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Detective Comics (2016-) #1000

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After 80 years, it’s here-the 1,000th issue of DETECTIVE COMICS, the title that literally defines DC! This 96-page issue is stacked with an unbelievable lineup of talent that will take you on a journey through Batman’s past, present and future...plus a sensational epilogue that features the first-ever DC Universe appearance of the deadly Arkham Knight! But who is under the After 80 years, it’s here-the 1,000th issue of DETECTIVE COMICS, the title that literally defines DC! This 96-page issue is stacked with an unbelievable lineup of talent that will take you on a journey through Batman’s past, present and future...plus a sensational epilogue that features the first-ever DC Universe appearance of the deadly Arkham Knight! But who is under the mask? And why do they want Batman dead? The incredible future of Batman adventures begins here!


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After 80 years, it’s here-the 1,000th issue of DETECTIVE COMICS, the title that literally defines DC! This 96-page issue is stacked with an unbelievable lineup of talent that will take you on a journey through Batman’s past, present and future...plus a sensational epilogue that features the first-ever DC Universe appearance of the deadly Arkham Knight! But who is under the After 80 years, it’s here-the 1,000th issue of DETECTIVE COMICS, the title that literally defines DC! This 96-page issue is stacked with an unbelievable lineup of talent that will take you on a journey through Batman’s past, present and future...plus a sensational epilogue that features the first-ever DC Universe appearance of the deadly Arkham Knight! But who is under the mask? And why do they want Batman dead? The incredible future of Batman adventures begins here!

30 review for Detective Comics (2016-) #1000

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Batman looks good for 80, doesn’t he? Oh that’s right, he’s a drawing! And Detective Comics reaches its 1000th issue this month. Unlike Action Comics’ 1000th last year though, this bumper 96-page comic of Batman short stories isn’t half bad. My favourite story was “Batman’s Greatest Case” by current Batman writer Tom King. The Bat family banters while posing for a photo op, and I thought it was very amusing. King captures their voices so distinctly that, even though most of the dialogue bubbles Batman looks good for 80, doesn’t he? Oh that’s right, he’s a drawing! And Detective Comics reaches its 1000th issue this month. Unlike Action Comics’ 1000th last year though, this bumper 96-page comic of Batman short stories isn’t half bad. My favourite story was “Batman’s Greatest Case” by current Batman writer Tom King. The Bat family banters while posing for a photo op, and I thought it was very amusing. King captures their voices so distinctly that, even though most of the dialogue bubbles are floating around a moody Bruce Wayne elsewhere, you have a good idea who’s talking. Dick and Damian continue to have the most fun sibling relationship and I loved Batwoman’s stoicism – I want to read a King-scripted Batwoman series now! The story highlights how Detective Comics has always been an ensemble title with Batman as part of that cast. It remains so today albeit the entire ensemble are all now derivative of Batman! Tony S. Daniel and Joelle Jones’ art is dependably gorgeous and the ending is sweet without being sappy. Kevin Smith surprisingly writes the second best story here, with art from the legendary Jim Lee, in “Manufacture for Use”. Bruce as Matches Malone tracks down the gun that killed his parents and puts it to good use. Clever, quietly moving and enjoyable, a story about protecting the heart is especially pertinent from Smith given that he recently suffered a near fatal heart attack – glad you’re still with us, Kev! Continuing the tradition of this title having the more detective-y Batman stories (as well as living up to its name) is “Batman’s Longest Case” by celebrated New 52 Bat-team, Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo. It’s not amazing but some of the clues are very clever and it was cool to see Slam Bradley make an appearance, a private detective character who was around the same time as Batman when he made his 1939 debut. Paul Dini and Dustin Nguyen tell the story of inept henchman Knute Brody which was kinda dull but had an unexpected punchline. Warren Ellis and Becky Cloonan’s “The Batman’s Design” was a dreary story about Batman herding mercs into a warehouse deathtrap and having his fun with them. Denny O’Neil and Steve Epting’s “Return to Crime Alley” was a snoozy downer about how sad and hollow Batman’s life is - way to kill the celebratory buzz, Denny! Christopher Priest and Neal Adams’ “Heretic” is some rubbish about The League of Shadows. Brian Bendis and Alex Maleev’s “I Know” is a load of nothing about how Penguin figures out Batman is Bruce Wayne. James Tynion IV and Alvaro Martinez-Bueno’s “The Precedent” is the worst story here, about Batman and Robin’s beginnings, a story that’s been told far too many times to be remotely interesting, particularly without variation on the details. Geoff Johns and Kelley Jones’ “The Last Crime in Gotham” was dull though I liked the (very brief) introduction of The April Fool, the Joker’s son, and the close-up panel of his face was genuinely creepy – well done Kelley Jones! The issue closes out with Peter J. Tomasi and Doug Mahnke’s “Medieval”, which is the beginning of a new story arc starting in Detective Comics #1001: the Arkham Knight’s debut in the DCU. (view spoiler)[It’s Jason Todd. (hide spoiler)] Paaaaaaaaarp. The Arkham Knight is this terrible character from one of the Arkham games who had a boring run in the Arkham spin-off comics. Can’t wait to not read that! By no means a must-read for anyone but the fans, Detective Comics #1000 is a semi-successful collection of stories, some of which are fun. Anyhoo - well done on reaching 1000 issues DC and happy 80th Batman!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Holy One-Thousandth Issue, Batman! And just 80 years later... ...Detective Comics, the comic book that introduced Batman in its 27th issue, back there in 1939,... ...came to reach its 1000th issue! Obviously, while in the beginning the comic book title had several other characters, once the Dark Knight arrived, soon enough took over the book and it became basically a "Bat-title" featuring stories of Batman, and the 1000th issue is a special of 96 pages containing several different tales about Ba Holy One-Thousandth Issue, Batman! And just 80 years later... ...Detective Comics, the comic book that introduced Batman in its 27th issue, back there in 1939,... ...came to reach its 1000th issue! Obviously, while in the beginning the comic book title had several other characters, once the Dark Knight arrived, soon enough took over the book and it became basically a "Bat-title" featuring stories of Batman, and the 1000th issue is a special of 96 pages containing several different tales about Batman, made by different creative teams. As in any anthology-like presentation, not all are that good, but happily I can say that you get more good ones than not, and even the not so good ones is just because they rested more in the "tribute" angle than trying to developed a more ambitious story, something quite understandable in a comic book issue like this one in particular. There are several covers, per each decade and others, I chosen the one of 70's (that it's not this one featured, but it was the best option to choose here in GR), and certainly it's an essential issue to collect to any Batman fan. Here, here, Dark Knight, well done in these 80 years!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Siona St Mark

    To be completely honest, this was a mixed bag of stories. My favorite was the Penguin story I think, or of Batman buying the gun used to kill his parents. The “story” introducing the Arkham Knight was cringey to me, so hopefully next issue and his story over all will he more interesting and well done.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    Last year Superman reached milestone 1000 issues of Action Comics, and this year Detective Comics got to the same number. I was fully planning to go on the same Batman binge as I did last year with Superman, but truthfully my heart wasn't in it this year, and anyway I just don't love Batman as much as I do Superman. Maybe that's why I didn't get as much of a kick out of 'tec 1000, or maybe the stories really just weren't that good. So just like last year, this issue is just an extra-thick collect Last year Superman reached milestone 1000 issues of Action Comics, and this year Detective Comics got to the same number. I was fully planning to go on the same Batman binge as I did last year with Superman, but truthfully my heart wasn't in it this year, and anyway I just don't love Batman as much as I do Superman. Maybe that's why I didn't get as much of a kick out of 'tec 1000, or maybe the stories really just weren't that good. So just like last year, this issue is just an extra-thick collection of short Batman stories from a variety of creators. The talent involved is pretty standard if you know your DC of recent years — Tom King, Paul Dini, James Tynion, Geoff Johns, Scott Snyder, Peter Tomasi, Christopher Priest, Brian Bendis. Two surprise writers involved were Warren Ellis and Kevin Smith, and the obligatory classic creator this time around was Denny O'Neil. If I had to pick the best stories from the bunch, I'd say Kevin Smith shockingly wrote the most memorable one about Batman seeking out the gun that killed his parents and repurposing it into a bulletproof plate for his chest. Warren Ellis wrote a very Warren Ellis story that could have been part of any of his recent comics and didn't have a lot to do with Batman himself, but was still pretty cool. Tom King's story was sweet and actually involved the entire Bat-family for a change. The rest of them was okay to meh, and most I already forgot despite having just read them. The worst of the bunch were by far the ones by Geoff Johns and Peter Tomasi, which is unsurprising since they're some of the worst current DC writers, and Johns's story was also accompanied by absolutely abysmal artwork from Kelley Jones — this guy can go join Frank Miller and Tim Sale in the exclusive club of Worst Batman Artists Ever Who Are Bizarrely Still Loved By Fans. But I guess my biggest problem with this issue is that it's too focused on Batman despite this not really even being his anniversary. Batman first appeared in Detective comics #27, and while he's definitely the most prominent and important character to have originated from the series, he's far from the only big one. I would have loved this issue to spend more time on some other fantastic characters who first appeared in this series, like Martian Manhunter, Batwoman, a variety of Robins, Jim Gordon, Renee Montoya, Crispus Allen and so many others. Instead it was a full on Batman-fest, with only brief appearances by his most well-known villains and the supporting cast. And, unlike with Action 1000 which signalled a big and hopeful shift for Superman with the introduction of Bendis on both titles (which paid off incredibly well so far), there's no sense that something great is coming up for Batman. Tom King's run is still very good and not going anywhere anytime soon, but Detective Comics has been overtaken by Tomasi who has once again been writing some of the worst Batman comics I've ever read (I've been reading his current run in preparation for issue 1000, which was a huge mistake — it's so bad that I can't even force myself to review it, and I'm definitely not planning to read any more of it past this issue). But let's be real, Batman will always be DC's MVP, he'll be just fine no matter how many crappy directors and writers will do him disservice on the big screen or in comics. He will always be THE superhero in the public eye, and that's definitely something worth celebrating. While this milestone may not actually be 1000 issues of Batman, 2019 is still his 80th anniversary, so happy birthday, Batman — here's to 1000 more.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Samhain

    The gun-as-an-armor story is the best part of this very special issue. It's the most Batman thing ever: super emo, super powerful, super symbolic, super over-the-top use of his detective/disguise skills and of his money, super Alfred-is-done-master-Bruce. I love everything about it. And it arrived just in time to shut up all those Snyder stans trying to retcon 70+ years of Bruce trying his best to be a top notch dude even though he's super fucked up. From now on, he's always wearing this underne The gun-as-an-armor story is the best part of this very special issue. It's the most Batman thing ever: super emo, super powerful, super symbolic, super over-the-top use of his detective/disguise skills and of his money, super Alfred-is-done-master-Bruce. I love everything about it. And it arrived just in time to shut up all those Snyder stans trying to retcon 70+ years of Bruce trying his best to be a top notch dude even though he's super fucked up. From now on, he's always wearing this underneath his costume unless the story explicitly tells me he isn't <3

  6. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    This, just like action comics 1000, is a bunch of stories all put together by different artist and writers. The running theme is basically talking about Bruce. Who he is, why does he fight crime, who his family is, and what he stands for. Most of the stories here actually range from good to great. The highlights being Bendis story about Penguin and Batman relationship, King's story about the Bat Family, and Denny O’Neil darker take on what it cost Bruce to be batman. Also, like to shout out to K This, just like action comics 1000, is a bunch of stories all put together by different artist and writers. The running theme is basically talking about Bruce. Who he is, why does he fight crime, who his family is, and what he stands for. Most of the stories here actually range from good to great. The highlights being Bendis story about Penguin and Batman relationship, King's story about the Bat Family, and Denny O’Neil darker take on what it cost Bruce to be batman. Also, like to shout out to Kevin Smith for bringing and really solid addition to the collection since his Batman stories are not usually loved but here it hit the nail on the head. While there's a few I didn't like (Snyder's and John's) they all still capture what it is to be Batman. All the artist bring their A game and the warren Ellis script with Cloonan art is awesome. Overall, Detective Comics 1000 does a great job of reminding us who Batman is and why he writes. A lot of stories worth reading here! A 4 out of 5.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    Last year, Superman turned eighty years old and DC celebrated this special anniversary with the publication of Action Comics #1000, in which multiple writers and artists tell their own short stories that celebrates the Man of Steel. Since Supes’ super friend from Gotham City tuns eighty this year, it would seem appropriate to give the Dark Knight a similar treatment with the release of Detective Comics #1000. Since his origin began in the pages of the title’s 27th issue published in 1939, Batman Last year, Superman turned eighty years old and DC celebrated this special anniversary with the publication of Action Comics #1000, in which multiple writers and artists tell their own short stories that celebrates the Man of Steel. Since Supes’ super friend from Gotham City tuns eighty this year, it would seem appropriate to give the Dark Knight a similar treatment with the release of Detective Comics #1000. Since his origin began in the pages of the title’s 27th issue published in 1939, Batman has long been known as the World’s Greatest Detective as evident in some of the stories in the 1000th issue. Beginning with the creative team that took over the main Batman title during DC’s New 52 initiative, writer Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo tell the tale of “Batman’s Longest Case”, in which Batman finally solves the first case he ever took. Told in just six pages, Snyder and Capullo gives us a globe-trotting adventure with clues ranging from technology to ancient hieroglyphics, all of which climaxes with Batman encountering the Guild of Detection, comprising of familiar faces from Detective Chimp to Slam Bradley, a private detective developed by Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. Seeing this classic character who gives advice towards Batman presents something human and universal as the aim of detection is not so much reach the end, but going through the journey itself, as Batman’s journey will never end. Whatever ending there is to Batman, his journey began with tragedy as we all know, and so it depends on whatever creative team shapes the Dark Knight on whether he does achieve happiness or even more tragedy. With art by the great Jim Lee, Kevin Smith (yep, that one!) tells the story of Matches Malone purchasing the gun that took the lives of Thomas and Martha Wayne. Now of course Malone is actually the Bat in disguise and nicely evokes a piece of Bat-history, the story may sound grim in why would Bruce Wayne keeps hold of a weapon that has scarred him for years. However, Smith cleverly makes this tale a triumphant one by retconning the significance of the Bat-symbol, which has always been a target on his chest. It's by far the best thing Kevin Smith has done in years, which isn’t saying much, considering his recent filmography. The sense of triumph in the company of friends and family rarely happens when it comes to Batman, when it does, it feels great as explored in “Batman’s Greatest Case” from the current creative team on the main Batman title. Written by Tom King, he coincides with two time frames, one featuring Bruce walking towards his parents’ graves on a rainy night (drawn by Joëlle Jones), and the other taking place on a Gotham rooftop consisting of the many sidekicks that are among Batman’s family (drawn by Tony S. Daniel). King has maintained his sense of humour during his time on Batman and it shows here among the interactions with the Bat-Family, whilst continuing with this theme throughout his current run, which is the possibility of happiness for our hero. In showing both the light and the dark towards Batman, some of the stories aren’t doing anything groundbreaking, as evident in “The Precedent” by James Tynion IV and Alvaro Martinez-Bueno, which is a conversation between Bruce and his trusted butler Alfred, who discuss about the future of a young Dick Grayson, who will become fight alongside the Dark Knight as the first Robin will shed a new light for Bruce himself. On the dark side, “Return to Crime Alley” reunites Batman and Dr Leslie Thompkins during an anniversary of his parents’ murder. Written by Denny O’Neil, the story isn’t saying much with Thompkins is the voice of reason and explains why Bruce should do more than wearing the cape and cowl, which embodies the tragedy that he has defined him. However, Steve Epting illustrating eight pages is proof that he is ideal to draw more of the crime-ridden streets of Gotham. Some of the stories may not be much, but are worth reading due to the artwork, such as Alex Maleev reuniting with former Marvel writer Brian Michael Bendis on a future story about the Penguin, which is Bendis once again trying to be self-aware towards playing with a superhero mythos. Considering they made a brilliant run on Marvel’s Daredevil, I’m excited to see what Bendis and Maleev do together on future DC titles. When it comes to the return of veteran Bat-artists such as Kelley Jones and Neal Adams, their stories here suffer the worst with their art-styles are not up to today’s standards, whilst the stories themselves are rather lacklustre. If I was to say what is the best that this issue offers, it would be “The Batman’s Design” by Warren Ellis and Becky Cloonan. Being no stranger to Batman and his world, the two creators present a bleak examination of the Bat himself, who narrates whilst taking down some gunmen in a warehouse. As well as being a brilliantly crafted action sequence (drawn by Cloonan and coloured by Jordie Bellaire), it is reminiscent of when Ellis was writing Moon Knight for Marvel, where he explored the psychology and theatricality of the hero. Batman doesn’t not kill, but through some form of performance, he takes some enjoyment out of taking down the bad guys. Concluding the issue, is a story told entirely through twelve splash pages, each showcasing a piece of Batman’s history, stunningly drawn by Doug Mahnke. Written by Peter Tomasi, who is currently writing Detective Comics, he is essentially doing what the same thing he did with Action Comics #1000, which is to celebrate the character’s long history. The final page sets up what he is planning to do with his run, which is the comic book debut of the Arkham Knight, a villain who was introduced in the last of Rocksteady’s Batman: Arkham games, marketed poorly as an “original character”. Overall, I am not excited about this new take on the Arkham Knight, but as for this issue alone, it succeeds exactly what Superman went through last year, which is to be celebrated as an iconic superhero who has lived longer than I have and will continue to exist long after I’m dead. Long live the bat!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Oleksandr Tarasov

    It's almost funny how a few days ago Zach Snyder said some really provocative, but mostly stupid things about Batman, modern world and "we live in a society" BS and today 1000th issue of Detective Comics came out and it's full of heart. I'm not even sure I could handle this level of love to the characters, lore and readers. This is one of those comics that will inspire many to learn, write and draw. It's almost funny how a few days ago Zach Snyder said some really provocative, but mostly stupid things about Batman, modern world and "we live in a society" BS and today 1000th issue of Detective Comics came out and it's full of heart. I'm not even sure I could handle this level of love to the characters, lore and readers. This is one of those comics that will inspire many to learn, write and draw.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Al

    I almost skipped this one. You know how I feel about standalones that don't stand up. Heck, for that matter, it is almost hard to tell if this "96 Page Issue" is all new material or a host of reprints. Still, it's a pretty stellar cast for Batman, who with all of his versatility, might be America's greatest hero. There's some of the recent Batman names of all stripes (Snyder, King, Dini, Tomasi, Tynion, Johns, Kevin Smith), the legend (Denny O'Neil), the "hot" name (Bendis) and a few wild cards ( I almost skipped this one. You know how I feel about standalones that don't stand up. Heck, for that matter, it is almost hard to tell if this "96 Page Issue" is all new material or a host of reprints. Still, it's a pretty stellar cast for Batman, who with all of his versatility, might be America's greatest hero. There's some of the recent Batman names of all stripes (Snyder, King, Dini, Tomasi, Tynion, Johns, Kevin Smith), the legend (Denny O'Neil), the "hot" name (Bendis) and a few wild cards (Warren Ellis, Christopher Priest). The exclusion (for whatever reason, I don't know) of Grant Morrison particularly sticks out. I figured I should try it, even if I was not particularly impressed with DC's similar 1000 issue of Superman. I also am not a big fan of annuals, but this felt like it could be a decent enough stand-alone, and for that, it does actually work. Let's talk about the stories. Given the impact Scott Snyder and Tom King have had with this character in recent years, they get book-end stories. Both make their effort worthwhile. Snyder has a likeable "Don't think about it too hard" story that is generally memorable and enjoyable. King's story is less memorable, but he essentially has 6 pages to work with, so he uses it to capture a really good Batman feel and show off his strengths. Unlikely as it might seem, but Kevin Smith has the best story and it's pretty straight forward. At 8 pages, it goes quickly. Not only is it a good payoff, but the build up really grabs the reader, captures the right mood and is complimented by Jim Lee's art. Paul Dini does what Dini does, and it is a fairly memorable and likely story. At six pages, it is maybe overlong. It's a great story, but he telegraphs the ending, so the mystery is solved fairly easily and before Dini gets to it. Brian Michael Bendis tells a future Penguin/Batman story that seems like a logical fit for a book like this, though it probably falls under an Elseworlds story or something similar. It is pretty good, maybe only let down by an ending that doesn't feel all that original. The real hero is Alex Maleev who's art and colors give it particular staying power. I was happy with both Bendis and Dini putting their particular marks on here, though the ending of both stories strike me as plots I've known before. Warren Ellis is given 8 pages, though his part is unexpectedly forgettable. Seeing Ellis's name, I expected either a new plot that no one had thought of, or some deep characterization that would resound. Neither is there. This is a light piece, almost poetry, whose best feature is Becky Cloonan's art and Jordie Bellaire's colors by a mile. From there, it tends to be a lot of filler. This is like the golden age of Compact Discs when you might buy an album for 3 or 4 songs. Like CD's, the $10 price tag is pretty steep, and undoubtedly, the company wanted to make sure they were providing enough content for the money. Also like those albums of the past, this comic is heavily front loaded with all of the good stuff near the start. It ends with Peter Tomasi's intro into the next Detective Comics art, which was not nearly enough to get me to want to pick #1001 up, The art is pretty good through without (Capullo, Joelle Jones and Tony Daniel and the ones I mentioned and didn't mention). DC does a weird job of sequencing in that is hard to tell when the story has ended and the next (and very different) story has started. It also does a bad job of advertising the creators inside. Overall, I keep going back to the CD analogy. I was satisfied enough that I bought this, and it will likely only appreciate with age, but it wouldn't be a complete review, without acknowledging there's plenty of filler, too.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jakub Kvíz

    Anthology of short Batman stories by A-list writers and artists. Kevin Smith’s was really nice, rest was okay and the introduction of Arkham Knight was total crap.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    Batman for 80 years! This was an okay issue, some of the stories by Bendis and Warren Ellis were good, but the rest were just okay stories.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aldo Haegemans

    Some good ,some meh. Nothing too spectacular.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Minus a very few shining moments... That was one of the most lackluster, boring, meaningless collection of short stories I've read in a long, long time. Cut that down to like the 4 good ones and be done with it. Minus a very few shining moments... That was one of the most lackluster, boring, meaningless collection of short stories I've read in a long, long time. Cut that down to like the 4 good ones and be done with it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julio Bonilla

    IS THE BATMAN IMMORTAL? 1,000 issues of Batman is truly a milestone. But this issue was not worth 5 stars. More like a few short episodes of Batman: The Animated Series!

  15. 5 out of 5

    B. P. Rinehart

    I love these special anthology/celebration editions. When done right they are amazing and when done poorly...they are bland. I was happy with what I read here (compared to the two other Batman-related comics I have read of late), but of course I have to be "that guy" and point out the obvious. They are celebrating 27 issues too soon. Batman debuted in Detective Comics #27 not issue number one. So it would have made more since to celebrate the 1,027 issue of this comic book--but eh, whatever: Hap I love these special anthology/celebration editions. When done right they are amazing and when done poorly...they are bland. I was happy with what I read here (compared to the two other Batman-related comics I have read of late), but of course I have to be "that guy" and point out the obvious. They are celebrating 27 issues too soon. Batman debuted in Detective Comics #27 not issue number one. So it would have made more since to celebrate the 1,027 issue of this comic book--but eh, whatever: Happy early-Birthday to Batman.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Simeon Scott

    A neat collection of new short stories by creators from across the character's history that all make some sort of statement about what makes this character and his world interesting, the standout stories to me were The Precedent and Batman's Greatest Case which both are right next to each other in the books reading order. Overall I wouldn't say this is a must buy unless you're a collector of big landmarks like this but I don't regret giving it a read. A neat collection of new short stories by creators from across the character's history that all make some sort of statement about what makes this character and his world interesting, the standout stories to me were The Precedent and Batman's Greatest Case which both are right next to each other in the books reading order. Overall I wouldn't say this is a must buy unless you're a collector of big landmarks like this but I don't regret giving it a read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Georgie

    After action comics hitting #1000, detective comics hits #1000 and it’s way better than the action comics one Detective comics #1000 - like action conics it’s full of short stories written by various writers like Scott Snyder or Tom king and drawn by tony Daniels and Greg Capullo. My thoughts - this was way better than action comics, I think all the stories were entertaining and a lot more enjoyable to read than action comics. Some of the best ones were the ones by Kevin smith, Greg Capullo and To After action comics hitting #1000, detective comics hits #1000 and it’s way better than the action comics one Detective comics #1000 - like action conics it’s full of short stories written by various writers like Scott Snyder or Tom king and drawn by tony Daniels and Greg Capullo. My thoughts - this was way better than action comics, I think all the stories were entertaining and a lot more enjoyable to read than action comics. Some of the best ones were the ones by Kevin smith, Greg Capullo and Tom king, and Geoff johns. I really love the variant covers which I also think are better than the action comics ones. Overall good book

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steven Shinder

    Batman first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. Today, that book has released its 1000th issue (with New 52's issues taken into account when adding them all up). Special issues of a comic series can be a mixed bag. Sometimes, they can be like clip shows of a TV show that don't really add much. A "greatest hits" that doesn't feel all that compelling. Going into Detective Comics #1000, I was expecting a collection of Batman shorts that, while made by various writers paying tribute to 80 Batman first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. Today, that book has released its 1000th issue (with New 52's issues taken into account when adding them all up). Special issues of a comic series can be a mixed bag. Sometimes, they can be like clip shows of a TV show that don't really add much. A "greatest hits" that doesn't feel all that compelling. Going into Detective Comics #1000, I was expecting a collection of Batman shorts that, while made by various writers paying tribute to 80 years of Batman, might not live up to the hype that DC has been building around it. Now, having read this 96-page issue, I do believe that those who contributed to this issue did a fantastic job depicting quintessential Batman. And the stories are very accessible, so there's no need to read any arcs prior to this issue. Though they are brief, these shorts showcase who Batman is, as well as some incredible artwork depicting him, his allies, his adversaries, and Gotham itself. "Batman's Longest Case" by Scott Snyder feels like a detective story leads nowhere and somewhere at the same time. It feels like a potential setup that one could follow up on later, but I'm not sure that this is the intention. In "Manufacture for Use," Kevin Smith, probably thinking as a collector of geeky things, delves into the collector aspect of crimes in Gotham. Of course, we know from a glance at the Batcave that Batman himself is a collector. This story connects to the fateful night in Crime Alley, and also shows some heart (in an almost literal sense) in a way that really seems fitting for Batman. Next is "The Legend of Knute Brody." Here, Paul Dini tells a story of a henchman who keeps messing up as he works for Batman's adversaries. Honestly, I could see the ending coming a mile away and wasn't all that impressed with this one. In "The Batman's Design" by Warren Ellis, however, I was impressed by the speech that Batman gives to someone who wants to blow up all of Gotham City. It asks whether being haunted and haunting others is truly worth it. "Return to Crime Alley" by Denny O'Neil is another story that...well, returns to Crime Alley. This is more of a discussion between Batman and Leslie Thompkins, who believes that he goes a bit too far pretending to be the monsters he's trying to keep at bay. There's a moment when she actually yells "Bruce!" as he beats a masked guy with a gun, and it makes me wonder whether this was a mistake that didn't get edited out. Sure, she doesn't say "Bruce Wayne," but couldn't one put two and two together? (A bit more on that subject below) The ending feels abrupt, and I doubt that this will have a follow-up in the ongoing series. "Heretic" by Christopher Priest has Batman go up against someone in China. Ra's al Ghul also makes an appearance, but I didn't find this story to be that exciting for some reason. In "I Know" by Brian Michael Bendis, we see an elderly Oswald Cobblepot revealing that he once figured out that Bruce Wayne was Batman. I do question whether there's a point in the timeline of the ongoing series that this may take place, but my guess is that the writers wouldn't be worrying too much about this. We get another glimpse at a possible future in Geoff Johns' "The Last Crime in Gotham." Damian Wayne is a grown up Robin, and Batman and Catwoman have a crime-fighting daughter named Echo. Oh, and Ace the Bat-hound is still active. But in this story, it seems to be the end of their crime-fighting days. The Joker is actually dead by this point, and I was amused when Batman told Gordon, "He's dead, Jim," since I associate that line with Star Trek. The theme of the Batfamily continues in the next two stories. "The Precedent" shows the beginning of Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson's crime-fighting partnership as they think about what's in store for Robin's future. And then "Batman's Greatest Case" is pretty much a gathering between Batman and his various sidekicks and allies the night before the anniversary of the murder of his parents. Seeing how far Batman has come to have a family after losing his parents years earlier makes this poignant. It would've been fitting as a finale for this issue. But then we get "Medieval" by Peter J. Tomasi, which contains a monologue depicting Batman in a negative light. It turns out that this is somewhat of a tie-in to Arkham Knight (though it does not have spoilers for that game). I think that this story should've been placed somewhere earlier in the collection. Because the four before it flow thematically and build toward a fine ending, and then this one comes from nowhere. Even though the order of the stories could've been better, I still maintain that this book is a must-read for Batman fans.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Max's Comic Reviews and Lists

    Milestone Just like with Action Comics #1000 last year, I stood and stared at the comic rack for about half an hour trying to figure out what frickin Variant cover to choose. I ended up going with Miller’s 1980’s variant. The 1930’s variant was definitely gonna be my second pick though. And if I had went on bulletproof.com I woulda gotten that beautiful Delotto painted cover. ANYWAY the #1000th issue man. That’s a milestone if I’ve ever seen one. A collection of stories by various writers and Milestone Just like with Action Comics #1000 last year, I stood and stared at the comic rack for about half an hour trying to figure out what frickin Variant cover to choose. I ended up going with Miller’s 1980’s variant. The 1930’s variant was definitely gonna be my second pick though. And if I had went on bulletproof.com I woulda gotten that beautiful Delotto painted cover. ANYWAY the #1000th issue man. That’s a milestone if I’ve ever seen one. A collection of stories by various writers and artists is definitely the way to go, and I can say that this 96 page issue was a delight especially for a HUUGE Batman enthusiast. Snyder and Capullo’s story was a good one to start off with. Snyder really put the impact of Batman’s existence into perspective here and Greg Capullo’s art is my personal favourite style in this book. Kevin Smith has never been one of my favourite Batman writers “Eh hem! Widening Gyre…” but he crafted a perfectly good Batman short that perfectly elaborates on his relationship with Gotham city and the corruption that is so deeply ingrained in it. Plus Jim Lee is goddamn amazing. You can tell when you’re reading a Paul Dini story, cuz it feels like an episode of Batman The Animated Series. I did like this short even if it was pretty goofy. By the end there was a definite “Oh Shit!” moment. The art by Dustin Nguyen was serviceable. Warren Ellis is someone I really didn’t expect to have taken part in this book. He wrote definitely the most action packed and the most badass of the shorts. It is what you’d expect from a modern Batman action scene. Becky Cloonan’s pencils are very well done. Simplistic but well done. Denny O’Neil and Steve Epting is up next. This one I’m kinda split on. The positives are the amazing artwork and the deconstruction of Batman’s action. BUT, I feel like painting Batman as a more negative figure was a little out of place here, and the first page teases something way less crazy than what it makes it out to be. Clickbait. Christopher Priest’s short is the first one in this book that I didn’t like. The way it was written made it seem like the little plot went from 0 to 100 in a rushed span of time. However, in terms of the art, I know people think Neal Adams’ magic pencils have diminished over the years, but I don’t care. I think this is a beautiful looking short. Absolutely timeless art. Brian Michael Bendis. Wow he’s really laying into DC. And my boy Alex Maleev composing some amazing visuals with his gritty rough style that we all know and love. Bendis’ writing isn’t anything incredible here but there’s no denying the quality. Geoff Johns and Kelly Jones are next up on the roster. And I’d say this is one of the better shorts collected here. The concept behind this story is really cool and by the end, there was another “Oh Shit!” moment. References to the Long Halloween are always great as well. Kelly Jones’ style is classic and very polished here. James Tynion IV has become a very popular writer in the last few years, and it’s not hard to see why. While I didn’t love this short by any means I feel like this little moment in Bruce Wayne’s life should stay canon. And the pencils! HOoOo! Good stuff Alvaro Martinez-Bueno. Bueno stuff. Every Batman story I’ve ever read by Tom King has disappointed me. And I am sad to say this short was no different. I dunno man. This was a chore to read. Not knowing who the hell was talking most of the time was pretty irritating so it just seemed useless to keep having to plow through each dialogue box. Tony S. Daniel and Joëlle Jones, however. Phenomenal artwork. Absolutely amazing. ALRIGHT. The last short by Peter J. Tomasi was not my favourite though. It’s a tease for another mini series featuring a very questionable character. Cuz don’t we know who’s under the mask? And if it’s in continuity, theeeeeennnnn what? Doug Mahnke’s artwork is 10/10 though. One thing that bothered me about this book and Action Comics #1000 is that in between each short there should’ve been an art print. It’s like when Vertigo didn’t put the issue covers between issues in the first few Hellblazer trades. Why? Just put something that divides them more obviously. You know I’m right. Other than that little nitpick I love the format for these #1000th issues. A collection of top notch writers and artists writing and illustrating passion pieces about the greatest character ever made. I didn’t like ALL of them, but man if this wasn’t a good read. Letter Grade: B+

  20. 4 out of 5

    Will Robinson Jr.

    I picked up my copy of this landmark Batman issue today. For the most part I was pleased with this book. All the writers really brought a great impression of what Batman represents. It goes without saying the Dark Knight is agreeably the greatest comic book character ever created. Batman is definitely one of the main reasons I read comics. I can remember watching the reruns of the old Batman television as a kid in the 80s. In the 90s Batman the animated series was my jam along with X-men & Disne I picked up my copy of this landmark Batman issue today. For the most part I was pleased with this book. All the writers really brought a great impression of what Batman represents. It goes without saying the Dark Knight is agreeably the greatest comic book character ever created. Batman is definitely one of the main reasons I read comics. I can remember watching the reruns of the old Batman television as a kid in the 80s. In the 90s Batman the animated series was my jam along with X-men & Disney's Gargoyles. The animated series was so well written and entertaining. I became not just a Batman fan but a comic book fan in the 90s. I drifted away from comics bit in college but by 2010 I came back to comics in a big way thanks to DC comics New 52 and specifically Scott Snyder's epic run on Batman. I am not much of a fan of Tom King's current run with the character but even Mr. King has told some great Batman tales which include Batman, Volume 4: The War of Jokes and Riddles, Batman, Volume 3: I Am Bane, Batman, Volume 6: Bride or Burglar, and the annual King wrote including Swamp Thing. I am happy that DC comics has put Peter Tomasi and Doug Manke on Detective Comics. Their first arc feels like a anniversary tale all by itself. But the stories we get in this book are all good with some being alright amazing. I thought they could have got a better artist on the Paul Dini story but since the story was more of a lighthearted fare the art was satisfactory. My overall favorite stories were the ones by Kevin Smith, Scott Snyder, Dennis O'neil, James Tynion, and the Tom King one was not bad either. Tynion's tale really touched me the most because it showcased perfectly why Batman needs a Robin and why Bruce is not just a lone soul but that guides others along the way in his quest to stop crime. The Snyder tale was just plain cool because of the rich history Batman shares with all the detectives of the DC Universe. Freaking Slam Bradley is in this book. Overall I enjoyed this book as much as the Action Comics (2016-) #1000. I really looking forward to a 75th anniversary Wonder Woman book. Come on DC comics you have to knock that one out of the park. Before I go I wanted to share some of my favorite Batman graphic novels to celebrate this occasion: Batman: The Man Who Laughs, Batman: The Killing Joke, Batman, Volume 4: Zero Year: Secret City, Batman, Volume 5: Zero Year: Dark City, Batman: The Dark Knight: Master Race, Batman: Earth One, Volume 1, Batman: Earth One, Volume 2, Batman: Year One, Batman/The Flash: The Button Deluxe Edition, Batman and Robin, Volume 4: Requiem for Damian through Batman and Robin, Volume 7: Robin Rises. There are more titles I could have added but I hope you enjoy the ones I suggested.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matt Graupman

    I’m a Marvel guy and have been since I was a kid but, be that as it may, who doesn’t love Batman? Rational, morally-conflicted, and all-too-human, Batman always struck me as the most Marvel-ish of the DC heroes, so much more real than Superman or The Flash or Martian Manhunter. With the publication of “Detective Comics’” historic 1000th issue, DC has gathered a who’s who of comics creators to pay homage to the Dark Knight in his flagship book. The results aren’t bad. With any anthology of short I’m a Marvel guy and have been since I was a kid but, be that as it may, who doesn’t love Batman? Rational, morally-conflicted, and all-too-human, Batman always struck me as the most Marvel-ish of the DC heroes, so much more real than Superman or The Flash or Martian Manhunter. With the publication of “Detective Comics’” historic 1000th issue, DC has gathered a who’s who of comics creators to pay homage to the Dark Knight in his flagship book. The results aren’t bad. With any anthology of short works there are bound to be highs and lows and, happily, “Detective Comics #1000” has more of the former. Showing off just how pliable the Bat can be, both stylistically and story-wise, this issue shows why the World’s Greatest Detective has endured for all these years. Here’s to many, many more. FAVORITES: “Manufacture For Use” by Kevin Smith (!) & Jim Lee - In disguise, Batman tracks down the gun that was used to kill Thomas and Martha Wayne in order to forge it into something more useful. “The Batman’s Design” by Warren Ellis & Becky Cloonan (one of the most criminally underrated modern Batman artists) - The Dark Knight guides a crew of mercenaries into a specially-rigged warehouse in order to teach them a lesson. “I Know” by Brian Michael Bendis & Alex Maleev - A moody futuristic piece about the Penguin confessing he’s always known Batman’s secret identity.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Berk

    Batman Detective Comics #1000 is a celebration. Of Batman and I love it. I love Batman he’s in my top three fictional creations of all time. I feel comfortable in Gotham. I go there when I’m stressed, happy, down, bored, beaten down, lonely, sad, disappointed, and overall looking for inspiration. So this is a big milestone for the Bat. He isn’t the first one to get there but he is the second. In the pages of this $10, 96 page issue are an all star lineup from the Bats history. Including Greg Capu Batman Detective Comics #1000 is a celebration. Of Batman and I love it. I love Batman he’s in my top three fictional creations of all time. I feel comfortable in Gotham. I go there when I’m stressed, happy, down, bored, beaten down, lonely, sad, disappointed, and overall looking for inspiration. So this is a big milestone for the Bat. He isn’t the first one to get there but he is the second. In the pages of this $10, 96 page issue are an all star lineup from the Bats history. Including Greg Capullo, Scott Snyder, Tom King, Paul Dini, Geoff Johns, Neal Adams, Jason Fabok, Tom King, and Clay Mann. The stories range in quality but at the very least all of them are entertaining and interesting ideas. My personal favorite is either the Capullo/Snyder or Brian Bendis. It’s worth a pickup just for the milestone. It’s worth two pickups for the great covers. It’s worth three pickups for the love of Batman. Overall there’s a lot of love here and it shows. And I enjoy it very much. It’s all well drawn and written well for short stories. Except the Geoff Johns one which feels like a small part in a bigger story. 4 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    These comics are of course never supposed to have an ending, but it makes you wonder why Paul Dini and Scott Snyder have mildly interesting set-ups for their pieces here in this landmark title, and let their stories just fizzle out and drop off the page when the required count has been reached. Elsewhere, Bats gains the weapon that killed his parents, 20 years ago apparently, an alias gets retired, and we learn that Damian looks like a boy playing dress-up in plumber's clothes. An elderly Bats g These comics are of course never supposed to have an ending, but it makes you wonder why Paul Dini and Scott Snyder have mildly interesting set-ups for their pieces here in this landmark title, and let their stories just fizzle out and drop off the page when the required count has been reached. Elsewhere, Bats gains the weapon that killed his parents, 20 years ago apparently, an alias gets retired, and we learn that Damian looks like a boy playing dress-up in plumber's clothes. An elderly Bats gets an unlikely family, complete with daughter by a saggy-titted, elderly and unattractive Catwoman, and faces one of his biggest foes – a bleeding heart liberal. Oh, and Bats can have a whole warehouse full of voice-activated booby traps, but still needs Alfred to, er, push the ON button for it. Yes, for anything like quality art alongside a reasonable story, we have to wait for Mr Bendis with his short, wherein The Penguin tells how and why he found Bats unkillable. After the surprisingly poor 1000th issue of, er, something else, this one really should have known to be better. It wasn't. And of course it ends with not an end, but the beginning of #1001. Ho-hum.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Terry Mcginnis

    A very ho-hum tribute to the Dark Knight, Detective #1000 contains many tiny stories created by various individuals in the field. Only one or two stand out (and I'm being generous), the rest are forgettable and disposable. The last few pages set up the events to come in the arc that follows this issue, which is the only real reason to read. Batman deserves better than this. This was a real chore to get through. Not recommended. A very ho-hum tribute to the Dark Knight, Detective #1000 contains many tiny stories created by various individuals in the field. Only one or two stand out (and I'm being generous), the rest are forgettable and disposable. The last few pages set up the events to come in the arc that follows this issue, which is the only real reason to read. Batman deserves better than this. This was a real chore to get through. Not recommended.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Short stories with mixed results. Fun celebration of #1000

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Some stories were forgettable but the art really made a big impression on me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adrianne

    Wonderful mix of writers and artists. The stories I like best are the ones by Warren Ellis, James Tynion IV, and Tom King.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Martin-Gant

    "Don't act like you're special, Dick. We've all died." "I haven't died." "Give it time." Honestly, worth the price for that exchange alone. "Don't act like you're special, Dick. We've all died." "I haven't died." "Give it time." Honestly, worth the price for that exchange alone.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    A great way to celebrate 80 years of Batman!!! This was not a 96-page story, it was 96 pages containing several short stories about Batman by some of today's top Batman artists and writers. My favorite story in here was "Manufacture For Use", written by Kevin Smith and Illustrated by Jim Lee, Scott Williams, and Alex Sinclair. A great way to celebrate 80 years of Batman!!! This was not a 96-page story, it was 96 pages containing several short stories about Batman by some of today's top Batman artists and writers. My favorite story in here was "Manufacture For Use", written by Kevin Smith and Illustrated by Jim Lee, Scott Williams, and Alex Sinclair.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Flow Chi Minh

    Great collection of stories here. I think there was only one I didn't care for. What an achievement DC is marking. I hope we get 1000 more. Great collection of stories here. I think there was only one I didn't care for. What an achievement DC is marking. I hope we get 1000 more.

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