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44 Irish Short Stories - An Anthology Of Irish Short Fiction From Yeats To Frank O'Connor

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An immaculate pot pourri of Irish fiction with DJ now in a protective mylar sleeve. Contents are tight, bright and clean, free of any internal markings or personalizations.


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An immaculate pot pourri of Irish fiction with DJ now in a protective mylar sleeve. Contents are tight, bright and clean, free of any internal markings or personalizations.

30 review for 44 Irish Short Stories - An Anthology Of Irish Short Fiction From Yeats To Frank O'Connor

  1. 5 out of 5

    Karol

    An interesting, older anthology.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    Gosh, hard to rate as I found a few gems but most were so-so. Some I felt were dated and all were written in the late 19th century and early 20th. A favorite "The happy giant", a poignant fantasy by Oscar Wilde, also outstanding were "Saint Bakeoven" where a man interacts with Beethoven's ghost, another fantasy: "Kith of the Elf-folk" where a fairy-like creature becomes mortal and decides it's not for her "Father Christmas": about a department store Santa "The hawk": anthropomorphic story and feel Gosh, hard to rate as I found a few gems but most were so-so. Some I felt were dated and all were written in the late 19th century and early 20th. A favorite "The happy giant", a poignant fantasy by Oscar Wilde, also outstanding were "Saint Bakeoven" where a man interacts with Beethoven's ghost, another fantasy: "Kith of the Elf-folk" where a fairy-like creature becomes mortal and decides it's not for her "Father Christmas": about a department store Santa "The hawk": anthropomorphic story and feelings of a hawk from its viewpoint. Many of the other stories showed different aspects of the Irish character. I liked some of the writing style and cadence of Irish speech. There should be something for everyone in this grab bag of stories. 2.5 stars rounded to 3.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This is a wonderful collection. Some of these stories will stay with me forever.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Martin Bihl

    i have the feeling this book was published in the 1950s, judging from the authors, which are primarily from the first half of the twentieth century, covering subject matter that is even earlier. so the book is an interesting introduction to a variety of authors i've not encountered before, which is always interesting. that said, it's still fairly uneven, and sometimes you get a little tired of the stock country characters and a bit too much of the "begorrah". still, any collection that includes i have the feeling this book was published in the 1950s, judging from the authors, which are primarily from the first half of the twentieth century, covering subject matter that is even earlier. so the book is an interesting introduction to a variety of authors i've not encountered before, which is always interesting. that said, it's still fairly uneven, and sometimes you get a little tired of the stock country characters and a bit too much of the "begorrah". still, any collection that includes yeats, oconnor, shaw, wilde kavanaugh and, of course, the brilliant (and overlooked) brian onolan, can't be all bad.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I thought this would be a perfect book to read before my trip to Ireland. I especially enjoyed Yeats, Wilde and O'Kelly. I thought this would be a perfect book to read before my trip to Ireland. I especially enjoyed Yeats, Wilde and O'Kelly.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Glen

    A strong selection of stories first published in 1955 that bears the mark of its vintage in that all but one of the authors sampled herein is male. The lone exception is the remarkable Mary Lavin and her heart-rending "The Story of the Widow's Son." My reason for not giving it a full five-star rating is not the anachronistic one however, it is that some of the more allegorical stories and those seeking to represent Irish folk wisdom (complete with wee people and the shadow of the miraculous) are A strong selection of stories first published in 1955 that bears the mark of its vintage in that all but one of the authors sampled herein is male. The lone exception is the remarkable Mary Lavin and her heart-rending "The Story of the Widow's Son." My reason for not giving it a full five-star rating is not the anachronistic one however, it is that some of the more allegorical stories and those seeking to represent Irish folk wisdom (complete with wee people and the shadow of the miraculous) are weak compared to those which display the grueling poverty, self-destruction of alcoholism, and punishing parochialism of Irish social life so prevalent until fairly recent years. Sometimes this is done with a winning sense of humor, as in Frank O'Connor's "The Drunkard", but more often with chilling realism, as in James Plunkett's "Weep For Our Pride", and in James Joyce's unforgettable "Counterparts" (from Dubliners).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bill S.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Favorites: Frank O'Connor - For me, the undisputed master of the Irish Short Story (Yes, not Joyce. You always wait for something to happen in a Joyce story, and when it does, you think, "Oh, that was it???). "The Drunkard" is a funny story of a boy who drinks his father's beer at a funeral and creates a scene in town. He becomes a hero to his mother. She saved the father from getting drunk which would usually result in a long binge. "The Majesty of the Law" - Unusual for O'connor in that it is n Favorites: Frank O'Connor - For me, the undisputed master of the Irish Short Story (Yes, not Joyce. You always wait for something to happen in a Joyce story, and when it does, you think, "Oh, that was it???). "The Drunkard" is a funny story of a boy who drinks his father's beer at a funeral and creates a scene in town. He becomes a hero to his mother. She saved the father from getting drunk which would usually result in a long binge. "The Majesty of the Law" - Unusual for O'connor in that it is not first person narration. A police officer spends time with a man in his home and only as he goes to leave does he ask if he will pay the fine he owes and if not when would be a good time to turn himself in? Next Friday the man says. He wants the man he hit to feel guilty when he goes to prison. O'Connor is one of those writers who can capture so much in one sentence: "Dan had looked after his mother while the life was in her, and after her death no woman had crossed his threshold." Lavin's "The Widow's Son" - Has two alternative endings. Wilde - "The Happy Prince" - wonderful fairy tale about mercy. George Bernard Shaw - "The Miraculous Revenge" - clever and funny. A man is sent as a secret agent from the Cardinal to investigate a miracle. After a local notorious sinner was buried in a holy graveyard, the entire graveyard, overnight, ends up on the other side of the river. A clear miracle to anyone who looks at the ordinance map. The "spy" is rebuffed by a local girl, struck by her boyfriend, and treated badly by the local Priest whose reputation is on the line. So, he has his revenge. He digs up the sinner at night and moves the body to the new location of the cemetery. Sure enough, the graveyard moves back to its original location to get away from the sinner. The Priest is removed. O'Corkery - "The Awakening" Story of the rise and passing of a captainship of a fishing vessel. O'Faolain, O'Flaherty impressed me in a previous collection. The stories from them in this book were good but not great.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rena Sherwood

    I read the 1955 edition, which includes the almost omniscient "Araby" by James Joyce and the ethereal "The Happy Prince" by Oscar Wilde. There is also a surprisingly bizarre story "The Miraculous Revenge" by George Bernard Shaw (a renowned atheist) that proved that not only God exists but has a sick sense of humor. Irish writers make an art out of misery. However some of these stories will make you damn well suicidal -- especially "The Black Mare" by Edward Sheehy, "The Hawk" by Liam O'Flaherty a I read the 1955 edition, which includes the almost omniscient "Araby" by James Joyce and the ethereal "The Happy Prince" by Oscar Wilde. There is also a surprisingly bizarre story "The Miraculous Revenge" by George Bernard Shaw (a renowned atheist) that proved that not only God exists but has a sick sense of humor. Irish writers make an art out of misery. However some of these stories will make you damn well suicidal -- especially "The Black Mare" by Edward Sheehy, "The Hawk" by Liam O'Flaherty and "Weep For Our Pride" by James Plunkett. Also, I wonder what Irish readers think of this book since it does show lots of stereotypes like drunk Irishmen and Irish saying, "Beggorah!" I lived in the UK for five years and met me many Irish folks and although they did drink not one said "Beggorah!"

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Vanness

    An interesting collection of 5 to 25 page shorts. The subtitle is "An Anthology of Irish Short Fiction from Yeats to Frank O'Conner". Of the 33 different authors, I enjoyed Oscar Wilde's as much as any. I found most of the shorts enjoyable. Finished my day with one each night. Am loaning to a interested lady at next bookclub meeting. I do like shorts. Back in the 60's I subscribed to "SHORT STORY INTERNATIONAL". An interesting collection of 5 to 25 page shorts. The subtitle is "An Anthology of Irish Short Fiction from Yeats to Frank O'Conner". Of the 33 different authors, I enjoyed Oscar Wilde's as much as any. I found most of the shorts enjoyable. Finished my day with one each night. Am loaning to a interested lady at next bookclub meeting. I do like shorts. Back in the 60's I subscribed to "SHORT STORY INTERNATIONAL".

  10. 5 out of 5

    CJ Bowen

    Some really neat tales in here, and very little fluff. Yeats unfortunately closes the book with some odd clunkers, but most of the stories are quite fun, including a Christmas story that will likely become part of my yearly read-aloud stories. Good show.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    magical. due a reread.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Machim

    short stories,Irish

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    Some of the stories were okay, but mostly boring. : (

  14. 5 out of 5

    George

    Read the book after a trip to Ireland. Some of the stories were hard to follow, but fun after having been to some of the locations.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alison Burke

    Like all compilations of short stories, it's difficult to rate. Some stories I loved, others, not so much. Like all compilations of short stories, it's difficult to rate. Some stories I loved, others, not so much.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lea

    I only enjoyed two stories out of forty-four!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Miranda

    Really like this collection of stories, wide variety of snapshots of Irish life.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    A delightful book when you need a quick escape but don't have time to read an entire novel. A delightful book when you need a quick escape but don't have time to read an entire novel.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Banker

  20. 5 out of 5

    joe ryan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ae Goode

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ana-marija Sev

  23. 4 out of 5

    Craig Tiffen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

  25. 4 out of 5

    Roseline

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  27. 5 out of 5

    selena gomezzz

  28. 5 out of 5

    Terry

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gerard Doherty

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cayenne

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