probably more I’m forgetting but a few content warnings that stood out/I still remember include: extreme homophobia (most other CWs stem from this), bullying, being disowned by parents after coming out (in the past & off page but reference Actual rating: 4.5/5 stars. I binged this at the beginning of December and apparently forgot to mark it as read here. I read the book first and watched the Netflix adaption a week or so later and while I enjoyed both, I definitely liked the book more. There are probably more I’m forgetting but a few content warnings that stood out/I still remember include: extreme homophobia (most other CWs stem from this), bullying, being disowned by parents after coming out (in the past & off page but referenced multiple times) Love sapphic books, too? Let's be friends! Bookstagram | Booktube | Book Blog | Twitter

  17. 5 out of 5

    roxi

    i've heard the musical is better but honestly the book felt like a really really bad joke i've heard the musical is better but honestly the book felt like a really really bad joke

  18. 4 out of 5

    Fei

    tldr; the musical is better, the writing is eeeh inconsistent, save your money and get the audible free trial for a happy lesbian love story with good good narrators, or just read some fanfic i really wanted to love this book, and i only loved bits of it. the prom musical has been my obsession for the past few months and so i was eager (and trepidatious because, novelisation) to read this. as an adaption, i have only a few complaints. the plot was handled fairly well - as an overly hammy broadway tldr; the musical is better, the writing is eeeh inconsistent, save your money and get the audible free trial for a happy lesbian love story with good good narrators, or just read some fanfic i really wanted to love this book, and i only loved bits of it. the prom musical has been my obsession for the past few months and so i was eager (and trepidatious because, novelisation) to read this. as an adaption, i have only a few complaints. the plot was handled fairly well - as an overly hammy broadway musical the original canon was of course not realistic. i don't think that the changes mitchell made would bother anyone who hadn't seen the musical first, though they do seem somewhat unnecessary. the plot still works with the removal of the characters trent and angie, yet it doesn't run any smoother, so why do it? not to mention that it is jarring for those who've seen the musical. having emma sing 'dance with you' instead of 'unruly heart' works in the novel, but it doesn't add anything, so why change it? in fact, i would even suggest that 'unruly heart' is more universal an anthem than 'dance with you'. also in the list of unnecessary-deviations-from-canon are changing the age at which emma was kicked out of her house, and changing the car she drives from a pickup truck to a beetle. small details to be sure, but why?? there were also changes to canon that sparked controversy - mitchell initially declared that she intended to change alyssa's sexuality from that of a lesbian to pansexual. after the furor sparked by her statement, the published novel changes alyssa's sexuality back to match the musical's canon. however, it reads like mitchell mere did a find and replace, exchanging the word 'pansexual' with 'lesbian', which is just shoddy editing. i very much enjoyed the emma/alyssa centric focus of the story, with chapters alternating from their perspectives, but the tone of the novel was frankly annoying. sure, at some points mitchell's writing was achingly poignant, but this clashed with the narrators speaking directly to the reader, over-the-top 'teen speech' (think characters saying OMG), and some... very weirdly written ?romance? scenes, all things that immediately turn me off YA novels. characterisation was another odd point - book!alyssa's mother was scarily deranged where in the musical she is humanly understandable, but the characterisation of emma's grandmother was everything i had hoped for. mitchell also incorporated quotes from the musical which were at some point cringey and at other points really beautiful, so i guess that balances out. listening to this as an audiobook is what saved it - i could listen to caitlin kinnunen just read credits FOREVER. if i had read this in paperback form, i probably wouldn't have liked it. as it stands, i'll probably be listening to the audiobook again, because kinnunen is just that good. if you're looking for more emma/alyssa content, or just more wlw content, i suggest having a look through the prom musical tag on ao3 for content with better characterisation and better writing (though lacking caitlin kinnunen's narration). better yet, i'll start you off with the the prom fandom's premier fic: the cowgirl au. here's the goodreads link to how could they call this bad love when all i want is more or read it here on ao3 with all that said, i'm giving it 3 stars because i did genuinely enjoy it. the musical has lots of big big moments and drama and triumphant crescendos, but i appreciated the novel's deeper focus on less-addressed issues such as alyssa's relationship with her mother. there were moments that really tugged at my heartstrings and quotes that were just beautiful to listen to. mitchell portrays, accurately, homophobia - both the big acts of discrimination and the day-to-day cruelties, the struggles of both those closeted and those out, and the wrongness of parents who forcibly mold children into who they want them to be and refuse to accept children for who they are. at the heart of it all, the prom novel was a sweet yet meaningful lesbian love story, and we need more of those.

  19. 5 out of 5

    John Amory

    I really wanted to like this, mostly because so many people are negatively reviewing it without having read it (for "erasing" a character's sexuality, which is not at all the case), but it's kind of a mess. First of all, as an adaptation of the musical The Prom, this is a failure. The musical tells dual stories of the teen girls at the center of the prom controversy and the Broadway actors seeking positive press coverage by protesting the prom controversy. Most of the latter plotline is completel I really wanted to like this, mostly because so many people are negatively reviewing it without having read it (for "erasing" a character's sexuality, which is not at all the case), but it's kind of a mess. First of all, as an adaptation of the musical The Prom, this is a failure. The musical tells dual stories of the teen girls at the center of the prom controversy and the Broadway actors seeking positive press coverage by protesting the prom controversy. Most of the latter plotline is completely eliminated, and the book is told from the dueling perspectives of Emma and Alyssa. By cutting out the POV of Barry and Dee Dee and by removing multiple characters from that side of the story (Trent, Angie, Sheldon), there's very little story left. That can be a good thing, as it allows for more focus on the teen protagonists and their relationship, but it also takes out almost all of the action and humor. Gone are the monster truck rally and the subplot of Dee Dee and Principal Hawkins dating (though it's hinted at). Gone are the hysterically narcissistic scenes in New York and the adult jokes. Gone is, quite literally, the majority of the musical's content. What's left is a relatively simple coming-out story set in Indiana. There's nothing wrong with that, of course, but in 2019, it feels passe and old-fashioned. If you read this without having any prior knowledge of the musical, I can't imagine this being too exciting. Basically now it's a story of two girls dating in the Midwest, one out and bullied for it and the other popular and closeted. The out girl tries to get the closeted girl to come out to the school and her parents. The out girl continues to be bullied; the closeted girl gathers the strength to come out; they go to prom together. And a couple of Broadway stars are there to screw stuff up a little bit and then to later act as a deus ex machina. It's a thin story, and not enough (almost nothing, that I can think of) is added to pad or expand the plot, aside from a few internal monologues and a primer on what it means to be pansexual (which, as much as everyone else is up in arms over this "change," is probably the best thing Saundra Mitchell did in her adaptation). The overall feeling is that The Prom is slight. I sat in the Longacre Theatre last year and kept thinking how important this story was, how beautiful the show was, and how delicately yet bombastically this sweet, sensitive story was told. In book form, without the songs and dance numbers and flashing lights and bright colors and inside baseball Broadway jokes, the story is still sweet and sensitive but a little more hollow, a little less special.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura Wilson

    The final release of this book corrected the ARCs horrific handling of Alyssa's sexuality, however it does not save the abysmal writing, nor does it correct how Saundra Mitchell butchered the plot of a fantastic musical. She clearly does not understand the characters or the show. If you want The Prom, listen to the soundtrack. Don't waste your time with this book. If you absolutely must read it, at least listen to the audiobook, where you can hear the cast try their best to save the material. The final release of this book corrected the ARCs horrific handling of Alyssa's sexuality, however it does not save the abysmal writing, nor does it correct how Saundra Mitchell butchered the plot of a fantastic musical. She clearly does not understand the characters or the show. If you want The Prom, listen to the soundtrack. Don't waste your time with this book. If you absolutely must read it, at least listen to the audiobook, where you can hear the cast try their best to save the material.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cor

    to not only erase a character’s sexuality but to then ignore the actual real life community affected by it ... i can’t imagine being able to enjoy or support this book in any way, shape, or form; you have completely destroyed alyssa’s character.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ana P

    you want me to like this when theres lesbian erasure? i dont know why theres still things like this happening, this is so disappointing

  23. 5 out of 5

    Georgia Collins

    Really amazing book about injustice and love. It's one of my favorites. Really amazing book about injustice and love. It's one of my favorites.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Monte Price

    I was going to say that if you follow me on twitter then you're probably used to me talking about The Prom and my love of the Netflix adaptation, and then I remembered that I don't link my socials so we're gonna start doing that. Anyway, I love the adaptation that Netflix made, it was a rare hit for Mr. Ryan Murphy in my eyes but that's not what I'm here to review. To mention the movie one final time though I was very disappointed in how little time I got to spend with Alyssa Greene, and when I r I was going to say that if you follow me on twitter then you're probably used to me talking about The Prom and my love of the Netflix adaptation, and then I remembered that I don't link my socials so we're gonna start doing that. Anyway, I love the adaptation that Netflix made, it was a rare hit for Mr. Ryan Murphy in my eyes but that's not what I'm here to review. To mention the movie one final time though I was very disappointed in how little time I got to spend with Alyssa Greene, and when I remembered that Penguin had published this novelization focusing on Emma and Alyssa it seemed like the perfect remedy for all the things that left me feeling disappointed in the stage production. My first complaint is that this reads very young. Which, on one hand I do appreciate given the fact that it is a YA book and so often YA can teeter over into more adult content, but the writing here often felt very middle grade. Which again, isn't a bad thing I'm sure elementary school Monte would have ate up a book about two girls going to prom together, the issue for was that not only did the book feel very young but it also didn't do any of the things that I'd expect from a novelization exploring the teenage protagonists of this musical. One of the complaints I've seen about the Netflix adaptation, and what I can assume is somewhat true of the stage production this is actually attempting to novelize, is the focus on the cast of adult characters. here though not only are the adult characters of the show minimized they also seem to be a compilation which feels like an odd choice made solely so the book could be written faster? But the novel actually spends very little time exploring Emma or Alyssa outside of what you might see in the show. Which is more of a problem for Alyssa because she gets very little stagetime and here the book I think royally fucks her over? I also just couldn't tell you if Alyssa was actually supposed to be a Black girl. She has coconut oil in her hair and the girl on the cover is ethnically ambiguous so my gut is saying she is, but the fact that Alyssa continues to be minimized is just really sad to me as Black reader. I wanted to be able to understand more of her character and have something to her more than the solo she gets in the show. Here she just kind of fell flat. Emma in the novelization is just... an awful person? She starts off by being really endearing, but then she decides to out Alyssa to Dee Dee and Barry for a reason that I couldn't quite place? Instead of like in the show the breakup being because Emma cannot continue to be with someone who isn't there for her it becomes this thing where she's attacking Alyssa for not coming out and saying "it's bad enough they know", it just left a bad taste in my mouth in a book where I knew the author wasn't going to do anything to make the happily ever after we get in the musical make sense in the novelization they'd crafted. For younger readers I'd probably recommend this, for everyone else I'd just say to watch the musical and give this a pass. twitter booktube goodreads

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kali Cole

    In terms of the book itself, I really enjoyed this. I have not heard the musical yet, but I learned the Alyssa should actually be a lesbian and not pansexual, which she is in this book versus the musical. Taking that huge misrepresentation away, I felt that Emma’s story is definitely one that relates to many lgbtqia+ people that are surrounded by religious individuals. I can’t even imagine the abuse that some of these people face in those parts of the world and it is so unfair because that commu In terms of the book itself, I really enjoyed this. I have not heard the musical yet, but I learned the Alyssa should actually be a lesbian and not pansexual, which she is in this book versus the musical. Taking that huge misrepresentation away, I felt that Emma’s story is definitely one that relates to many lgbtqia+ people that are surrounded by religious individuals. I can’t even imagine the abuse that some of these people face in those parts of the world and it is so unfair because that community is full of people with big hearts and trustworthy personas. They are some of the best people I have ever met and I love how this took a really important event in people’s lives and showed how easy it is to just accept people for who they are because love is love no matter what.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Celina

    I don’t know if any of you watched The Prom on Netflix, but I certainly did. And as much as I loved the star-filled cast, I wanted more focus on Emma and her story. Luckily, I was gifted a digital copy from the publisher to find out more! The book focuses entirely on the students with the adults in the background. Emma and Alyssa have the most chapters and that is exactly what I wanted from the film. I am not sure if the Broadway musical is the same format as the book, but I would love to see it I don’t know if any of you watched The Prom on Netflix, but I certainly did. And as much as I loved the star-filled cast, I wanted more focus on Emma and her story. Luckily, I was gifted a digital copy from the publisher to find out more! The book focuses entirely on the students with the adults in the background. Emma and Alyssa have the most chapters and that is exactly what I wanted from the film. I am not sure if the Broadway musical is the same format as the book, but I would love to see it if it is! I highly recommend for fans of the musical and/or film who want to know more about the relationship between Emma and Alyssa. I also recommend to all my sapphic readers! Thank you Netgalley and Penguin Random House Children’s UK for the arc! This title was released September 12, 2019.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    3.5 I love this musical but the book fell a bit flat for me. It should have been longer and a bit more in depth. I did love that all the chapters were named after musical songs (my musical theatre loving heart was very happy)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lennon

    i’m very disappointed in saundra mitchell for writing this story and penguin random house for allowing this lesbophobic book to be published. in addition to erasing a canon lesbian’s sexuality (the author changed alyssa greene’s sexuality from lesbian to pansexual), saundra mitchell has been active on social media websites, despite numerous accounts making posts describing the terribleness of this book and tagging her in them. please don’t support this book. don’t request ARCs or buy it when it i’m very disappointed in saundra mitchell for writing this story and penguin random house for allowing this lesbophobic book to be published. in addition to erasing a canon lesbian’s sexuality (the author changed alyssa greene’s sexuality from lesbian to pansexual), saundra mitchell has been active on social media websites, despite numerous accounts making posts describing the terribleness of this book and tagging her in them. please don’t support this book. don’t request ARCs or buy it when it comes out. don’t support saundra mitchell. instead, see The Prom on broadway, the original source material with all the correct characters and their sexualities represented.

  29. 5 out of 5

    harms

    okay so firstly, this is a retelling of a musical. So is this the best written book out there? No. But it's such an important story everyone needs to read it. I cried like 5 times while reading this. okay so firstly, this is a retelling of a musical. So is this the best written book out there? No. But it's such an important story everyone needs to read it. I cried like 5 times while reading this.

  30. 4 out of 5

    kel

    Buckle in because this review has now become the longest review I have ever written and there's a lot to unpack here but it must be said. I want to start this off by saying I really wanted to like this, like so much. A story about two lesbians who just want to go to prom together sounds like something right up my alley. I don't know if this just didn't transfer well to novel and I can't say anything about the musical because I haven't seen it yet, but I have some pretty big issues with this and i Buckle in because this review has now become the longest review I have ever written and there's a lot to unpack here but it must be said. I want to start this off by saying I really wanted to like this, like so much. A story about two lesbians who just want to go to prom together sounds like something right up my alley. I don't know if this just didn't transfer well to novel and I can't say anything about the musical because I haven't seen it yet, but I have some pretty big issues with this and it entirely stems from the fact that the villains (i.e. the violently homophobic people who live in Emma's town) change their ways so quickly it only takes a sad song and explaining the bible to get them to realize the errors of their ways. But let me explain things a little bit more so you get a better understanding of why I'm filled with so much rage over the ending. Emma is faced with extreme homophobia and bullying throughout the entire book. In fact, there are only four characters (Emma, Alyssa who is Emma's closested girlfriend, Emma's grandmother and the principal) from Emma's town that are not homphobic. Emma's parents, who kicked her out when she was 14, are homophobic. Alyssa's mother is homophobic. Every kid mentioned at school is homophobic. Every parent that is brought up is homophobic. There are no teachers, no parents, no students that are not depicted as not being homophobic. They are literally all homophobic. (logically the entire town/school probably isn't homophobic but there's literally no characters from Emma's town who aren't depicted as such so that can't be considered I can only write about what was actually depicted) It is stated that the homophobia and bullying was bad when she first came out but died down over the years until she decided she wanted to go to prom with a girl and it picked back up again. After she said she wanted to go to prom with a girl people called her slurs, squirted lotion in her locker, humiliated her every chance they could and even went as far as hanging a rainbow bear by a noose from her locker. Yes, it was really that bad. So, for the past three years Emma has dealt with homophobia at school which you would assume would be pretty traumatic expecially now that it's picked up again and escalated. Emma even states at one point the whole school hates her so much because she's a lesbian that she doesn't even know if going to prom is worth it. **SPOILERS PAST THIS POINT** People were incredibly cruel to her, even going so far as to move the prom last minute without telling her so they can exclude her from the prom. Now all of this, while horrible, is also fairly understandable. I do not have an issue with the homophobia in the book (even though I don't like how extreme it got) because I get why it's there and I understand the reasoning. I mean, it's integral to the story. I even, to a certain extent, understand how cruel they were to Emma by changing the prom to exclude her because it depicts how homophobic her town is. However, I do have a very big issue with the homophobia and bullying being excused so easily. Because really, it was excused way too easily. To put things into perspective: Emma is understandly crushed when everything happens and she gets excluded from the prom. To be clear when I say excluded I mean she showed up to the school and walked in on an empty gymnasium because the PTA and the students behind planning the prom had changed the location last minute and refused to tell her where it was being held. They quite literally humiliated her because they were too afraid of 1). having a gay person at their prom or 2). their prom getting cancelled because a gay person was at their prom. It was a cruel act of homophobia and and it devastated Emma. To cope, Emma wrote a song about her experience and posted it on her YouTube channel so that people could hear the full story from her and to fix any rumors that had been started because her story had gone viral. Around the same time, a broadway star (who more or less had Emma's best interest at heart even though things were a little skewed in the beginning) gave a lecture to some kids when he found out they didn't like Emma because she's gay and they believe in the bible. In this lecture he told them other things the bible frowns on like getting tattoos and wearing more than one fabric at a time. Because of this, many kids at school see the error of their ways and suddenly feel really bad that they treated her so badly. Like seriously??? That's it??? Just a lecture and a sad song cured their violent homophobia??? And it wasn't even that they were all (okay not all because it's mentioned that one student in particular still hates Emma and there are probably others but pretty much the entire school) cured of their homophobia practically over night, it was that Emma FORGAVE them almost immediately. Just a couple of days after the incident when Emma returned to school everything suddenly changed. People were nice to her in the hallway, nobody said anymore slurs, they didn't snicker or give her dirty looks anymore. They greeted her like nothing had even happened even though Emma had been facing this homophobia FOR THREE YEARS. And Emma just... forgave them. I'm sure it was really good for her to finally be in a somewhat accepting environment and I'm not saying their change of heart wasn't a good thing or that Emma didn't deserve it, but I find it incredibly annoying that it happened less than a week after the prom incident occured and that it happened because of a SONG and a 2 MINUTE LECTURE. Not only are the students suddenly not homophobic, they even help Alyssa plan a prom for all and invite lgbt people from all over to come. They buy pronoun pins, pride flags and all kinds of pride merch to give out at this prom. What is so confusing to me about this is that the parents who were so against Emma coming to prom because they didn't want their children exposed to homosexuality and literally plotted to have it changed last minute to exclude her are not mentioned and have nothing to say about their kids now throwing a "prom for all" where anyone is welcome to show up. Literally. There is no fight from anyone or even any opposition whatsoever when the entire book so far has been nothing but trying to prevent a single girl from going to her school's prom because she's a lesbian but suddenly throwing a "prom for all" is okay. Does that make sense to any of you? Because it doesn't to me! Also, not to mention the entire catalyst for the plot is Alyssa's mom being homophobic. Alyssa was not out to her mom yet which is the entire reason Emma and her concoct the fake date plan in the first place and when Alyssa's mom finds out about Emma wanting to take a girl to the prom she's completely furious. So furious that she even comes up with a "only boy/girl couple allowed" rule because she's the leader of the PTA and when that gets foiled she plots the entire plan to get the prom moved last minute to exclude Emma. She is incredibly homophobic and talks major crap about Emma and does everything in her power to get her painted as the villain. But when Alyssa finally does come out to her there's... barely any fight at all. She's clearly not happy about it and she clearly doesn't understand but she tells Alyssa she loves her and is proud of her no matter what which completely defeats the whole purpose of the book. Now to wrap things up I am not saying that I'm not glad people saw the error of their ways and that things ended up really good for Emma. I wanted Emma to have a good ending. I wanted her to feel comfortable in her own town. I wanted people's opinions to change. What I didn't want is every single villain depicted in this book to suddenly come to their senses and not hate gays anymore simply because they got a short lecture and heard a sad song. I do not want them to think that the years of bullying they subjected Emma too is suddenly forgiven because they're "no longer homophobic." I do not appreciate the entire school changing their ways in just a few days because they heard a sad song and suddenly realized the way they had treated Emma was terrible. I don't appreciate any part of that. I understand that this was supposed to be a fluffy romcom about two girls who just wanted to go to prom together and I wish it had been that. Instead, I had to read about extremely homophobic people being cured of their homophobia and forgiven for it immediately and I was not impressed in the slightest. I understand if people like this, I really do, but I just can't forgive that.

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